web site hit counter So Tall Within: Sojourner Truth's Long Walk Toward Freedom - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

So Tall Within: Sojourner Truth's Long Walk Toward Freedom

Availability: Ready to download

From author Gary D. Schmidt comes a picture book biography of a giant in the struggle for civil rights. Sojourner Truth was born into slavery but possessed a mind and a vision that knew no bounds. So Tall Within traces her life from her childhood through her emancipation to her leadership in the movement for rights for both women and African Americans.


Compare

From author Gary D. Schmidt comes a picture book biography of a giant in the struggle for civil rights. Sojourner Truth was born into slavery but possessed a mind and a vision that knew no bounds. So Tall Within traces her life from her childhood through her emancipation to her leadership in the movement for rights for both women and African Americans.

30 review for So Tall Within: Sojourner Truth's Long Walk Toward Freedom

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    The story of Sojourner Truth is the story of a great American hero who forced society to live up to the promises that were so often made - but not kept. Relevant today (more than ever) and will be even more relevant in years to come - the art is beautiful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    An incredible story, told in a way that is accessible--truly--to all ages. Excellent backmatter and additional sources as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Plourde

    Poetic, powerful, Caldecott worthy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Her biography is absolutely breathtaking artwork combined with a thoughtful sentence interspersed throughout a lengthier picture book biography that educates those that don't know how influential she was as a "first female", one that made a tremendous impact and was listed in Smithsonian magazine's top 100. Again, it's the illustrations that bring this book to a five but the ruminations that Schmidt brings to readers about a woman who brought out her strength throughout her life to be "so tall w Her biography is absolutely breathtaking artwork combined with a thoughtful sentence interspersed throughout a lengthier picture book biography that educates those that don't know how influential she was as a "first female", one that made a tremendous impact and was listed in Smithsonian magazine's top 100. Again, it's the illustrations that bring this book to a five but the ruminations that Schmidt brings to readers about a woman who brought out her strength throughout her life to be "so tall within" is sentimental and heartwarming as well as frustrating about what she needed to overcome. I know our HS classrooms will be using this because I'll be ordering several!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    A picture book on slavery and the life of Sojourner Truth. This was fantastic - in true Gary Schmidt form - it is full of thoughtful lines, tender reminiscing, and truth. What a fantastic story to share with our young readers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Deidre

    I gave another book five stars just before reading this one, and had to go back to change it to four because it did not come close to this one. History, but also poetry and amazing illustrations.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hankins

    Schmidt's back matter in this book is an example of how another book featuring Sojourner Truth can be part of a "gate fold experience" as he presents other texts that feature this heroic black figure. Minter's weaving of a modern day parallels in verse and visual add an important layer to the overall feel and message of the book bridging past and present within the pages. Schmidt's back matter in this book is an example of how another book featuring Sojourner Truth can be part of a "gate fold experience" as he presents other texts that feature this heroic black figure. Minter's weaving of a modern day parallels in verse and visual add an important layer to the overall feel and message of the book bridging past and present within the pages.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michele Knott

    The poetic format of this story will stick with me longer than the words from any history text. Prepare to spend time lingering over the details in the illustrations.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dee Dee G

