web site hit counter The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays

Availability: Ready to download

In this anthology, renowned murder mystery writer Dorothy L. Sayers tackles faith, doubt, human nature, and the most dramatic story ever told. For almost a century, a series of labyrinthine murder mysteries have kept fans turning pages hungrily as Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane discover whodunit, again and again. Detective novel enthusiasts may not know that for almost In this anthology, renowned murder mystery writer Dorothy L. Sayers tackles faith, doubt, human nature, and the most dramatic story ever told. For almost a century, a series of labyrinthine murder mysteries have kept fans turning pages hungrily as Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane discover whodunit, again and again. Detective novel enthusiasts may not know that for almost as many years, Christian thinkers have appreciated the same Dorothy L. Sayers for her acumen as an essayist, playwright, apologist, and preeminent translator of Dante's Divine Comedy. Now, for the first time, an anthology brings together the best of both worlds. The selections uncover the gospel themes woven throughout Sayers's popular fiction as well as her religious plays, correspondence, talks, and essays. Clues dropped throughout her detective stories reveal an attention to matters of faith that underlies all her work. Those who know Sayers from her nonfiction writings may wonder how she could also write popular genre fiction. Sayers, like her friend G. K. Chesterton, found murder mysteries a vehicle to explore the choices characters make between good and evil. Along with C. S. Lewis and the other Inklings, with whom she maintained a lively correspondence, Sayers used her popular fiction to probe deeper questions. She addressed not only matters of guilt and innocence, sin and redemption, but also the cost of war, the role of the conscience, and the place of women in society. None of these themes proved any hindrance to spinning a captivating yarn. Her murder mysteries are more reminiscent of Jane Austen than Arthur Conan Doyle, with all the tense interpersonal exploration of the modern novel.


Compare

In this anthology, renowned murder mystery writer Dorothy L. Sayers tackles faith, doubt, human nature, and the most dramatic story ever told. For almost a century, a series of labyrinthine murder mysteries have kept fans turning pages hungrily as Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane discover whodunit, again and again. Detective novel enthusiasts may not know that for almost In this anthology, renowned murder mystery writer Dorothy L. Sayers tackles faith, doubt, human nature, and the most dramatic story ever told. For almost a century, a series of labyrinthine murder mysteries have kept fans turning pages hungrily as Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane discover whodunit, again and again. Detective novel enthusiasts may not know that for almost as many years, Christian thinkers have appreciated the same Dorothy L. Sayers for her acumen as an essayist, playwright, apologist, and preeminent translator of Dante's Divine Comedy. Now, for the first time, an anthology brings together the best of both worlds. The selections uncover the gospel themes woven throughout Sayers's popular fiction as well as her religious plays, correspondence, talks, and essays. Clues dropped throughout her detective stories reveal an attention to matters of faith that underlies all her work. Those who know Sayers from her nonfiction writings may wonder how she could also write popular genre fiction. Sayers, like her friend G. K. Chesterton, found murder mysteries a vehicle to explore the choices characters make between good and evil. Along with C. S. Lewis and the other Inklings, with whom she maintained a lively correspondence, Sayers used her popular fiction to probe deeper questions. She addressed not only matters of guilt and innocence, sin and redemption, but also the cost of war, the role of the conscience, and the place of women in society. None of these themes proved any hindrance to spinning a captivating yarn. Her murder mysteries are more reminiscent of Jane Austen than Arthur Conan Doyle, with all the tense interpersonal exploration of the modern novel.

