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Early Man and the Ocean: A Search for the Beginnings of Navigation & Seaborne Civilizations

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When Thor Heyerdahl sailed the Kon-Tiki, a primitive balsa raft, from Peru to Polynesia, he was attempting to prove that American culture from Pre-Incan times could have reached those distant lands. And when he piloted Ra II, an Egyptian reed boat, from North Africa to the shores of the Caribbean, he was trying to show how men from the earliest known civilizations could ha When Thor Heyerdahl sailed the Kon-Tiki, a primitive balsa raft, from Peru to Polynesia, he was attempting to prove that American culture from Pre-Incan times could have reached those distant lands. And when he piloted Ra II, an Egyptian reed boat, from North Africa to the shores of the Caribbean, he was trying to show how men from the earliest known civilizations could have reached the New World by sea. This rich collection of essays, filled with facts and speculations on subjects ranging from primitive navigation techniques, ocean winds and currents to Columbus, the Vikings, and the striking similarities between cultures separated by legions of ocean, is the result of such explorations, the hard core of what Heyerdahl learned and the work for which he will ultimately be remembered. Here is the compelling evidence for his long time theory that men were crossing the oceans - spreading both their cultures and there genes - thousands of years before Columbus.


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When Thor Heyerdahl sailed the Kon-Tiki, a primitive balsa raft, from Peru to Polynesia, he was attempting to prove that American culture from Pre-Incan times could have reached those distant lands. And when he piloted Ra II, an Egyptian reed boat, from North Africa to the shores of the Caribbean, he was trying to show how men from the earliest known civilizations could ha When Thor Heyerdahl sailed the Kon-Tiki, a primitive balsa raft, from Peru to Polynesia, he was attempting to prove that American culture from Pre-Incan times could have reached those distant lands. And when he piloted Ra II, an Egyptian reed boat, from North Africa to the shores of the Caribbean, he was trying to show how men from the earliest known civilizations could have reached the New World by sea. This rich collection of essays, filled with facts and speculations on subjects ranging from primitive navigation techniques, ocean winds and currents to Columbus, the Vikings, and the striking similarities between cultures separated by legions of ocean, is the result of such explorations, the hard core of what Heyerdahl learned and the work for which he will ultimately be remembered. Here is the compelling evidence for his long time theory that men were crossing the oceans - spreading both their cultures and there genes - thousands of years before Columbus.

55 review for Early Man and the Ocean: A Search for the Beginnings of Navigation & Seaborne Civilizations

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mary Mack

    When scientists base their hypotheses on incorrect theories and assumptions, they invariably tie themselves in knots. Thor Heyerdahl untangled the web of confusion caused by arrogant scientists and historians who could not imagine that any dark-skinned race could possibly have discovered anything until Europeans did so first. Despite the fact that European explorers found indigenous peoples on every island and continent they travelled to, they still boasted that they were the first to find these When scientists base their hypotheses on incorrect theories and assumptions, they invariably tie themselves in knots. Thor Heyerdahl untangled the web of confusion caused by arrogant scientists and historians who could not imagine that any dark-skinned race could possibly have discovered anything until Europeans did so first. Despite the fact that European explorers found indigenous peoples on every island and continent they travelled to, they still boasted that they were the first to find these New Worlds! It was this arrogance that blinded 'civilized' historians into assuming that aboriginal peoples of various non-European cultures were not intelligent enough to understand concepts of navigation and marine engineering, and therefore could never have gone on long voyages without the white man's expertise. Yet they did, and thousands of years before the white man ever learned about sailing! Christopher Columbus, eat your heart out. Thor Heyerdahl approached his investigations into Early Man's travels and cultural achievements with an open mind, and therefore assessed the facts using logic and common sense. He assumed that Early Man was intelligent and capable, and the evidence proved him right. This book is an eye-opening treatise, very well written and easy to understand. Heyerdahl's method of scientific exploration is very hands on. Rather than sit around assuming that the natives of Peru were too backward to build sailing vessels capable of crossing the Pacific, he went out and built such a raft out of balsa wood and tested his theory! (Now, that took balsa, in my opinion.) In recent years, I have read several scientific analyses about the origins of the Polynesians, the Olmec, the Inca, and the Mayans, and misguided anthropologists to this day are continuing to regurgitate the same nonsense about Asian origins and a Bering Strait land bridge. Obviously, they didn't take Heyerdahl seriously; or else deliberately ignored his thesis because it undermines all the erroneous precepts that their PhDs are based on. It's much easier to continue living the lie. Gag me with a spoon. Get over your arrogant selves already. The prejudices that limit open-minded examination of our origins cause ethnologists, anthropologists, and historians to stumble and run into block walls. The world could truly benefit from teachers like Thor Heyerdahl, but unfortunately, minds like his are belittled and ostracized by the modern-day scientific community. It's a shame, too, because scientists and historians are wandering blindly down a dark corridor of narrow thought that is leading them away from truth and enlightenment. P.S. I really liked having my mind blown wide open by this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    refgoddess

    I'm always interested in Heyerdahl's stories, having been hooked way back by Kon Tiki. However, this is a compilation of essays, written for fellow archaeologists, mainly, and is a bit dry going. Also, I'm under the impression that his theories have been exploded. I'll have to take a look at that. I'm always interested in Heyerdahl's stories, having been hooked way back by Kon Tiki. However, this is a compilation of essays, written for fellow archaeologists, mainly, and is a bit dry going. Also, I'm under the impression that his theories have been exploded. I'll have to take a look at that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Conrad

    There is, perhaps, more detail here than the average reader might desire and some of the information can be found in his other books, but pulling it all together in one book gives a marvelous overview of the probable migration of people (Hittites and Phoenicians from near Asia to Mexico, Panama, Ecuador and Peru, for example) carrying their technology, religion and culture along on the ocean currents. It is a fascinating study that causes the reader to rethink much of what has been accepted as h There is, perhaps, more detail here than the average reader might desire and some of the information can be found in his other books, but pulling it all together in one book gives a marvelous overview of the probable migration of people (Hittites and Phoenicians from near Asia to Mexico, Panama, Ecuador and Peru, for example) carrying their technology, religion and culture along on the ocean currents. It is a fascinating study that causes the reader to rethink much of what has been accepted as historical ‘fact’.

  4. 5 out of 5

    S. Dawn

    Heyerdahl makes a convincing argument for the spread of cultures along oceanic currents, contrary to conventional wisdom. While subsequent research may not have supported all his theories, I found his confidence in the abilities of early humans to navigate the open ocean both refreshing and inspirational. This book is a collection of essays based on academic conference proceedings. As such, it is not as quick a read as works intended as popular history. Despite the scholarly tone, it is a worthw Heyerdahl makes a convincing argument for the spread of cultures along oceanic currents, contrary to conventional wisdom. While subsequent research may not have supported all his theories, I found his confidence in the abilities of early humans to navigate the open ocean both refreshing and inspirational. This book is a collection of essays based on academic conference proceedings. As such, it is not as quick a read as works intended as popular history. Despite the scholarly tone, it is a worthwhile read for those interested in prehistory.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zeka Vasch

    Сборник научных работ. Не сильно "популярное чтиво" поэтому скучноватое Сборник научных работ. Не сильно "популярное чтиво" поэтому скучноватое

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tess

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    Artie

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    Dess

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    Peter Genovese

  13. 5 out of 5

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    Konstantin

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    Friedrich Mencken

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    Tim

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    Paul Colver

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    Luanne Lusic

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    John Ervin

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    Leonard

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    allladinlibra

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    Scott

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    imladris

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    Kevin Vernon

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    John

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