web site hit counter 20th Century Ghosts - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

20th Century Ghosts

Availability: Ready to download

A collection of short stories. Imogene is young and beautiful. She kisses like a movie star and knows everything about every film ever made. She's also dead and waiting in the Rosebud Theater for Alec Sheldon one afternoon in 1945.... Arthur Roth is a lonely kid with big ideas and a gift for attracting abuse. It isn't easy to make friends when you're the only inflatable boy A collection of short stories. Imogene is young and beautiful. She kisses like a movie star and knows everything about every film ever made. She's also dead and waiting in the Rosebud Theater for Alec Sheldon one afternoon in 1945.... Arthur Roth is a lonely kid with big ideas and a gift for attracting abuse. It isn't easy to make friends when you're the only inflatable boy in town.... Francis is unhappy. Francis was human once, but that was then. Now he's an eight-foot-tall locust and everyone in Calliphora will tremble when they hear him sing.... John Finney is locked in a basement that's stained with the blood of half a dozen other murdered children. In the cellar with him is an antique telephone, long since disconnected, but which rings at night with calls from the dead.... The past isn't dead. It isn't even past...


Compare

A collection of short stories. Imogene is young and beautiful. She kisses like a movie star and knows everything about every film ever made. She's also dead and waiting in the Rosebud Theater for Alec Sheldon one afternoon in 1945.... Arthur Roth is a lonely kid with big ideas and a gift for attracting abuse. It isn't easy to make friends when you're the only inflatable boy A collection of short stories. Imogene is young and beautiful. She kisses like a movie star and knows everything about every film ever made. She's also dead and waiting in the Rosebud Theater for Alec Sheldon one afternoon in 1945.... Arthur Roth is a lonely kid with big ideas and a gift for attracting abuse. It isn't easy to make friends when you're the only inflatable boy in town.... Francis is unhappy. Francis was human once, but that was then. Now he's an eight-foot-tall locust and everyone in Calliphora will tremble when they hear him sing.... John Finney is locked in a basement that's stained with the blood of half a dozen other murdered children. In the cellar with him is an antique telephone, long since disconnected, but which rings at night with calls from the dead.... The past isn't dead. It isn't even past...

30 review for 20th Century Ghosts

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    Seldom does a collection of weird stories feature a style so accomplished, a range of tone and mood so broad, or a generosity so profound. Hill, the son of Stephen King, inherits his father's empathy for the ordeals of childhood as well as his artfulness in constructing a tale, but he also possesses a warmth and an elegance all his own. At times his stories are chilling and gripping like the horror fiction of King ("The Black Phone"), but at other times they are gentle and elegiac like Bradbury Seldom does a collection of weird stories feature a style so accomplished, a range of tone and mood so broad, or a generosity so profound. Hill, the son of Stephen King, inherits his father's empathy for the ordeals of childhood as well as his artfulness in constructing a tale, but he also possesses a warmth and an elegance all his own. At times his stories are chilling and gripping like the horror fiction of King ("The Black Phone"), but at other times they are gentle and elegiac like Bradbury ("Better Than Home") or quirky and humorous like Vonnegut ("Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead"). And then there are times when Hill's writing is so good that comparisons don't arise. There is the self-aware, post-modernist work in which a well-known anthologist gets savagely schooled by a contributor about what constitutes "The Best in Modern Horror," the unsettling tale about the effect of family disguises and games on a son ("My Father's Mask"), the powerful, sustained novella about an autistic brother who can construct marvelous, imprisoning labyrinths, a story which never loses its horror or its humanity ("Voluntary Committal"), or the masterpiece--I do not use the term lightly--about an "inflatable" childhood friend ("Pop Art") that has something to teach every reader about disability and transcendence.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wil Wheaton

    Absolutely wonderful book. This is a collection of stores that will have you crying, checking for monsters under the bed, and wondering how the hell Joe Hill came up with that. Comparisons to Joe's dad will be unavoidable, especially from those of us who read Night Shift and Skeleton Crew at a certain age ... and though I believe Joe has more than earned the right to be far, far out of his father's shadow, I say with love that the comparisons are well-deserved. This is a sensational collection, a Absolutely wonderful book. This is a collection of stores that will have you crying, checking for monsters under the bed, and wondering how the hell Joe Hill came up with that. Comparisons to Joe's dad will be unavoidable, especially from those of us who read Night Shift and Skeleton Crew at a certain age ... and though I believe Joe has more than earned the right to be far, far out of his father's shadow, I say with love that the comparisons are well-deserved. This is a sensational collection, and very much worth your time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Read with some friends over at Horror Aficionados. I have to say I was expecting some true horror stores but I wasn’t feeling half of them. I’m giving it 3 stars for the ones I did like though. BEST NEW HORRORwas the creepiest one and I loved it! The other ones I liked were Pop Art You Will Hear The Locust Sing (was okay) The Black Phone Last Breath And the added Typewriter store in the ad section Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    "Best New Horror" - Fun concept and well executed for most of the story, but my interest tanked when the editor finally tracks down the author. Maybe I was supposed to laugh at the cliche-ness? 4 stars for the 1st half, 2 for the second = 3 "20th Century Ghosts" - There was a delicacy to this haunted movie theater story that I appreciated, although I felt it ran too long (or rather, too wordy) for what it was. 3 stars "Dead-wood" - Instances of ghostly trees. You know, Joe, it would be okay to wri "Best New Horror" - Fun concept and well executed for most of the story, but my interest tanked when the editor finally tracks down the author. Maybe I was supposed to laugh at the cliche-ness? 4 stars for the 1st half, 2 for the second = 3 "20th Century Ghosts" - There was a delicacy to this haunted movie theater story that I appreciated, although I felt it ran too long (or rather, too wordy) for what it was. 3 stars "Dead-wood" - Instances of ghostly trees. You know, Joe, it would be okay to write non-fiction if you felt like it. You don't have to force there to be a story. 3 stars "Widow's Breakfast" - solid descriptive story about a poor young hobo. Not horror, no reason for the inclusion of the slightly-creepy daughters that I could see, weak last line. 3 stars Okay, so having read 4 stories and 3-starred all, I feel like I don't need to read the remainder. I didn't dislike any of them, but I did not particularly enjoy them, either. I feel like this collection is not-onerous task rather than a pleasure, and I have better things to read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    The crab apple does not fall far from the poisoned tree. While the sensibility is his own, it is eminently clear that Joe Hill has been gifted with DNA predisposed to horror greatness. Before Heart-Shaped Box, Hill wrote short stories. Maybe he still does. I was immediately taken with his ability to draw the reader in. For most of the stories here, I quickly felt that I could settle back in my chair and let Hill lead me wherever he wanted. He engages quickly and strongly. He is having a lot of fu The crab apple does not fall far from the poisoned tree. While the sensibility is his own, it is eminently clear that Joe Hill has been gifted with DNA predisposed to horror greatness. Before Heart-Shaped Box, Hill wrote short stories. Maybe he still does. I was immediately taken with his ability to draw the reader in. For most of the stories here, I quickly felt that I could settle back in my chair and let Hill lead me wherever he wanted. He engages quickly and strongly. He is having a lot of fun here with standard horror fare. Best New Horror looks at both the world of small magazine/journal publishing and Hollywood movie clichés. Movies come to the fore again in 20th Century Ghost, in which a specter appears in an old movie house to select patrons. There’s no place like home. I was less impressed with Pop Art, although I admire its daring. The narrator is a boy with an inflatable friend and even in a book of ghost stories it was too allegorical to allow any emotional engagement. You Will Hear the Locust Sing takes a Kafkaesque look at social ostracism and adolescent rage with a dose of apocalyptic religiosity. Abraham’s Boys brings Van Helsing to America, wonders how he might be welcomed in the New World, and what sort of father he might be. Better Than Home looks at a Billy Martin sort of volcanic baseball manager. The Cape offers a nice twist on wish fulfillment. Voluntary Commitment is the story here that most makes one recall Hill’s father. Adolescent boys, danger, fear, and magic. Hill stretches a bit in defining what constitutes a ghost story. Some, frankly, don’t qualify. But that is a quibble. This is a collection of mostly interesting tales, well told. I am eager to read more of Hill’s work. He is a very bright light on the horror scene. =============================EXTRA STUFF Links to the author’s personal, Instagram and Tumblr pages Other Joe Hill books I have reviewed: -----Full Throttle -----Strange Weather -----The Fireman -----NOS4A2 -----Heart-Shaped Box reviews of some books by his dad -----The Institute -----Revival -----Doctor Sleep -----Mr. Mercedes -----The Shining -----Under the Dome -----Duma Key -----Lisey's Story