    This is a very short book for young readers. Even though it’s short it’s a good introduction and they can read more about her as the grow older. Sad, inspiring and informative.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: SO TALL WITHIN: SOJOURNER TRUTH’S LONG WALK TOWARD FREEDOM by Gary D. Schmidt and Daniel Minter, ill., Roaring Brook, September 2018, 48p., ISBN: 978-1-62672-872-1 “In Slavery Time, when Hope was a seed waiting to be planted, Isabella lived in a cellar where the windows never let the sun in and the floorboards never kept the water out. She had ten or twelve brothers and sisters--she couldn’t be sure, since almost all of them were sold as slaves before she was old enough to remembe Richie’s Picks: SO TALL WITHIN: SOJOURNER TRUTH’S LONG WALK TOWARD FREEDOM by Gary D. Schmidt and Daniel Minter, ill., Roaring Brook, September 2018, 48p., ISBN: 978-1-62672-872-1 “In Slavery Time, when Hope was a seed waiting to be planted, Isabella lived in a cellar where the windows never let the sun in and the floorboards never kept the water out. She had ten or twelve brothers and sisters--she couldn’t be sure, since almost all of them were sold as slaves before she was old enough to remember. But Mau-mau Bett, her mother, kept them in memory. Sometimes at night, she held Isabella and pointed to the skies over New York State. ‘Those are the same stars, and that is the same moon, that look down upon your brothers and sisters,’ she whispered. And Isabella looked at those same stars, that same moon, and dreamed.” Gary Schmidt is one of my all-time favorite storytellers. Despite the multitude of books I consume, many of his characters remain alive in my mind year after year. Over the years, I’ve read several books about Sojourner Truth. She’s an important historical figure. But in Gary Schmidt’s hands, the woman who began life as an enslaved child named Isabella rises from the page and the dust of history to become one of those unforgettable characters. The events that befall Isabella and the deliberate steps she takes in response to those injustices make for a story that is historically true but feels utterly fresh. It doesn’t surprise me that Gary Schmidt chose to write about Sojourner Truth. Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy, his 2004 award-winning historical novel based upon horrific events that occurred a century ago in Maine is, unquestionably, one of the best books for young people ever written about the history of race relations in the North. Isabella is born in New York, back when slavery was legal there. SO TALL WITHIN is both a textual and a visual work of art. “When Isabella was about nine, she was sold for a hundred dollars--along with a flock of sheep. Mau-mau Bett held her one last time. They would always remember to look at those same stars and that same moon, even though they would be ‘ever so far away...from each other.’ Every night after that, Isabella kept her eyes wide open. SO TALL WITHIN is beautifully illustrated by award-winning artist Daniel Minter. Interspersed in and demarking parts of the story are eleven pages that make poetic statements about life “In Slavery Time” and “In Freedom Time.” The illustrator highlights these thematic pages by inserting a vertical panel alongside a larger-print phrase of text. In a number of illustrations, Minter depicts Isabella and unnamed slaves semi-translucent against the backdrop of nature, including the trees that are the story’s symbol of growing hope. The slaves represent the countless people for whom the story is true. If there’s an inspirational story about what one seemingly-insignificant person can accomplish, this is it. SO TALL WITHIN is a story you won’t soon forget, and neither will the young people with whom you share it. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ [email protected]

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This is as much a refection on character as biography. The sense of who this woman was and her deep inner courage are what readers will take away from this stunning book. Daniel Minter's gorgeous and moving illustrations are outstanding. Schmidt does a wonderful job of incorporating Sojourner Truth's words into the book and his Author's Note and Bibliography are outstanding. This is as much a refection on character as biography. The sense of who this woman was and her deep inner courage are what readers will take away from this stunning book. Daniel Minter's gorgeous and moving illustrations are outstanding. Schmidt does a wonderful job of incorporating Sojourner Truth's words into the book and his Author's Note and Bibliography are outstanding.

  12. 5 out of 5

    DaNae

    Stunning. So much more than a standard, picture book biography. I will hold this up for both Newbery and Caldecott.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Renee Weasley

    Beautiful, poetic, and empowering. Everyone should read this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    How Isabella Baumfree, born into slavery in New York State during the last years of the 18th century became one of the most outspoken and influential people in American history and acquired the name Sojourner Truth. Schmidt’s biography and Minter’s powerful illustrations emphasizes her experience as a slave and the emotional toll that slavery in the United States took from its victims. And it also tells of her stubborn resistance to accept it, and her use of the legal system and her own persiste How Isabella Baumfree, born into slavery in New York State during the last years of the 18th century became one of the most outspoken and influential people in American history and acquired the name Sojourner Truth. Schmidt’s biography and Minter’s powerful illustrations emphasizes her experience as a slave and the emotional toll that slavery in the United States took from its victims. And it also tells of her stubborn resistance to accept it, and her use of the legal system and her own persistent and powerful testimony as a traveling abolitionist to work against it. When slavery ended, she did not stop. She continued to walk the walk and talk the talk. She spoke out as a feminist, prison reformer, evangelist and prophet. until her death in 1883.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Annette Vellenga

