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A handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for preserving A handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for preserving plus master recipes and contemporary variations for each type of fruit. Former restaurant chef/owner, culinary historian, and master preserver Joyce Goldstein includes straightforward, no-fail instructions for canning fruit preserves, along with serving ideas for using preserves for much more than toast, including Mango-Lime Jam to elevate pork tenderloin, Pickled Peaches to perk up fried chicken, and Apricot Jam to glaze cake. Packed with ideas, 75 time-tested recipes, and gorgeous photographs of produce, process, and finished fruit preserves, preserving newcomers and veterans alike will find Goldstein's handbook just the right amount of instruction and inspiration.


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A handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for preserving A handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for preserving plus master recipes and contemporary variations for each type of fruit. Former restaurant chef/owner, culinary historian, and master preserver Joyce Goldstein includes straightforward, no-fail instructions for canning fruit preserves, along with serving ideas for using preserves for much more than toast, including Mango-Lime Jam to elevate pork tenderloin, Pickled Peaches to perk up fried chicken, and Apricot Jam to glaze cake. Packed with ideas, 75 time-tested recipes, and gorgeous photographs of produce, process, and finished fruit preserves, preserving newcomers and veterans alike will find Goldstein's handbook just the right amount of instruction and inspiration.

30 review for Jam Session: A Fruit-Preserving Handbook [a Cookbook]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    This book is beautiful and the layout is well-done. The copy needs better editing though as I’ve found a number of mistakes. I have made all the peach recipes and they are delicious, but the yields are off on all of them, some as much as 50% off. It is not just a question of cooking down the jam too much - 2 pounds of peaches does not make 6-7 cups of flesh. I’ve adjusted the recipes to double the peaches and sugar (which might be too much - going to try less) and kept the seasonings the same wi This book is beautiful and the layout is well-done. The copy needs better editing though as I’ve found a number of mistakes. I have made all the peach recipes and they are delicious, but the yields are off on all of them, some as much as 50% off. It is not just a question of cooking down the jam too much - 2 pounds of peaches does not make 6-7 cups of flesh. I’ve adjusted the recipes to double the peaches and sugar (which might be too much - going to try less) and kept the seasonings the same with good results. I’m looking forward to trying all the other recipes, but I’m glad I got this from the library as I’m unsure whether a book in need of so many edits/revisions is worth adding to my collection.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher- The right-sized handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for pr I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher- The right-sized handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for preserving plus master recipes and contemporary variations for each type of fruit. Former restaurant chef/owner, culinary historian, and master preserver Joyce Goldstein includes straightforward, no-fail instructions for canning fruit preserves, along with serving ideas for using preserves for much more than toast, including Mango-Lime Jam to elevate pork tenderloin, Pickled Peaches to perk up fried chicken, and Apricot Jam to glaze cake. Packed with ideas, 75 time-tested recipes, and gorgeous photographs of produce, process, and finished fruit preserves, preserving newcomers and veterans alike will find Goldstein's handbook just the right amount of instruction and inspiration. Having just taken a food preservation class, I do wish that I had had this book before I took it. Jam is hard!!! Reading Goldstein’s book makes it look easy enough to attempt at home. Where I have air conditioning. The mango lime is on tap to be made this weekend … ditto the pickled peaches as I now feel confident to try it on my own. GREAT book for the foodie in your life!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    This is probably a good book.  It certainly has several interesting flavor combinations, and the author is experienced and credentialed.  The recipes are clear and detailed, but I would still say this book leans more towards those who have some comfort in the kitchen already as opposed to a newbie.  The recipes leave room for the natural variability of fruits, different pectin levels, different juiciness, etc., instead of insisting that a recipe is "foolproof".  It requires some more attention t This is probably a good book.  It certainly has several interesting flavor combinations, and the author is experienced and credentialed.  The recipes are clear and detailed, but I would still say this book leans more towards those who have some comfort in the kitchen already as opposed to a newbie.  The recipes leave room for the natural variability of fruits, different pectin levels, different juiciness, etc., instead of insisting that a recipe is "foolproof".  It requires some more attention to detail, as well as frequent tasting and testing.  It also leaves space for personal riffing on the flavors and suggests different ideas and combinations.  If this suits your cooking style, give this book a go! Personally, this wasn't the book I was looking for.  It has plenty of merit, but it just wasn't for me.  It's fun to have different flavor combinations and profiles, but the author has made it clear she and I just have different taste.  For example, I absolutely love apples, apple butter, and more, and I live in an area with stupendous apples, but the author doesn't care much for apples:  "On their own, they produce rather bland preserves.  Apple butter is comforting but hardly a groundbreaking topping for toast.  Apple jelly is mild and needs a flavor accent, such as mint or rosemary, to make it interesting.  In my opinion, the best use for apples in preserving is to make pectin-rich apple jelly to help set all of your other preserves." Again, to each their own, just added proof that this book isn't after my heart.  Another personal let-down is that I'm not a fan of cherries but absolutely love strawberries, and while there are some strawberry recipes, it's clear by number that the author loves cherries.  She's also big on making jams and jellies more zippy--she mentions she likes a more acidic bite, but her recipes also show a strong preference for adding things like ginger, pepper, rose sugar, and serrano chiles.  I like some variation, but I miss a few more of the old standbys.   I understanding that biologically some things are a fruit, even if many consider them vegetables from a culinary perspective.  A common example of this is the tomato, so I suppose it can make sense to include tomato sauce in a "fruit-preserving handbook".  I was even more surprised, though, at the inclusion of a handful of recipes for carrots, eggplants, and pumpkins and winter squash.  No complaints, though!  Just surprised. If you're looking for classics (and apples), this is not the book for you.  If you're ready for different and zippy flavors, give this book a go!  If you're a newbie who can taste and test, the author includes plenty of info in the introduction to get you started, but if you're looking for something more "foolproof" or really laid-out for you, this will not be the book for you.  Take a look at this book for yourself and see what you think!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher- The right-sized handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for p I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher- The right-sized handbook for fruit preserving, with 75 basic and special recipes for jams, jellies, chutneys, and compotes, by chef emeritus and master preserver Joyce Goldstein. Jam Session is the lushly photographed and selective guide to making all-natural fruit preserves, organized by type of fruit and seasonal availability, with descriptions of the best varieties for preserving plus master recipes and contemporary variations for each type of fruit. Former restaurant chef/owner, culinary historian, and master preserver Joyce Goldstein includes straightforward, no-fail instructions for canning fruit preserves, along with serving ideas for using preserves for much more than toast, including Mango-Lime Jam to elevate pork tenderloin, Pickled Peaches to perk up fried chicken, and Apricot Jam to glaze cake. Packed with ideas, 75 time-tested recipes, and gorgeous photographs of produce, process, and finished fruit preserves, preserving newcomers and veterans alike will find Goldstein's handbook just the right amount of instruction and inspiration. Having just taken a food preservation class, I do wish that I had had this book before I took it. Jam is hard!!! Reading Goldstein’s book makes it look easy enough to attempt at home. Where I have air conditioning. The mango lime is on tap to be made this weekend … ditto the pickled peaches as I now feel confident to try it on my own. GREAT book for the foodie in your life!!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kaijsa

