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What would you find if you walked into the rooms of your soul? One man is about to find out. James L. Rubart is the bestselling, four-time Christy Award-winning author of nine novels, and has won numerous other accolades for his unique, mind-bending stories. About ROOMS: It was just a letter. Cryptic, yes absolutely. But Seattle software tycoon Micah Taylor can’t get i What would you find if you walked into the rooms of your soul? One man is about to find out. James L. Rubart is the bestselling, four-time Christy Award-winning author of nine novels, and has won numerous other accolades for his unique, mind-bending stories. About ROOMS: It was just a letter. Cryptic, yes absolutely. But Seattle software tycoon Micah Taylor can’t get it out of his mind—the claim that a home was built for him by a great uncle he never knew, on the Oregon coast. In Cannon Beach. The one place he loves. The one place he never wants to see again. Micah heads to Cannon Beach to sell the house and keep his past buried, but the nine thousand square-foot home instantly feels like it’s part of him. Then he meets Sarah Sabin at the local ice cream shop ... maybe Cannon Beach can be the perfect weekend getaway. But strange things start happening in the house. Things Micah can’t explain. Things he can barely believe. All the locals will say is the house is “spiritual.” Unsettling since Micah’s faith slipped away like the tide years ago. And then he discovers the shocking truth: the home isn’t just spiritual, it’s a physical manifestation of his soul.


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What would you find if you walked into the rooms of your soul? One man is about to find out. James L. Rubart is the bestselling, four-time Christy Award-winning author of nine novels, and has won numerous other accolades for his unique, mind-bending stories. About ROOMS: It was just a letter. Cryptic, yes absolutely. But Seattle software tycoon Micah Taylor can’t get i What would you find if you walked into the rooms of your soul? One man is about to find out. James L. Rubart is the bestselling, four-time Christy Award-winning author of nine novels, and has won numerous other accolades for his unique, mind-bending stories. About ROOMS: It was just a letter. Cryptic, yes absolutely. But Seattle software tycoon Micah Taylor can’t get it out of his mind—the claim that a home was built for him by a great uncle he never knew, on the Oregon coast. In Cannon Beach. The one place he loves. The one place he never wants to see again. Micah heads to Cannon Beach to sell the house and keep his past buried, but the nine thousand square-foot home instantly feels like it’s part of him. Then he meets Sarah Sabin at the local ice cream shop ... maybe Cannon Beach can be the perfect weekend getaway. But strange things start happening in the house. Things Micah can’t explain. Things he can barely believe. All the locals will say is the house is “spiritual.” Unsettling since Micah’s faith slipped away like the tide years ago. And then he discovers the shocking truth: the home isn’t just spiritual, it’s a physical manifestation of his soul.

59 review for Rooms: a novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Johnny Virgil

    Holy crap! No, that's not a two word review, but it could be. This book was not at all what I was expecting. As a "non-religious" person, I found this book to be a little too over the top with the holy-roller stuff. If you're a confirmed believer in all things God/Savior/Sin, you will probably love it. If you are turned off by televangelists or Jehovah's Witnesses, you will probably hate it. I had the distinct feeling that if the author met me, he would tell me I was going to burn in hell. The Ch Holy crap! No, that's not a two word review, but it could be. This book was not at all what I was expecting. As a "non-religious" person, I found this book to be a little too over the top with the holy-roller stuff. If you're a confirmed believer in all things God/Savior/Sin, you will probably love it. If you are turned off by televangelists or Jehovah's Witnesses, you will probably hate it. I had the distinct feeling that if the author met me, he would tell me I was going to burn in hell. The Christian angle notwithstanding, I didn't find the characters to be particularly believable. A good novel tends to ease into the supernatural aspects of the story. I thought the book jumped into it quickly, before I really had time to get the whole "suspension of disbelief" thing going. I also didn't think there was much in the way of meaningful suspense, and what little suspense there was seemed to be resolved in a pretty heavy-handed, expedient manner. Not being all that familiar with christian-based fiction, maybe that's just the way these sorts of novels are. Certainly not a complete waste of time, but I did find myself rolling my eyes on occasion because of some of the inane actions of and conclusions drawn by the characters. I guess I couldn't relate.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Let me also start off by stating very clearly that this novel is Christian Fiction. Very strongly so. That is fine with me but I know some do not enjoy reading it and the plot synopsis does not exactly share that crucial tidbit. So there is my first urging to all readers-if this novel's Christian basing does not match your beliefs, there is a good chance you will not enjoy this book. Even for me, as a Christian, I can see this book as being potentially intimidating and how the path to God is show Let me also start off by stating very clearly that this novel is Christian Fiction. Very strongly so. That is fine with me but I know some do not enjoy reading it and the plot synopsis does not exactly share that crucial tidbit. So there is my first urging to all readers-if this novel's Christian basing does not match your beliefs, there is a good chance you will not enjoy this book. Even for me, as a Christian, I can see this book as being potentially intimidating and how the path to God is shown here would have bothered me deeply, even if it is taken to an extreme. When I first grabbed the book, I did not know if was a religious novel so the original summary does not express that at all and I feel that it should. I have since read a few variations that have improved upon this, luckily for future readers. The story itself was enjoyable for me. Micah starts of as a wealthy, worldly man who gets a strange inheritance in the form of an amazing and very special house. I want to quickly interject here that upon his first tour of the house I would LOVE to live there myself! Some of the rooms he discovers are fantastic, others a bit more disturbing, but each is very unique. Although I also wanted MORE from it. Micah's journey and transformation was quite interesting. What an experience! I cannot say too much on this without giving anything away though. And at the same time I would not want to live the dual lives he finds himself in. The messages in this book are great but a bit over the top in how they are expressed, even for a novel. While it's form is spot on, the presentation needed a lot of polishing as did the writing. These things cost a the book for me. it was predictable. Parts were too outlandish to match the rest of the book and characters seemed like they needed a lot of polishing up in my opinion. It does drift a bit. I wanted more from this. The second time reading it I almost didn't enjoy it much at all. Could be that all the mystery was gone. So not a worthy re-read. A once through is enough. The narrator via audiobook did didn't help. Flat and monotone. Still I enjoyed reading it. A fun read for Christians, but if your faith differs or is shaky this may not be the book for you as the messages and the manner in which they are laid out are a bit "preachy."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence

    As I was reading Rooms, I thought about the rooms in my heart for Jesus Christ. Am I allowing Him first place in every area of my heart? That question has stayed with me throughout the reading of this book. It was truly a soul searching and thought-provoking experience. I highly recommend it to all readers. Please make room in your heart for Jesus Christ.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Wow, not sure what I want to say about this book that I just finished up? I guess I will start with my first anticipation.... Rooms was toted as being similar to "The Shack". I loved "The Shack"! In fact I think during the time that book was in my hands all I wanted to do was read it and nothing else. It was fantastical (fantastic, fantasy, mystical - all rolled into one word). When I happened across Rooms at the bookstore, it was the cover that first drew me in. Yes, I am one of those people who Wow, not sure what I want to say about this book that I just finished up? I guess I will start with my first anticipation.... Rooms was toted as being similar to "The Shack". I loved "The Shack"! In fact I think during the time that book was in my hands all I wanted to do was read it and nothing else. It was fantastical (fantastic, fantasy, mystical - all rolled into one word). When I happened across Rooms at the bookstore, it was the cover that first drew me in. Yes, I am one of those people who judge books by their cover! :) The cover appears that the story will be foreboding, possibly filled with turbulence. After reading the backcover and reading over the "Praise for Rooms" contained in the first couple of pages, I was anxious to open the book up and dive in. The story line was intriguing, it captured me fairly quickly. However, somewhere midway in this book the overwhelming preachiness and really hard to believe types of things going on in the story started irking me a bit. By the time I was finishing the last 100 or so pages, I just wanted to finish reading the book and be done. There are aspects about Rooms that I really enjoyed, but it is so overwrought in what I think of when I think of crazy tele-evangelists that it lost a whole lot of glamour the longer the story went on. This is just one for you to decide for on your own if you want to pick it up. I'd advise to read online reviews prior though. You will find 5-star raving reviews and 1-star critiques, whichever your heart leans more towards will decide if you want to read Rooms. I'd say both the 5-star and 1-star type reviews are accurate, it's just a preference to what extent and lengths you want to have Christianity in your fictional literature. For me this was too much.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paula Vince

    It seems the blurb and cover of this book led some reviewers to think this would be a haunted house story. It's actually something like a Christian version of "Sliding Doors" which intrigued me from the start. Micah Taylor is a young business tycoon in the computer software industry. One day, he receives a letter from a great-uncle who's been dead for twelve years, informing him that a new coastal home has just been completed for him to inherit. The house turns out to have creepy goings-on behind It seems the blurb and cover of this book led some reviewers to think this would be a haunted house story. It's actually something like a Christian version of "Sliding Doors" which intrigued me from the start. Micah Taylor is a young business tycoon in the computer software industry. One day, he receives a letter from a great-uncle who's been dead for twelve years, informing him that a new coastal home has just been completed for him to inherit. The house turns out to have creepy goings-on behind the doors of various rooms, and weird things filter in to every aspect of Micah's life. People he was with on certain occasions are sure their meetings never happened, while apparent strangers seem to think he should remember them well. And what about his car clocking up thousands of kilometres unexpectedly? Micah is pulled between two worlds and thinks he can pick and choose the best of both. On one side is his company, fellow-founder and recent girlfriend, Julie, fame, money, international trips, influence. On the other, is his new reflective life at the coast, with the friendship of Rick, the enigmatic mechanic, and the lovely Sarah who works at the local ice-cream parlour. Micah discovers that his two lives are mutually exclusive in a riveting battle for his soul. Although it's not difficult for the discerning reader to figure out which influence Micah should flee from, the predictability is not the point of the story. What earned it five stars from me is that the evil influence came across sounding so chillingly reasonable and even godly. I'm sure I won't be the only one who realises that I've been duped by similar voices at various times in my life. And who hasn't sometimes wondered what our life might have looked like had we chosen another path that seemed an attractive option at the time? As I can't do it myself, I enjoy getting drawn into stories such as Micah's.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Keiki Hendrix