    Written by Gary D. Schmidt, So Tall Within walks us through the life of Sojourner Truth on her way to freedom and living as an adult with a mission... freedom for slaves. I loved the set up of this lovely picture book, which is geared toward children 4-8 years old. The vignettes that opened each chapter spoke truth about what slavery was and did to the people trapped within that way of living. This opening page set the tone for the rest of the book, showing the promise within the hardship. I jus Written by Gary D. Schmidt, So Tall Within walks us through the life of Sojourner Truth on her way to freedom and living as an adult with a mission... freedom for slaves. I loved the set up of this lovely picture book, which is geared toward children 4-8 years old. The vignettes that opened each chapter spoke truth about what slavery was and did to the people trapped within that way of living. This opening page set the tone for the rest of the book, showing the promise within the hardship. I just loved how aptly the text fit the image created by Daniel Minter. Schmidt walks us through Sojourner's life, starting with her life as a slave with her momma Mau-mau Bett, learning to remember who her siblings were, to her eventual slavery, through the promise of freedom and finally needing to seize it. She married whom she was told to, had children and found her way to freedom with the help of good people. Despite her inability to read, she knew the law and her rights and fought for them. And through that, she developed her mission in life. Tell her story, help bring about freedom for others. And so Sojourner Truth walked and taught, and walked some more, telling her story to any who would listen. She travelled through Michigan, Iowa, Washington D.C, and beyond. Talking and walking, it was her life's work fighting for freedom. Interspersed among the 48 pages of the lovely book that causes one to think, ask questions, and ponder the will of a strong woman, are lovely pictures. Oh my! They are wonderful pictures filled with tons of images to point out to a young child, or that will inspire the thinking in an older one. Images that are full of colour and darkness and light. Images to grab the artist within you and make you ponder all the more the story of Sojourner Truth. Seeing her faith, seeing her determination, seeing her will to succeed. Sojourner fought for what is right and didn't let time or distance stop her. She had help along the way, and we are shown that help. We saw her loss and fear. The Slavery was a Time images pulled out truth as we entered into a new part of Sojourner's life. Get this book. Read it with your youngsters. Use it as a start to a study on Black History. Let your teens read it as well! It's not just a book for littles, but for anyone wanting to know more about Sojourner Truth and the struggles that black people had coming out of slavery. It was a tough time, but determination... wow.. it wins through.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Isabella grew up in slavery, sold away from her mother when she was nine. She did hard labor for years, sometimes with no shoes in the winter and other times with no sleep at night because of the work expected of her. One year after she had been forced to marry a man and had five children, she was promised her freedom. But freedom didn’t come and so she escaped with her baby. She arrived at the home of two kind people, who stood by her in her escape and paid for the freedom of Isabella and her b Isabella grew up in slavery, sold away from her mother when she was nine. She did hard labor for years, sometimes with no shoes in the winter and other times with no sleep at night because of the work expected of her. One year after she had been forced to marry a man and had five children, she was promised her freedom. But freedom didn’t come and so she escaped with her baby. She arrived at the home of two kind people, who stood by her in her escape and paid for the freedom of Isabella and her baby. When her son was sold away by her old master, Isabella went to court to have him returned to her. As time went by, she took the name Sojourner Truth and started to speak publicly against slavery. She fought many battles for equality, standing tall and speaking the truth. This book aches with pain, loss, and grief. The book is broken into sections, each starting with an evocative phrase about slavery, that shows what is ahead. These poetic phrases add so much to Sojourner Truth’s biography, pulling readers directly into the right place in their hearts to hear her story. Schmidt’s writing doesn’t flinch from the damage of slavery and its evil. He instead makes sure that every reader understands the impact of slavery on those who lived and died under it. Minter’s art is so powerful. He has created tender moments of connection, impactful images of slavery, and also inspiring moments of standing up for what is right. The images that accompany Schmidt’s poetic phrases are particularly special, each one staring right at the reader and asking them to connect. A riveting biography of one of the most amazing Americans in our history. Appropriate for ages 7-10.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Daring to dream of a better life, taking action to gain her own freedom, and speaking out for her rights and the rights of others are only a few of the reasons that the name of Sojourner Truth should be known to today's students of history. Born into slavery in New York as Isabella Baumfree, this amazing woman would later rename herself Sojourner Truth and walk many miles in her determination to share the truth about the rights of women and former slaves. The repetition of the notion that she "f Daring to dream of a better life, taking action to gain her own freedom, and speaking out for her rights and the rights of others are only a few of the reasons that the name of Sojourner Truth should be known to today's students of history. Born into slavery in New York as Isabella Baumfree, this amazing woman would later rename herself Sojourner Truth and walk many miles in her determination to share the truth about the rights of women and former slaves. The repetition of the notion that she "felt so tall within" (unpaged) to accompany her various fights for justice adds power to an already-powerful story, and some readers may even draw inspiration from her example of speaking out against injustice and speaking truth to those in power to do the same thing today in support of their own causes. It's clear from the text that this woman often wondered about the unfairness of life and that she might well have wondered how much of an impact her own deeds and words could have, but still, she persisted and plucked at the hearts, minds, and souls of others. The rich, luminous illustrations provide perfect support for this inspiring story about a woman who dared to take action to change her life despite the odds against her. The back matter includes a biographical note, a bibliography, and a note from the artist. The notion of being tall inside, no matter how short one might be in stature or in regard by others, is an important one that should provide hope for all those who are oppressed or dealing with unfairness of any sort.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laura Giessler

