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The Endless Quest... Troubles and delays continued to mount as Garion, Belgarath, Polgara, and the company pursued Zandramas across the known world. Possessed by the Dark Destiny, she had stolen Garion's infant son for a ritual that would destroy all that men valued. She was always one step ahead, taunting and spying on them, flying over in the form of a great dragon. Her a The Endless Quest... Troubles and delays continued to mount as Garion, Belgarath, Polgara, and the company pursued Zandramas across the known world. Possessed by the Dark Destiny, she had stolen Garion's infant son for a ritual that would destroy all that men valued. She was always one step ahead, taunting and spying on them, flying over in the form of a great dragon. Her armies, led by a Demon Lord, threatened on one side; on the other were the forces of Emperor Zakath, seeking to capture them. Somehow, as the Seeress of Kell had warned, they had to be at the Place Which Is No More for the ritual at the same time as Zandramas, or face disaster. But where that might be they still had no clue.


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The Endless Quest... Troubles and delays continued to mount as Garion, Belgarath, Polgara, and the company pursued Zandramas across the known world. Possessed by the Dark Destiny, she had stolen Garion's infant son for a ritual that would destroy all that men valued. She was always one step ahead, taunting and spying on them, flying over in the form of a great dragon. Her a The Endless Quest... Troubles and delays continued to mount as Garion, Belgarath, Polgara, and the company pursued Zandramas across the known world. Possessed by the Dark Destiny, she had stolen Garion's infant son for a ritual that would destroy all that men valued. She was always one step ahead, taunting and spying on them, flying over in the form of a great dragon. Her armies, led by a Demon Lord, threatened on one side; on the other were the forces of Emperor Zakath, seeking to capture them. Somehow, as the Seeress of Kell had warned, they had to be at the Place Which Is No More for the ritual at the same time as Zandramas, or face disaster. But where that might be they still had no clue.