    "A wonderful fictional portrayal of the mysterious, adventurous, and amazing workings of God in the life of a believer on his way to his hearts desire.” Are you a believer? Or, are you on your way to walking with God? If so, you are going to find the events in this novel right up your alley. Micah Taylor, the twenty-something founder of a multi-million dollar software company finds himself finds himself summoned to a journey of fulfillment like he has never known before which will take him through "A wonderful fictional portrayal of the mysterious, adventurous, and amazing workings of God in the life of a believer on his way to his hearts desire.” Are you a believer? Or, are you on your way to walking with God? If so, you are going to find the events in this novel right up your alley. Micah Taylor, the twenty-something founder of a multi-million dollar software company finds himself finds himself summoned to a journey of fulfillment like he has never known before which will take him through changes that many Christians undertake. First he is intrigued by a letter from a long dead great-uncle. Then, he experiences doors that appear, disappear and then reappear – each one purposed to challenge him in his walk with God. Though shaken and apprehensive, he begins to taste the sweetest of a walk with his Creator and is finally faced with a moment that may cost him everything he has worked for. What did I love most about this novel? Quite a number of things; how deception by some things we consider dear plays out in a life, the waywardness of Micah’s decisions that somehow resembled those in my own life, and perhaps the most striking was the way a heart resurfaces at an appointed time to call a soul home. Loved the dialogue, loved the warmth of the characters, and the supernatural aspect visually portrayed in the rooms. Just a great read for those of us who have traveled the internal struggles Micah faced in this story. If you are looking for a different kind of novel that portrays what many of us go through on our way back to God, this is great choice. I recommend it highly. Reviewed by: Keiki Hendrix Reviewed for: The Vessel Project

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jerri

    This book is everything I dislike about most Christian fiction: it is preachy, it is unrealistic and it is annoying. I am a sci-fi fan so I am all for suspending reality for a good story but this was ridiculous. I don't know how anyone could compare it to The Shack, not even close. I never really cared about Micah and I only kept reading it because I knew it would be quick read. For a software genius the guy was just a tad slow to grasp the obvious. I was also bothered by some of the author's th This book is everything I dislike about most Christian fiction: it is preachy, it is unrealistic and it is annoying. I am a sci-fi fan so I am all for suspending reality for a good story but this was ridiculous. I don't know how anyone could compare it to The Shack, not even close. I never really cared about Micah and I only kept reading it because I knew it would be quick read. For a software genius the guy was just a tad slow to grasp the obvious. I was also bothered by some of the author's theology, particularly his literal take on giving up worldly possessions. I am by no means a proponent of the popular "prosperity gospel" but what exactly was he trying to say? I do like his theme of freedom which is the only reason that I gave it 2 stars, that and the character Rick. Sorry, not my cup of tea. For Christian fiction I will stick to Francine Rivers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    How would you feel if you inherited a house on a beach made just for you? Oddly enough, it reflected your personality? Would you be excited? What about, if this house came from an uncle you never really met, and this uncle was the family weirdo? Still excited? Well... I'd think that I would be ecstatic... until, maybe living there made feel like I was losing my sanity. Micah Taylor, inherits a home from his long been dead Uncle Archie. An uncle he has never met. Micah is the owner of his own soft How would you feel if you inherited a house on a beach made just for you? Oddly enough, it reflected your personality? Would you be excited? What about, if this house came from an uncle you never really met, and this uncle was the family weirdo? Still excited? Well... I'd think that I would be ecstatic... until, maybe living there made feel like I was losing my sanity. Micah Taylor, inherits a home from his long been dead Uncle Archie. An uncle he has never met. Micah is the owner of his own soft ware company and a multi- millionaire. His life revolves around work and his upscale lifestyle. At first he is not sure he wants to go visit the home in Cannon Beach, where he put his past to rest. But curiosity gets the best of him. He is determined to see it and put it up for sale. But God's plan is different. Micah feels drawn to the home, and Cannon Beach. He meets some amazing people there. Slowly he begins to see his life in a different light. The longer he stays in Cannon Beach, the more his life in Seattle changes. Some days he feels like he is loosing his sanity. The house is a reflection of his soul. Every now and then a new room just shows up. Micah has to make a choice. Will he choose God, and his new life in Cannon Beach, or will he choose to go back to Seattle where he seems to be on top of the world and in control. Matthew 16:26 What will it benefit a man if he gains the whole world yet loses his life? Or what will a man give in exchange for his life? This book is INTENSE! There were times I just had to put it down. Micah had so many decisions to make. Sometimes his life was going fine, other times he felt like he was losing it. God tells us there is nothing we can gain that is worth more than our life or our relationship with God. That should always come first. One of the parts of the book that really got to me was the room with the Voice. Micah thought it was his own voice and he would go in and consult the voice, discuss things that were happening etc. The voice would at times confuse him. It would quote Scripture to him but many times with a twist that confused him more than helped. Sometimes he would listen to the voice, other times he wouldn't. I know there have been times in my life, I can relate to that situation. What to do or not to do.... Every decision Micah made affected his life in Cannon Beach or in Seattle. I know I want to always choose GOD, but at times it seems the choice is not always black and white. I picked this book up at my local library and am being compensated in no way for this review. I just really like this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather Trim

