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Cum au salvat homosexualii civilizaţia: Adevărata şi eroica poveste a felului în care bărbaţii gay au modelat lumea modernă

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A cultural history of the customs, fashions, and figures of gay life in the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries-and how they have changed us for the better. How the Homosexuals Saved Civilization presents a broad yet incisive look at how an unusual "immigrant" group, homosexual men, has influenced mainstream American society and has, in many ways, become mainst A cultural history of the customs, fashions, and figures of gay life in the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries-and how they have changed us for the better. How the Homosexuals Saved Civilization presents a broad yet incisive look at how an unusual "immigrant" group, homosexual men, has influenced mainstream American society and has, in many ways, become mainstream itself. From the way camp, irony, and the gay aesthetic have become part of our national sensibility to the undeniable effect the gay cognoscenti have had on media and the arts, Cathy Crimmins examines how gay men have changed the concepts of community, family, sex, and fashion.


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A cultural history of the customs, fashions, and figures of gay life in the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries-and how they have changed us for the better. How the Homosexuals Saved Civilization presents a broad yet incisive look at how an unusual "immigrant" group, homosexual men, has influenced mainstream American society and has, in many ways, become mainst A cultural history of the customs, fashions, and figures of gay life in the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries-and how they have changed us for the better. How the Homosexuals Saved Civilization presents a broad yet incisive look at how an unusual "immigrant" group, homosexual men, has influenced mainstream American society and has, in many ways, become mainstream itself. From the way camp, irony, and the gay aesthetic have become part of our national sensibility to the undeniable effect the gay cognoscenti have had on media and the arts, Cathy Crimmins examines how gay men have changed the concepts of community, family, sex, and fashion.

30 review for Cum au salvat homosexualii civilizaţia: Adevărata şi eroica poveste a felului în care bărbaţii gay au modelat lumea modernă

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a very problematic book. The author uses historical and pop cultural examples to argue that gay men have made the world a better place. And this frantic attempt at back patting, she strips all the context and controversy from queer life. Circuit parties are not rife with dangerous unprotected sex, they are just the legacy of Capote's black and white ball! Gentrification is great! And women (queer or straight) don't impact culture, apparently we're just invisible and gay men created everyt This is a very problematic book. The author uses historical and pop cultural examples to argue that gay men have made the world a better place. And this frantic attempt at back patting, she strips all the context and controversy from queer life. Circuit parties are not rife with dangerous unprotected sex, they are just the legacy of Capote's black and white ball! Gentrification is great! And women (queer or straight) don't impact culture, apparently we're just invisible and gay men created everything good about the gay community on their own. All the racism and sexism and classism that is endemic in the queer community is whitewashed for some feel good examples of great things that a handful of white gay men have done. You might enjoy this book if you know nothing about queer culture and want to learn a little. But if you already know much of the back story, you'll find little to celebrate in this sanitized version of history.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Az

    1/7, about fifty pages in. Not terribly convinced of its accuracy, but this book makes an excellent pick-me-up. Particularly for any queer who feels slighted, that we've been pushed to the edges of society, forced into hiding. No real effect, always forced to act within straight norms. 1/29, done. In response to the adage "Ginger Rodgers did everything Fred Astaire did but backwards and in high heels," Crimmins responds that "Homosexuals did everything with great style and panache, and they did 1/7, about fifty pages in. Not terribly convinced of its accuracy, but this book makes an excellent pick-me-up. Particularly for any queer who feels slighted, that we've been pushed to the edges of society, forced into hiding. No real effect, always forced to act within straight norms. 1/29, done. In response to the adage "Ginger Rodgers did everything Fred Astaire did but backwards and in high heels," Crimmins responds that "Homosexuals did everything with great style and panache, and they did a lot of it in tiny closets with no lights, and sometimes while fearing for their lives." (213) That basically sums up the tone of this book. Society was influenced by gay men who were nothing but fabulous even while facing severs disadvantages. It is nice to point out gay influence--that designer, that artist, that author. It's a kind of backhanded respect, the acknowledgment that the majority likes us (and our work) much more than they think they do. It's nice to think these things when you're feeling alone and filled with an overwhelming sense that nothing you do could possibly matter. That being said, this book makes incredibly broad statements while having a narrow focus. The volume isn't about 'homosexuals', it's about a specific type of gay man. To really enjoy this book, you have to excuse that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linnea Arneson