30 review for Sorceress of Darshiva

  1. 5 out of 5

    MrsJoseph *grouchy*

    I find it rather strange that The Belgariad and The Malloreon are my favorite series. I read this series every year [at least] but I still see so many issues in the way women are characterized. But it’s still my favorite series. When I have reading slumps or I’m feeling out of sorts, this is the series that I always turn to. I see it’s faults (characterization, slow pace, repetition, etc) but I still love it. And I recommend it (to people who like old school Fantasy) quite often. So even though I find it rather strange that The Belgariad and The Malloreon are my favorite series. I read this series every year [at least] but I still see so many issues in the way women are characterized. But it’s still my favorite series. When I have reading slumps or I’m feeling out of sorts, this is the series that I always turn to. I see it’s faults (characterization, slow pace, repetition, etc) but I still love it. And I recommend it (to people who like old school Fantasy) quite often. So even though a lot of the below are complaints, don’t get it twisted: I LOVE this series and I will be reading it again in 2018 (ooorrrr maybe again in 2017). With that said, let’s get started!! Love this quote about Belgarion! "There was some turmoil in Katakor, your Majesty - up around Ashaba. It was the sort of thing one might associate with Belgarion - strange lights in the sky, explosions, that sort of thing. P21 So. Let's talk Nadraks and sexism. Women - all women - are property in Nadrak. The way the authors made this "ok" is that the owners of the women aren't allowed to touch them, they just own them. *rolls eyes* The Nadrak women all carry sharp knives that they use to cut any man who would dare touch her person without permission. And because they're feisty! *rolls eyes* The woman also gets 1/2 of her "sale price" when/if her owner decides to sell her. The typical Nadrak woman does not get married until she's been with the man for some time and (usually) have had at least 1 child by him. Though marriage can happen without children. But because women are property – sometimes they are required to wear a collar and chain. Need I say more? You know, I will! Let’s talk the characterization of [basically all] women who are designated antagonists. Starting with this book and Zandramas, the current Child of Dark (she’s the Big Bad): "Anyway, among his [Naradas] followers there was a young Grolim priestess named Zandramas. She must have been about sixteen then, and very beautiful, I've heard. Naradas reintroduced the old forms of worship, and the altar in the Temple at Hemil ran with blood." He shuddered. "It seems that the young priestess was the most enthusiastic participant in the Grolim rite of sacrifice – either out of an excess of fanaticism, or innate cruelty, or because she knew that this was the best way to attract the eye of the new archpriest. There are rumors that she attracted his eye in other ways as well. She'd unearthed a very obscure passage in the Book of Torak that seem to say that the rite of sacrifice should be performed unclad. They say that Zandramas has a striking figure, and I guess the combination of blood and her nakedness completely inflamed Naradas. I've heard that things used to happen in the sanctum of the Temple during the rite I cannot be described in the presence of ladies." P115 When Zandramas first became possessed by the Dark Spirit, she "...reached the edge of the city, she stripped off her clothes and ran naked into the forest." P115 What is with constant association of “bad women” and “sexually active but unmarried?” I have to say it doesn’t pass the smell test. For another example, we need to look back at book two of this series, The King of the Murgos. The King of the Murgos has another female antagonist, Chabat. Chabat also had sex with her Archpriest - as well as another Grolim priest while performing disgusting rituals. Chabbat was described as once beautiful (she scarred herself for religion) but after her scarring ritual was referred to as “that scar-faced hag.” Chabat was also innately cruel and delighted in blood. Hmmmmmm And this is just another passing quote about Polgara being an Alorn – even though Belgarath the Sorcerer will negate all of this. "Polgara is an Alorn? 'Zakath sounded surprised. "Use your eyes, man. Her hair's dark, I'll grant you, but her twin sister was as blonde as a wheat field. Look at her cheekbones and her jaw. I rule a kingdom of Alorns and I know what they look like. She and Liselle could be sisters." P198 Favorite Quote: I'm very disappointed in you, Kheldar. You're a spy, an assassin, and a thief. You cheat at dice, you counterfeit money, and you're unscrupulous with married women. You swindle your customers outrageously and you soak up ale like a sponge. You're the most corrupt man I've ever known, but you refuse to transport a few harmless little compounds that will make your customers very happy." "A man has to draw the line somewhere," Silk reply loftily. -31 Omnibus Edition

  2. 4 out of 5

    S. Pearce

    If you like fantasy, aren't troubled by uncomplicated plots, don't really mind that characterisation is pretty thin, then you will like this book. Most of the characters are annoyingly smug. I think my favourite character of them all is the wolf, who appears towards the end of the book, because her simple understanding of the world about her is a fresh change from the frequent smarmy comments of the other characters. It might sound like I didn't enjoy this book, but I did. This is because I read If you like fantasy, aren't troubled by uncomplicated plots, don't really mind that characterisation is pretty thin, then you will like this book. Most of the characters are annoyingly smug. I think my favourite character of them all is the wolf, who appears towards the end of the book, because her simple understanding of the world about her is a fresh change from the frequent smarmy comments of the other characters. It might sound like I didn't enjoy this book, but I did. This is because I read the book early in the morning, on my way to work, when my brain has barely switched on, and the easy, reasonably predicatable storyline, the magic, the monsters and demons, is just what I need at that time of the day. Along with my cup of coffee.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jane Jago