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **SPOILER ALERT** The main character, Micah, in ROOMS by James L. Rubart is pushed into a journey of spiritual discovery. I didn’t like this book. It had a great premise: A house that represents his soul. I liked the idea of the house and dealing with the hidden parts of his soul. The major theme of the story is giving up worldly things for things of the spirit: Choosing God over money. I was happy with this concept until the guy is losing things as he advances his relationship with God in a sci- **SPOILER ALERT** The main character, Micah, in ROOMS by James L. Rubart is pushed into a journey of spiritual discovery. I didn’t like this book. It had a great premise: A house that represents his soul. I liked the idea of the house and dealing with the hidden parts of his soul. The major theme of the story is giving up worldly things for things of the spirit: Choosing God over money. I was happy with this concept until the guy is losing things as he advances his relationship with God in a sci-fi way, not in a "turning from it" sort of way. It made the whole story ridiculous. None of this book seemed like Micah had a choice at all. To me, God gives us a choice to seek him or not. God gives us the choice to lay aside the things of this world. If a good Christian guy has a fab idea and sells it to the world, does that mean he has a bad relationship with God? This is a trite generalization. It makes this character seem contrived for the sake of making this lesson plain to people. Micah gets to know God and therefore loses things in his life. They are mysteriously changing (for the worse.) He doesn’t intentionally decide to leave certain things behind. They are TAKEN from him. It feels more like a punishment for knowing God than the changing of a man’s heart. I’m sad that it appears that way. It really could have been a good demonstration of how to live our own lives. Needless to say, it is simply cruel to say that God would do that. God gives us a choice to lay the things of this world aside. It would have made for a more practical story to see Micah do it intentionally. So, BIG strike one! Strike Two: Holy preach-fest! It's hard to read a novel that has almost as much bible verse quotes as it does pros. People don't go around talking like that. I don't think even God's angels would quote scripture like the one in this book does. (Do you quote your friends from what they've written, or by what you talk about with them?) Strike Three: There is no such thing as self-deliverance. Maybe I’ll pretend it was fiction based on fiction, OR I’ll say that I work in deliverance ministry and there’s no way a demon will leave just because you get worked up into a religious frenzy and tell it to leave. Ain’t happ’nin’! No one has ever, or will ever see the middle of their own back with their own eyes. Only where two or more are gathered and the full name/authority of Jesus will this ever occur. Also, watching rated “R” movies isn’t Christian? (I thought they told us not to watch them in Christian college, just to control us! I never thought it meant you’d go to hell.) Ridiculous. Is it worth it to read this book? I’d rate this book at a 2: Not quite worth the time. (I won’t say it was “Totally not worth it” because I liked the mysterious house and the IDEA of it all!) HYPE-BUSTER: They say this book is like THE SHACK by William Young. Let me sum up with one word: NOPE! The Shack actually has truth in it without being preachy. So it can be done… Christian Fiction without preachy-ness—what a novel idea!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    What can I say here? I really, really wanted to like this book. A friend of mine here "kids" me because I so often open a review with, "I'm a Christian". I do that so anyone who reads my review will understand the point of view with which I approach the book in question. This is....make no mistake...a Christian fiction. It sets out to tell a slightly allegorical tale (not precisely allegorical but that's getting semantic) of a man's journey back to Christ. Now, that isn't a spoiler and I include i What can I say here? I really, really wanted to like this book. A friend of mine here "kids" me because I so often open a review with, "I'm a Christian". I do that so anyone who reads my review will understand the point of view with which I approach the book in question. This is....make no mistake...a Christian fiction. It sets out to tell a slightly allegorical tale (not precisely allegorical but that's getting semantic) of a man's journey back to Christ. Now, that isn't a spoiler and I include it because if you read the synopsis it's written so that you might think this is sort of a paranormal mystery. I read several "bad" reviews where people rated the book low simply because they were mislead and didn't find the type of story they went into the book expecting. So, a Christian story told taking place in a supernatural house with its mysterious "rooms" that appear and disappear unpredictably. So far so good. I find no "real problem" with the lessons the book attempts to teach (though there will be differences in theology within most Christian books. There is a core of teachings most Christians "that's most Christians" can agree on and then there are more peripheral teachings where we often disagree). No my problem isn't with what the book says. It's with how it says it...the book itself. I'm sorry and I don't want to discourage other readers too much as tastes differ, but I just thought the book wasn't all that well written. I found myself constantly laboring to stay with it. It was so often "yawn worthy". I finally resorted to the old standby of skimming forward. Look, I'll not write the author off, but I really didn't get into this book. I wasn't enthralled with the people nor the lives they'd lived. They were a little cookie cutter and not that well presented. Now that's my take. maybe others will like the book better, but I just couldn't get into it. Sorry.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dan Walsh

    Great read, similar to The Shack but, to me, better written. Both are allegorical stories about how God can mend a broken man but Rooms, as far as the allegory connects to Scriptural truth, is much more solid. Someone not interested in the Christian faith might struggle, but if you are a Christian, curious or even open-minded, worth your time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Olson