30 review for The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    This book shouted at me from the "new book" shelf at my library as a fan of Sayers' mysteries. Though I may well own a copy of all of her mysteries, I was ignorant of her life, associations and subsequent accomplishments. This book, published by Plough Publishing House is a wonderful introduction to those missing pieces. Plough is the printing offshoot of the Bruderhof Community, yet another religious community group I was unfamiliar with. I should say this book may be a challenge or hold little This book shouted at me from the "new book" shelf at my library as a fan of Sayers' mysteries. Though I may well own a copy of all of her mysteries, I was ignorant of her life, associations and subsequent accomplishments. This book, published by Plough Publishing House is a wonderful introduction to those missing pieces. Plough is the printing offshoot of the Bruderhof Community, yet another religious community group I was unfamiliar with. I should say this book may be a challenge or hold little interest for anyone uninitiated or lacking interest in Christian theology. It is rather remarkable to realize the Sayers mysteries that have stood the test of time were produced over a period of approximately 13 years or so. After she put that effort aside she wrote plays and essays on Christian themes, and then concentrated on scholarly translation works of Dante, dying at age 64 before she had completed that work. There are selected excerpts from about 10 of the mysteries and then plays and essays, etc. The commentary accompanying the excerpts was excellent for reflection on her purposes. It is enjoyable to be reminded of so many of those books in one place. This paperback is only 241 pages. A moving and intelligent tribute by C. S. Lewis finishes the book. He had to admit that he was not a reader of detective stories and had wondered if she was embarrassed by them as reported. His wife had the opportunity to ask Dorothy this question, and she denied it saying "she had stopped working in that genre because she felt she had done all she could with it...There is in reality no cleavage between the detective stories and her other works. In them, as in it, she is first and foremost the craftsman, the professional...I have an idea that, with a very few exceptions, it is only such writers who matter much in the long run."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joseph J.

