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You are about to meet: YOUR NEXT FAVORITE AUTHOR. The 33rd edition of Writers of the Future may be the best new book yet! Brand-new adventure through space, time and possibility. Along the way new authors will introduce you to fascinating characters. These authors take creative writing to a whole new level! The answers, the stories, the visions, and the mind-stretching pos You are about to meet: YOUR NEXT FAVORITE AUTHOR. The 33rd edition of Writers of the Future may be the best new book yet! Brand-new adventure through space, time and possibility. Along the way new authors will introduce you to fascinating characters. These authors take creative writing to a whole new level! The answers, the stories, the visions, and the mind-stretching possibilities are all waiting inside. Welcome to the future of Science Fiction and Fantasy. It gets better every year. These are the award winning short stories of the international contest that have launched the writing careers of some of the best new books! BONUS stories and articles on how to write by New York Times best sellers Anne McCaffrey, Robert J. Sawyer, Todd McCaffrey, Larry Elmore and Bob Eggleton Contents: Introduction (L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future, Volume 33) • essay by Dave Wolverton [as by David Farland] Moonlight One / novelette by Stephen Lawson • interior artwork by Jason Park The Armor Embrace / short story by Doug C. Souza • interior artwork by Christopher Kiklowicz Envoy in the Ice / novelette by Dustin Steinacker • interior artwork by Yader Fonseca Search for Research (1991) • essay by L. Ron Hubbard The Devil's Rescue (1940) / short story by L. Ron Hubbard • interior artwork by Preston Stone Tears for Shülna / short story by Andrew L. Roberts • interior artwork by Rachel Quinlan The Drake Equation / short story by C. L. Kagmi • interior artwork by Michael Michera Acquisition / short story by Jake Marley • interior artwork by Ryan Richmond Obsidian Spire / short story by Molly Elizabeth Atkins • interior artwork by Aituar Manas A Thousand or So Words of Wisdom • (1986) • essay by Anne McCaffrey Gator (1997) / short story by Robert J. Sawyer • interior artwork by Joshua Meehan A Glowing Heart / short story by Anton Rose • interior artwork by Anthony Moravian The Long Dizzy Down / short story by Ziporah Hildebrandt • interior artwork by Asher Ben Alpay The Woodcutter's Deity / short story by Walter Dinjos • interior artwork by Chan Ha Kim How to Become an Illustrator • essay by Larry Elmore The Dragon Killer's Daughter / short story by Todd McCaffrey • interior artwork by Larry Elmore Useless Magic / short story by Andrew Perry • interior artwork by Hanna Al-Shaer Adramelech / short story by Sean Hazlett • interior artwork by Aituar Manas The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove / novelette by Ville Meriläinen • interior artwork by David Furnal The Magnificent Bhajan / short story by David VonAllmen • interior artwork by Chan Ha Kim Notes on Art Direction: Is It DIrection or Suggestion? • essay by Bob Eggleton The Year in the Contests • essay by Dave Wolverton [as by David Farland]


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You are about to meet: YOUR NEXT FAVORITE AUTHOR. The 33rd edition of Writers of the Future may be the best new book yet! Brand-new adventure through space, time and possibility. Along the way new authors will introduce you to fascinating characters. These authors take creative writing to a whole new level! The answers, the stories, the visions, and the mind-stretching pos You are about to meet: YOUR NEXT FAVORITE AUTHOR. The 33rd edition of Writers of the Future may be the best new book yet! Brand-new adventure through space, time and possibility. Along the way new authors will introduce you to fascinating characters. These authors take creative writing to a whole new level! The answers, the stories, the visions, and the mind-stretching possibilities are all waiting inside. Welcome to the future of Science Fiction and Fantasy. It gets better every year. These are the award winning short stories of the international contest that have launched the writing careers of some of the best new books! BONUS stories and articles on how to write by New York Times best sellers Anne McCaffrey, Robert J. Sawyer, Todd McCaffrey, Larry Elmore and Bob Eggleton Contents: Introduction (L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future, Volume 33) • essay by Dave Wolverton [as by David Farland] Moonlight One / novelette by Stephen Lawson • interior artwork by Jason Park The Armor Embrace / short story by Doug C. Souza • interior artwork by Christopher Kiklowicz Envoy in the Ice / novelette by Dustin Steinacker • interior artwork by Yader Fonseca Search for Research (1991) • essay by L. Ron Hubbard The Devil's Rescue (1940) / short story by L. Ron Hubbard • interior artwork by Preston Stone Tears for Shülna / short story by Andrew L. Roberts • interior artwork by Rachel Quinlan The Drake Equation / short story by C. L. Kagmi • interior artwork by Michael Michera Acquisition / short story by Jake Marley • interior artwork by Ryan Richmond Obsidian Spire / short story by Molly Elizabeth Atkins • interior artwork by Aituar Manas A Thousand or So Words of Wisdom • (1986) • essay by Anne McCaffrey Gator (1997) / short story by Robert J. Sawyer • interior artwork by Joshua Meehan A Glowing Heart / short story by Anton Rose • interior artwork by Anthony Moravian The Long Dizzy Down / short story by Ziporah Hildebrandt • interior artwork by Asher Ben Alpay The Woodcutter's Deity / short story by Walter Dinjos • interior artwork by Chan Ha Kim How to Become an Illustrator • essay by Larry Elmore The Dragon Killer's Daughter / short story by Todd McCaffrey • interior artwork by Larry Elmore Useless Magic / short story by Andrew Perry • interior artwork by Hanna Al-Shaer Adramelech / short story by Sean Hazlett • interior artwork by Aituar Manas The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove / novelette by Ville Meriläinen • interior artwork by David Furnal The Magnificent Bhajan / short story by David VonAllmen • interior artwork by Chan Ha Kim Notes on Art Direction: Is It DIrection or Suggestion? • essay by Bob Eggleton The Year in the Contests • essay by Dave Wolverton [as by David Farland]