    What if you had the choice of choosing A) A life with prestige, fame, wealth and power or B) A life with a deep and meaningful relationship with God? What if you had the opportunity to wander back and forth between both lives and see the results of those choices? Pretty thought provoking stuff. James Rubart examines these ideas and many more in his book Rooms: A Novel. Micah Taylor, a very successful up-and-comer Seattle based Software mogul, is put into a huge quandary. “Is the life I’m living What if you had the choice of choosing A) A life with prestige, fame, wealth and power or B) A life with a deep and meaningful relationship with God? What if you had the opportunity to wander back and forth between both lives and see the results of those choices? Pretty thought provoking stuff. James Rubart examines these ideas and many more in his book Rooms: A Novel. Micah Taylor, a very successful up-and-comer Seattle based Software mogul, is put into a huge quandary. “Is the life I’m living really the life I want?” when he receives a mysterious letter from a deceased Great Uncle Archie. In this letter, his uncle has left him a rather large house built for him in Cannon Beach, Oregon. Having never met this Great Uncle, Micah is incredibly confused and rather skeptical that this offer can be real. “It’s time to face your past”, his Great Uncle writes him and that’s the last thing that Micah wants to do. But the mystery is too much, so Micah acquiesces and goes to check out the house. It is a house like no other and “face his past” he does, along with a great many other things in his life that need serious attention. The house was designed specifically for Micah and its quite a ride as he confronts many things in the ever-changing house. There are now choices to be made worldly success, or God- and he finds himself with one foot in both worlds. What would you choose? Coming at this book from a Christian world view I found that James Rubart really raises so many truly intriguing questions in this book and takes Micah Taylor on quite a spiritual journey- one that we can all relate to. What are those things in our life that we have let pull us away from a deeper relationship with God? There are so many fascinating aspects to this story that I can’t fit it in to this review. I would encourage you to read it for yourself and just like the house in the story that was ever-changing , I suspect that each reader will take away something different that impacts them in a unique way. My only negative comment is I felt that the story got a little slow in the middle, but it truly is worth plowing through because the ending is brings the whole story to a great conclusion. I will definitely keep reading this author and look forward to his reading his next book “Book of Days”. I was graciously provided a review copy of this book by B&H Books through the Netgalley program and the opinions I expressed were my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    There have unfortunately been far too few books that I have picked up and then been unable to put down. One of those books was James Rubart’s Rooms. It snagged me from the beginning and I found myself doing the ‘one more chapter’ thing late into the night. Who wouldn’t want to inherit a house or money from someone we don’t know, a distant uncle or cousin. Micah had enough wealth that the letter that notified him about the house just served as a brief interruption in his busy life. Micah is curiou There have unfortunately been far too few books that I have picked up and then been unable to put down. One of those books was James Rubart’s Rooms. It snagged me from the beginning and I found myself doing the ‘one more chapter’ thing late into the night. Who wouldn’t want to inherit a house or money from someone we don’t know, a distant uncle or cousin. Micah had enough wealth that the letter that notified him about the house just served as a brief interruption in his busy life. Micah is curious enough to go to Oregon to see it and to put it on the market and get back to his full schedule. Only he finds more than he anticipated. The house is possessed. It is attractive to him, holding his interest and challenging him to inhale its atmosphere and facing the challenges of the rooms that appear and disappear. As he stays, his life back in Seattle also changes, parts that appear and parts that disappear. Micah, as he tries to decide what to do with the changes in his life and faces the challenges that house presents is torn between his ‘real’ life in Seattle and what life would be like in Oregon. The book is well written and the premises are one that is not terribly cliché. Usually reading a book (or watching a movie) about a spiritually live house is one that promises horror and near bloody defeat. The possibility in Rooms is that the house is pretty benign showing or reflecting Micah choices in different ways. Micah faces a suppressed childhood memory, finding relief in ways that would make the lot of us broken people want to pilgrimage to the house for healing. Three stars, four stars, one-hundred stars. James Rubart is truly creative, and this book will certainly show you entertaining reading and some wonderful word-smithing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Terri Blackstock

    Wonderful book!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Rayburn

    I loved Rooms! I purchased it as a gift but snuck a peak when I got it home, and then I couldn’t put it down until I finished it. I liked the simplicity of the description combined with the complexity of the surreal fantasty of a house that keeps changing. It’s a journey of personal healing, of finding what really matters, and of letting go of that which hinders God from something better than we expected. Although wealth doesn’t mutually exclude a relationship with Jesus. For Micah Taylor, his p I loved Rooms! I purchased it as a gift but snuck a peak when I got it home, and then I couldn’t put it down until I finished it. I liked the simplicity of the description combined with the complexity of the surreal fantasty of a house that keeps changing. It’s a journey of personal healing, of finding what really matters, and of letting go of that which hinders God from something better than we expected. Although wealth doesn’t mutually exclude a relationship with Jesus. For Micah Taylor, his pursuit of worldly acclaim and wealth did hinder him from what God wanted for him. It isn’t about what distracts Micah as much as it is about readers seeing that what they think is a noble pursuit might be exactly what’s holding them back. And it’s about seeing how giving up financial security and taking a risk is both difficult and rewarding all at the same time. I thoroughly enjoyed the imaginative twists of discovering rooms, and the mystery of how the past could be altered by Micah’s decisions. Author James Rubart has done a marvelous job of spinning a fantasy tale that grips a reader. It reminded me of Frank Peretti or Ted Dekker’s writing. One drawback about the book was that the letters from Uncle Archie lost a little momentum towards the end. I thought these could have been a bit more dramatic or exciting. I also wondered about his brother, Mick. He’s mentioned here and there in reflections on the past but then left out of most of the story and I wondered about their relationship. Perhaps there is more to come in a another. I’m not sure what I missed, but I didn’t get the last line of the book. Despite all this, I think James Rubart has fantastic potential as an imaginative writer and I can’t wait to see more from him. I wonder if any readers can figure out the clever way Rubart came up with the name of the main character.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    This book is nothing like the blurb on the back and it pissed me off that I read this book under false pretenses, I never would have touched it if the blurb really described what was in this book. A rip off of The Shack with way too much bible preaching for my taste. There is little to no character development and the characters aren't even very fleshed out to begin with. A the man guy is the most solid and he's an a**hole that I couldn't and don't want to connect with. The time jumps and pacing This book is nothing like the blurb on the back and it pissed me off that I read this book under false pretenses, I never would have touched it if the blurb really described what was in this book. A rip off of The Shack with way too much bible preaching for my taste. There is little to no character development and the characters aren't even very fleshed out to begin with. A the man guy is the most solid and he's an a**hole that I couldn't and don't want to connect with. The time jumps and pacing of the story is annoying as it starts slow, speeds up, slows down and speeds up again and again without really going anywhere. Also the message that the author is trying to get across isn't really clear as he tries to cover too much stuff at once without really digging into it and trying to do it all at once but mixing it up. God has taken away free will here and if you don't do what he wants your life is going to suck. It also dates itself with all the pop culture references of early 2010's that won't matter in a few years. Also the events for which this "deep thinking via the bible" is supposed to enlighten is so completely unbelievable it's laughable. I could see something like it happening in the distant past but not after the 80's and the events happen in the 90's. By the end of this book I was rolling my eyes at every other sentence I thought they would fall out, if I was someone in this story I would have shot myself in the head back at the beginning. How I wish there was a way to erase the brain of some things, this would be first on the list...for everyone who read it as an apology for picking this book up.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    A Quickie Review An imaginative allegory, Rooms was a great read that I finished in one sitting. Those who aren't fans of fantasy may not like it, but for a geek like me, it was an insane read. The writing was great, as was the story. It's not as scary as it would seem, but it does have its weird moments. Score: 4.5/5 A Quickie Review An imaginative allegory, Rooms was a great read that I finished in one sitting. Those who aren't fans of fantasy may not like it, but for a geek like me, it was an insane read. The writing was great, as was the story. It's not as scary as it would seem, but it does have its weird moments. Score: 4.5/5