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    I really enjoyed this compilation of short stories by Joe Hill! They are not all horror so know that going in when you read this. Overall, I would give this compliation 4 stars! I've broken down all the short stories below and what I liked about them. Some were "okay" and not a favorite but the writing was still good. Joe Hill has a fantastic imagination and his writing is top notch in my books! Best New Horror – 5 stars! This was one of my favorite short stories. I loved the take on the producer try I really enjoyed this compilation of short stories by Joe Hill! They are not all horror so know that going in when you read this. Overall, I would give this compliation 4 stars! I've broken down all the short stories below and what I liked about them. Some were "okay" and not a favorite but the writing was still good. Joe Hill has a fantastic imagination and his writing is top notch in my books! Best New Horror – 5 stars! This was one of my favorite short stories. I loved the take on the producer trying to find the new horror writer and how it all goes downhill at the end. 20th Century Ghost – 4 stars Eerie and a bit romantic. Loved the setting of an old movie theater! Pop Art – 2.5 stars Still a bit confused by the balloon people, but the ending was a nice touch. You Will Hear the Locust Sing - 3.5 stars It was gross and felt like a creature feature. I enjoyed this one for what it was! Abraham’s Boys - 5 stars! I loved this one and it was a favorite! It was a nice, new take on Abraham Van Helsing and vampires. Better Than Home - 2 stars Ehh…I didn’t see the point in this one for the compilation. Maybe looking through the eyes of someone who sees the world differently? I thought the kid might be autistic. The Black Phone - 3.5 stars It had a John Wayne Gacy feel to the book and I was happy with the end! In the Rundown - 2 stars The writing was good but wasn’t great. It just felt unfinished. Ehh… The Cape - 3 stars I enjoyed the magical realism to this story. Last Breath - 4 stars Creepy and great idea to bottle the last breath of someone when they die! I liked the idea of this one. Dead-Wood - 2.5 stars I would give this a higher rating if it was longer. I just wanted more from this one! What a cool start and concept though. The Widow’s Breakfast - 3.5 stars I liked how this one ended. It was a bit open and creepy. You’re not quite sure what will happen to Killian with the girls. Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead - 3 stars Not a bad short story about being an extra in a movie and finding lost connections again. My Father’s Mask - 3.5 stars I felt like I was on acid reading this. I’m not sure what the playing cards theme was about or all the masks. Very weird but still creepy and I liked it! Voluntary Committal - 4 stars I really liked this one about an autistic brother and the magical worlds he built from his mind. He would build buildings or forts from boxes, dominos or Dixie cups. It was a very magical story about the loss of innocence and seeing the world through the eyes of someone who looks at it in a different way.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Char