    This book was really disappointing. I guess you shouldn't judge a book by its title or subtitle. Because it should have been called "How the 20th Century White Male Homosexuals Influenced American Consumer Culture and the Media: How Gay Men Made Everything from Movies to Fashion Fabulous and Swishy." But I guess that wouldn't have really caught on. It addressed the problem of stereotyping in gay culture by acknowledging that they exist, that they are not always true, and saying, basically: "Yeah This book was really disappointing. I guess you shouldn't judge a book by its title or subtitle. Because it should have been called "How the 20th Century White Male Homosexuals Influenced American Consumer Culture and the Media: How Gay Men Made Everything from Movies to Fashion Fabulous and Swishy." But I guess that wouldn't have really caught on. It addressed the problem of stereotyping in gay culture by acknowledging that they exist, that they are not always true, and saying, basically: "Yeah, it's pretty much true, but hey, at least it's a good stereotype." The oldest reference I found was the required nod to Oscar Wilde (so ten years removed from the 20th century; hmm I thought civilization was a lot older than that) who is one of my favorite favorite writers, and what does this author have to say? How much his priceless wit exemplifies "gay sassiness." Arrrgh!!!! And then try to read chapter after chapter about how gay people - oh wait, I mean men, it's not like lesbians or straight women are important at all (I should have put the book down after the author said that in the first chapter) - have been soooo totally important in language, food, TV, music, movies, and musical theater (does anyone really need to write a book about how homosexuals influenced The Rocky Horror Picture Show?) I guess for a title such as "Saving Civilization" I thought there would be more actual history and stuff. While I am fascinated that a gay man invented deviled eggs and I do love them, would civilization really be lost without deviled eggs? And yet it doesn't even mention Alan Turing, the gay man who pretty much invented computer science and artificial intelligence, without which civilization really would be lost. Or saved, depending on your perspective on technology. I guess CS is sooooo nerdy and doesn't fit in with the stylish swishy stereotype she's trying to cultivate. I guess I'm not really the intended audience for this book, but it makes me wonder: who is? I'm pretty sure gay men would find it as stereotyping as I did. Straight women, maybe, seeing as the author is a self-identified "fag-hag", and the book contains a lot of swooning-over-Rock-Hudson stuff. Hey, maybe it's just because I don't swoon over Rock Hudson that I didn't like it. And that I don't care about fashion. Or movies. Or whether or not there's any freaking homosexual subtext in a movie. A cigar is just a cigar, people. To quote (roughly) Dan Savage "Gay isn't good or bad. It's just gay."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eric Rickert

    HOW THE HOMOS SAVED CIVILIZATION is a dated tutorial for Baby Boomers on how gay men speak, act, eat, drink, dress, and exhibit their sexuality in non-sexual ways. It was published when Will & Grace was gasping for breath. Like that show it is totally, utterly, miserably--truly, madly, deeply--devoid of sexuality. I may give a copy to my mother at Xmas. It details the neutered influence of gay men on our culture, and in that way is totally out of step with the contemporary idea of gayness domina HOW THE HOMOS SAVED CIVILIZATION is a dated tutorial for Baby Boomers on how gay men speak, act, eat, drink, dress, and exhibit their sexuality in non-sexual ways. It was published when Will & Grace was gasping for breath. Like that show it is totally, utterly, miserably--truly, madly, deeply--devoid of sexuality. I may give a copy to my mother at Xmas. It details the neutered influence of gay men on our culture, and in that way is totally out of step with the contemporary idea of gayness dominated by gay marriage and Truvada whores. Of course this book reads as out of sync and foreign: it's written by a fruit fly. The topic deserves a proper academic unpacking. This is not it. One star cuz apparently it was exhausting to write. Cool story, bro. I always appreciate a commitment to sparkle motion. #realtalk: I really hate being lumped into the misnomer "the homosexuals." The homosexuals? Nast. What a horrible way to qualify an object. #realtalk: I got it for 20 cents at my local indie bookstore because I'm looking for an easy breezy beach read. Like Jay Z and Drizzy said before me, "ON TO THE NEXT ONE"