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ronie

    This was a life-changing book for me. Great storytelling and spiritually impacting!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Luttkus

    All in all, it was disappointing. There were several plot holes and a good amount of repetition. The book could have ended about 100 pages sooner. I kept going, because I wondered if perhaps the ending would be so good it would make up for the rest of it. The ending was definitely bigger and better, but overall not enough to make the whole book enjoyable.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becky Fleming

    Thought-provoking book I have never read a book quite like this one. Absolutely loved it! Couldn't put it down! Even though it was bizarre, it was almost believable. Definitely made me reflect on my own life and whether or not I am living my best life, fully surrendered and sold out to Jesus. Thought-provoking book I have never read a book quite like this one. Absolutely loved it! Couldn't put it down! Even though it was bizarre, it was almost believable. Definitely made me reflect on my own life and whether or not I am living my best life, fully surrendered and sold out to Jesus.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Janet Ferguson

    The book has an interesting concept with the house, and I like that the main character is working through his issues. Some of the theology didn't sit exactly right with me and the book went a little long in the middle, but I think this is a novel that men would enjoy. The book has an interesting concept with the house, and I like that the main character is working through his issues. Some of the theology didn't sit exactly right with me and the book went a little long in the middle, but I think this is a novel that men would enjoy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Misty Baker

    When I was in Jr. High my Sunday school class decided to study the book of “Job”. Up until this point I had never done any extensive studying of a particular book, just stand alone versus, so the fact that I shook with the anticipation of learning what would happen next (to this poor soul – as I liked to refer to him at the time) floored me. Over the years I have continued to study the bible, reading scripture and trying (sometimes is vain) to make it make sense to me. Sometimes I fail horribly, When I was in Jr. High my Sunday school class decided to study the book of “Job”. Up until this point I had never done any extensive studying of a particular book, just stand alone versus, so the fact that I shook with the anticipation of learning what would happen next (to this poor soul – as I liked to refer to him at the time) floored me. Over the years I have continued to study the bible, reading scripture and trying (sometimes is vain) to make it make sense to me. Sometimes I fail horribly, while other times the message I read sparks like a lightning bolt to my brain, I get it instantly. Now, after all these years one fact remains… I remember the book of “Job” more than any other book I have ever read. Why am I telling you all of this you may ask? Because “Job” has just come back to life in James L Rubarts’ novel “Rooms” We all travel through our lives with a set plan, some are significantly more ambitious than others, but regardless if your “plan” is to eat that 1 lb tub of gummy bears before next Monday, or become a millionaire by the time you are 30… the fact remains that you have a plan. For Micah the plan was to put a house up for sale and go back to his corporate life in Seattle, but when the house (that his deceased uncle left him) starts to sprout extra rooms that speak to his soul, calling Caldwell Banker doesn’t seem all that simple anymore. LIFE doesn’t seem all that simple anymore. With daily assaults of horrendous childhood memories and a slew of possibilities Micah is forced to make a choice, walk the path that God has forged for him, or walk the path that he forged for himself. Both choices have their ups and downs, and the art of choosing is the most difficult of all. Would you give up everything for a slim chance of happiness or would giving up everything make you unhappy? Writing a spiritual novel is a quest all on its own, for the author (more often than not) they are slaves to the voice inside their heart vs. the voices of the publishing Gods, but when an author can merge a life lesson into a genuinely intriguing plot, what’s left is simply beautiful. Here is a novel that was captivating from the 1st chapter, reaching out to grab it’s audience with the reality of inner confliction. Which way do I go? To whom do I turn? The “lesson” was blatantly obvious (as it rightfully should have been) but the way in which it was expressed was refreshing and thought provoking. Rubart posed questions many of us would feel uncomfortable asking ourselves, but he did it in a way that left you unable to avoid the answers. I nod my head in a sincere kudos to the man that chose to write a beautiful piece of literature, “because he had something to say.” And I encourage those of you that are wandering the path of uncertainty to join in the journey Rubart has created. Happy reading my fellow Kindle-ites and remember: we are all tightly wound balls of yarn, and it’s not until we start to unravel that we see what can be made out of a few tiny strings.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janet Sketchley