    I began this book distantly aware of Dorothy Sayers as a mystery writer, and vaguely recognizing the name of her fictional protagonist, Lord Peter Wimsey. I was unaware of Sayers reputation as a biblical interpreter and a scholar-translator of Dante's The Divine Comedy. I had no idea of her religious background-high Anglican and daughter of a rector-or her career in advertising and jingle writing prior to World War II. A single mother who placed her son elsewhere after his birth, she "adopted" h I began this book distantly aware of Dorothy Sayers as a mystery writer, and vaguely recognizing the name of her fictional protagonist, Lord Peter Wimsey. I was unaware of Sayers reputation as a biblical interpreter and a scholar-translator of Dante's The Divine Comedy. I had no idea of her religious background-high Anglican and daughter of a rector-or her career in advertising and jingle writing prior to World War II. A single mother who placed her son elsewhere after his birth, she "adopted" him after her later marriage. A unique life, and these pages include a brief biography but are focused on the interweaving of Christian and Biblical themes in her mystery stories, as well as her social and cultural commentaries. She penned fascinating dialogues-plays-involving persons from the Virgin Mary to Emperor Constantine, also excerpted here. The portrait emerges of an artist who decried mediocrity in religious expression and practice. The source of her complaint was a rigorously expressed belief in the unprecedented power of the Gospel message and the story of Jesus Christ, of God made man. That this singular happening could be watered down to a message couched in crushing boredom was repugnant to her. Her faith and her background in advertising merge: She knew the power of the message, and in the Gospel that power was inherent. The passages from her Lord Peter works are rooted in aspects of guilt and forgiveness no less powerful today that in Sayers' time between the World Wars, and during the days of England's fight against Nazism. To read her words on advertising skills and how people replace spirituality with earthly values struck me as I read them Thanksgiving weekend which has descended into an orgy of materialism. I read her imaginative dialogue of the new mother Mary being cared for in the home of a shepherd as we entered Advent. That her vibrant imagination and use of language drew censure from the establishment males of the Church recalled the ridicule and oversight of the poems and homilies of Gerard Manley Hopkins by his superiors, as recounted in the Hopkins volume in the same Plough series as this work. She takes a story as familiar as the Prodigal Son, and compares the love of God for us, even at a far distance, as she focuses on the father's love for his approaching once-lost son. In a retelling of the crucifixion her language is blunt describing the barbarism of the act. How the Incarnation and Crucifixion an Resurrection are transmitted to today's often questioning believers is as great a question today as in Sayers' time when the darkness of Nazism threatened civilization. This important volume from Plough raises Sayers to a contemporary platform beyond her mystery writings with a message as vibrant now as in the past century.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: For almost a century, the murder mysteries of Dorothy L. Sayers have kept enthusiasts hungrily turning pages. The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers is an anthology with dozens of excerpts from her works: her mystery novels, her radio plays, her essays, her poems. The chapters seem to be arranged somewhat thematically. There are chapters on faith, forgiveness, belief, pride, envy, greed, creativity, time and eternity, etc. Each chapter includes at least one long excerpt and sometimes sev First sentence: For almost a century, the murder mysteries of Dorothy L. Sayers have kept enthusiasts hungrily turning pages. The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers is an anthology with dozens of excerpts from her works: her mystery novels, her radio plays, her essays, her poems. The chapters seem to be arranged somewhat thematically. There are chapters on faith, forgiveness, belief, pride, envy, greed, creativity, time and eternity, etc. Each chapter includes at least one long excerpt and sometimes several shorter ones as well. The commentary between excerpts is kept to a minimum--for better or worse. On the one hand, Sayers' words--her works--speak for themselves. On the other hand, the transition from one thing to another can be tough in a few places. Before reading The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers I had a vague notion that she was Christian-ish. I remember her being quoted in a Michael Horton book and was impressed. (I love, love, love Michael Horton.) I still like a few of the quotes from her essay 'The Dogma is the Drama.' I did learn more about her, her background, her faith and theology. For better or worse. I had no idea she was Catholic and not Anglican. (I had no idea she believed in purgatory, for example) I also had no idea she was so liberal--and liberal is definitely the wrong word, I mean free and easy, loose with facts--in her radio dramas. Her life of Christ--from the excerpts included here and there sprinkled throughout the book--takes SO MANY liberties. I have a hard time seeing how the same woman who wrote "The Dogma is the Drama" could also write so many other works I struggle with accepting as even being Christian. For example, one of the radio plays has Jesus talking with Mary and Martha and Lazarus BEFORE Lazarus' death and resurrection. Mary has been confused with the other Mary--a big pet peeve of mine. And her conversation with Jesus is just weird. But his conversation with Lazarus is just DISTURBING and bizarre. Apparently Lazarus was all angsty and suicidal. I still love her creation, Lord Peter Wimsey, but reading this book has convinced me that I should not seek out her other books. That's not to say the book itself--edited by Carole Vanderhoof--was poorly written. The book helped clarify to me Sayers' beliefs and theology.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: An anthology of Sayers' work organized by theological topics, drawing on her detective fiction, plays, and essays. This work is the latest installment in Plough Publishing's The Gospel in Great Writers series, and it is a gem. Dorothy L. Sayers was one of the first women to receive a degree from Oxford. Her experience in an ad agency became a resource for a series of Lord Peter Wimsey (and Harriet Vane) detective mysteries. As a committed Christian, and friend of the Inklings, she was ca Summary: An anthology of Sayers' work organized by theological topics, drawing on her detective fiction, plays, and essays. This work is the latest installment in Plough Publishing's The Gospel in Great Writers series, and it is a gem. Dorothy L. Sayers was one of the first women to receive a degree from Oxford. Her experience in an ad agency became a resource for a series of Lord Peter Wimsey (and Harriet Vane) detective mysteries. As a committed Christian, and friend of the Inklings, she was called upon by the BBC to speak and write about the Christian faith. She published several plays that brought the gospel accounts to life. She was an essayist, and her extended essay on The Mind of the Maker, simultaneously served as a work of Christian aesthetics, and a reflection on the Trinity. Many consider her translation of Dante's The Divine Comedy (Paradiso completed posthumously by Barbara Reynolds) to be one of the best. In this anthology, we have material from many of her works, that introduces the reader both to the different facets of her writing and the deep theological insight to be found. The material is organized into twenty chapters, each on a particular them, and combining either her fiction or plays with essay material on the same themes. Themes range from Conscience to Covetousness to Despair and Hope to Work and finally Time and Eternity. What struck me afresh in reading this collection was how delightfully frank and able to cut through pretense Dorothy could be--the counterpart of Harriet Vane in her detective stories.  In writing about Judgement, she notes: "It is the inevitable consequence of man's attempt to regulate life and society on a system that runs counter to the facts of his own nature." In her essay, The Dogma is the Drama, she concludes: "Let us, in Heaven's name, drag out the Divine Drama from under the dreadful accumulation of slip-shod thinking and trashy sentiment heaped upon it, and set it on an open stage to startle the world into some sort of vigorous reaction. If the pious are the first to be shocked, so much the worse for the pious--others will pass into the Kingdom of Heaven before them." In her play The Man Who Would Be King, she uses informal language to describe the crucifixion of Jesus. The Bishop of Winchester protested this. Here is Dorothy's reply: "I've made all the alterations required so far, but now I'm entering a formal protest, which I have tried to make a mild one, without threatenings and slaughters. But if the contemporary world is not much moved by the execution of God it is partly because pious phrases and reverent language have made it a more dignified crime than it was. It was a dirty piece of work, tell the Bishop." In her essay Why Work?, she makes this trenchant observation: "How can anyone remain interested in a religion which seems to have no concern with nine-tenths of his life?" This work is rich in such observations and often the essay excerpts are a good reflection of the key ideas in those essays. If there is any flaw, the excerpts from the detective fiction do not sufficiently reflect these works as a whole, even if they are connected thematically to the other pieces in the chapter. Hopefully, something of the character of Lord Peter Wimsey shows through, which develops over the course of Sayers fiction. The only remedy for this is that you need to read the works in their entirety, often available in inexpensive print or electronic editions. A bonus to this volume comes in the form of "A Panegyric for Dorothy L. Sayers" by C.S. Lewis, written following her death. I think she would have most appreciated this comment: "There is in reality no cleavage between the detective stories and her other works. In them, as in it, she is first and foremost the craftsman, the professional. She always saw herself as one who had learned a trade, and respects it, and demands respect for it from others." For those who only have heard of Dorothy L. Sayers, this volume is a wonderful introduction to her broad range of writings, and her acute thinking about theology and art. For those who have read her works, it is a wonderful review that serves to connect the dots between her different genres of work. For all of us, this work gives us a chance to think along with one of the great theological minds of the twentieth century. ___________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary review copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers Edited by Carole Vanderhoof Initially known for her detective novels in the late 30’s - early 40’s, Sayers went on to write plays that rendered religious tones with high praises. Almost the alter-ego of Dorothy Parker, who also wrote the same varied genres, including ad slogans, Sayers had as much the hidden messages/undertones in her writings as Parker did obvious snark. What I enjoyed most about this was it was a leisure read, given each chapter was its own story The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers Edited by Carole Vanderhoof Initially known for her detective novels in the late 30’s - early 40’s, Sayers went on to write plays that rendered religious tones with high praises. Almost the alter-ego of Dorothy Parker, who also wrote the same varied genres, including ad slogans, Sayers had as much the hidden messages/undertones in her writings as Parker did obvious snark. What I enjoyed most about this was it was a leisure read, given each chapter was its own story, play, essay, what not, with a brief introduction. The collectives own intro is as informative into the woman behind such forward-thinking writings. Highlighted are the gospel themes within her many offerings. Her mystery novels, spanning near a century, were a highly sought read, while also were her religious-themed expostulations. She, unbeknownst to me, was a reveled translator of Dante’s Divine Comedy. A woman of many surprises and talents, it’s delightful to see her recognized in a tidy tribute, sure to please her fans on both ends of the quill.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gilion Dumas

