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Condensed Chaos provides a practical introduction to Chaos Magic, one of the fastest growing areas of Western Occultism. Through it you can change your circumstances, live according to a developing sense of personal responsibility, effect change around you, and stop living as a helpless cog in some clockwork universe. All acts of personal/collective liberation are magical Condensed Chaos provides a practical introduction to Chaos Magic, one of the fastest growing areas of Western Occultism. Through it you can change your circumstances, live according to a developing sense of personal responsibility, effect change around you, and stop living as a helpless cog in some clockwork universe. All acts of personal/collective liberation are magical acts. Magic leads us into exhilaration and ecstasy; into insight and understanding; into changing ourselves and the world in which we participate. Through magic we may come to explore the possibilities of freedom.


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Condensed Chaos provides a practical introduction to Chaos Magic, one of the fastest growing areas of Western Occultism. Through it you can change your circumstances, live according to a developing sense of personal responsibility, effect change around you, and stop living as a helpless cog in some clockwork universe. All acts of personal/collective liberation are magical Condensed Chaos provides a practical introduction to Chaos Magic, one of the fastest growing areas of Western Occultism. Through it you can change your circumstances, live according to a developing sense of personal responsibility, effect change around you, and stop living as a helpless cog in some clockwork universe. All acts of personal/collective liberation are magical acts. Magic leads us into exhilaration and ecstasy; into insight and understanding; into changing ourselves and the world in which we participate. Through magic we may come to explore the possibilities of freedom.

30 review for Condensed Chaos: An Introduction to Chaos Magic

  1. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    I learned how to turn invisible, and to shoot lightning from my eyes.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jericha

    Hard to review this one. I am congenitally allergic to anything with this many typos, but that aside, there's some neat stuff in here -- despite the fact that I am highly disinclined to call it "magic." As far as I can tell, this is a fairly useful book about techniques for self-actualization cloaked in magical terminology. For example, at one point Hine talks about using magic to generate the resources to buy a new computer. His spells keep failing, his bank won't loan him money, etc, so he ask Hard to review this one. I am congenitally allergic to anything with this many typos, but that aside, there's some neat stuff in here -- despite the fact that I am highly disinclined to call it "magic." As far as I can tell, this is a fairly useful book about techniques for self-actualization cloaked in magical terminology. For example, at one point Hine talks about using magic to generate the resources to buy a new computer. His spells keep failing, his bank won't loan him money, etc, so he asks his tarot cards what's up. "The result," he writes, "was very explicit and shocking. The tarot cards pointed out that me trying to sustain a loan at the moment would have poor long-term consequences; I really didn't need a new computer anyway, and it would be more realistic to repair the current machine." Now, if you're the kind of person who doesn't have the self-awareness to just, y'know, analyze your situation and see this, then maybe Chaos Magic is just what you need -- the practices Hine describes are genuinely useful, meaningful approaches to understanding yourself and your emotions and enacting practical and meaningful changes for the better. For me, however, there was a deep underlying feeling of no wonder you think magic is real: later, in the same section he describes how the tarot cards' 'revelation' causes him to change his approach and instead "cast a sigil to call forth 'help' from other people, which was indeed forthcoming." See, me, I don't need magic to realize that I shouldn't buy stuff I can't afford, and generally speaking I don't need to cast spells to ask for help, I just, y'know, ask for help. But if you're someone who really does feel a blockage or difficulty that makes it hard for you to understand what you need, fight emotional demons, ask for help directly, and so on, I can see why this book might be genuinely useful. The section on demons in particular seemed genuinely practical, although the techniques, which have much in common with mindfulness training and cognitive behavioral therapy, are at base fairly prosaic. (Which reminds me, he seems to think prosaic means the opposite of what it means.) But I can see how they might *feel* magical, and certainly they seem effective. And yet...I couldn't help noticing the rather horrible example he gives of "successfully" working with your demons. As a way of illustrating the importance of how it's what you do with your anger that counts, he describes a secretary whom he found annoying, and how instead of blowing up at her when she started talking to him one day he "redirected and channeled his anger"...by calmly saying to her "Mary, if you don't shut up, I'm going to bang your head against the computer monitor." This the dude seems to feel was a positive way of channeling his feelings. Seriously, guy, what the actual fuck is wrong with you that you think threatening someone you work with means you have successfully managed your anger? I can't even with that. All of which is to say, it's not not worth reading, but buy a second-hand copy because he's clearly an asshole.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Ashendorf