  5. 4 out of 5

    JC Roes

    Excelente libro en el que conocemos mucho más acerca del impacto que ha tenido la comunidad gay en diferentes ámbitos de la sociedad a lo largo de los años. La manera en la que lograron modificar conceptos como moda, arte, sexo, familia, entretenimiento, etc. La autora celebra a las diferentes personalidades gay y los distintos sucesos que han marcado la cultura pop que hoy se encuentra tan presente en la sociedad, al mismo tiempo que a través de la irreverencia, la información y una narrativa a Excelente libro en el que conocemos mucho más acerca del impacto que ha tenido la comunidad gay en diferentes ámbitos de la sociedad a lo largo de los años. La manera en la que lograron modificar conceptos como moda, arte, sexo, familia, entretenimiento, etc. La autora celebra a las diferentes personalidades gay y los distintos sucesos que han marcado la cultura pop que hoy se encuentra tan presente en la sociedad, al mismo tiempo que a través de la irreverencia, la información y una narrativa atinada demuestra a los lectores cómo hasta la comida que se llevan a la boca, la ropa que utilizan o la música que escuchan encuentran su base gracias a la mente de personas homosexuales que cambiaron (y siguen cambiando) por completo la historia social, comercial y hasta política de nuestro planeta. Muy recomendable.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    This book brings up some interesting things to think about. Most of the evidence in here, though, comes from the personal experience of the author, who is not a gay man but reassures us that she has a lot of gay men friends. Read it if you want to get some ideas of things to read about elsewhere.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Andersen-Andrade

    This book supports what I've always thought, that gays are an enlightened people who make great contributions to our culture. This book supports what I've always thought, that gays are an enlightened people who make great contributions to our culture.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    Far from perfect but still interesting and a positive view at the contributions of people who were often closeted

  9. 4 out of 5

    Agathokles

    At first I was rather apprehensive about this book, and started out being very critical about it. In some ways I still am, as I still refute the assertions about a homosexual lifestyle. However, I did realise that the book is really more about things that are "gay" and "queer", in a way that is different from biological homosexuality, although often associated with biologically homosexual people. It's a book that makes you think about the profound influence that *some* (emphasis is mine) gay men At first I was rather apprehensive about this book, and started out being very critical about it. In some ways I still am, as I still refute the assertions about a homosexual lifestyle. However, I did realise that the book is really more about things that are "gay" and "queer", in a way that is different from biological homosexuality, although often associated with biologically homosexual people. It's a book that makes you think about the profound influence that *some* (emphasis is mine) gay men have had on American - and through that on Western culture, ultimately. But the book is way too generalising sometimes and makes it seem as if *all* biologically homosexual men have such influence upon culture, and no biologically straight people. I was doubting between giving this book a 3 or 4-star rating, but decided to give it the benefit of the doubt.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Likens