    Sayers is best known for her detective series featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. But she also was a noted classic translator, apologist, and theologian. This anthology traces faith-based themes through her popular fiction and other writings. The book is part of the Gospel in Great Writers series from Plough Publishing House and follows the same format. Each chapter takes a different topic -- Conscious, Forgiveness, Pride, or Sacrificial Love, for example -- and then lays out large exc Sayers is best known for her detective series featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. But she also was a noted classic translator, apologist, and theologian. This anthology traces faith-based themes through her popular fiction and other writings. The book is part of the Gospel in Great Writers series from Plough Publishing House and follows the same format. Each chapter takes a different topic -- Conscious, Forgiveness, Pride, or Sacrificial Love, for example -- and then lays out large excerpts of Sayers's writings that address these topics, starting with a passage from one of her mysteries followed by more elucidating material from her nonfiction work. The editor's introduction explains the method and gives background on Sayers, but other than brief descriptions of excerpts, there is no commentary and there is definitely no analysis. It makes an interesting companion book to Sayers's fiction, a tantalizing introduction to her non-fiction, and a handy compendium of her thinking on theology.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Glenn

    What a beautiful book written by our favorite author who shares with us different selections of her works. So well written for our pleasure to take you on an engaging journey through her works tackling some of the hard subjects. This book is simply amazing and a great addition to your library.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Literary Redhead