    4.5 stars! My favorite stories were: Pop Art 20th Century Ghost Better Than Home My Father's Mask Voluntary Committal My thought on this collection cannot possibly make a dent in all of reviews already written about this book. Suffice it to say: I loved it and it gets my highest recommendation. 4.5 stars! My favorite stories were: Pop Art 20th Century Ghost Better Than Home My Father's Mask Voluntary Committal My thought on this collection cannot possibly make a dent in all of reviews already written about this book. Suffice it to say: I loved it and it gets my highest recommendation.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    When I read NOS4A2, I had pegged Joe Hill as a horror writer of the calibre of his celebrated father. When I started this book, I expected much of the same fare: however, I was pleasantly surprised. “20th Century Ghosts” is less about ghosts than other sorts of boogeymen: more subtle, more scary, and all definitely weird. It starts off with a traditional story (“Best New Horror”) about a horror anthology editor trapped in something like one of his own tales: despite the story-within-the-story str When I read NOS4A2, I had pegged Joe Hill as a horror writer of the calibre of his celebrated father. When I started this book, I expected much of the same fare: however, I was pleasantly surprised. “20th Century Ghosts” is less about ghosts than other sorts of boogeymen: more subtle, more scary, and all definitely weird. It starts off with a traditional story (“Best New Horror”) about a horror anthology editor trapped in something like one of his own tales: despite the story-within-the-story structure of the first part, this tale becomes highly predictable towards the end and falls rather flat. In fact, all the stories using familiar tropes in this collection (“The Black Phone” about a serial killer, and the novella “Voluntary Committal” about an idiot savant and tunnels to distant dimensions) suffer from predictability. Joe Hill comes into his own, I think, when he throws away the manual and drifts off into the territory of the weird. Take “Pop Art”, a story of an inflatable boy – no, not a toy but a living being born to flesh and blood parents, in an alternate universe where such things are possible: or “My Father’s Mask”, where the goofy family game played by a family slowly slides into reality: or “The Cape”, where the superhero myth takes a violent twist. None of these can be called horror, but we are definitely in the land of Kafka. Speaking of whom, there is a sort of tribute to one of his all-time great stories, The Metamorphosis – in “You Will Hear the Locust Sing”, a youngster in the same dilemma as Greg Samsa decides to take his life in hands, with true American fortitude. The question “what happened after Count Dracula was defeated?” is answered in “Abraham’s Boys”, but it may not be everyone’s cup of tea to see this negative take on a classic of the horror genre. I found it powerful, however – especially how the author depicts the tortured world of the Van Helsing children with such cruel clarity. Indeed, the disturbed and often terrifying world of misfit children and broken homes is a common theme in this collection – it permeates eight of the sixteen stories. Is it so bad in America now, one wonders. There are a stories without any element of horror (“Better Than Home”, “The Widow’s Breakfast”, “Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead”) which are still unsettling because of the human misery left unsaid underneath the bland narration. This is one thing that Joe Hill does beautifully; his prose is sometimes so prosaic and unemotional, almost Hemingway-esque, still it conveys a depth of feeling. Among all these stories, the title story stands out as the only one where a traditional ghost appears. But there is nothing frightening about this ghost – in fact, she is rather endearing and sexy. Through her, the author manages to convey what the magic of movies was before television forced itself into our living rooms. If you are a connoisseur of the unconventional, a fan of the disturbing and likes your literature to keep you awake than put you to sleep, this is the book for you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    Joe Hill makes me feel like I'm seven again. More specifically, I'm seven and he is the nine-year-old kid down the street hanging out with me in my tree fort telling me scary stories and urban legends that he swears are true. His voice is hushed, as if he is letting me in on a little known secret and I'm not quite sure whether to believe him but I'm mesmerized and a little afraid. Joe Hill gets the underdog and the misunderstood. He also writes childhood well, but it is when writing that mislabel Joe Hill makes me feel like I'm seven again. More specifically, I'm seven and he is the nine-year-old kid down the street hanging out with me in my tree fort telling me scary stories and urban legends that he swears are true. His voice is hushed, as if he is letting me in on a little known secret and I'm not quite sure whether to believe him but I'm mesmerized and a little afraid. Joe Hill gets the underdog and the misunderstood. He also writes childhood well, but it is when writing that mislabeled person that he truly shines. One story called Pop Art was not scary in the traditional sense. It was its own kind of brilliant, somehow age-old and refreshingly new. This short story collection is quite good. I listened to the audio and the narrator is perfect, which adds an important element in this genre. As with any collection of shorts, I liked some more than others but I give this extra credit for variety and interesting endings. 3.75 stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    I did it I finished the only story I couldn't make it through was the cockroach one. I much prefer his full length novels I did it I finished the only story I couldn't make it through was the cockroach one. I much prefer his full length novels

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    More often than not, Joe Hill characterizes the child’s life within these stories. I think that’s where our imaginations and fears are strongest, and when things scare us the most. When we are grown, most of that is gone…until we pick up a certain book. Shit, I love the way Hill writes. It is so utterly readable. He makes me believe in ghosts and the supernatural, but even more in the power of a simple story. I say that because not even half of the stories included here are meant to be frighteni More often than not, Joe Hill characterizes the child’s life within these stories. I think that’s where our imaginations and fears are strongest, and when things scare us the most. When we are grown, most of that is gone…until we pick up a certain book. Shit, I love the way Hill writes. It is so utterly readable. He makes me believe in ghosts and the supernatural, but even more in the power of a simple story. I say that because not even half of the stories included here are meant to be frightening. Some are just about people, like you and me. So, I have no qualms in giving 5 stars to 20th Century Ghosts. There were a few lesser-than-great short stories in here, but others were like shining lights, out of the park homeruns. Following is a short take on each: Best New Horror - Includes a story within the story called the Buttonboy, written by a truly creepy amateur writer named Kilrue, whose inspiration is very real. In this one, the getting there may be better than the finish. 20th Century Ghost - Very much a character-driven piece about a young woman who haunts the Rosebud theatre, and Alec Sheldon the man who spends his life there because of it. Not meant to be frightening, although I kept waiting for the other shoe to drop. A satisfying climax. Pop Art - Such a wildly different kind of story. I didn’t know at first if it was all in the kid’s head, or some sort of magical realism. I grew to care and wanted to defend this boy made of plastic and air. Such good stuff with a lesson for life. I wanted to effing cry. Is this the best of the bunch? A++++ You Will Hear the Locust Sing - An Ode to Franz Kafka and The Metamorphosis, but far darker and insidious. Didn’t think I would like it, but I surely did. Abraham’s Boys - Is their father a vampire hunter, or simply an abusive man who found an excuse to kill? A different take on a vampire tale. One that I enjoyed, but the story could have been stretched with a few more pages. I want to know more. Better Than Home - Some of this is summed up in the title. It’s a lovely, short analogy for one dad’s relationship with his boy. I had to think a bit about this one at the end. Baseball, fathers. Then it hit me. Gosh this was exceptional and beautifully understated. The Black Phone - A boy is abducted by the fat man with the black balloons. Just the right amount of tension and paranormal in here. I am always more scared for the young and innocent characters. Also, looking back on childhood, I remember the belief in the supernatural that vanishes with age. In the Rundown - The tables are turned in a very different sort of way for a young guy who doesn’t realize he’s judgmental a bully. I wasn’t sure about the meaning, or the point. Maybe there isn’t one for some situations. The Cape - Did the lucky blanket that became his cape make this boy fly? Now an adult, does any of that child’s wonder remain in Eric’s life? What I thought would be an introspective piece became the unexpected. Has a wow ending that had my mouth hanging open! Last Breath - Enter a museum that collects the last breaths sounds (or silences) people make. High creep factor. Short and not sweet. Dead-Wood - The runt of the litter. A Widow’s Breakfast - A straight tale with a hint of darkness, but really more literature than horror. I’ll call it a parable. A mourning vagrant (really sounds like too harsh a word) finds the gift Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead - Bobby bumps into his high school flame as zombie-extras on a film shoot at the local mall. Harriet is now married and Bobby was the “most-likely-to-succeed” bound for Hollywood. Things don’t always work out as we hope. Hill writes about life in so many different ways. Simple yet deep. “Everyone wants a do-over” My Father’s Mask - Super weird tale told from the viewpoint of a 13-year old with parents I could not fathom. Not without its moments of realness. Voluntary Commital - The longest of the book at 50 pages, and in some ways it is the most disturbing. Nolan tells the story of his younger, autistic brother Morris, his friend Eddie, and how they both went missing. It makes believe that holes can be made that lead to somewhere else. A place from where there is no return. Good from start to finish, and one of the best in this collection. If I had to judge, I’d give top honors to Pop Art and Better than Home, but this is almost too close to call. PS. Do not skip the acknowledgements.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was the most awful grueling book to get through. The stories had great starts (some of them anyways) but then just ended with no warning, and not even at a place that really made much sense. Some of these stories I think could have made an excellent book on their own had they been fully completed. It was very difficult to make my way through these stories. I kept hoping they would get better or I'd find one really great story in the mess. Some really grabbed my interest in the begining but This was the most awful grueling book to get through. The stories had great starts (some of them anyways) but then just ended with no warning, and not even at a place that really made much sense. Some of these stories I think could have made an excellent book on their own had they been fully completed. It was very difficult to make my way through these stories. I kept hoping they would get better or I'd find one really great story in the mess. Some really grabbed my interest in the begining but then just went dead...like a dud firecracker. Quite disappointed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul O'Neill