    Note: I received a free ebook ARC from Ten Speed Press via NetGalley in exchange for a review. I love home canning, but I've never gotten past the basics and really tried experimenting with flavors and different types of preserves beyond simple jams, jellies, and marmalades. Jam Session not only includes recipes with creative flavor combinations, but gives suggestions for how to use them with meats and other interesting applications. For absolute beginners, there is a nice overview of kinds of pr Note: I received a free ebook ARC from Ten Speed Press via NetGalley in exchange for a review. I love home canning, but I've never gotten past the basics and really tried experimenting with flavors and different types of preserves beyond simple jams, jellies, and marmalades. Jam Session not only includes recipes with creative flavor combinations, but gives suggestions for how to use them with meats and other interesting applications. For absolute beginners, there is a nice overview of kinds of preserves, advice for shopping for produce (and when it's ready), and how to adjust for taste as well as troubleshoot issues that come up. There are reference lists for high to low-pectin fruit and lots about sugar, which is super important in preserves, as well as the equipment you need. The advice is good, and I learned some new things. I liked the idea behind the organization of the book by season, but this will really only work for people who live in certain regions. Here in the mountain west, local, seasonal produce is limited to a few months and we have to rely on grocery store to provide fruits and veggies that traveled long distances. Still, I will be looking forward to trying out some of these recipes soon. Rhubarb, Blood Orange, and Rose Jam sounds particularly lovely, as do Peach and Cardamom Jam and Whole Spiced Figs in Tea Syrup

  6. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    I am sure that if I had not purchased the Kindle edition, this review would be a five star review. (E-cookbooks are a struggle for me.) That being said, Goldstein's book is a useful addition to my preserving cache of books. The book is divided into seasonal sections and usually starts with a basic jam recipe, like strawberry jam for the "Spring" section. For each season, she does include some more exotic pairings like "Whole Strawberry Preserves with Black Pepper and Pomegranate." I appreciated t I am sure that if I had not purchased the Kindle edition, this review would be a five star review. (E-cookbooks are a struggle for me.) That being said, Goldstein's book is a useful addition to my preserving cache of books. The book is divided into seasonal sections and usually starts with a basic jam recipe, like strawberry jam for the "Spring" section. For each season, she does include some more exotic pairings like "Whole Strawberry Preserves with Black Pepper and Pomegranate." I appreciated that she included the unusual and exotic like carrots (for jam?), mangoes, and red currants (exotic and unattainable for me). There's a big Moroccan influence with some of the recipes like the eggplant preserves. She also includes a few mostarda recipes (a mustardy-fruity compote). The photos are fantastic and show the true beauty of the produce and the preserves. (If you are not a preserving guru, she offers a basic tutorial at the beginning of the book with definitions and how-tos.)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm always looking for new canning recipes and ideas. In Jam Session Joyce Goldstein gives a brief overview of canning and how she got into canning and preserving. Then the recipes are organized by season, which is great because especially with fruit it's best when it's peak season. While I haven't had a lot of success with canning jelly (it doesn't set and then I have to do it all a second time), I would like to try jams and other fruit preserving. There are definitely a few recipes I'd like to I'm always looking for new canning recipes and ideas. In Jam Session Joyce Goldstein gives a brief overview of canning and how she got into canning and preserving. Then the recipes are organized by season, which is great because especially with fruit it's best when it's peak season. While I haven't had a lot of success with canning jelly (it doesn't set and then I have to do it all a second time), I would like to try jams and other fruit preserving. There are definitely a few recipes I'd like to try. A good book for an experienced canner looking for new ideas with fruit.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Liz Banks