    THE GOSPEL IN DOROTHY L. SAYERS: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays In this anthology, the subtext of Christian faith is revealed in the works of famous murder mystery writer Dorothy L. Sayers (1893-1957). For almost a century, her whodunnits captured the imagination of fans who hungrily followed the exploits of detectives Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. Mystery buffs may not know that she was also an esteemed essayist, playwright, apologist, and preeminent translator of Dan THE GOSPEL IN DOROTHY L. SAYERS: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays In this anthology, the subtext of Christian faith is revealed in the works of famous murder mystery writer Dorothy L. Sayers (1893-1957). For almost a century, her whodunnits captured the imagination of fans who hungrily followed the exploits of detectives Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. Mystery buffs may not know that she was also an esteemed essayist, playwright, apologist, and preeminent translator of Dante’s Divine Comedy. Now, for the first time, an anthology brings together the best of both worlds in a rich introduction to her work. Sayers, like her friend G. K. Chesterton, found murder mysteries a way to explore choices made between good and evil by her characters. Along with C. S. Lewis and the other Inklings with whom she kept a lively friendship, Sayers used popular fiction to probe deeper questions. This volume is the newest from Plough Publishing House to highlight Christian faith in the work of great writers, such as Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and George MacDonald. Highly recommended! Pub Date 31 Oct 2018 Thanks to Plough Publishing and NetGalley for the review copy. Opinions are fully mine. #DorothyLsayers #NetGalley

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carole Vanderhoof

    Disclaimer: I admit that I edited this book, and am rather proud of it!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ben House

    Dorothy Sayers is, in my world, the lady who wrote the essay. I am referring to “The Lost Tools of Learning,” which Miss Sayers wrote in 1947 and delivered at Oxford University. Like quite a few other people, I read it several decades later, and slowly, it began to change my whole approach to education. That essay is the founding document in the classical Christian school movement in America. It doesn’t say everything that needs to be said about education in general or classical education more s Dorothy Sayers is, in my world, the lady who wrote the essay. I am referring to “The Lost Tools of Learning,” which Miss Sayers wrote in 1947 and delivered at Oxford University. Like quite a few other people, I read it several decades later, and slowly, it began to change my whole approach to education. That essay is the founding document in the classical Christian school movement in America. It doesn’t say everything that needs to be said about education in general or classical education more specifically, but it said enough to spark thought, debate, and, more important, application. That essay was just a sliver of the corpus of writing that Dorothy Sayers did in her lifetime (1893-1957). Her main means of support was writing mysteries, and her main characters in her stories were Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. Lest one think that this was just pot-boiling writing to make a buck, take note that she was one of the founding members of the Detection Club. She also served as president of that organization of mystery writers, being preceded by G. K. Chesterton, author of the Father Brown stories, and succeeded by Agatha Christi. She was also an incredibly gifted theological writer. Her contemporaries were such fellows as C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and others among the famed Inklings. I am not sure she was ever able to hang out with the guys, but she could have more than held her own trading wit and wisdom with those writers of Christian thought and imagination. Her theological books blend deep convictions about doctrine with a worldview that applies the faith to art and all of life. Not as wittily quotable as Lewis, she was still quite bold, profound, and solid. In her own personal life, she battled quite a few issues. She got a degree from Oxford at a time when such a thing was unheard of for a woman. Her personal life was full of struggles, both from her own bad choices and from other circumstances, but she persevered and made her own niche in English letters. Plough Publishing House has produced a series of books with titles beginning with the words The Gospel in…. Authors whose works have been chosen for this series include Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, George MacDonald, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Dorothy L. Sayers. As the subtitle of The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers states, this book is made up of “Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays.” This book is a marvelous way to either get acquainted with Dorothy Sayers or to renew and enrich that acquaintance. Reading her books would involve taking quite a few mystery novels, a number of theologically-centered plays, several books of theology, some translations of classics (like The Song of Roland and Dante’s Divine Comedy), and reading her letters. This is not to say that they are all here in this volume, but it is a great selection of bits and pieces of her mysteries, without any fatal spoilers, and portions of her other writings. The book consists of twenty chapters, preceded by a biographical sketch and followed by short essay about Sayers by C. S. Lewis. The chapters are mostly named for her mystery novels, and then the selections begin with something from a novel, followed by non-fictional writings on the same topic. Topics include conscience, sin and grace, covetousness, forgiveness, judgment, and more. Let me confess something: I have failed greatly in not reading or appreciating enough of Dorothy Sayers’ writings. My response to the chapters of this book as I read it in the mornings (usually) is one of lament and regret over having ignored her. As I said in the beginning, my Sayers’ experience has been centered on that one brilliant essay, “The Lost Tools of Learning.” This book is a marvelous means of literary repentance for me. I love this whole series of books by Plough Publishing House. I hope they do more books of this type. So many writers have structured their books around Gospel themes. Even unbelieving authors resort to sin and grace, forgiveness and redemption, fall and restoration in their stories. Literature is a bulwark of Christian history and apologetics. Books like this one, The Gospel in Dorothy Sayers, are great tools for students and teachers. Forget that statement. It sounds much too serious. This book is great fun to read and is packed full of plenty that will nurture the soul and create an appetite for reading more of Dorothy Sayers.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gilion Dumas