    A fantastic collection of stories, tightly written (like a certain family member). Short stories aren’t usually my thing but between this and his more recent collection of four novellas, Strange Weather, Joe Hill has maybe changed my mind. Some stories were better than others but there wasn’t a single dudd in this collection. My favourites were Pop Art (boy makes friends with Art, a balloon), Better Than Home (a nice Father-Son story) and the longer story at the end of the book, Voluntary Commit A fantastic collection of stories, tightly written (like a certain family member). Short stories aren’t usually my thing but between this and his more recent collection of four novellas, Strange Weather, Joe Hill has maybe changed my mind. Some stories were better than others but there wasn’t a single dudd in this collection. My favourites were Pop Art (boy makes friends with Art, a balloon), Better Than Home (a nice Father-Son story) and the longer story at the end of the book, Voluntary Commital (em... can’t really describe without spoiling). I’d go as far to say that Pop Art is one of the best things I’ve read all year and is up there with Loaded which is one of Hill’s stories in Strange Weather. Most of these stories are horror stories, although they are not blunt but rather subtle and scary as hell. I think I read the scariest thing ever in Best New Horror: ‘He made holes in my eyes and he said after he did it he saw my soul rush out. He said it made a sound like when you blow on an empty Coke bottle, real pretty. Then he put these over my eyes to keep my life trapped inside.’ As he speaks, Jim touches the smiley-face buttons. ‘He wants to see how long I can live without a soul inside me.’ Although mostly horror, Hill has some nicer stories in this collection and all of the stories are about the people in them and not just an excuse for some horror porn like other collections. You get an astronaut’s life whether you want it or not. Leave it all behind for a world you know nothing about. That’s just the deal. A worthwhile read from one of my favourite authors.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    Short story collections can be hit or miss. Some stories may be wonderful, others may be clunkers. Every story in “20th Century Ghosts” is wonderful, some are even superlative. While Hill is a horror writer, not all of the stories in this book are horror. And, some of the ones that deal with the typical subjects of horror are not horrific. To me, the best stories in this collection are: “20th Century Ghost”, a touching story about a haunted movie theater. “Abraham’s Boys”, a tale about teen-age re Short story collections can be hit or miss. Some stories may be wonderful, others may be clunkers. Every story in “20th Century Ghosts” is wonderful, some are even superlative. While Hill is a horror writer, not all of the stories in this book are horror. And, some of the ones that deal with the typical subjects of horror are not horrific. To me, the best stories in this collection are: “20th Century Ghost”, a touching story about a haunted movie theater. “Abraham’s Boys”, a tale about teen-age rebellion in unusual circumstances. “Better than Home”, a sweet story told from the perspective of the autistic son of a baseball coach. It really tugged at my heart. “My Father’s Mask”, a very creepy warped, fairytale-like story that left me with the shivers. “Voluntary Committal”, an indescribable fantasy/horror story about brotherly love. Be sure to read the acknowledgments at the end. Hill throws in a terrific little story as an encore. I have to admit that I am now a Joe Hill fan and will be on the lookout for his next book. His work isn’t formulaic; and, as some of his short stories prove, he leans more towards psychological horror than blood & gore. His work is rich and complex. His characters are multidimensional and realistic. I highly recommend Joe Hill’s work for anyone who wants a good read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Oddly enough, this collection was something of a hit or miss with me. When the stories hit, they hit hard and wonderfully and had me chortling with glee. Best Horror Story was easily my favorite. I really liked a number of the others, as well. What really got me, though, were the stories that, while emotionally engaging and had me chomping at the bit for more, just STOPPED. Anyone who has read these particular stories will know what I mean. Some of the best ended right where we should have gotten Oddly enough, this collection was something of a hit or miss with me. When the stories hit, they hit hard and wonderfully and had me chortling with glee. Best Horror Story was easily my favorite. I really liked a number of the others, as well. What really got me, though, were the stories that, while emotionally engaging and had me chomping at the bit for more, just STOPPED. Anyone who has read these particular stories will know what I mean. Some of the best ended right where we should have gotten a full blow-by-blow and it was FINE in some cases. In others, it was like... wtf? What kind of end is that? Is he going to get blamed for a murder he didn't commit or not? Huh? lol All in all, the writing is solid as hell and fun and while the endings come and go, the beginnings and middles are all pretty much tops. :) I had fun, regardless.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    This is my first ever Joe Hill book. Well, it is a collection of short stories to be exact. For the single titles of the stories, please refer to my status updates, where you can also see the individual ratings. As you can see, not every story was a winner for me but the majority was great. And among those with a low(er) rating, I noticed that the writing itself was always of high quality. One simply didn't belong in a horror collection in my opinion and one or two other(s) seemed too short, like This is my first ever Joe Hill book. Well, it is a collection of short stories to be exact. For the single titles of the stories, please refer to my status updates, where you can also see the individual ratings. As you can see, not every story was a winner for me but the majority was great. And among those with a low(er) rating, I noticed that the writing itself was always of high quality. One simply didn't belong in a horror collection in my opinion and one or two other(s) seemed too short, like a joke ending without the punch line. What was noticable in a number of stories was the subtlety with which the author delivered the supernatural kick to the reader's face. Like in the bonus story where I'm sure many a reader will have to go back to read one word at least twice before realizing what has been said. That is awesome! :D And some stories showed clearly that this is Stephen King's son - the characterization of a few people here was fantastic in an infuriating sort of way that I only know from the King of Horror. *lol* Great atmosphere, distinct characters in often very creepy situations ... (almost) perfect Spooktober read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    For a long time, this book was my “white whale”. Up to recently, I had three of Joe Hill’s novels (Heart-Shaped Box, Horns, NOS4A2) in hardcover and although 20th Century Ghosts was easily accessible in paperback or for download on my Kindle, I felt I needed to match my existing format and seek out the rare hardbound edition. With every second-hand bookstore I entered, this illusive short story collection was front and centre in my mind. Unfortunately, I just couldn’t find it. A few months ago I For a long time, this book was my “white whale”. Up to recently, I had three of Joe Hill’s novels (Heart-Shaped Box, Horns, NOS4A2) in hardcover and although 20th Century Ghosts was easily accessible in paperback or for download on my Kindle, I felt I needed to match my existing format and seek out the rare hardbound edition. With every second-hand bookstore I entered, this illusive short story collection was front and centre in my mind. Unfortunately, I just couldn’t find it. A few months ago I had all but given up until my lovely girlfriend surprised me with a copy for Christmas! Did I mention it was signed? My name might not be “Tom” but who cares? Close enough. 20th Century Ghosts is a collection of short stories dealing with the subjects of death, loss and fear. Although Joe Hill is an accomplished horror novelist, not everything in here will give you the willies. In fact, although one of the better stories - the collection’s namesake, 20th Century Ghost - features a spooky specter, it’s more nostalgic and sweet rather than scary. There are some great ones in here that I really enjoyed. “Best New Horror” tells of a magazine editor who has fallen into a rut - both professionally and personally - before coming across a new story so enthralling that it sets him on a quest to find its reclusive author. “Pop Art” did a real number on me and is probably my favourite of the bunch. It is a sad, coming of age tale about two friends who experience profound loss - did I mention one of them is an inflatable human? I still struggle with short story collections in that I’m so accustomed to long-form fiction that reading several tales in one session tends to burn me out a lot faster. I need to process a story after I finish one and then refocus on another. Maybe they’re better read in short bursts. I should probably adapt this strategy in the future. 20th Century Ghosts is a glimpse into Hill’s past as several of the stories were written just as he was starting out as a published author - a time when he was relatively unknown and people didn’t know he was Uncle Stevie’s boy. It’s worth checking out for die hard fans and genre fiction enthusiasts alike.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    The title seems false and the stories are lame. 0 of 10 stars