    Warming up nicely now. But I still wish Garion had a bit more side to him...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    Fluffy, silly, and fun The Malloreon books are, let's be honest, not incredibly well written. All the main characters have started to sound the same, they all use the same idioms and expressions, and things got far too well for them. It's like a band of Mary Sues. I still love this book. It's fun to read, the events and writing are fun and good enough to be enjoyable. It's not war and peace, but it's still a fun read. Fluffy, silly, and fun The Malloreon books are, let's be honest, not incredibly well written. All the main characters have started to sound the same, they all use the same idioms and expressions, and things got far too well for them. It's like a band of Mary Sues. I still love this book. It's fun to read, the events and writing are fun and good enough to be enjoyable. It's not war and peace, but it's still a fun read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    Thoughts after a reread a decade later. There is a lot of travel in this book, much through a war zone. Everyone has plenty of witty dialogue to share & we learn up close more about the Karands & the Melcenes. I love the Melcenes. We also learn more about the Nadraks as Yarblek, Silk's partner and Vella, Yarblek's woman appear in it more often than others. Queen Porenn of Drasnia spends some time teaching wild & free Vella how to be a lady. I cannot for the life of me figure out how Nadrak society Thoughts after a reread a decade later. There is a lot of travel in this book, much through a war zone. Everyone has plenty of witty dialogue to share & we learn up close more about the Karands & the Melcenes. I love the Melcenes. We also learn more about the Nadraks as Yarblek, Silk's partner and Vella, Yarblek's woman appear in it more often than others. Queen Porenn of Drasnia spends some time teaching wild & free Vella how to be a lady. I cannot for the life of me figure out how Nadrak society works. Women are property but they are well armed and dangerous property that chooses their owners & gets half the sales price. They dance provocatively, deliberately to make men wild, and then pull knives on the guys. Vella has been abroad in the world since she was 12. So her father sold her as a 12 year old to some guy? Is 12 the age of consent? Was her first owner a wannabe pedophile? (since touching gets you stabbed it has to be just a wannabe) I can kind of, just barely, get my head around the idea of adult women being legally property but actually having complete body autonomy & men just accepting they will get stabbed if they touch where touch isn't wanted. I kind of like the idea of armed women stabbing gropers until as men, as a whole in society, learn to keep their hands to themselves. But I can't make it work with a 12 year old girl. Between all the bad women being characterized as sexually lax in some way, the whole of Nadrak society, and Polgara's rampant misandry, this book has some rough spots for me. But just some rough spots. They don't really much diminish my enjoyment in the story but they need to be acknowledged.

  6. 5 out of 5

    L.A.L.

    April 2020: continuing my reread of The Malloreon.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sotiris Karaiskos

    Shortly before the end, in the fourth book in the series, our heroes continue to roam in the war zone, trying to make sense out of the various prophecies to be able to find the place of the final confrontation. Of course this work is not easy at all, but it slowly seems to be getting untagled and they understand what they have to do. In short, there is not much happening and the book is more a preparation for the last one where everything will be decided. In general, however, I feel that the ser Shortly before the end, in the fourth book in the series, our heroes continue to roam in the war zone, trying to make sense out of the various prophecies to be able to find the place of the final confrontation. Of course this work is not easy at all, but it slowly seems to be getting untagled and they understand what they have to do. In short, there is not much happening and the book is more a preparation for the last one where everything will be decided. In general, however, I feel that the series begins to lose momentum and somehow becomes tedious and repetitive, so fortunately is completed the next book that I'm sure will have more interest. Λίγο πριν το τέλος, στο τέταρτο βιβλίο της σειράς οι ήρωες μας εξακολουθούν να περιφέρονται στην εμπόλεμη ζώνη προσπαθώντας να βγάλουν άκρη με τις διάφορες προφητείες για να μπορέσουν να βρουν τον τόπο όπου θα γίνει η τελική αναμέτρηση. Φυσικά αυτό το έργο τους δεν είναι καθόλου εύκολο αλλά σιγά σιγά φαίνεται τα πράγματα να ξεμπλέκονται και με καταλαβαίνουν τι ακριβώς πρέπει να κάνουν. Με λίγα λόγια δεν γίνεται και πολλά πράγματα και το βιβλίο είναι περισσότερο μία προετοιμασία για το τελευταίο όπου θα κριθούν και τα πάντα. Γενικότερα, όμως, έχω την αίσθηση ότι η σειρά αρχίζει να χάνει τη δυναμική της και κάπως να γίνεται κουραστική και επαναλαμβανόμενη, οπότε ευτυχώς ολοκληρώνεται στο επόμενο βιβλίο που είμαι σίγουρος ότι θα έχει περισσότερο ενδιαφέρον.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    As the fourth in the Malloreon series this book sees things get serious, setting up the characters and the story for the finale to come. Here our intrepid crew manage to uncover an undamaged version of the Ashabine Oracles, a vital piece of the puzzle that leads them to the next stage in their quest and the very thing that allows Garion to see the truth behind what he might have to sacrifice to stop Zandramas' plans. As our heroes continue their quest war breaks out amongst the various factions As the fourth in the Malloreon series this book sees things get serious, setting up the characters and the story for the finale to come. Here our intrepid crew manage to uncover an undamaged version of the Ashabine Oracles, a vital piece of the puzzle that leads them to the next stage in their quest and the very thing that allows Garion to see the truth behind what he might have to sacrifice to stop Zandramas' plans. As our heroes continue their quest war breaks out amongst the various factions and races that have been stirred up by Zandramas and her henchment as they lead the world to the edge of destruction. While the writing doesn't offer much more than the previous novels, the story and the characters have become warm and familiar making this a joy to read despite its flaws and somewhat predictable events and outcomes. Bring on the epic final book in all its good vs evil glory (as I bet that's exactly what it's going to be).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonel

    I love the in depth history and geography that Eddings develops here. I could easily picture travelling alongside the characters while they were on their quest. The sense of inevitability was inescapable. The different uses of the will & the world kept me entertained as the increasing intensity of the plot had me glued to the pages. The characters were a lot of fun too. I truly enjoyed the time I spent with them. I love how each of them stood out on their own, yet really fit together as a group I love the in depth history and geography that Eddings develops here. I could easily picture travelling alongside the characters while they were on their quest. The sense of inevitability was inescapable. The different uses of the will & the world kept me entertained as the increasing intensity of the plot had me glued to the pages. The characters were a lot of fun too. I truly enjoyed the time I spent with them. I love how each of them stood out on their own, yet really fit together as a group as well. The well-developed accents for each region really serve to bring this world together while also allowing each person to stand out. This was a very entertaining tale that has me dying for the conclusion of this high intensity tale.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mollie Clarke

    A fitting lead up to the final book. A lot happens in this book, some of which will be a interesting but pleasant surprise to the reader. Nearing the end of their journey Garion and his friends find themselves in a lot of sticky situations in this book. An enjoyable and exciting read for a book which may be considered the hardest to get right. I can't wait to read the last and final book of the series. A fitting lead up to the final book. A lot happens in this book, some of which will be a interesting but pleasant surprise to the reader. Nearing the end of their journey Garion and his friends find themselves in a lot of sticky situations in this book. An enjoyable and exciting read for a book which may be considered the hardest to get right. I can't wait to read the last and final book of the series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gary Sundell

    That was a quick fun reread. First read this upon its release in hardcover.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mark Oppenlander