    Wow. What a gorgeous book about a giant of a woman! What would it have been like to live at the time when this woman walked this land, speaking her truth? It is mind-boggling that in the 1800s, in addition to speaking out against slavery and the ways she had been personally violated, she spoke about a woman's right to vote, the need for prison reform, the evils of capital punishment. Here we are in the 21st Century, still fighting these battles! How long, O Lord?? The text and illustrations are Wow. What a gorgeous book about a giant of a woman! What would it have been like to live at the time when this woman walked this land, speaking her truth? It is mind-boggling that in the 1800s, in addition to speaking out against slavery and the ways she had been personally violated, she spoke about a woman's right to vote, the need for prison reform, the evils of capital punishment. Here we are in the 21st Century, still fighting these battles! How long, O Lord?? The text and illustrations are both rich and stunning, so worthy of close examination, so many images, ideas, and facts to be noticed and discussed. Every illustration--some vertical panels, others narrative spreads--is a deep work of art to be studied and appreciated--wow! (Read the Artist's note at the end too.) Gary Schmidt tells it like it was with the hard, cold, cruel realities that Isabella Baumfree faced, and he does it in a way that readers of any age can learn and be moved. The notes at the end are fantastic, including many recommendations on books and documentaries for readers of all ages who wish to learn more. I want to check out the PBS documentary This Far by Faith, episode #1: There is a River.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Craig Wiesner