    I've been an Eclectic Witch for 14 years. I am not Wiccan. I was for the first couple of years but now I personaly view Wicca as elementary school. I know several people who are Chaos magicians. At first I thought like most people do, that its all dark ooooo... But I read some web sites about and laughed my butt off. I resounated with everything they wrote about. I wanted more so I bought this book. I apsolutely love it. It is funny, it is everything that I believe..do your own thing, use what y I've been an Eclectic Witch for 14 years. I am not Wiccan. I was for the first couple of years but now I personaly view Wicca as elementary school. I know several people who are Chaos magicians. At first I thought like most people do, that its all dark ooooo... But I read some web sites about and laughed my butt off. I resounated with everything they wrote about. I wanted more so I bought this book. I apsolutely love it. It is funny, it is everything that I believe..do your own thing, use what you think is best for that ritual or spell...I have been saying that I practice Nikkism...goes right along with the Chaos magicians tenents.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nikmaack

    It is easy to mistake a complex mess for wisdom. "I don't understand what this guy is saying. He must be brilliant!" Or, alternatively, he's so broken he's spewing a stream of consciousness word salad that cannot be interpreted. Because there is no meaning. A serious chaos magician might respond to my criticism by saying, "Yes, yes, that's the point exactly." To which I say, screw off. The games are boring, friend. Say it straight, or shut up. "Ah, but you're not ready to recieve..." No. Shut up. I It is easy to mistake a complex mess for wisdom. "I don't understand what this guy is saying. He must be brilliant!" Or, alternatively, he's so broken he's spewing a stream of consciousness word salad that cannot be interpreted. Because there is no meaning. A serious chaos magician might respond to my criticism by saying, "Yes, yes, that's the point exactly." To which I say, screw off. The games are boring, friend. Say it straight, or shut up. "Ah, but you're not ready to recieve..." No. Shut up. It took me a long time to read this book, mainly because it is a swamp of contradictions. And for an author who supposedly prides himself on speaking plainly, this book is a slog of silliness at times. Believe whatever you want to believe, the book says. Want to get through traffic faster? We've built a cool cat god with sunglasses riding a skateboard who can help you. See how chaos magic works? Build a god, give it powers, use it as you see fit. Design your own rituals. Neat, right? So why, only a few chapters later, are we hearing about Ganesh in great detail? He can be used to rid yourself of demons. He rides a mouse. Let's explore that and take it seriously. Yes, respect the gods of India. Astrology! Let's take that seriously. And chakras. And and and... If nothing is true and everything is permitted, why take any of the old faiths seriously? If we can build gods like tinkertoys, why give Ganesh the time of day? Because we are postmodern and all things are true? The author trashes channeling as embarrassingly self serving crap. This criticism could be levelled at EVERYTHING in this book. And why wax eloquently on Ganesh and not wax eloquently on Jesus? Because the "foreign" religions are fascinating and ours are dull and familiar? And then there's how a good 25% of this book can be found in any basic self help text. Nothing to do with magic. Eat healthy, get plenty of sleep, trust your own voice, be good to each other. When it came to magic... One chapter, on "servitors" (building mystical imaginary friends to do missions for you) got me very excited. But the book is a little vague on what such beings are for, and what they can accomplish. In fact, the author admits to making one to do tasks for him, and how it left him in a weakened state, where he'd relied to much on his imaginary friend. So... Why build one then? Beyond sending good healing vibes to a friend, the author doesn't give many suggestions. The book is a jumbled mess. The author took 10 essays, put them together, and called them a book. There is no logical growth of ideas. Each chapter contradicts the last. You might glean something useful on a particular page, but it's a chore to get there. And the next three chapters might kill whatever you've learned. I want to take this stuff seriously, but it's hard not to read this book and think, "Oh. Phil Hines is nuts. He's done enough acid to shatter his brain. He cannot coherently describe anything." Or maybe he's just a bad writer. Or maybe he just has no cohesive theory to hold all these ideas together. Today, he believes in astrology. Tomorrow he believes in chakras. The day after that, Ganesh. "That's the whole point!" yells the serious chaos magician. Shut up, I say. Shut the hell up.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Clive F