    Before starting this review, I read a few plot summaries of this book to refresh my memory (I've since started the fifth book in the series and I didn't want to conflate them) and I also read a few reviews, just to see what some other people thought. These actions confirmed two things for me: First, that there isn't actually all that much plot in these novels and second, that there is a lot of repetition of themes and ideas. The fourth installment of The Malloreon finds our heroes in the far East Before starting this review, I read a few plot summaries of this book to refresh my memory (I've since started the fifth book in the series and I didn't want to conflate them) and I also read a few reviews, just to see what some other people thought. These actions confirmed two things for me: First, that there isn't actually all that much plot in these novels and second, that there is a lot of repetition of themes and ideas. The fourth installment of The Malloreon finds our heroes in the far East, still traveling toward a confrontation between the two destinies. As with previous books in the series, they travel to various locations and have relatively brief encounters with a variety of people, seeking out information. In this case, they travel through the island nation of Melcena, followed by Peldane, Gandahar and eventually Darshiva. They meet up with a sorcerer who is covertly teaching at a college, a drunken Melcene noblewoman, a pig farmer and a former Grolim. In each case, they learn snippets of information that might be useful to them in their eventual confrontation with Zandramas. But for the most part, it feels as if Eddings provides these scenes as a way of doling out exposition to his readers, one small chunk at a time. Belgarion and his companions continue to travel just days behind Zandramas, the Child of the Dark. There are only brief moments of action and in most cases the resolution of any given conflict, physical or otherwise, is never really in doubt. The most momentous thing to happen in this volume is that Emperor Zakath recaptures the traveling party and must be convinced to let them go. There is also a rather spectacular revelation about Durnik near the very end, although it didn't feel like as big a deal as Eddings seemed to make it out to be. We already knew Durnik was a sorcerer so why shouldn't he also be (view spoiler)[a disciple of Aldur? (hide spoiler)] . I found the reactions of the other characters a little confusing on this score. It's interesting to consider how popular these books were when they were first written in the 1980's and early 90's. Was this truly the gold standard of the fantasy genre? Terry Brooks' Shannara series is better than this and, depending on your tastes, so are the The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, although the latter probably wouldn't be acceptable for younger readers. My guess is that these books were so immensely successful because they read quickly, were easy to digest and the public was absolutely starved for fantasy content in the wake of the renewed interest in The Lord of the Rings in the late 1970's. Now, we have so many more options for good fantasy - in a wide variety of subgenres - that a mediocre series such as this probably wouldn't past muster and get published. Or if it did, it wouldn't make much of a splash. My biggest complaint at this time (beyond the fact that the pattern of the books has become extremely repetitive and that nothing much really happens in them) is that there are too many characters and Eddings doesn't really offer us sufficient time with any of them. Although a part of the fellowship, Ce'nedra barely appears in this book. Others, such as Sadi or Toth, get only incidental mentions. And a brief section that takes us back to the lands of the West reminds us that there are a whole slew of other characters who are languishing back there, including Queen Porenn and Barak. I felt that Eddings would have been better off to commit to going deep into the exploration of two or three of these characters and willfully ignoring the rest than trying to remind us that everyone is still there. Instead, this felt like one of those massive superhero movies where everyone's favorite characters are present, but each one gets about 30 seconds of screen time. The characters who get the most attention (Polgara, Belgarath, Belgarion, Silk, Beldin and Durnik) continue to behave in exactly the same ways they always have; there is nothing new here. I'm eager to wrap this series up, but my hopes are not high for the final volume. These books offer very little suspense and no significant emotional attachment for me; Eddings' seemed focused on episodic action and world-building, however the emotional stakes and character development are thin. But perhaps I will be pleasantly surprised with the finale.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Narilka

    Sorceress of Darshiva is the fourth book in The Malloreon by David Eddings. The never ending quest! Trouble and delays seem to plague Garion and the party in their efforts with Zandramas always staying one step ahead. With Demon Lords and enemy forces on one side and agents of Emperor Zakath trying to capture them on the other, the party will need to hurry if they want to make it to the Place Which Is No More in time. Assuming Belgarath can figure out what that phrase means. This volume is all ab Sorceress of Darshiva is the fourth book in The Malloreon by David Eddings. The never ending quest! Trouble and delays seem to plague Garion and the party in their efforts with Zandramas always staying one step ahead. With Demon Lords and enemy forces on one side and agents of Emperor Zakath trying to capture them on the other, the party will need to hurry if they want to make it to the Place Which Is No More in time. Assuming Belgarath can figure out what that phrase means. This volume is all about setting the stage for the final book. It's not boring and the pacing is decent, just a lot of activity and travel happens in a short time. The constant threat to the world also feels a bit lessened in this book due to the need to rush everyone from one task to the next so the bad guys, while there, aren't quite as menacing as they were in previous installments. This is the book where Durnik gets a chance to shine, which is nice as he's not really had his moment. His major scene is one of my favorites in this series. Also love the addition of the she wolf and her pup. It's too bad they weren't in the series more towards the beginning.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I read the Bellgraid and the Malloreon about 10 years ago now, so my memory isn't up to a synopsis of the series or anything, but I did highly enjoy them then, they still grace my shelves now, and I hope to reread them in the near future. These books are great for the reader that enjoys fantasy series reading (so if you prefer a one off, try something else). They develop an amazing story and history that kept me engaged. The two series are intimately related/connected. The world is more of a high I read the Bellgraid and the Malloreon about 10 years ago now, so my memory isn't up to a synopsis of the series or anything, but I did highly enjoy them then, they still grace my shelves now, and I hope to reread them in the near future. These books are great for the reader that enjoys fantasy series reading (so if you prefer a one off, try something else). They develop an amazing story and history that kept me engaged. The two series are intimately related/connected. The world is more of a high fantasy setting with magic and prophecies (lighter than Tolkien's writing, but more in depth than Anne McCaffrey's). I would recommend this book to teens and adult readers of the Harry Potter series, Tolkien fans, and Pern fans.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Denae Christine

