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Naomis Too

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A heartfelt, sweet, social justice-themed ode to blended and unconventional families—perfect for fans of Rita Williams-Garcia, Lisa Graff, and Sara Pennypacker. This middle grade novel is an excellent choice for tween readers in grades 5 to 6, especially during homeschooling. It’s a fun way to keep your child entertained and engaged while not in the classroom. In this seque A heartfelt, sweet, social justice-themed ode to blended and unconventional families—perfect for fans of Rita Williams-Garcia, Lisa Graff, and Sara Pennypacker. This middle grade novel is an excellent choice for tween readers in grades 5 to 6, especially during homeschooling. It’s a fun way to keep your child entertained and engaged while not in the classroom. In this sequel to Two Naomis, now that Naomi Marie’s mom and Naomi E.’s dad are married, the girls have learned to do a lot of things together, like All-Family Sunday dinners, sixth-grade homework, navigating the subway system by themselves, and visiting their favorite bakeries. Until sixth grade in a new school presents a whole new set of surprises and challenges. Trusting her gut has worked for Naomi E. all her life, and she figures that it will be an asset to her role as a Peer Mediator—until she realizes how much of the job requires the Art of Compromise, which she’s only just starting to get used to at home. Naomi Marie is excited about making new friends—but she wants to keep old ones too. And when she sees that some in the school community have a hard time with the realities of “diversity in action,” she wonders if the new members of her family can see those realities as well. As the girls deal with the ups and downs of middle school and the mysteries of family dynamics, they learn that even when life and school try to drive you apart, it’s ultimately easier to face everything together.


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A heartfelt, sweet, social justice-themed ode to blended and unconventional families—perfect for fans of Rita Williams-Garcia, Lisa Graff, and Sara Pennypacker. This middle grade novel is an excellent choice for tween readers in grades 5 to 6, especially during homeschooling. It’s a fun way to keep your child entertained and engaged while not in the classroom. In this seque A heartfelt, sweet, social justice-themed ode to blended and unconventional families—perfect for fans of Rita Williams-Garcia, Lisa Graff, and Sara Pennypacker. This middle grade novel is an excellent choice for tween readers in grades 5 to 6, especially during homeschooling. It’s a fun way to keep your child entertained and engaged while not in the classroom. In this sequel to Two Naomis, now that Naomi Marie’s mom and Naomi E.’s dad are married, the girls have learned to do a lot of things together, like All-Family Sunday dinners, sixth-grade homework, navigating the subway system by themselves, and visiting their favorite bakeries. Until sixth grade in a new school presents a whole new set of surprises and challenges. Trusting her gut has worked for Naomi E. all her life, and she figures that it will be an asset to her role as a Peer Mediator—until she realizes how much of the job requires the Art of Compromise, which she’s only just starting to get used to at home. Naomi Marie is excited about making new friends—but she wants to keep old ones too. And when she sees that some in the school community have a hard time with the realities of “diversity in action,” she wonders if the new members of her family can see those realities as well. As the girls deal with the ups and downs of middle school and the mysteries of family dynamics, they learn that even when life and school try to drive you apart, it’s ultimately easier to face everything together.

56 review for Naomis Too

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michele Knott

    Loved this book. Loved this book. Loved this book. It gets so much right - it has the tough and uncomfortable conversations that are needed to be had from the youngest of readers to the oldest. Must have. Must read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    No one should have to suffer a writing teacher like Katherine. And if there's a third Naomi book (which I will not be reading), here's hoping it includes a less horrifying relationship with sugar. I started fantasizing about green salads four chapters in.... No one should have to suffer a writing teacher like Katherine. And if there's a third Naomi book (which I will not be reading), here's hoping it includes a less horrifying relationship with sugar. I started fantasizing about green salads four chapters in....