    Sayers is best known for her detective series featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. But she also was a noted classic translator, apologist, and theologian. This anthology traces faith-based themes through her popular fiction and other writings. The book is part of the Gospel in Great Writers series from Plough Publishing House and follows the same format. Each chapter takes a different topic -- Conscious, Forgiveness, Pride, or Sacrificial Love, for example -- and then lays out large exce Sayers is best known for her detective series featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. But she also was a noted classic translator, apologist, and theologian. This anthology traces faith-based themes through her popular fiction and other writings. The book is part of the Gospel in Great Writers series from Plough Publishing House and follows the same format. Each chapter takes a different topic -- Conscious, Forgiveness, Pride, or Sacrificial Love, for example -- and then lays out large excerpts of Sayers's writings that address these topics, starting with a passage from one of her mysteries followed by more elucidating material from her nonfiction work. The editor's introduction explains the method and gives background on Sayers, but other than brief descriptions of excerpts, there is no commentary and there is definitely no analysis. It makes an interesting companion book to Sayers's fiction, a tantalizing introduction to her non-fiction, and a handy compendium of her thinking on theology.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This has helped me appreciate Dorothy L. Sayers even more than I did already. Each chapter spotlights an aspect of the gospel found in snippets from Sayers' writings, both fiction and non-fiction. Most of these I had already read (novels, essays), but others were new to me (lectures, letters, sacred plays). It made me realize that I missed a lot by racing through the mysteries, too fixed on the plots and "who-dunnit" to see the depths Sayers' explored through the characters--greed, pride, self-s This has helped me appreciate Dorothy L. Sayers even more than I did already. Each chapter spotlights an aspect of the gospel found in snippets from Sayers' writings, both fiction and non-fiction. Most of these I had already read (novels, essays), but others were new to me (lectures, letters, sacred plays). It made me realize that I missed a lot by racing through the mysteries, too fixed on the plots and "who-dunnit" to see the depths Sayers' explored through the characters--greed, pride, self-sacrifice, faith...so much more than I had appreciated before. Now I need to re-read the Wimsy mysteries (and her collections of essays) to see them with fresh eyes and from this fresh perspective and after the humbling reminder that I can be a shallow reader. And I need to carefully read the collection of sacred plays I ordered halfway through this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    This is probably one for the die-hard Dorothy L Sayers fan, one who is also interested in and knowledgeable about theology. I don’t fall into that category, but nevertheless I found much to discover in this exploration of the Christian thinking in her work. Until recently I’d never even looked at any of her books, but then I read my first Lord Peter Wimsey in a literature class and came to realise how multi-layered and complex her work actually is. I’d certainly never thought of her as a Christi This is probably one for the die-hard Dorothy L Sayers fan, one who is also interested in and knowledgeable about theology. I don’t fall into that category, but nevertheless I found much to discover in this exploration of the Christian thinking in her work. Until recently I’d never even looked at any of her books, but then I read my first Lord Peter Wimsey in a literature class and came to realise how multi-layered and complex her work actually is. I’d certainly never thought of her as a Christian writer, nor realised how faith informed her life and writing. I didn’t read all of this well-researched and informative book but it’s one that I will keep by me for when I tackle another of her novels. Sayers devotees will no doubt love this anthology, but even a casual reader will find something of interest here.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    Recently a friend was lamenting how few people today know Dorothy Sayers as a theologian (although she wouldn't call herself that). This book seeks to remedy that oversight. The well-selected excerpts follow themes through both her fiction and non-fiction, as well as personal letters. Recommended both for readers who are unfamiliar with this creative Christian thinker and those who know her and want a thoughtful compilation drawn from her writings. Review based on an ARC received through NetGall Recently a friend was lamenting how few people today know Dorothy Sayers as a theologian (although she wouldn't call herself that). This book seeks to remedy that oversight. The well-selected excerpts follow themes through both her fiction and non-fiction, as well as personal letters. Recommended both for readers who are unfamiliar with this creative Christian thinker and those who know her and want a thoughtful compilation drawn from her writings. Review based on an ARC received through NetGalley.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    What a wonderful collection! Reading these excerpts particularly in the format they were given, gave insight into who Sayers was as a person and what she hoped to accomplish with her writing. Arranging the excerpts by topic really helped give a thorough perspective of how deeply these ideas permeated her writing, both fictional and non-fictional. Quite a few of the chapters were very thought provoking as some of her views are incompatible with current opinions. I highly recommend this for anyone What a wonderful collection! Reading these excerpts particularly in the format they were given, gave insight into who Sayers was as a person and what she hoped to accomplish with her writing. Arranging the excerpts by topic really helped give a thorough perspective of how deeply these ideas permeated her writing, both fictional and non-fictional. Quite a few of the chapters were very thought provoking as some of her views are incompatible with current opinions. I highly recommend this for anyone who has any interest in Sayers.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    I came to this wonderful book as I was starting my second Lord Peter Wimsey mystery; the timing was delightful. It is a compendium of Sayers work [fiction, drama, correspondence and prose] surrounding key themes: art, faith, the incarnation, etc. There were many nuggets to be enjoyed. The end result is an earnest desire to read more of her.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Keller