    How do you stand tall when life keeps knocking you down? Sojourner Truth somehow stood taller and taller no matter how much harder her life in slavery was, and she was of course tallest when she grabbed her freedom and began the long trek of telling her story, demanding justice for all whom she saw oppressed. This is a beautifully, powerfully illustrated story told in poetry, about a girl named Isabella, who at a very young age was taken away from her mother, sold to another slave-owner, and ano How do you stand tall when life keeps knocking you down? Sojourner Truth somehow stood taller and taller no matter how much harder her life in slavery was, and she was of course tallest when she grabbed her freedom and began the long trek of telling her story, demanding justice for all whom she saw oppressed. This is a beautifully, powerfully illustrated story told in poetry, about a girl named Isabella, who at a very young age was taken away from her mother, sold to another slave-owner, and another, and another until finally one day she walks to freedom, taken in by a kind couple who pay off her last owner. She then walks, and walks, and walks, and walks, for justice for herself, other slaves, and all other oppressed people of her time. At a time when we are celebrating women who resist it is absolutely wonderful that this book about a woman who could be dubbed the "mother of women's resistance" should have her story told in such moving verse and images. Fantastic!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    This book is absolutely gorgeous and I hope it wins all of the awards and gets all of the stars. Schmidt's prose is lyrical but also pulls no punches as he describes Sojourner Truth's early life and chronicles her journey from being born in slavery to becoming one of the most important figures in American history. Minter is working in a new style here and the artwork is stunning and paints difficult scenes with gentleness and strength. The book includes a selected bibliography from Schmidt, a no This book is absolutely gorgeous and I hope it wins all of the awards and gets all of the stars. Schmidt's prose is lyrical but also pulls no punches as he describes Sojourner Truth's early life and chronicles her journey from being born in slavery to becoming one of the most important figures in American history. Minter is working in a new style here and the artwork is stunning and paints difficult scenes with gentleness and strength. The book includes a selected bibliography from Schmidt, a note about Sojourner Truth's life, and a note from Minter about how he approached this book and chose to illustrate it. This is a stunning achievement for both author and illustrator and I can't wait to have it on my library's shelves.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    Breathtaking... First the metaphors: "In Slavery Time when Hope was a seed waiting to be planted..." combined with symbolic illustrations, create a sort of poetic narrative. If followed, just those pages of metaphors could inspire rich conversations and could be used as mentor texts for students to write their own. And then the story...often told in Sojourner Truth's own words...The title itself is a quote. And then the rest of the illustrations...Strong, like Sojourner. Tall. Driven. And you must Breathtaking... First the metaphors: "In Slavery Time when Hope was a seed waiting to be planted..." combined with symbolic illustrations, create a sort of poetic narrative. If followed, just those pages of metaphors could inspire rich conversations and could be used as mentor texts for students to write their own. And then the story...often told in Sojourner Truth's own words...The title itself is a quote. And then the rest of the illustrations...Strong, like Sojourner. Tall. Driven. And you must study each page for all the hidden messages. And the ghosts of her siblings and children who were lost to her. One of the many picture books that expands that genre into mainstream literature.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This is a prime example of what a picture book can be. So much of the story is told through these superb pictures. I swear, the woman grew taller as the story proceeded. Within those historic pictures is strong truth. Beautifully rendered, a few conveyed the sense of all the others Isabella was fighting for. The format, using time divisions--"In Slave Time," and "In Freedom Times," all used impressions to give a context. Powerful! One of the best of the year. This is a prime example of what a picture book can be. So much of the story is told through these superb pictures. I swear, the woman grew taller as the story proceeded. Within those historic pictures is strong truth. Beautifully rendered, a few conveyed the sense of all the others Isabella was fighting for. The format, using time divisions--"In Slave Time," and "In Freedom Times," all used impressions to give a context. Powerful! One of the best of the year.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Melodie

    The illustrations are emotive and beautiful. Take your time with this one, and let each page hold you for a moment. I appreciated the biographical note, bibliography, and artist’s note at the end. After reading the artist’s note, I had to go back and look at some illustrations again. My heart aches, knowing we still have a long, long way to go.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    The language here is so beautiful, but it tells the story of slavery without being graphic and without flinching from the truth. The illustrations were perfect for the poetry, tone, and the time of the story. This is a great way to introduce children to Sojourner Truth.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Nice biographical story of Sojourner Truth, her childhood, and her life's mission. Nice biographical story of Sojourner Truth, her childhood, and her life's mission.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    The story of Sojourner Truth from childhood through her powerful years of speaking out for freedom. Gorgeous illustrations support the text.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alyson (Kid Lit Frenzy)