    What in the hell did i just read? Was this a serious text of the fabulousness of being gay or a pitiful satire of the entire gay culture/universe seen through the eyes of a well intentioned, yet sorely misguided straight woman? 3/4ths of the book was nothing but a horrible mishmash of cliches and worn out stereotypes, while the remaining 1/4 was truly useless exposition of the glory of being a homosexual. As a gay man in his thirties, i appreciate the author's attempt to placate and pacify a very What in the hell did i just read? Was this a serious text of the fabulousness of being gay or a pitiful satire of the entire gay culture/universe seen through the eyes of a well intentioned, yet sorely misguided straight woman? 3/4ths of the book was nothing but a horrible mishmash of cliches and worn out stereotypes, while the remaining 1/4 was truly useless exposition of the glory of being a homosexual. As a gay man in his thirties, i appreciate the author's attempt to placate and pacify a very fickle & particular segment of gay men. But this book did nothing, absolutely nothing, to go further into the context of what it means to be a homosexual in contemporary civilization. WE ARE ALL NOT THE SAME.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This is a fantastic and hilarious insight into the history of recent 'straight' America and how gay people (primarily men) have changed things without anyone really realizing it. I already was aware of many of these influences, though there were quite a few that were interesting to read about. What mostly made this book enjoyable was the lighthearted joking tone that the author maintained throughout the exploration of gay mens' impact on modern America. It talks about nearly everything, from foo This is a fantastic and hilarious insight into the history of recent 'straight' America and how gay people (primarily men) have changed things without anyone really realizing it. I already was aware of many of these influences, though there were quite a few that were interesting to read about. What mostly made this book enjoyable was the lighthearted joking tone that the author maintained throughout the exploration of gay mens' impact on modern America. It talks about nearly everything, from food to television to property values, and gives an insight into a world that has slowly been morphing into something with more class, more variety, and more culture, without even realizing it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    S.t.

    The tone of this book is sassy and at times a bit mean. I think the author could have been less cheeky and it would have made a stronger case for the thesis. As it was, the points didn't seem strong enough and it seemed a bit shallow and thin. Still, given the fact that it was written almost ten years ago, the author did make some interesting point. I had other problems with it, including some egregious errors. Elton John is not a lyricist being one. It read to me like the author was chatting at The tone of this book is sassy and at times a bit mean. I think the author could have been less cheeky and it would have made a stronger case for the thesis. As it was, the points didn't seem strong enough and it seemed a bit shallow and thin. Still, given the fact that it was written almost ten years ago, the author did make some interesting point. I had other problems with it, including some egregious errors. Elton John is not a lyricist being one. It read to me like the author was chatting at a cocktail party and decided to write a book. I will give her credit for even being brave enough to make the case, but it desperately needs revisited by a new edition.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Wellington

    The cover of the book caught my attention. Who has the guts to give a title of a book like that? I burned through the book in one evening. If one looks hard enough at history ... looking hard for homosexual influence, you will find homosexual influence. In the middle of the book, she made a great leap in pronouncing homosexual influence when a confirmed heterosexual does a homosexual activity. Homosexual activity seemed to be defined (over) broadly as anything artistic .... Quaint book but nothing The cover of the book caught my attention. Who has the guts to give a title of a book like that? I burned through the book in one evening. If one looks hard enough at history ... looking hard for homosexual influence, you will find homosexual influence. In the middle of the book, she made a great leap in pronouncing homosexual influence when a confirmed heterosexual does a homosexual activity. Homosexual activity seemed to be defined (over) broadly as anything artistic .... Quaint book but nothing really special.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Broodingferret

    While entertaining, this book wasn't too terribly informative. This is a good book for anyone looking for a super-simple intro to queer culture and its impact on mainstream culture. Also, Crimmins intentionally paints herself as a stereotypical fag hag who views the entirety of the gay male community through rose-tinted glasses, which I typically find annoying. Still, she has a quick wit, so it was fairly entertaining to read. While entertaining, this book wasn't too terribly informative. This is a good book for anyone looking for a super-simple intro to queer culture and its impact on mainstream culture. Also, Crimmins intentionally paints herself as a stereotypical fag hag who views the entirety of the gay male community through rose-tinted glasses, which I typically find annoying. Still, she has a quick wit, so it was fairly entertaining to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Jedeikin