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mary Kate

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was an excellent sequel to "Two Naomis"! In fact, I liked it better than the first book because it was able to more deeply explore the dynamics of living in a racially blended family and how social justice works in practice among middle schoolers. I noticed that some other reviewers felt that the social justice emphasis in the book was too pedantic and that Naomi Marie was particularly hard on Naomi E., but 1) the characters *are* both in sixth grade, and they're written in a way that refle This was an excellent sequel to "Two Naomis"! In fact, I liked it better than the first book because it was able to more deeply explore the dynamics of living in a racially blended family and how social justice works in practice among middle schoolers. I noticed that some other reviewers felt that the social justice emphasis in the book was too pedantic and that Naomi Marie was particularly hard on Naomi E., but 1) the characters *are* both in sixth grade, and they're written in a way that reflects their ages and 2) Naomi Marie's feelings as a Black girl are completely valid and are likely reflective of the experiences of Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich and those of people she knows as Black women in the world today. As was the case with the first book, I enjoyed the switching perspectives from chapter to chapter, and I loved how the book was written by a Black woman and a white woman, as each was able to write their character from an authentic, lived perspective. This book was exactly my cup of tea, from its mention and explanation of awesome, liberal librarians (Valerie and Daisuke) to its lack of shying away from what some might consider to be tough topics. After all, Black children face the issues that come up in the book every day, and I think it's only appropriate for them to be honestly addressed in a book that has a Black protagonist. The only thing I didn't like about this book was how soon it was over! I'd love for there to be a third book in the series -- I want to know if all the Naomis' friends (including Annie) get along, how their Global Girls vlog works out, what happens with the Eco-casita and the controversial figure who wants to donate the money so it can be built, and more! The characters Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich and Audrey Vernick have crafted are so endearing to me that they felt like people I knew by the time this second book was over, and I hope to be able to read more about their challenges and adventures together in the future.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shaye Miller

    Naomis Too is on my #MustReadin2019 list. So after reviewing Two Naomis in April, I was very happy when book #2 became available through my Overdrive library in May. YAY! Now living in “the yellow house,” Naomi Marie and Naomi Edith are attending school together and attempting to navigate their new blended and racially-mixed family. Let me just start by saying: There’s a whole lot to unpack in this one. But there’s lots of helpful and important dialogue about race and perceptions. “Words and langu Naomis Too is on my #MustReadin2019 list. So after reviewing Two Naomis in April, I was very happy when book #2 became available through my Overdrive library in May. YAY! Now living in “the yellow house,” Naomi Marie and Naomi Edith are attending school together and attempting to navigate their new blended and racially-mixed family. Let me just start by saying: There’s a whole lot to unpack in this one. But there’s lots of helpful and important dialogue about race and perceptions. “Words and language matter. Would you use the term gypped? Indian giver? People say ‘that’s ghetto’ to mean something negative. Think about ‘off the rez.’ What does that really mean?” These are the kinds of conversation that adults should be having, so I’m delighted to see it addressed in a middle grade book. I’m also happy to see a white parent take responsibility for having not properly prepared their child to interact with children from different races and to recognize their own privilege. “That’s one thing I’ve learned about the first step to checking my privilege,” Tom says. “It starts with listening.” Throughout this story I found soooo many references to other books and I highlighted 53 items on my kindle. So yeah, this is one I’d like to read and discuss with my own children. I hope it makes it into many schools and libraries around the world! For more children's literature, middle grade literature, and YA literature reviews, feel free to visit my personal blog at The Miller Memo!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    I liked this better than the first one and I really liked the first one!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

    I enjoyed the first book about these characters, but felt bogged down by all the "issues" this second book seems like it wants to take on. For right now, after just one chapter, I've decided to pass . I enjoyed the first book about these characters, but felt bogged down by all the "issues" this second book seems like it wants to take on. For right now, after just one chapter, I've decided to pass .