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mauoijenn

    Loved it!!! Loved it!!!! Loved it!!!!! These stories have got to be the best in any collection I have ever read. Hill's imagination is a wild ride I would stand in line for all day. I can't get enough from this man! Spooky, scary, frightening and just down right crazy... I love it all. Loved it!!! Loved it!!!! Loved it!!!!! These stories have got to be the best in any collection I have ever read. Hill's imagination is a wild ride I would stand in line for all day. I can't get enough from this man! Spooky, scary, frightening and just down right crazy... I love it all.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    4.5 stars for the collection as a whole As always, I find Hill's work compulsively readable and eminently enjoyable. My favourites here are probably "Better than Home" and "Voluntary Committal," followed closely by "Abraham's Boys" and "The Cape." But there's nothing bad or weak in here, just varying degrees of good to excellent. Best New Horror (4/5) One of those stories that isn't creepy until it is, and the obviousness makes it more so rather than less. I love endings where the reader's mind ke 4.5 stars for the collection as a whole As always, I find Hill's work compulsively readable and eminently enjoyable. My favourites here are probably "Better than Home" and "Voluntary Committal," followed closely by "Abraham's Boys" and "The Cape." But there's nothing bad or weak in here, just varying degrees of good to excellent. Best New Horror (4/5) One of those stories that isn't creepy until it is, and the obviousness makes it more so rather than less. I love endings where the reader's mind keeps spinning after the last word and fills in the blank space on the final page. 20th Century Ghost (4/5) A wistful ghost story, with elements of nostalgia for film and movie houses. I kept thinking about my own history of growing up with film, and transitions such as going from 70mm to digital. The sound of film in a projector and the hot and dusty smell of the light, those have been replaced by digital silence and cool LED. Not a bad thing, just different; sensory elements removed from the experience. Pop Art (4/5) A fantastical and emotive story that examines the transformative power of friendship. In a friendship, especially in a friendship between two young boys, you are allowed to inflict a certain amount of pain. This is even expected. But you must cause no serious injury; you must never, under any circumstances, leave wounds that will result in permanent scars. You Will Hear the Locust Sing (4/5) The first few lines set a vivid stage for the body horror to come, and it just keeps on going: Francis Kay woke from dreams that were not uneasy, but exultant, and found himself an insect. He was not surprised, had thought this might happen. Or not thought: hoped, fantasized, and if not for this precise thing, then something like it. Sooooo creepy! Abraham's Boys (4.5/5) Ever wonder what kind of parent Abraham Van Helsing made after taking up with Mina? Pretty much what you would expect, and makes you wonder who is the actual monster hunter of the family? Better Than Home (5/5) Comical, sad, happy, vivid, and everything else a slice of life is. I loved this story and kept reading sections out loud to my mom, who was sitting next to me with her own book. It doesn't "go" anywhere, it just is what it is. The Black Phone (4/5) True horror from start to finish. Honestly, though, I'm not good with abduction stories. They freak me out. There's a reason I've never read the book or watched the film Room. In the Rundown (3/5) The story had a good start but needed a final turn for a truly devastating finish to be implied. It stopped just short of making the outcome inevitable, which lessened the impact a bit. The Cape (4.5/5) Great! You think it's a story about a little bit of the fantastic in the life of an otherwise ordinary non-achiever. It is, but it's got a horror element that appears seemingly out of nowhere. Last Breath (4/5) This story about the Museum of Silence and its unique collection reminded me of the Black Museum from Season 4, Episode 6 of Black Mirror. The curator here, however, seemed much more refined. Dead-Wood (3/5) Less a story and more a bit of thoughtful musing. The roots of a shattered tree still drink for months after death, so used to the habit of life they can't give it up. Something that doesn't know it's alive obviously can't be expected to know when it's dead. The Widow's Breakfast (3.5/5) Descriptive and sad; nicely written but the end was a bit too abrupt. It would have been excellent for me if only the end had just been pushed a bit. Bobby Conroy Comes Back From the Dead (3/5 stars) While working as extras on George Romero's classic, "Night of the Living Dead," two former high school flames experience sad and slightly angry feelings of nostalgia about their road not taken together. This was OK, but I didn't love it. My Father's Mask (4.5/5) One of  those stories where I'm not completely sure what happened, but I know I loved it. There is an undercurrent of dreamlike dread and unease that runs throughout and never really resolves. Voluntary Committal (5/5) My favourite kind of story, and one in which both Joe Hill and Stephen King excel. A story of the ordinary, emotional life of a person who finds themselves confronted unexpectedly with the slightly fantastical.  There's no real way of knowing whether the event will ultimately result in horror or happiness except keep moving through it to the end. How exciting it is to hold a box and not be sure what's in it. What it might contain. A whole world might be closed in there. Who could tell from the outside? The featureless outside. Bonus Story: Scheherazade's Typewriter If you read the acknowledgments at the end of this collection, you will come across a small gift left by Hill for the dedicated and persistent reader, a meta story not listed in the Table of Contents.