    Cute, if a bit lighthearted, chronicling of how elements of gay culture have infused their way into the broader mainstream, oftentimes without the broader mainstream having any idea (Liberace, anyone?). I would have preferred a bit more of a deep-dive into notions of upending sexual mores and the perspective granted by those who feel free to do so, but since this isn't an academic treatise I suppose that's forgivable. All in all, a clever little expose. Cute, if a bit lighthearted, chronicling of how elements of gay culture have infused their way into the broader mainstream, oftentimes without the broader mainstream having any idea (Liberace, anyone?). I would have preferred a bit more of a deep-dive into notions of upending sexual mores and the perspective granted by those who feel free to do so, but since this isn't an academic treatise I suppose that's forgivable. All in all, a clever little expose.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I know a rule of criticism is never to blame a work for what it isn't, but I would have liked this so much better if it had been more scholarly and less light in tone. The idea is fascinating--she treats gay people not as a sexual orientation that pops up here and there, but instead, semi-joking, but also seriously, as an "immigrabt group" in her own words. An engaging enough writing style, but so disappointing, and rife with minor errors. I'd give it one and a half if that were an option. I know a rule of criticism is never to blame a work for what it isn't, but I would have liked this so much better if it had been more scholarly and less light in tone. The idea is fascinating--she treats gay people not as a sexual orientation that pops up here and there, but instead, semi-joking, but also seriously, as an "immigrabt group" in her own words. An engaging enough writing style, but so disappointing, and rife with minor errors. I'd give it one and a half if that were an option.

  17. 5 out of 5

    deanna

    This only moderately tongue-in-cheek book takes a look at the ways that gay men have helped make our culture what it is. I especially enjoyed the parts that focused on language and on the ways in which gay culture has influenced how we speak and the evolution of slang and other informal language. I was suprised how many things we take for granted began as a part of a culture many straight people assume is on the fringe. . .turns out it's more like these guys are on the forefront. This only moderately tongue-in-cheek book takes a look at the ways that gay men have helped make our culture what it is. I especially enjoyed the parts that focused on language and on the ways in which gay culture has influenced how we speak and the evolution of slang and other informal language. I was suprised how many things we take for granted began as a part of a culture many straight people assume is on the fringe. . .turns out it's more like these guys are on the forefront.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    On the one hand, this book is brilliant - it's about time a cultural studies book acknowledged GLBT people as a culture. On the other hand, I found it vaguely disturbing, the way everything must be attributed to a man, including straight women’s culture. Crimmins quotes Robert Clark from The Solace of Food: A Life of James Beard, “Helen would often say to James, ‘as usual, the boys win.’” That quote really sums up this book. On the one hand, this book is brilliant - it's about time a cultural studies book acknowledged GLBT people as a culture. On the other hand, I found it vaguely disturbing, the way everything must be attributed to a man, including straight women’s culture. Crimmins quotes Robert Clark from The Solace of Food: A Life of James Beard, “Helen would often say to James, ‘as usual, the boys win.’” That quote really sums up this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thom

    The book examines a number of sciological phenomena surrounding gay men and 'in' culture. From the popularization of vodka-based drinks to broadway, show business, marketing, home design, and the emergence of male beauty, the gays have had their manicured hands in it. The book examines a number of sciological phenomena surrounding gay men and 'in' culture. From the popularization of vodka-based drinks to broadway, show business, marketing, home design, and the emergence of male beauty, the gays have had their manicured hands in it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Derek Oberg

    Definitely skewed to find these equivalencies where she wants to find them, but mostly it works. Some of the chapters are amazing. I really liked the chapter on "gay" vocabulary and how it has permeated our culture in general. Definitely skewed to find these equivalencies where she wants to find them, but mostly it works. Some of the chapters are amazing. I really liked the chapter on "gay" vocabulary and how it has permeated our culture in general.

  21. 5 out of 5

    William Ramsey

    Cute, pop academia.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    Not as good as I was hoping it would be.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Austin Rose

    Such a STRANGE book coming from a straight woman and why does she use the clinical term 'homosexual' so much? A few interesting tidbits but I rolled my eyes through most of it. Such a STRANGE book coming from a straight woman and why does she use the clinical term 'homosexual' so much? A few interesting tidbits but I rolled my eyes through most of it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marla Glenn

    Very witty. So sorry to hear she died recently! I learned a lot from this, though she's definitely reaching with some of her conclusions, such as who invented deviled eggs at picnics. Very witty. So sorry to hear she died recently! I learned a lot from this, though she's definitely reaching with some of her conclusions, such as who invented deviled eggs at picnics.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dsoinski

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Leigh

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matty

  29. 5 out of 5

    Simon Gurovich

  30. 4 out of 5

    Feño

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