    I should confess first of all that this book isn't really about my kind of thing: I'm a maths/science geek, so a book talking about how to perform real magic, with spirit summoning and so forth, isn't likely to be my cup of tea. But it was on my wishlist (because of a recommendation by an author I rate) and my thoughtful son bought me a copy for my birthday, so I read it with some curiosity. And it's fair to say that even from my somewhat doubting point of view, Phil Hine does a great job here. H I should confess first of all that this book isn't really about my kind of thing: I'm a maths/science geek, so a book talking about how to perform real magic, with spirit summoning and so forth, isn't likely to be my cup of tea. But it was on my wishlist (because of a recommendation by an author I rate) and my thoughtful son bought me a copy for my birthday, so I read it with some curiosity. And it's fair to say that even from my somewhat doubting point of view, Phil Hine does a great job here. He explains in a really very straightforward way how one might go about doing some of these magical things, if one wants to do so. He's very clear that you need to actually DO the things, rather than just read about them in books, and that if/when magic starts to work for you, only then will you truly believe. A lot of what Hine talks about seems plausibly to act on a psychological level, and I can see how much of this might be useful. You're reminded that the world is in many ways deeply interconnected, in ways that we don't always see. You're told about your power to make small changes that may have large effects - again, undoubtedly true, and the foundation for the mathematical "chaos" theory that Hine references. You're also given specific instructions for magical acts - for example how to construct a mental "servitor", and how to project it forth into the world to do your bidding. You're reminded that you need to be very specific, otherwise you may get exactly what you ask for, not what you wanted. Given the way I do think minds work, together with the vast set of situations one actually encounters every day if you're paying attention, I can see how this might seem to work for people, setting your mind up for success, and tuning it to look for the early signs. Hine says he says that he, too, used to think of magic as simply psychological, until early one morning when he awoke to be confronted by a cloudy grey creature sat on his chest, which he eventually dispelled by "projecting" a pentagram at it with his mind. I haven't had any such experiences, and even if I had I think I would likely attribute them to a particularly vivid dream, or some other bug in the wetware of my brain. So it seems to me there are many explanations of these things that still conform to conventional physics, without having to resort to creatures from another realm materialising in your bedroom. However, I can say is that the author seems entirely sincere, and so I should at least do him the courtesy of adjusting my prior belief in the reality of magic from "extremely unlikely to be the case" to perhaps a tiny fraction more possible. Three stars, because it was entertaining and well written, and if you were after something like this, then this would seem to me to be a good book for it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Watts

    Juvenile, and full of "quotes" to "describe things", which really "pisses me off." Juvenile, and full of "quotes" to "describe things", which really "pisses me off."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Clara Babbage

    I tried to read Peter Carroll Once. I'm not saying the man doesn't have good ideas, but his prose is somewhat unwieldy. Some thirty years later, enter Phil Hine who does an expert job of decrypting and re-interpretting ancient arcane ideas for the modern generation. I'm not saying I believing everything that was written, but it is highly readable and certainly somethings stayed with me. I tried to read Peter Carroll Once. I'm not saying the man doesn't have good ideas, but his prose is somewhat unwieldy. Some thirty years later, enter Phil Hine who does an expert job of decrypting and re-interpretting ancient arcane ideas for the modern generation. I'm not saying I believing everything that was written, but it is highly readable and certainly somethings stayed with me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steve Cran