    Out of all the battles they had, someone finally got injured! Bruised. For a couple days. And it wasn't even an important character. Okay, so I find books more interesting when characters have to struggle through injuries every now and then. Very repetitive. Attacks, storms, lots of traveling, any problems are solved in a chapter or two. It felt like a bunch of miniature episodes of adventure instead of one super-duper long one. Not even a middling sized one. If they had come up against the demons Out of all the battles they had, someone finally got injured! Bruised. For a couple days. And it wasn't even an important character. Okay, so I find books more interesting when characters have to struggle through injuries every now and then. Very repetitive. Attacks, storms, lots of traveling, any problems are solved in a chapter or two. It felt like a bunch of miniature episodes of adventure instead of one super-duper long one. Not even a middling sized one. If they had come up against the demons more, or Zandramas's competitors more, then it might have felt more connected. Instead, the main characters managed to avoid a lot of the fighting and hardly got involved.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alan Gallagher

    I read these books as a kid and they were great then. As I've grown older, I've noticed the detracting factors from the quality of writing to the originality of the story - but my nostalgia wins through. This series - The Mallorean - does not have as many good qualities as the first, but again, nostaglia. This series will always be a classic for me. Will update once I've read them again. I read these books as a kid and they were great then. As I've grown older, I've noticed the detracting factors from the quality of writing to the originality of the story - but my nostalgia wins through. This series - The Mallorean - does not have as many good qualities as the first, but again, nostaglia. This series will always be a classic for me. Will update once I've read them again.

  17. 4 out of 5

    G. Connor Salter

    The writing style is good, the humor is still there, but the plot is flat. It's just the same old characters, doing the same old things they've been doing for nine books now, and I really don't care that much about them anymore. Entertaining enough to read, but only if you have nothing better to do. The writing style is good, the humor is still there, but the plot is flat. It's just the same old characters, doing the same old things they've been doing for nine books now, and I really don't care that much about them anymore. Entertaining enough to read, but only if you have nothing better to do.

  18. 4 out of 5

    ☆Ruth☆

    Still very much enjoying this five-book series and now look forward to the final denouement in the last of this epic. For anyone thinking of reading the Malloreon I would suggest you get the whole set, since each book is a continuation of the story and they are more like five parts of the whole, than separate books.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Have I mentioned how nifty it is to have the Main Evil Guy be, in fact, a woman? And not a shriveled old crone of a woman, even? I didn't know Leigh Eddings died in February of this year. Thank you, Leigh, for making sure we got as many good female characters as males in these series. Have I mentioned how nifty it is to have the Main Evil Guy be, in fact, a woman? And not a shriveled old crone of a woman, even? I didn't know Leigh Eddings died in February of this year. Thank you, Leigh, for making sure we got as many good female characters as males in these series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The ongoing challenges facing our Heroes continue to grow in danger and the levels of deceit reach new heights. We meet a new disciple and a new prophet. Things are a changing!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The Belgariad and Malloreon are wonderful series that can happily be read and re-read time and time again.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Neridan

    I don't have much to add to my previous reviews of the Malloreon; Sorceress of Darshiva continues with a similar pace, plot, and characters from where Demon Lord of Karanda left us. The book is still very much character-focused, as the adventure draws closer to its inevitable climax. It's still such a cozy and comfortable read, and I would most likely even read a spinoff story where all these characters take a trip to the DMV. I liked the ending of the book, and it builds up well the anticipatio I don't have much to add to my previous reviews of the Malloreon; Sorceress of Darshiva continues with a similar pace, plot, and characters from where Demon Lord of Karanda left us. The book is still very much character-focused, as the adventure draws closer to its inevitable climax. It's still such a cozy and comfortable read, and I would most likely even read a spinoff story where all these characters take a trip to the DMV. I liked the ending of the book, and it builds up well the anticipation of the final book of the series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zach P.

