web site hit counter The Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin, Vol. 71: May 1922 (Classic Reprint) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin, Vol. 71: May 1922 (Classic Reprint)

Availability: Ready to download

Excerpt from The Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin, Vol. 71: May 1922 General Davis was a commanding figure in the State of Delaware for many years. Born in the year of the Declaration of Independence, he seemed destined for patriotic service. During the war of 1812 he was placed in command of the coast defences. For his successful defence of Lewes, Delaware, at the battle of th Excerpt from The Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin, Vol. 71: May 1922 General Davis was a commanding figure in the State of Delaware for many years. Born in the year of the Declaration of Independence, he seemed destined for patriotic service. During the war of 1812 he was placed in command of the coast defences. For his successful defence of Lewes, Delaware, at the battle of that name, he was rewarded by a gold sword presented by the State of Delaware, the sword being now in the possession of his son, Sussex D. Davis, Esq. In 1819 the State of Delaware commissioned Thomas Sully to paint a full-sized portrait of the General; this, however, was destroyed by fire. Fortunately the Davis family had ordered a replica by Sully himself and this is the picture now hanging in the Pennsylvania Museum. It is a large picture, 86 x 60 inches, commenced by Sully June 19, 1819, and finished July 15th of the same year, signed with the artist's monogram, T. S. 1819. It shows the General, then Colonel, standing by the dunes, with a suggestion of the naval battle of Lewes in the distance. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


Compare

Excerpt from The Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin, Vol. 71: May 1922 General Davis was a commanding figure in the State of Delaware for many years. Born in the year of the Declaration of Independence, he seemed destined for patriotic service. During the war of 1812 he was placed in command of the coast defences. For his successful defence of Lewes, Delaware, at the battle of th Excerpt from The Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin, Vol. 71: May 1922 General Davis was a commanding figure in the State of Delaware for many years. Born in the year of the Declaration of Independence, he seemed destined for patriotic service. During the war of 1812 he was placed in command of the coast defences. For his successful defence of Lewes, Delaware, at the battle of that name, he was rewarded by a gold sword presented by the State of Delaware, the sword being now in the possession of his son, Sussex D. Davis, Esq. In 1819 the State of Delaware commissioned Thomas Sully to paint a full-sized portrait of the General; this, however, was destroyed by fire. Fortunately the Davis family had ordered a replica by Sully himself and this is the picture now hanging in the Pennsylvania Museum. It is a large picture, 86 x 60 inches, commenced by Sully June 19, 1819, and finished July 15th of the same year, signed with the artist's monogram, T. S. 1819. It shows the General, then Colonel, standing by the dunes, with a suggestion of the naval battle of Lewes in the distance. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

0 review for The Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin, Vol. 71: May 1922 (Classic Reprint)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.