    Wow this book was awesome. Short powerful and too the point. wish I had read this earlier in my quest. This book is pure magical technique. If you want to get started with magic this book is a great place to start. If it is piffy little spells you are looking for then this will not be what your looking for. Chaos magick is a very unique form of magick. . There are several paradigms of magic; Ceremonial, Wicca, Voodoo etc. Chaos is not exactly it's on paradigm yet it is a philosophy that let lets Wow this book was awesome. Short powerful and too the point. wish I had read this earlier in my quest. This book is pure magical technique. If you want to get started with magic this book is a great place to start. If it is piffy little spells you are looking for then this will not be what your looking for. Chaos magick is a very unique form of magick. . There are several paradigms of magic; Ceremonial, Wicca, Voodoo etc. Chaos is not exactly it's on paradigm yet it is a philosophy that let lets you paradigm hop so as to do the form of magic that is best suited for what your goal is. Belief is a tool and you can basically believe in a paradigm while you are working with it and when you are done you can sort of move on to another paradigm. Chaos magic is results oriented magic. If you do a working and it worked then you will have the physical results you were working for. Very real and down to earth. Chaos spurns the mentality that rejects the physical world over the spiritual . In a way physical is most important. Magic id done for results Becoming a magician does require commitment and drive. It is something that you have to want to do. One has to do magic at their level. Phil Hine crumbs on the magus's or people who think they are all that. He I against these inflated egos. Magic is meant to be fun and the value of laughter in dispelling negative magic is unspeakably powerful. Other items covered in this book are how to make Chaos servitors, energy creation that do our bidding. It tells about ho o do it, the pitfall and how to do it safely. Ego magiick tells about dissolving the identity so a to make oneself more fluid flexible and able to take needed action. Our demons are those little buggers in our subconscious that act up as jealousy or anger. The book tells how to del with it and how to make use of it. The Shamanic path is discussed as well. If you like magic then whatever you path this one is for you. Great technique which are easy to understand and easy to use. This is one book I will refer back to time and again.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Yomna Asar

    My feelings about Phil Hine are that I want to a) Hug him a) slap the shit out of him! other than that this books is a pretty firm introduction to Chaos Magic and digresses nicely every now and then into other types of magical practice. Chaos magic is great as an introduction to the occult because it avoides all the pompous, rigorous rituals and instructions that will almost definitely discourage anyone from "dabbling" if that's what you're into. It's also really terrible for beginners of the occ My feelings about Phil Hine are that I want to a) Hug him a) slap the shit out of him! other than that this books is a pretty firm introduction to Chaos Magic and digresses nicely every now and then into other types of magical practice. Chaos magic is great as an introduction to the occult because it avoides all the pompous, rigorous rituals and instructions that will almost definitely discourage anyone from "dabbling" if that's what you're into. It's also really terrible for beginners of the occult for precisely that same reason. just like anything else, magic or (magick) has rules and necessary preparation and specific ways of doing things. the point is, even chaoists (chaotes) didn't get their start in chaos magic. they all learned the basics of ceremonial magic first then dedicated themselves to Eros. kind of like Mark Zuckerberg, it's true that he quit Harvard but he did manage to get into Harvard in the first place. Chaoists are the Mark Zuckerberg of the Magick world; a cool, nonchalant facade but hard work has gone into the process none the less. Also, Phil Hine is a tiny bit scary in the first part of this book, so prepare to be spooked.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Well.... I... um...... ????????????? This book is kind of a mess..... but not necessarily BAD. I mean it's literally a mess, as in it's not exactly ORGANIZED, like, at all. It's very stream of consciousness, which is not how one expects an overview of a subject to be written. At the same time, it DID give a good solid overview of the subject, on the whole. As for the subject itself..... the jury's still out. Parts of it are so mundane that I know I've had multiple therapists tell me exactly the sa Well.... I... um...... ????????????? This book is kind of a mess..... but not necessarily BAD. I mean it's literally a mess, as in it's not exactly ORGANIZED, like, at all. It's very stream of consciousness, which is not how one expects an overview of a subject to be written. At the same time, it DID give a good solid overview of the subject, on the whole. As for the subject itself..... the jury's still out. Parts of it are so mundane that I know I've had multiple therapists tell me exactly the same things, in a completely non-magical context. So these parts are really just good solid life advice. Then other parts are really interesting in laying out this concept of what magic is and how it works, which just leaves me the task of deciding how much I think is legit. And then suddenly there's a demon cat on a skateboard coming to help get you out of a traffic jam. I love the levity of it, but it also..... is so silly it makes it HARDER to believe the basic concepts under it. And then there's the stuff that's just dated -- I only skimmed the last chapter because I am so over Joseph Campbell, I have no interest in reading about how magical initiation is The Hero's Journey. Despite all this, it's definitely the closest thing I've read to something that makes magic MAKE SENSE. So......on the whole...... ?????????????