30 review for Writers of the Future: Volume 33

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    My first experience with this series and I was impressed. Writers of the Future is an anthology of newly published and recently selected shorter works by up and coming (and very talented) writers. This also contains fabulous illustrations, commentary from L. Ron Hubbard and Anne McCaffrey, and some classic short stories from Hubbard, Robert J. Sawyer and Todd McCaffrey. This one, the 33rd, and first published in 2017, features this year’s fourteen best short works from the Writers of the Future I My first experience with this series and I was impressed. Writers of the Future is an anthology of newly published and recently selected shorter works by up and coming (and very talented) writers. This also contains fabulous illustrations, commentary from L. Ron Hubbard and Anne McCaffrey, and some classic short stories from Hubbard, Robert J. Sawyer and Todd McCaffrey. This one, the 33rd, and first published in 2017, features this year’s fourteen best short works from the Writers of the Future International writers’ program and illustrations from the winners in the Illustrators of the future program. I enjoyed the introduction that explained that this series has provided an accelerated start to the careers of many well-known writers. A short bio of all the contributors was also good to read. These stories span the gamut of SF/F writing, from epic fantasy to hard core SF (with some paranormal and horror themes thrown in for good measure). This one seemed to me to tend towards the SF side and that was fine, many good stories, great ideas and all put together well. I especially enjoyed “The Armor Embrace” by Doug C. Souza and “The Woodcutter’s Deity” by Walter Dinjos. Special shout out for Jason Park’s illustration for “Moonlight One.” *** A free copy of this book was provided in exchange for an honest review

  2. 5 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    Writers of the Future: Volume 33 by Anne McCaffrey, David Farland (Editor) is a good collection of stories. Most authors had a story of their experiences of writing before their fiction story. My favorite story was that of Doug C Souza. All the stories was pretty good. I was given this book to read and the review is voluntary.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Basia

    Well, here we are on number 33, and still, this series does not disappoint. I LOVE the new writers and artists we meet as a result of this series' existence. Are there some stories that are better than others here? Of course. Always, I think, that is the case. But it is such a rare thing to award an anthology a 5/5 rating. This one? Deserves it yet again. Thank you to the publisher and authors for the eARC! Recommended to anyone wanting to stay plugged in to the newest, coolest voices in es ef and Well, here we are on number 33, and still, this series does not disappoint. I LOVE the new writers and artists we meet as a result of this series' existence. Are there some stories that are better than others here? Of course. Always, I think, that is the case. But it is such a rare thing to award an anthology a 5/5 rating. This one? Deserves it yet again. Thank you to the publisher and authors for the eARC! Recommended to anyone wanting to stay plugged in to the newest, coolest voices in es ef and fantasy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jake Marley

    Hi everyone! I don't really know the etiquette for Goodreads quite yet, but I am proud to say that my first published story will be appearing in this volume of Writers of the Future! Please feel free to find me online and let me know what you think! And thanks in advance to anyone who takes the time to give our book a read. Cheers! Hi everyone! I don't really know the etiquette for Goodreads quite yet, but I am proud to say that my first published story will be appearing in this volume of Writers of the Future! Please feel free to find me online and let me know what you think! And thanks in advance to anyone who takes the time to give our book a read. Cheers!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vernice