    Micah Taylor has it all: prestigious business, penthouse condo, a girlfriend who’s his perfect match. Until he leaves Seattle for Cannon Beach, Oregon, to check into a house he inherited. The house is everything he’d have wanted had he designed it himself – except for the location, stirring memories of childhood tragedy. And except for the mysterious rooms that suddenly appear. Rooms is a supernatural tale of how God might lead a person to revisit “rooms” in his heart to bring healing and truth. Th Micah Taylor has it all: prestigious business, penthouse condo, a girlfriend who’s his perfect match. Until he leaves Seattle for Cannon Beach, Oregon, to check into a house he inherited. The house is everything he’d have wanted had he designed it himself – except for the location, stirring memories of childhood tragedy. And except for the mysterious rooms that suddenly appear. Rooms is a supernatural tale of how God might lead a person to revisit “rooms” in his heart to bring healing and truth. The more Micah begins to trust God, the more things in his world shift. Events he remembers haven’t happened. His status begins to slip. Micah’s new friend and confidant, Rick, assures him he’s not crazy, but Micah doesn’t know how much more he can take. He wants this deeper relationship with God... but at what cost? Favourite line: He walked toward the door on his toes, drawing short sips of air as if a deep breath would alert whatever was in the room to his presence. [Kindle location 1623] Micah’s experiences wouldn’t happen in real life, but the principles and truth he learns about freedom in Christ translate directly into Christians’ lives today. So do the deceptions he faces. I found the story an intriguing way to look at the concept of our identity in Christ, and how life events and choices limit our spiritual growth – and how God may want to revisit those things to free us. James L. Rubart is a writer and speaker whose website tag line is “Live free.” Rooms was his first novel. His most recent is The Five Times I Met Myself. For more about the author and his books, visit jameslrubart.com. [Review copy from my personal library.]

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Seaman

    I like James Rubart and loved 2 of his previous books, Soul's Gate and Memory's Door. Rooms was another trip into the wonders of what God can do on levels that defy our basic understanding of Him. Rooms was an interesting book based on the premise of what relationships and choices do to your life. I loved the house and the rooms! Very interesting and exciting! I liked the characters Rick,and Sarah. I was not as accepting of the main character Micah. I think he was extremely stupid for a software I like James Rubart and loved 2 of his previous books, Soul's Gate and Memory's Door. Rooms was another trip into the wonders of what God can do on levels that defy our basic understanding of Him. Rooms was an interesting book based on the premise of what relationships and choices do to your life. I loved the house and the rooms! Very interesting and exciting! I liked the characters Rick,and Sarah. I was not as accepting of the main character Micah. I think he was extremely stupid for a software genius, and I found him irritating. Some very obvious truths he just could not seem to grasp. I also think the book was a little too long, some things were unnecessarily drawn out. I think the point of giving up worldy things was taken a bit too literal. You do not have to be a pauper living on the street wearing rags to know God on the most intimate levels. I gave the book 3 stars because I loved where the story was going, I loved the scenery, and the house, and I loved Rick's character. however I could not give the book more than 3 stars because Archie's character was under developed, the mother was barely a factor, other than dying, and the father had no depth of character. I think I expected more from the character development and I definitely expected more from Micah. It was unbelievable how dense he was even with certain truths staring him in the face! I find it hard to really enjoy a book when I am increasingly irritated by the characters lack of common sense. I needed more character depth from the supporting cast and less confused ramblings & verbiage from the main character.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Potentially a classic of Christian speculative fiction. It combines a modern setting and protagonist point of view with a classic Christian confrontation and choices. Not quite an allegory, but certainly not "normal" fiction. Sort of like It's a Wonderful Life (upside down) meets A Christmas Carol.(The liner notes do it a disservice by comparing it to The Shack It's much better, though both are contemporary stories touched by the supernatural.) Can't discuss any of the plot or characters without Potentially a classic of Christian speculative fiction. It combines a modern setting and protagonist point of view with a classic Christian confrontation and choices. Not quite an allegory, but certainly not "normal" fiction. Sort of like It's a Wonderful Life (upside down) meets A Christmas Carol.(The liner notes do it a disservice by comparing it to The Shack It's much better, though both are contemporary stories touched by the supernatural.) Can't discuss any of the plot or characters without spoiling the fun of subsequent readers. (If you think you may read it, do not read any synopses. Let it happen to you.) Fantasy works best opening in a believable atmosphere. If anything the opening (Seattle) portion is the weakest of the book. It reads like an outsiders daydream of a successful insiders life. But don't let that stop you; press on. It gets better. The Cannon Beach portion feels real and immediate. Yes, even the weird stuff. Having tipped us early on who/what two of his major characters were, Rubart still maintained the mystery as long as possible. (No, I'm not telling!) I had some theological concerns--the story seems to ignore sin--but feel they were acknowledged, if not dealt with, by the end. Otherwise, the issues and choices facing Micah were consistent with current Christian thought, though many readers--Christian and not--may find issues to quibble about. Provisionally giving five stars, though it's not quite perfect.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    Software magnate Micah Taylor receives a mystifying letter from a long-dead uncle he never met, informing him that a house has been built for him on the Oregon coast. Sounds perfect, except the location is one that haunts his past, and Micah has vowed never to go there again. But the house draws him, and continues to draw him back again and again. Something is happening in that house, something strange and compelling and frightening. Something Micah can’t walk away from, even though staying may Software magnate Micah Taylor receives a mystifying letter from a long-dead uncle he never met, informing him that a house has been built for him on the Oregon coast. Sounds perfect, except the location is one that haunts his past, and Micah has vowed never to go there again. But the house draws him, and continues to draw him back again and again. Something is happening in that house, something strange and compelling and frightening. Something Micah can’t walk away from, even though staying may very well cost him everything he holds dear – his whole life. Rooms, from debut novelist James L. Rubart, is one of the most imaginative and insightful novels I’ve read in a long time. As Micah confronts devastating incidents from his past, we see the hand of a powerful and loving Savior at work. As he chooses between what he knows is right and his own self-serving desires – sometimes with heartbreaking results – we are treated to a vivid demonstration of the very real impact of our own choices. Most of all, we see the hand of a loving God who alone has the power to heal and restore. Rooms is not a quick read. You’ll want to draw it out, savor the experience, pause to think about passages before you move on. And it’s one of those reading experiences that will stay with you long after you close the book. It will have you unlocking doors in your own life and stepping into rooms you didn’t even know existed. I loved it!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ionia