  11. 5 out of 5

    dp ⚕️

    Similar to Liber Null and Psychonaut, Condensed Chaos is chock full of magical techniques, but they’re not as detailed as I’d like. In contrast though, I do appreciate Phil Hine’s more relatable and down to earth writing style. There’s a lot of seemingly good stuff in this book, minus the serious and arcane vibe that Peter Carroll gave off. My biggest gripe is that there’s no clear entry point or guidance for the inexperienced / beginners - yet this is supposed to be an introduction to chaos mag Similar to Liber Null and Psychonaut, Condensed Chaos is chock full of magical techniques, but they’re not as detailed as I’d like. In contrast though, I do appreciate Phil Hine’s more relatable and down to earth writing style. There’s a lot of seemingly good stuff in this book, minus the serious and arcane vibe that Peter Carroll gave off. My biggest gripe is that there’s no clear entry point or guidance for the inexperienced / beginners - yet this is supposed to be an introduction to chaos magic. Lastly, the number of typos in the book is obscene.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    This is the book I’ve been waiting years to find! Phil Hine’s gentle easing into the fascinating world of chaos magic is simple enough that even people with no knowledge of magic can follow it, full of humour and useful analogies (which is crucial for a subject like this) and, perhaps most importantly, completely devoid of the usual ego-stroking pretention that fills other books like this. What’s great about this book is that it really explains the concept of chaos magic in an incredibly logical This is the book I’ve been waiting years to find! Phil Hine’s gentle easing into the fascinating world of chaos magic is simple enough that even people with no knowledge of magic can follow it, full of humour and useful analogies (which is crucial for a subject like this) and, perhaps most importantly, completely devoid of the usual ego-stroking pretention that fills other books like this. What’s great about this book is that it really explains the concept of chaos magic in an incredibly logical and stimulating way, so that even a sceptic (like myself), or complete non-believer, can get a lot out of it. If, like me, you’ve ever wondered how so many brilliant thinkers and artists (Grant Morrison, Alan Moore, Austin Osman Spare, William Burroughs, etc.) could be firm believers of chaos magic, despite their towering intellects and deeply rational outlooks, then this book will show you that they practice magic *in* spite of this. As this book shows, despite being a genuine form of “magic”, chaos magic is completely logical and rational, in so far as “mundane reality” is anything but logical, and we need to question everything and anything! Chaos magic, therefore, is really a kind of postmodern spirituality, one for people who don’t actually believe in “spirituality” (or don’t know if they do or not), a path for people with inquisitive minds that they can follow (or not follow) any way they want. Anybody familiar with the work of the late great Robert Anton-Wilson (of ‘The Illuminatus! Trilogy’ fame) will feel comfortable here. But, beware, Hine’s introduction won’t make a practising magician out of you in itself, as it’s very much “theory”. As a newcomer to this field, I still need to find a suitable follow-up book that I might consider to take me to the next (i.e. first) level, but I couldn’t recommend this more as a theoretical introduction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ora