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    I first heard of Joe Hill after winning a bundle of used hardcovers on Ebay. Among the books in the lot were several King, some limited edition Laymon, a Straub or two, and two first editions by an author of which I had never heard. Heart Shaped Box and 20th Century Ghosts were in fantastic condition, and seemed to have never been read. I threw these two books on my shelf and forgot all about them. Later that year, I found a book at my local BAM entitled Horns. The premise piqued my interest, so I first heard of Joe Hill after winning a bundle of used hardcovers on Ebay. Among the books in the lot were several King, some limited edition Laymon, a Straub or two, and two first editions by an author of which I had never heard. Heart Shaped Box and 20th Century Ghosts were in fantastic condition, and seemed to have never been read. I threw these two books on my shelf and forgot all about them. Later that year, I found a book at my local BAM entitled Horns. The premise piqued my interest, so I bought the hardcover, devoured it over the course of three days, and then went to place the book on my shelf in alphabetic order by author. Low and behold, I laid eyes on two other books by the same writer, the aforementioned ones I'd won in the bundle, which I had forgotten all about. It wasn't until I finished Heart Shaped Box (which was in slightly less perfect condition in comparison to 20th Century Ghosts) and went in search of more Joe Hill goodness on Amazon that I found out that Hill is Stephen King's son. Surprise, surprise! The following year, Hill released NOS4A2 and cemented his place as one of my new favorite authors. Still, I hadn't read 20th Century Ghosts. You may be asking yourself why, and the answer is one that all book collectors can sympathize with: my hardcover copy is a first edition AND it is in pristine condition. I wouldn't crack that book open if you put a gun to my head. But I had to read it, of course I did, so I bought the ebook and added the audio book as a companion purchase. And let me tell you, the audio book is the way to go. Notes on the Audible Edition: David Ledoux has a unique narrative voice. Every story herein is worth a read, but David's narration gives them that little something extra that just makes 'em pop. On the down side, the music, while thoroughly creepy, was produced at an entirely different volume than the spoken word. I had to turn down my device every time a story ended for fear of rupturing my ear drums when the musical intro for the next story began. Other than that, I recommend the Audible version. Now, I will not be reviewing each and every story because they're all above average. I will warn that some of these tales have no ending. They are not open endings, or bad ending, but the stories of which I speak are completely devoid of any closing scene. They simply STOP. A perfect example of this is the opener, "Best New Horror", which is also one of the best stories in the collection. My absolute favorite story in the collection is "Pop Art", and that's because of the sheer originality of the tale. Going into 20th Century Ghosts, I knew nothing about "Pop Art", and I hope you have the same option. Even giving you a brief, vague synopsis would ruin the experience, so I will move on. Other notable tales are "20th Century Ghost", "The Black Phone", "The Cape" (which has one of the best endings I've ever read where short stories are concerned), and the uber imaginative "Voluntary Committal". The only story I disliked was "Abraham's Boys". Hill tried too damn hard to breathe new life into overused, out-of-date characters, and it resulted in the book's only failure. That one story slowed the book down and gummed up the collection's works so badly I was compelled to knock off a full star from the overall rating. Yes, it was that bad. If I had to rate "Abraham's Boys" on its own, I would give it two stars. Everything else gets fours and fives. You should know that these are not short stories; not technically anyway. Hill suffers the same what-ails-him as his father. Neither man seems to grasp the concept of "short", but they write so damn well that you barely notice that their outings are more along the line of novelettes and novellas than they are short stories. In summation: A terrific collection of longer short stories, and far more literary in scope than your average horror anthology. If you're a fan of Stephen King's Skeleton Crew or Neil Gaiman's Smoke and Mirrors, you should enjoy 20th Century Ghosts. (A Note to Completionists: Hill hides a short story in the afterward, so make sure you don't skip the acknowledgment section. You're welcome.)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Wow. What better word to start this review? Joe Hill has a true gift for the short story. All short story collections are somewhat hit and miss with me. Some stories are great, some good, some okay, and some meh. That's pretty much the standard with even my favorite short story authors: Stephen King, Neil Gaiman, George R.R. Martin. But I'm definitely putting Joe Hill on that list now. His stories vary as well between excellent and meh, but even the "meh" category stories are written with his sub Wow. What better word to start this review? Joe Hill has a true gift for the short story. All short story collections are somewhat hit and miss with me. Some stories are great, some good, some okay, and some meh. That's pretty much the standard with even my favorite short story authors: Stephen King, Neil Gaiman, George R.R. Martin. But I'm definitely putting Joe Hill on that list now. His stories vary as well between excellent and meh, but even the "meh" category stories are written with his subtle flare. It cannot be denied that his stories flow smoothly, and this goes for the best as well as the worst of the lot. There really aren't any bad stories in this group. Some are better than others, and a few left me unsatisfied. But even those were engaging. Even the two page "Dead-Wood" was beautifully crafted and left me feeling like I had gained something. And the best of the lot? Oh, man. Those were solidly awesome. "Pop Art", "Abraham's Boys", "Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead", "My Father's Mask", "Voluntary Committal", and "Better Than Home" were stories that will stick with me for a long time indeed. Often when I read a collection, certain stories make me wonder if I've wasted my time. 20th Century Ghosts did not. In fact, it made me want more. Luckily, Joe's new novel is due out tomorrow.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle

    Oh how I love a collection of short stories! Joe Hill delivers yet again, these stories are creepy, bizarre and wonderful.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    I love Fall. Football has returned to the airwaves. The leaves are changing colors, and there’s a cold snap in the…oh, who am I kidding. This is Texas. If we’re lucky, it will only be 85 degrees with 95% humidity as you’re reading this. Still, I really do like the idea of Fall, though, and if I have to make my own chill, well, then, so be it. The best way I know of to bring a chill to the air is to break out the scary stories. Luckily for us, one of the finest collections of contemporary hor I love Fall. Football has returned to the airwaves. The leaves are changing colors, and there’s a cold snap in the…oh, who am I kidding. This is Texas. If we’re lucky, it will only be 85 degrees with 95% humidity as you’re reading this. Still, I really do like the idea of Fall, though, and if I have to make my own chill, well, then, so be it. The best way I know of to bring a chill to the air is to break out the scary stories. Luckily for us, one of the finest collections of contemporary horror stories has just been released in the US. Some of you may have picked up a debut novel this past Spring called Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill (If you didn’t, go ahead and grab one now. I’ll wait.). It was a terrific book: fast-paced, subtle, surprisingly touching, and truly creepy. But you might not know that way back in 2005 a British publisher called PS Publishing took note of a spate of award-winning stories by a new American author and collected them all together into a book called 20th Century Ghosts. The book garnered many award mentions and landed on numerous best-of lists, but it was only available in Britain. Darn greedy Brits. Lucky for us, an American version is finally available, just in time to add some spice to our Fall. As a bonus, because we had to wait so long, we get an extra story not included in the British edition. Take that, greedy Brits! Joe Hill is a mighty-fine writer, and this collection really showcases his talent. Are you looking for a sweet and subtle ghost story with some cogent points to make about aging and regret? Look no further than “20th Century Ghost.” Did you ever wonder what it would be like if you introduced Franz Kafka to the Nuclear Age (or just have a fondness for giant bugs)? Check out “You Will Hear the Locust Sing.” Maybe you favor a meditation on friendship and persecution? Take a look at “Pop Art,” which Christopher Golden (rightly) called transcendent. But wait a minute. I was talking about chills, wasn’t I? Maybe that’s what you want; the hard stuff. Like “Black Phone,” where a small child trapped in a very bad place receives phone calls from the dead. Or “Last Breath,” which starts out creepy and then sinks into downright disturbing. No, I know. You need a harsh story. A modern story. A story that actually uses your knowledge of horror conventions to build its atmosphere. You need “Year’s Best Horror.” 20th Century Ghosts is a terrific collection, and one that really makes use of Joe Hill’s talents. The stories differ in tone but share a style and subtlety and emotional impact – Hill weaves a web of such dark beauty that you long to be ensnared.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Stewart

    This was a reread for me and it will always be something special to me. It earned a place on my bookshelf as the best short story collection I had ever read. I often found such collections jarring in the past because of the ever changing tones and paces that can happen when reading collections. However, when I read this book for the first time I was engrossed and found every tale just as engaging as the next. That was then and this is now. I dropped my rating by one star because while their are This was a reread for me and it will always be something special to me. It earned a place on my bookshelf as the best short story collection I had ever read. I often found such collections jarring in the past because of the ever changing tones and paces that can happen when reading collections. However, when I read this book for the first time I was engrossed and found every tale just as engaging as the next. That was then and this is now. I dropped my rating by one star because while their are masterfully told stories here not all of them are of the same quality. 20th Century Ghost and Pop Art are masterpieces, filled with horror and sorrow and regret and delight. The rest unfortunately don’t come close to the high standard set by them. However, if you haven’t read this collection I think it’s very worth while, especially as a horror fan. I also feel it’s a collection that can be offered to non horror fans and they’d enjoy it. Joe Hill has a fantastic talent for making you care, for writing his tales that despite how grotesque they are you root for someone in them.