    The illustrations in this book are gorgeous. And the text is powerful.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    What a beautiful book teaching our kids about a beautiful woman.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Has excellent historical, bibliographical and artist notes that touch on historiography and present day context in a meaningful and accessible way.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Sojourner Truth began life around 1797 as Isabella, a slave in New York State who lived in a cellar with her mother, brothers, and sisters. Her siblings were sold off before she even got to know them. Isabella’s mother remembered them though, and told Isabella that the same stars and moon they saw at night also looked down on her brothers and sisters. When Isabella was around nine, she was sold for a hundred dollars along with a flock of sheep. Her work as a slave was hard, and her masters were c Sojourner Truth began life around 1797 as Isabella, a slave in New York State who lived in a cellar with her mother, brothers, and sisters. Her siblings were sold off before she even got to know them. Isabella’s mother remembered them though, and told Isabella that the same stars and moon they saw at night also looked down on her brothers and sisters. When Isabella was around nine, she was sold for a hundred dollars along with a flock of sheep. Her work as a slave was hard, and her masters were cruel. But sometimes, Schmidt writes, using her later memoir as a guide, “she looked up at those stars and that moon, and she asked God ‘if He thought it was right.’” Mr. Dumont, Isabella’s third master after she was sold, ordered her to marry a fellow slave, Thomas, and they had five children. Mr. Dumont claimed he would eventually free Isabella, but of course he never did. So one night, “she held her baby Sophia close and seized Freedom with her own hands.” She came to the house of Isaac and Maria Van Wagener and asked for sanctuary. She was there when Mr. Dumont found her. The Van Wageners had no interest in enslaving anyone, so instead they bought Isabella and her baby from Mr. Dumont in order to free them. Isabella then found out that Mr. Dumont sold her five-year-old son Peter to someone who shipped him to the South. Schmidt relates: “Though Isabella could not read or write, she knew that in New York, where they lived, no slave could be sold outside the state’s borders.” She protested and eventually went to a Grand Jury, which gave her a letter for the sheriff, granting her demand that Peter should be brought home. Although she eventually got him back, his Alabama masters had beaten him savagely; he never healed either physically or psychologically. Schmidt writes: “That was Slavery.” Isabella knew, Schmidt recounts, that she had a journey to make - a sojourn to tell the truth about Slavery. He writes: “More than fifteen years after she walked away from the Dumonts, Isabella changed her name to Sojourner Truth, and she began to walk again.” She spoke out against slavery to anyone who would listen, walking from New York to Massachusetts, Ohio, Indiana, and all the way to Washington, D.C. where she met Abraham Lincoln. And she kept going: to Michigan, to Virginia, and back the way she came: “For years and years, Sojourner Truth walked and told her story and fought for Freedom. And when Slavery Time finally ended, she felt so tall within.” Over fifteen years, she walked thousands of miles, speaking out not only against slavery but for a woman’s right to vote, more humane prisons, land for former slaves, and against capital punishment. She finally ended her journeys in Michigan, where she lived with her free daughters and grandchildren. There she was able to look up at the same stars and the same moon she saw as a slave, but now shone over her people who were free. In the biographical note at the end of the book, Schmidt added that Sojourner Truth published her story in a book in 1850, which was republished in 1878 with additional material. He reprints one of her stories: once a man approached her after a meeting and asked if she thought her talks advocating against slavery did any good, adding “I don’t care any more for your talk than I do for the bite of a flea.” She responded, “Perhaps not, but, the Lord willing, I’ll keep you scratching.” Schmidt also includes an extensive annotated bibliography. Illustrator Daniel Minter explains in a note that he approached the text as a work of poetry, and thus created a series of vertical paintings “that are loosely planted in the times of legal slavery but that parallel the feeling of struggle in today’s streets - the feeling that you may be buried, but you are surrounded by soil that nourishes you.” Evaluation: As Daniel Minter also commented, Sojourner Truth’s story shows the value of deep inner strength, spirituality, self-worth, and determination. No one can help but be awestruck and inspired by her story.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.