    Do you think like Agent Scully and at the same time you really want to believe? Here's the book for you. This is a clear-cut introduction to the basics of magic. It's actually a great primer for ANY spiritual background whether its magickal function is prayer, magick, voodoo, e-meters, the force, or Brony friendship. It takes a rational nearly scientific approach to spiritual practices. However, science disbelieves until something is true. This book tells you how to set aside your disbelief to ac Do you think like Agent Scully and at the same time you really want to believe? Here's the book for you. This is a clear-cut introduction to the basics of magic. It's actually a great primer for ANY spiritual background whether its magickal function is prayer, magick, voodoo, e-meters, the force, or Brony friendship. It takes a rational nearly scientific approach to spiritual practices. However, science disbelieves until something is true. This book tells you how to set aside your disbelief to achieve maximum genuine spiritual results (if any). Whether they are time honored traditions you are choosing to immerse yourself in, or more in the spirit of chaos magick if you develop your own new spiritual methods; either way, you will be given the tools to effectively determine how well the spiritual methods you are enacting are actually working and then try new ideas if they don't. If I had to write a book report on this, the summary would be very very simple: "Set aside your disbelief, and do what works." For me it was a foundation text for my spiritual awakening, and helped me find what worked for me, despite my natural healthy gift of extreme skepticism. If you're an atheist and genuinely want to know what draws people into spiritual belief, I'd recommend this book. I'm not sure it would succeed, but it's definitely the best book I can think of on the spirituality side of things. Any closer to science, and you'll be reading James Gleick's book on the actual science of "Chaos," or other Chaos Theory books.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'd recommend this book to anyone that wants a introduction to the concepts of Chaos Magic. Hine and Carroll do a wonderful job making the confusing nature of chaos magic more palatable to readers. They break down sigils and invocations. Emphasis is placed on charging and grounding (with instructions). I enjoyed the chapters towards the end the most about ego magic and metaprogramming. If you ever stumble upon it, give it a try! I'd recommend this book to anyone that wants a introduction to the concepts of Chaos Magic. Hine and Carroll do a wonderful job making the confusing nature of chaos magic more palatable to readers. They break down sigils and invocations. Emphasis is placed on charging and grounding (with instructions). I enjoyed the chapters towards the end the most about ego magic and metaprogramming. If you ever stumble upon it, give it a try!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Having been a solitary pagan for a the last three years, and after changing paths several times over, through whatever process exists (if any), I came across Condense Chaos. It is a pragmatic and easy to understand short manual on what magic is, what it isn't, how anyone with the desire can learn to apply magic to their everyday lives and most importantly, the lifting of the 'occultic secret veil' that seems to permeate nearly every book written on the subject of magic. Phil Hine writes in a conc Having been a solitary pagan for a the last three years, and after changing paths several times over, through whatever process exists (if any), I came across Condense Chaos. It is a pragmatic and easy to understand short manual on what magic is, what it isn't, how anyone with the desire can learn to apply magic to their everyday lives and most importantly, the lifting of the 'occultic secret veil' that seems to permeate nearly every book written on the subject of magic. Phil Hine writes in a concise way that defines the Chaos path, but not in a hand-holding spoon fed method. He points out (thankfully) that achieving gnosis is required for any ritual, rightfully putting the responsibility on the reader. No 'fluffy-bunny let's hope that everything kinda goes my way' pablum here! An issue that he dealt with which seems to be left out of many books of this nature is that of faith. Do I have to believe in a ritual (or at least the desired outcome) if it is to work? Not in my experience, and not in the way that Phil encourages Sigil magic rituals. Is it necessary for a patient to have faith in a doctor to repair his mangled limb? No, he just simply has to allow the doctor to perform, and the action takes care of the problem.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    The subtitle leads you to believe that this slim volume is an introduction to Chaos Magic, which I suppose it is. But this book is also a really cool, non-floofy self-help manual for people who think in terms of symbols and systems and for people who like to understand things but also like that not everything is understandable. As someone who has searched for, created, and banished any number of ordering principles to help me navigate life, I appreciate the ideas in this book. The acknowledgemen The subtitle leads you to believe that this slim volume is an introduction to Chaos Magic, which I suppose it is. But this book is also a really cool, non-floofy self-help manual for people who think in terms of symbols and systems and for people who like to understand things but also like that not everything is understandable. As someone who has searched for, created, and banished any number of ordering principles to help me navigate life, I appreciate the ideas in this book. The acknowledgement that the Universe is chaotic and the World itself is magical lies at the center, here. "Nothing is true; everything is permitted" refers to how you can manage understanding the world, not how you should act within it. Phil Hines' book is not so much a manual as it is a manifesto for how to approach understanding the Universe and yourself. It's all connected.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    An appealingly accessible introduction to chaos magic. I began reading Liber Null first, and am very thankful that I was pointed towards this book instead. I'll be reading other volumes about magic, but this was an ideal starting point. Only a couple of "huh." moments and nothing terribly cringeworthy, despire the book being from the 90s. The "cyber-" prefix coming in here and there dates it a bit, but overall, you hardly notice that the book is over a decade old. The other thing I like is that H An appealingly accessible introduction to chaos magic. I began reading Liber Null first, and am very thankful that I was pointed towards this book instead. I'll be reading other volumes about magic, but this was an ideal starting point. Only a couple of "huh." moments and nothing terribly cringeworthy, despire the book being from the 90s. The "cyber-" prefix coming in here and there dates it a bit, but overall, you hardly notice that the book is over a decade old. The other thing I like is that Hine rarely repeats himself. A lot of "intro to" texts seem to be overblown pamphlets if they're not condensed treatises. This is neither. Hine throws in enough history and theory to lay the groundwork for more instructional portions of the book, and then takes off at a comfortable job, rather than a sprint.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Musante