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Dulaney

    "Naomis Too" is the sequel to Rhuday-Perkovich's "Two Naomis," in which Naomi Marie's mom (African American) marries Naomi E's dad (Caucasian), however, both books will stand alone or could be read out of order with little to no difficulty. Wedding, move to a new house, and many family workshops have been completed and both girls are about to begin sixth grade at a new school, known for its academic excellence and inclusive student body. The girls continue to struggle with growing their new rela "Naomis Too" is the sequel to Rhuday-Perkovich's "Two Naomis," in which Naomi Marie's mom (African American) marries Naomi E's dad (Caucasian), however, both books will stand alone or could be read out of order with little to no difficulty. Wedding, move to a new house, and many family workshops have been completed and both girls are about to begin sixth grade at a new school, known for its academic excellence and inclusive student body. The girls continue to struggle with growing their new relationship as sisters, respecting each others' needs, and figuring out how they all form a family unit, but school uncovers a few new difficulties. Naomi E, sometimes called White Naomi by new little sister Bri, is having trouble keeping up with the homework load and the level of work excellence required by her teachers plus she is realizing that she really doesn't have a clue what it is like to be African American in a culture where sometimes racism still rears its ugly head. Naomi Marie is breezing through the school work, which furthers her new sister's angst, but has some trouble of her own--finding a new niche after being firmly established in one in her old neighborhood and school, as well as finding a way to help Naomi E to understand how it feels to be slighted due to her race without destroying their still-developing bond. This book would be excellent for readers in blended families, regardless of race(s), and for those who want to better understand how race does affect perceptions and responses of both the prejudiced and people who want better than that. It was a good read, although I hoped that by the end, Naomi Marie would have also made more growth in her heavy-handed approach to correctly her sister's unintentional racial slights. Naomi E's change over the course of the book was very clear and I loved how the author conveyed her genuine desire to be the best sister possible. Recommended for grades 4-7 with no reservations about content. Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    In this sequel to Two Naomis, we follow Naomi Marie ("Black Naomi") and Naomi E ("White Naomi") as they start middle school. Two step sisters of the same age and name who have spent the summer attending workshops with their blended family to help deal with the transition and develop greater multi-racial understanding, but it seems the rest of the world didn't attend. Their new school's motto is STRENGTH IN DIVERSITY, but not all students embody that belief. Naomi Marie encounters unsettling micr In this sequel to Two Naomis, we follow Naomi Marie ("Black Naomi") and Naomi E ("White Naomi") as they start middle school. Two step sisters of the same age and name who have spent the summer attending workshops with their blended family to help deal with the transition and develop greater multi-racial understanding, but it seems the rest of the world didn't attend. Their new school's motto is STRENGTH IN DIVERSITY, but not all students embody that belief. Naomi Marie encounters unsettling microagressions from Jen (one N) and her clique, but Naomi E doesn't seem to understand how hurtful they are. Naomi Marie is frustrated that she thinks her sister doesn't care, Naomi E hasn't experienced racial prejudice and has difficulty recognizing the bias. I love the way the authors split narration between the Naomis to give us insight into perspective, bias, good intentions, privilege, and compassion these sisters experience. Could be a real eye-opener for so many without being preachy, blaming, or shaming. (Also you'll want lots of yummy bakery treats to accompany this story!)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Boling

    3/10/2019 ~ This book made a big jump in complexity and topic from its prequel Two Naomis. Where the first book focused primarily on divorce and negotiating changing parent relations, this book tackles white privilege, Whiteness, and the systemic and subconscious racism that permeates our American society. In addition, it tackles the changes that occur in kids' lives when they attempt to build a new family. There is so much packed into this slim volume, but I felt there were a few details left ha 3/10/2019 ~ This book made a big jump in complexity and topic from its prequel Two Naomis. Where the first book focused primarily on divorce and negotiating changing parent relations, this book tackles white privilege, Whiteness, and the systemic and subconscious racism that permeates our American society. In addition, it tackles the changes that occur in kids' lives when they attempt to build a new family. There is so much packed into this slim volume, but I felt there were a few details left hanging from the first book - primarily how Naomi E.'s mother seems to have relocated from California to New York City permanently (when the first book ended, she was just going to be in NYC for the month of July). This book is a must have for any elementary library, and could probably even stand in a middle school or high school library. Likewise, it would make an excellent book for book clubs. Partner it with Can I Touch Your Hair by Irene Latham and Charles Waters.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Tanner

    I really liked this sequel about two girls named Naomi who end up being sisters when their mom and dad get married. They each have strong voices and opinions and really want to be good sisters to each other but it's hard. In this book, they are living together and starting middle school together. They're also navigating a new set of friends and trying to figure out race relations (both at home and at school). Their parents are supportive and positive and very clear about their expectations as we I really liked this sequel about two girls named Naomi who end up being sisters when their mom and dad get married. They each have strong voices and opinions and really want to be good sisters to each other but it's hard. In this book, they are living together and starting middle school together. They're also navigating a new set of friends and trying to figure out race relations (both at home and at school). Their parents are supportive and positive and very clear about their expectations as well as their own failures. It's a really great story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    E-ARC from Edelweiss Plus I loved this follow up about two step-siblings who share the same name and are different races. This time, they are navigating friendships, fitting in at a new school, and continuing to adjust as sisters. This author has created a great story that will allow students to examine their biases and beliefs about different races in a way that will linger long after the book is finished.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bethany M. Edwards

    A beautiful sequel to an extraordinary book full of humor and a dose of reality that will touch the hearts of so many kids. I love how author Olugbemisola expertly weaves all kinds of uncomfortable and thoughtful conversations about family, community, social justice, and privilege into the pages. Families and friendships are complicated in this ever more complicated world. This book is a necessary addition every shelf.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Sequel. The family continues to learn from and about each other as the two Naomis begin middle school. The author weaves discussions on privilege and race with the plot seamlessly. Both Naomis struggle to see where they fit in and how they develop their relationship. Typical middle school issues also have overtone of racism from a couple of classmates. Interesting to see what each character sees and takes from a situation. Use to discuss how we see the world and what we miss.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Simpson