    The Sorceress of Darshiva,book four of the Malloreon series, by David Eddings is about a man named Belgarion who gathers a large group of differently talented people and they go to catch the thief who kidnapped Belgarion's son to fulfill the dark prophecy instead of the light. however, the thief isn't the only thing they have to worry about. Their party is also being chased by an over-religious disciple of the dark god Torak who Belgarion killed in the previous series, The Belgariad. As Belgario The Sorceress of Darshiva,book four of the Malloreon series, by David Eddings is about a man named Belgarion who gathers a large group of differently talented people and they go to catch the thief who kidnapped Belgarion's son to fulfill the dark prophecy instead of the light. however, the thief isn't the only thing they have to worry about. Their party is also being chased by an over-religious disciple of the dark god Torak who Belgarion killed in the previous series, The Belgariad. As Belgarion and his party chase the thief, they're being chased by the fleet lead by the disciple, and the malloreon army lead by king Zakath of Mallorea. Belgarion is the king of a small isle west of the Seven Kingdoms, and is included in the four countries of the Alorns. along with being the king, he's also the child of light chosen by the prophecy and is the overlord of the west. Belgarion has special abilities called sorcery to do special things like translocate, will somthing to be, and a lot of other things. he was taught by his grand mother and great grand father slowly to use sorcery. As the series goes on, he gets stronger and can do more things. although he has lots of problems, such as his son being stolen or the world being taken over by an evil god, he pulls through with his wife and son. In my opinion, this book from the series is great and leads straight into the next, and last, book of the series. The book has a lot of suspense and excitement and is fun to read. every page is packed with details and gives you a very good image.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    The fourth book in the series - Garion is still chasing Zandramas, hoping to get his son back, but the prophecies are working on making sure he only does so when the time is right. From the island on Melcena, they travel slowly towards Kell, the one place where they can find out where the Place Which Is No More actually is. On the way, they find a copy of the Ashabine Oracles that neither Torak nor Zandramas tampered with, but what they learn there only adds to their worries, especially as Torak The fourth book in the series - Garion is still chasing Zandramas, hoping to get his son back, but the prophecies are working on making sure he only does so when the time is right. From the island on Melcena, they travel slowly towards Kell, the one place where they can find out where the Place Which Is No More actually is. On the way, they find a copy of the Ashabine Oracles that neither Torak nor Zandramas tampered with, but what they learn there only adds to their worries, especially as Torak has left a special message for Garion. In the end, all they can do is travel onwards and complete the tasks they have been set before the ultimate Choice has to be made. I'm still very much enjoying this series - although I am starting to feel the frustration of our heroes as the journey is interrupted time and again for things that seem to have little real impact. The coming together of all the different forces is exciting though, with all the characters converging on the same place. I like the fact that Beldin has more of a role now as I think he is a great character. Only one more to go to see how the story ends.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matt Braymiller

    Of the five book in the Malloreon series, this one is probably the slowest. SO many things need to happen, and Eddings shoved many of them into this volume to set up the final confrontation in the last book. As such, this one can be a bit disjointed in its pacing. But, it has the epic scene with Durnik in it, so of course I like it. On to the last book! I wonder if it will end the same way as the last time I read it?

  26. 4 out of 5

    James

    Full review here: http://jamesgenrebooks.blogspot.com/2... At this point in the series, one can't help but feel like the author is using the old Indiana Jones method of using an arrow on a map to move people along, with mosquito stops everyone on the map. Full review here: http://jamesgenrebooks.blogspot.com/2... At this point in the series, one can't help but feel like the author is using the old Indiana Jones method of using an arrow on a map to move people along, with mosquito stops everyone on the map.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fanderay

    He even makes the repetitiveness a plot point.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This Mallorean series is most certainly significantly weaker than the Belgariad. This feels like a novel with an awful lot of wandering around and not many key events.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    The fourth book of the Malloreon does not disappoint! I cannot wait to read the exciting conclusion.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

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