    This is a great top-level primer for chaos magic. I'm a total noob on the subject, so I can't say for certain that this covers everything that needs to be covered, but it defines a certain "outlook" that seems to be at the heart of chaos magic. It seems a tough subject to properly describe due to its manipulable and, well... "chaotic" nature, but the author has a steady and clear point of view that leads the reader into what seems to be a distilled "essence" of chaos magic. This book did its job This is a great top-level primer for chaos magic. I'm a total noob on the subject, so I can't say for certain that this covers everything that needs to be covered, but it defines a certain "outlook" that seems to be at the heart of chaos magic. It seems a tough subject to properly describe due to its manipulable and, well... "chaotic" nature, but the author has a steady and clear point of view that leads the reader into what seems to be a distilled "essence" of chaos magic. This book did its job as a proper first touch-point. I'm excited to dig into more books on the subject, although I have a sneaking suspicion that they will not be as easy to read as this.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    It’s like ‘The Science of Getting Rich’ or ‘The Secret’ meets early cyberpunk and psychology-based self-help literature, only with a whole lot of mysticism and furious masturbating on symbols. In short, what a delightful read. An absurd amount of fun and memorable passages and a perfect read for SPOOKTOBER. I will likely engage in more heady stuff than this and have all ready tapped into some of the recommended reads and mentioned titles sprinkled throughout — it’s a solid introduction to the wo It’s like ‘The Science of Getting Rich’ or ‘The Secret’ meets early cyberpunk and psychology-based self-help literature, only with a whole lot of mysticism and furious masturbating on symbols. In short, what a delightful read. An absurd amount of fun and memorable passages and a perfect read for SPOOKTOBER. I will likely engage in more heady stuff than this and have all ready tapped into some of the recommended reads and mentioned titles sprinkled throughout — it’s a solid introduction to the world of chaos magics and weird occultism.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lodane