    Wow! I love this book. I think I am officially hooked on this author. I read "The Chair" recently and fell in love with it so I had to read this and see if it was just as great. I am so glad I did. The setting of this book is what first captivated me. I spend as much time as possible hiking the Pacific Northwest and have a special place in my heart for the area of Oregon that the author uses as the setting for the mysterious house. This pulled me into the story right away. His descriptions were Wow! I love this book. I think I am officially hooked on this author. I read "The Chair" recently and fell in love with it so I had to read this and see if it was just as great. I am so glad I did. The setting of this book is what first captivated me. I spend as much time as possible hiking the Pacific Northwest and have a special place in my heart for the area of Oregon that the author uses as the setting for the mysterious house. This pulled me into the story right away. His descriptions were so vibrant and beautiful that I could feel the sea spray against my skin and hear the crashing of the waves. The way his characters struggle with belief, uncertainty and their faith is written so well and with such detail, that you can't help but feel compassion for them. In the matter of suspense and build up of the story and characters, James L Rubart has surpassed my expectations again. Just when you are sure you have it figured out, something else will happen that sets you back and makes you reconsider your initial conclusion. I may not have chosen a book with this type of spiritual theme before reading Mr. Rubart's works, but he has introduced me to a whole new genre, and it is one I am finding it difficult not to love. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes a book that can really make you stop and think. This review is based on a digital copy from the publisher.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Absolutely Brilliant! Mystical and Magical! Brought both tears of joy, as well as tears of sorrow while reading this. Not just for the characters, but, from my own heart as well. Ironically, I had befriended someone over two years ago. We instantly bonded and had a great connection. I often called him my "Angel on Earth" because of the timing he came into my life. He helped me through some personal issues and I like to think I helped boost his self esteem, as well. Just over 6 months ago we said Absolutely Brilliant! Mystical and Magical! Brought both tears of joy, as well as tears of sorrow while reading this. Not just for the characters, but, from my own heart as well. Ironically, I had befriended someone over two years ago. We instantly bonded and had a great connection. I often called him my "Angel on Earth" because of the timing he came into my life. He helped me through some personal issues and I like to think I helped boost his self esteem, as well. Just over 6 months ago we said our good nights and best wishes for a great next day and I have never heard from him since. No explanation, no closure, no reason. To this day it leaves me bewildered and confused. I often wonder if God put him in my life just for a season, if He pulled him from my life because it was not in His will or if the evil one filled my friend's heart with lies, forcing his decision to leave our friendship...similar to the way Micah was persuaded in this novel. On a more ironic note, my now vanished friend is the one who inspired me to start reading again and at the time we became friends he was reading Rooms. Although he never actually recommended this book for me to read, I do recall him saying he liked it. Now it's my turn to pray for the happy ending....in hopes that my friend will come back one day :(

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janalyn Voigt

    What would you do? What if a house you inherited is more than it seems? What if doors appear out of nowhere and lead to rooms filled with mystery? What if your life changed daily in unimagined ways? For Seattle software tycoon, Micah Taylor, these questions are not academic. An uncle he's never met leaves him a house in Canon Beach on the Oregon Coast. Micah determines to sell the home, especially since it's located in a place that holds powerful memories for him. But after a visit, and after me What would you do? What if a house you inherited is more than it seems? What if doors appear out of nowhere and lead to rooms filled with mystery? What if your life changed daily in unimagined ways? For Seattle software tycoon, Micah Taylor, these questions are not academic. An uncle he's never met leaves him a house in Canon Beach on the Oregon Coast. Micah determines to sell the home, especially since it's located in a place that holds powerful memories for him. But after a visit, and after meeting Sarah Sabin in a local ice cream shop, he can't quite let go. Micah walks a fine line between darkness and light, pain and healing, death and life. He faces a choice between two worlds, but first he must fight a battle with spiritual consequences. Enter the strange and wonderful world of Jim Rubart's "Rooms." I highly recommend this life-changing book for adult and young adult readers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Chind

  31. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  32. 4 out of 5

    Christy Trever

  33. 5 out of 5

    Glenda Bixler

  34. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Trujillo Batty

  35. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jeffc11

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Wardrip

  38. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

  39. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Frobisher

  40. 4 out of 5

    Bekki

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jean Werner

  42. 5 out of 5

    Evangeline

  43. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Marie

  44. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  45. 4 out of 5

    Rel

  46. 4 out of 5

    Carla Stewart

  47. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  48. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

  49. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  50. 4 out of 5

    Peace Love and Reviews

  51. 5 out of 5

    ♥Eliza Marie♥ Goco

  52. 4 out of 5

    Lena Dooley

  53. 5 out of 5

    Eric Wilson

  54. 4 out of 5

    Monika

  55. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  56. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  57. 5 out of 5

    Brenda S Anderson

  58. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

  59. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

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