    There are many important points and conversations within this book. I think it will spark some pertinent conversations among readers. I also loved all of the references to some amazing books throughout the story! Digital review copy from Edelweiss.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Camille Kraus

    I won this book in the goodreads giveaway! Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich is a wonderful story teller with many ways to spark and keep the reader's interest. I loved the story and will look for more from Rhuday-Perkovich. I won this book in the goodreads giveaway! Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich is a wonderful story teller with many ways to spark and keep the reader's interest. I loved the story and will look for more from Rhuday-Perkovich.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    3.5 stars Deals with important issues, but is too preachy and heavy-handed

  17. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    This is a great book that brings up emotional and social issues for upper elementary and middle school kiddos. Not only did I enjoy this, my 9 year old did, too!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Debby

    I really enjoyed the previous book and was looking forward to this one. However, this one fell short. It tries to tackle too many issues - newly blended family (Naomi E. is while, Naomi M. is black) beginning middle school in new neighborhood, racism all in a heavy manner. While both girls reference family workshops that they attended during the summer, none of the adults directly offer guidance to either girl. Naomi E. struggles with school and with Naomi M.'s expectations and the farther along I really enjoyed the previous book and was looking forward to this one. However, this one fell short. It tries to tackle too many issues - newly blended family (Naomi E. is while, Naomi M. is black) beginning middle school in new neighborhood, racism all in a heavy manner. While both girls reference family workshops that they attended during the summer, none of the adults directly offer guidance to either girl. Naomi E. struggles with school and with Naomi M.'s expectations and the farther along the story goes, the more domineering and demoralizing Naomi M. becomes. The other message, perhaps inadvertently given, is that baked goods solve all problems. I've never read a book where the characters visit bakeries for sweets at the rate this one does. Finally, the cover illustration is colorful and inviting, but the girls look like really little girls, not sixth graders, which will put off sixth grade readers.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    "When Annie and I need cheering up, we sort of picture-read picture books to each other, ignoring the words and making up a story. Because picture books are the comfort food of reading." As a picture book writer myself, especially one who is not an illustrator too, this is a quote I love! I loved this whole book actually. "When Annie and I need cheering up, we sort of picture-read picture books to each other, ignoring the words and making up a story. Because picture books are the comfort food of reading." As a picture book writer myself, especially one who is not an illustrator too, this is a quote I love! I loved this whole book actually.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susan McGilvray

    Loved this sequel as much as the first one! If you are a MS librarian- buy both for your library!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bunmi

    This was such a great follow up! This one leans more into social justice issues and race relationships as the two Naomis settle into being an interracial blended family.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Coe

    White parents, here's a totally engaging & accessible book that will help your tweens understand some of the issues Black kids face. I loved this one even better than TWO NAOMIS. Highly recommend. White parents, here's a totally engaging & accessible book that will help your tweens understand some of the issues Black kids face. I loved this one even better than TWO NAOMIS. Highly recommend.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Naomis Too by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich and Audrey Vernick is the sequel to Two Naomis. The Naomis are now sisters in a blended family. One is Black and one is white. They're going to a new school and having to field all sorts of rude questions and micro-aggressions. http://pussreboots.com/blog/2019/comm... Naomis Too by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich and Audrey Vernick is the sequel to Two Naomis. The Naomis are now sisters in a blended family. One is Black and one is white. They're going to a new school and having to field all sorts of rude questions and micro-aggressions. http://pussreboots.com/blog/2019/comm...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Scoutaccount

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ritter

  26. 5 out of 5

    Blaine King

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cara

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Johnson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jasontes5th

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  31. 5 out of 5

    Noa Sperber

  32. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

  33. 4 out of 5

    Anamaria

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lisa D

  35. 5 out of 5

    Luisina

  36. 4 out of 5

    YAYOMG

  37. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  38. 5 out of 5

    Abby Cooper

  39. 5 out of 5

    Devin

  40. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Lyons

  41. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Picone

  43. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  44. 4 out of 5

    Quinn

  45. 4 out of 5

    Mary Thomas

  46. 4 out of 5

    Julie Kirchner

  47. 5 out of 5

    Beth Parmer

  48. 4 out of 5

    Emily Montjoy

  49. 5 out of 5

    Deana Metzke

  50. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Smith

  51. 4 out of 5

    MayorEmma

  52. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  53. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

  54. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

  55. 5 out of 5

    JoEllen

  56. 5 out of 5

    hhertzof

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