    The 1-5 Star Review is the total of what I have to say about this book, specifically. Caveat: This review is historical/archival in nature. 'Date read' is speculative. This book is one of many books I have read about the occult/paganism/witchcraft. This was the readily available faith in my household as a child. Additionally, I worked for a company in this field, 2015-2016, and had to read an ocean of this stuff to do my job. The 1-5 Star Review is the total of what I have to say about this book, specifically. Caveat: This review is historical/archival in nature. 'Date read' is speculative. This book is one of many books I have read about the occult/paganism/witchcraft. This was the readily available faith in my household as a child. Additionally, I worked for a company in this field, 2015-2016, and had to read an ocean of this stuff to do my job.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Hunter

    A journey into chaos A someone who has read many a book on magic over the years, going on my own journey, I found this book helpful in confirming what I already know in a down to earth, matter of fact way. With the occasional inspired insight it describes what chaos magick is so that the reader comes away with a feeling of achievement and the desire to learn more...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aivaras Žukauskas

    There is some good advice to be found in the first half of the book, although it's nothing you can't find in any other self-help book nowadays. And the magic part was too vague for me for it to make much sense. I found some useful stuff in this, but probably would look for a better introduction elsewhere. There is some good advice to be found in the first half of the book, although it's nothing you can't find in any other self-help book nowadays. And the magic part was too vague for me for it to make much sense. I found some useful stuff in this, but probably would look for a better introduction elsewhere.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Eve

    While reading this it became apparent that the attributes that make a good anthropologist also make a good chaos magician. As such the world view it promotes was very appealing to me. Aside from a few editing errors found throughout the book it was an overall enjoyable read (though the errors mostly just made me laugh).

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily K.

    A more accessible intro to chaos magic than Liber Null. Sure, it’s from 90’s occult culture so the more PC inclined audience may take umbrage with some of the content, but it doesn’t spoil the ideas it contains about magic. It often came across like a self help book for people who are more interested in magic, which is a good thing. Get your life right and your magic will be right.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tem Yousafi

    Not badly written, even though there were a million typos and the text should've been divided into more paragraphs. Couldn't tell whether it was a beginner's guide to Chaos Magic or the world's most psychotic self-help book. 7/10 would read again. Not badly written, even though there were a million typos and the text should've been divided into more paragraphs. Couldn't tell whether it was a beginner's guide to Chaos Magic or the world's most psychotic self-help book. 7/10 would read again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hilda Ellis-Davidson

    One part new age philosophy. One part science paper. One part manual to hack the universe. Even as a placebo, this is a good book... and if even half of what it claims is true then the cosmos is a very interesting place.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Candice

    2018 Popsugar Reading Challenge prompt: a book you meant to read in 2017 but didn't get to. As a fan of Last Podcast on the Left, I was keen to read this after it was recommended by Marcus and Henry, but I liked their explanation of Chaos Magic better than this book. Interesting read, though. 2018 Popsugar Reading Challenge prompt: a book you meant to read in 2017 but didn't get to. As a fan of Last Podcast on the Left, I was keen to read this after it was recommended by Marcus and Henry, but I liked their explanation of Chaos Magic better than this book. Interesting read, though.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The best introduction to Chao Magick in print today. I recommend this to newbies over Peter Carroll's, Liber Null. The latter is still the classic, but Hine's entry puts the beginner on firmer ground. The best introduction to Chao Magick in print today. I recommend this to newbies over Peter Carroll's, Liber Null. The latter is still the classic, but Hine's entry puts the beginner on firmer ground.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rory Tregaskis

    I liked how the author goes from things like "I was doing a frustrating data entry job" to "I was burned alive on Kali's funeral pyre". I can see how this book isn't for everyone, some people it may be too basic, others too far out, but I really enjoyed it and was introduced to new concepts. I liked how the author goes from things like "I was doing a frustrating data entry job" to "I was burned alive on Kali's funeral pyre". I can see how this book isn't for everyone, some people it may be too basic, others too far out, but I really enjoyed it and was introduced to new concepts.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    More readable/understandable than most magic books. It is also down to earth

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