    Read this only if you really want to make jam. Ms. Goldstein is very creative. She puts interesting foods together with herbs and spices to make gourmet jams, chutneys, preserves, conserves and marmalades. She also makes her own pectin out of apples. The book is divided into seasonal sections. I will use this as a reference book but will continue to buy my own pectin.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    I enjoyed the layout to the book and the interesting recipes. I was disappointed that I needed to use the homemade apple pectin for most recipes and the amount of sugar involved in the recipes. I use Pomona pectin and may have been able to convert some, but I'm not too talented there. It is truly a wonderful book, my review is only one opinion. I enjoyed the layout to the book and the interesting recipes. I was disappointed that I needed to use the homemade apple pectin for most recipes and the amount of sugar involved in the recipes. I use Pomona pectin and may have been able to convert some, but I'm not too talented there. It is truly a wonderful book, my review is only one opinion.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jori Maguire

    Good basic book I think that the author covers a good amount of basic knowledge and had a few surprise recipes that I really enjoyed. I’m especially intrigued by the fig jam with porchetta flavors!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Great Jam recipes! Wonderful flavor pairings! -Strawberry with black pepper and pomegranate - Cherry Orange Marmalade -Blackberry bramble Jam -Blackberry,Plum, Mint and Black pepper -Blueberry Citrus -Blood Orange and Rose Sugar marmalade to name a few.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    Great for beginners like me; Goldstein gives you enough background info to let yourself play with flavors and techniques

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was a very complete guide to preserving items. I wish that I was brave enough to try this maybe someday. I loved all of the pictures and recipe ideas. TOP marks.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Broken up with Season and then Fruit. Great organization but basic common recipes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Great preserving cookbook This summer we made the peach jam and the peach Melba jam. The directions are very detailed and the jams are delicious.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Raelene

    5 stars for flavor and inventiveness. The fruit, flavor, and spice combinations are top notch and the end results have been consistently great. But 1 star for ratios and proportions - I’ve had to adjust every recipe I’ve tried (more than a dozen now) and the yields were rarely those projected. So a solid 3 stars - great for an experienced jam/jelly maker who can adjust as needed and just needs a little inspiration in terms of flavor combinations. But because of the ratio discrepancies, I would no 5 stars for flavor and inventiveness. The fruit, flavor, and spice combinations are top notch and the end results have been consistently great. But 1 star for ratios and proportions - I’ve had to adjust every recipe I’ve tried (more than a dozen now) and the yields were rarely those projected. So a solid 3 stars - great for an experienced jam/jelly maker who can adjust as needed and just needs a little inspiration in terms of flavor combinations. But because of the ratio discrepancies, I would not suggest for beginner/novice jam makers unfamiliar with the jam process.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dewayne Cushman

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Morrison

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cambrie

    As far as jam and preserving books go, I think this is the most modern recipe book I've seen! The recipes are indexed by growing season, which is extremely helpful for the Midwestern farmers market shopper. The author opens the book with a heartfelt, yet surprising introduction that is truly genuine (not all sunshine and rainbows, but truthful). She also gives you a nice introduction into preserving basics and terminology - including a pectin and acid chart!!! Getting into the flesh of the cookb As far as jam and preserving books go, I think this is the most modern recipe book I've seen! The recipes are indexed by growing season, which is extremely helpful for the Midwestern farmers market shopper. The author opens the book with a heartfelt, yet surprising introduction that is truly genuine (not all sunshine and rainbows, but truthful). She also gives you a nice introduction into preserving basics and terminology - including a pectin and acid chart!!! Getting into the flesh of the cookbook, she breaks each section down by growing season and fruit. Overall, it seems a bit text heavy but if you've never preserved before (which I haven't but now I definitely want to try!) but in reading everything, you realize that its extremely necessary and it feels as though the author is holding your hand through what could be a very scary, scientific experience. But have no fear, Joyce Goldstein is here to walk you through it, step by step (and she even has a troubleshooting section in the introduction!)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ethel Legg

  21. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

  22. 4 out of 5

    julie Mershon

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Warren

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  25. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Harrison

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  28. 5 out of 5

    M A

  29. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sheila LaBonty

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