  26. 4 out of 5

    joyce g

    What a marvel..Pop Art!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jim Ef

    People say the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. In this case, the apple fell very near indeed, but it got on the ground, grew its own roots and now it stands a proud tree. As you can imagine that is quite an achievement, when the tree that you fell from is named Stephen King. Before I write my thoughts on this book, I need to tell some very important things. First that not all the stories on this collection, are horror stories. Sure if you must put it in only one category, that would be the People say the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. In this case, the apple fell very near indeed, but it got on the ground, grew its own roots and now it stands a proud tree. As you can imagine that is quite an achievement, when the tree that you fell from is named Stephen King. Before I write my thoughts on this book, I need to tell some very important things. First that not all the stories on this collection, are horror stories. Sure if you must put it in only one category, that would be the one, but I find that unfair. Horror stories make you scared and give you a sense of fear. Those are by far not the only feelings you will get while reading this book. Secondly, here we have a collection of short stories, so they have the pros and cons of short stories. If you are not a fan, it would be better for you to let this one go. I had to choose only three stories to talk about, I would love to share my thoughts of all of them, but it would become quite a big review, not that is a short one now or that someone actually gives a damn about my thoughts. 1.Best new horror: A horror magazine publisher reads for a first time in many years an original story. The story is so good but he can’t find the author, so he becomes kind of obsessed. His search finally pays off... although he wish it wouldn’t. The plot is not anything new and the reason I ( and dare I say many people ) don’t enjoy most of the horror fiction (movies or books), is that the genre struggles from originality. Everything is too darn predictable. We know what is going to happen before it does. Imagine how good someone must be to turn this problem into their own favor. Joe Hill is that good. He knows what you are expecting and he drags you there, even when you don’t wanna go anymore, he is still taking you there. It’s like walking on a dark street on a windy night. You know that you are alone, you know that the sounds you hear are coming from the wind. You shouldn’t be scared…. You shouldn’t, but you are. 2.Pop Art: Right after I finish reading Pop Art I closed the book. It took me 5 minutes to do something else, to think anything else. I was upset, sad and…and i can’t even describe what was I feeling. Unlike “Best new horror” this is original. Here is the first line of the story “My best friend when I was twelve was inflatable” I thought that this is kind of ridiculous. It took mr.Hill 25 pages to make go from that to what I previously described. This story is a punch right in the heart. (6 stars) 3.Voluntary Committal: The last story in this book and what a way to end it. Sometimes it doesn’t matter if you are a kid or an adult. You might know something but you can’t say anything. If you are a kid it’s your imagination, if you are an adult you are crazy. I don’t want to say much about this unique story, so I’ll keep it short. We learn what we learn from Nolan (the narrator) who shortly after his younger brother Morris went missing, got some forgotten memories back. Memories about Eddie, his childhood friend who was last seen back in 1977. He is not sure if the two stories are somehow connected, but even if he was, he couldn’t say anything. It was very hard to choose those three stories so here are the ratings for the rest. 20th Century Ghost 4 You Will Hear The Locust Sing 4.5 (Kafka was clearly an inspiration for this one) "Abraham's Boys" 4 Better Than Home 4.5 The Black Phone 5 In The Rundown 5 The Cape 4 Last Breath 4.5 "Dead-Wood" 3 (it's only 1 page) "The Widow's Breakfast" 4 My Father's Mask 5 All I have left to say is, Have a great reading guys.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    *Re-Read (audio) in 2015 (originally read in 2010)* 4.5 stars This is a great story collection, which is interesting, because I was pretty disappointed by author Joe Hill's first two novels, Heart-Shaped Box and Horns . I thought they both started very strong and then fizzled about half-way through. Maybe Hill is better writing in the short form? The theme running most of these stories are kids coming of age through unexplained events and phenomenon that will stay with them forever, even as *Re-Read (audio) in 2015 (originally read in 2010)* 4.5 stars This is a great story collection, which is interesting, because I was pretty disappointed by author Joe Hill's first two novels, Heart-Shaped Box and Horns . I thought they both started very strong and then fizzled about half-way through. Maybe Hill is better writing in the short form? The theme running most of these stories are kids coming of age through unexplained events and phenomenon that will stay with them forever, even as they get older. There's a romantic, nostalgic quality to the writing that really resonates throughout, and Hill is really gifted at capturing the voice of a young boy. The title story, "20th Century Ghost," is one of the best short stories I've read. It really touched me and sets the standard for the whole collection. Other standout tales from the collection are "Pop Art," "The Cape," "Last Breath," "Bobby Conroy Comes Back From The Dead," and the great novella that closes the collection, "Voluntary Committal." And "My Father's Mask" is so uncomfortably disturbing! I decided to try my hand at audiobooks for the first time to help me through long commutes, and I thought re-reading this collection would be a great way to start. The reader was engaging and was great at voicing the kids. I would recommend this to anyone that enjoys coming of age tales and horror stories. This is a wonderful collection and deserves to be right up there with the great collections from Richard Matheson and Stephen King.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    A great short story collection. Check out my status updates for my opinions on each story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Gaffney

    Best New Horror - Okay. I would have liked to see the story expanded and continued. 20th Century Ghost - Really good. A nice, but still creepy, "love" story for horror buffs. Pop Art - The best short story that I have ever read. Can't go into too many details without giving away spoilers. You Will Hear the Locust Sing - Nice story with a 1950s "giant monster" movie feel. Abraham's Boys - Nice "continuing" tale of Van Helsing from Dracula. Good ending. Better Than Home - Eh, sucked. The Black Phone - A Best New Horror - Okay. I would have liked to see the story expanded and continued. 20th Century Ghost - Really good. A nice, but still creepy, "love" story for horror buffs. Pop Art - The best short story that I have ever read. Can't go into too many details without giving away spoilers. You Will Hear the Locust Sing - Nice story with a 1950s "giant monster" movie feel. Abraham's Boys - Nice "continuing" tale of Van Helsing from Dracula. Good ending. Better Than Home - Eh, sucked. The Black Phone - Another fine, scary story. I feel like Joe Hill, at this point, already does short stories better than his dad. In the Rundown - Okay at best. The Cape - My third fav after Pop Art. Gave me the chills. Last Breath - Very chilling. I would love to see this made into a tv show of some sort. Dead-Wood - Could have saved some trees and done without this one. The Widow's Breakfast - The daughter's were creepy. Would have liked just a story about them. Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead - Eh. One of my least favorite. Seems to just remind the reader that Joe Hill grew up being Stephen King's son. My Father's Mask - WOW. If I hadn't already read Pop Art, then this would be my fav short story. Simply amazing. Voluntary Committal - Nice build up of dread as the story went along, but I felt it was a little dragged out.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.