    Now I want to read more of Dorothy Sayers! I have been a fan of her fictional detective, Lord Peter Wimsey, but had no idea about the depth and breadth of her writing on Christianity. She writes compelling prose about dusty old church creeds. Her writing about the concept of the Trinity is a revelation. I am looking forward to reading "The Mind of the Maker." Now I want to read more of Dorothy Sayers! I have been a fan of her fictional detective, Lord Peter Wimsey, but had no idea about the depth and breadth of her writing on Christianity. She writes compelling prose about dusty old church creeds. Her writing about the concept of the Trinity is a revelation. I am looking forward to reading "The Mind of the Maker."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kathie

    I have loved all the “Lord Peter Whimsey” mysteries, and her ARE WOMEN HUMAN essay; but several of the essays in this, I found to be profound. It’s the sort of book you want to compel your friends to read so that you’ll have someone to discuss it with!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    What a great book! I'm a fan of Dorothy Sayers and it was really interesting to read about a different approach to her works. More on an ethical and religious side than usual. Highly recommended! Many thanks to Plough Publishing House and Edelweiss for this ARC What a great book! I'm a fan of Dorothy Sayers and it was really interesting to read about a different approach to her works. More on an ethical and religious side than usual. Highly recommended! Many thanks to Plough Publishing House and Edelweiss for this ARC

  20. 5 out of 5

    Iggy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Klusman

    Providing a review for this book has been a delightful challenge. I hesitated reading this book because at first glance it struck me as a choppy, dry compilation of plays, letters, and essays --- not the normal book I would select to read. Lesson learned --- don't judge a book by its cover. I quickly found myself distracted by the interjected plays and letters, though interesting, but wanting instead to absorb and stay spellbound by Dorothy's insight on numerous topics including but not limited Providing a review for this book has been a delightful challenge. I hesitated reading this book because at first glance it struck me as a choppy, dry compilation of plays, letters, and essays --- not the normal book I would select to read. Lesson learned --- don't judge a book by its cover. I quickly found myself distracted by the interjected plays and letters, though interesting, but wanting instead to absorb and stay spellbound by Dorothy's insight on numerous topics including but not limited to Forgiveness, Belief, Pride, Greed, Work, Equality and Time and Eternity. This book was not an easy read. Textbook in content yet at the same time thought-provoking. I found myself re-reading and often times re-reading again particular sentences and paragraphs attempting to grasp her mindset which caused me to reflect on my own beliefs, outlook on life, and the future of our country as a whole. Dorothy's writing are direct and the reader quickly realizes that she has little concern whether her opinions are shared or not. How would I describe the writings of Dorothy L. Sayers --- insightful, eccentric, bold, heartfelt, and God-based. C.S. Lewis best described her by saying, "the variety of Dorothy Sayer's work makes it almost impossible to find anyone who can deal properly with it all" and by Dorothy saying "what we ask is to be human individuals, however peculiar and unexpected." This book would be an ideal bible study selection. Sherry Klusman

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katie Anselmo

  23. 5 out of 5

    Justine Olawsky

  24. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    Very thought provoking, I will be passing this on because it is sooooo worth reading ! Thank you very much. Allie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Patti

  26. 5 out of 5

    LeeAnn

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Brantly

  28. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roberta

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.