    I received a free copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I think most of these stories were hampered by the fact that they were just that -- short stories. I'm confident that at least 90% of them would have been so much better had they had more length. So while I feel more or less bleh about this collection, I'd definitely look out for more works by the various authors. Because it's fantasy and sci-fi, world-building is usually necessary, and often this resulted in a lot I received a free copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I think most of these stories were hampered by the fact that they were just that -- short stories. I'm confident that at least 90% of them would have been so much better had they had more length. So while I feel more or less bleh about this collection, I'd definitely look out for more works by the various authors. Because it's fantasy and sci-fi, world-building is usually necessary, and often this resulted in a lot of info-dumping that had my eyes going skew and tech talk that went right over my head. I'm not saying it wasn't necessary or done bad, but it did feel clumsy and rushed and detracted from the story itself. I don't know if there was a word limit to these stories, but I would have appreciated more time with each. Moonlight One by Stephen Lawson - When Gwen's husband is found murdered, she's the only suspect. After all, they were the only two people on the moon: Decent sci-fi murder mystery begging for it's own full length novel. Writer has an engaging writing style that let me gloss over any holes in the story. ★★★★ The Armor Embrace by Doug C. Souza - Flora's father is a mech-soldier of the Slayer Class, but how much of him is really left inside the machine?: It had a very interesting concept, and probably would have worked better as a longer length novel. Leaves you with a lot of questions. ★★ Envoy in the Ice by Dustin Steinacker - When an alien with godly intelligence is discovered watching the earth, one man must try to learn if its motives are pure: The blurb is kind of misleading, but not completely off. A lot of unanswered questions that could be explored in a longer novel. ★★★ The Devil's Rescue by L. Ron Hubbard - If you were stranded in an open boat and the only hope for rescue came from a ghost ship, would you dare to ride?: Bleh... the language was a bit pretentious, and the story was kinda boring. ★★ Tears for Shulna by Andrew L. Roberts - Some gifts come with heavy price tags, and the giver must rise to the occasion.: I need more of this! More Selkies! This story was too short though. ★★★★ The Drake Equation by C.L. Kagmi - What if an alien asks for your help with a question, and the answer fects the future of the whole human race?: Hmmm... I literally can't remember this story... Acquisition by Jake Marley - Barlow has a talent for finding the dead. Or do they find him?: Pretty good, would also make a good series. ★★★★ Obsidian Spire by Molly Elizabeth Atkins - When Varga sets out to explore the ancient stronghold of a long dead wizard, she discovers that the ruins aren't as deserted as she thought.: Loved this one! Would love more by this author and even this story... maybe a prequel! ★★★★★ Gator by Robert J. Sawyer - If only that reptile in the sewer were something as predictable as an alligator.: Uhm... no... maybe it was because of the length limit, but this just fell completely flat and was insensible. ★ A Glowing Heart by Anton Rose - On a distant world among the cloud peaks, the light-hawks promise a rich reward for those daring enough to harvest one.: Not much to say about this one, but it was very good. ★★★★ The Long Dizzy Down by Ziporah Hildebrandt - In a world where memories can be stripped, Bill discovers that he has a family he has never known.: Didn't even read this one. Couldn't stomach the writing ★ The Woodcutters' Deity by Walter Dinjos - Not all spirits have the best of intentions, and they must be dealt with.: This was also very good. Definitely would want more about the mythology here. ★★★★★ The Dragon Killer's Daughter by Todd McCaffrey - You can put an end to something wondrous, but only at a cost.: Meh... didn't really make any sense ★★ Useless Magic by Andrew Peery - In a life-or-death situation, sometimes you wish that you had a really powerful spell. But that begs the question - What is power?: A decent enough short story ★★★ Adramelech by Sean Hazlett - Some devils are as old as a dream, and more evil than men can imagine.: Didn't really feel this one either. Maybe if the author had more time it could have been better ★★★ The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove by Ville Merilainen - When the world needs saving, three children are called to the task.: Probably my favorite of them all... coincidentally also the longest! ★★★★★ The Magnificent Bhajan by David Von Allmen - Can an aging sorcerer find a way to track down his old nemesis with the small bit of magic he has left, or is he just fooling himself?: Another bleh ★★★

  6. 4 out of 5

    Beth Cato

    I received this galley through Library Thing's Early Reviewer program. While the Church of Scientology behind the Writers of the Future and Illustrators of the Future Contests can be readily criticized, one thing is certain: they have boosted the careers of many fantastic authors and artists, and this book is a prime example of that. The stories gathered here are as strong as that of an anthology of authors with decades of writing and many books to show for it, but for some of these authors, this I received this galley through Library Thing's Early Reviewer program. While the Church of Scientology behind the Writers of the Future and Illustrators of the Future Contests can be readily criticized, one thing is certain: they have boosted the careers of many fantastic authors and artists, and this book is a prime example of that. The stories gathered here are as strong as that of an anthology of authors with decades of writing and many books to show for it, but for some of these authors, this is among their first publications. There was only one story I could not finish; the others were enjoyable all the way through. My favorites included "Acquisition" by Jake Marley and "Useless Magic" by Andrew Peery. Also, as a long-time fan of Larry Elmore's work, it was a joy to see one of his paintings on the cover and read an encouraging essay by him as well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Lawson

    This is some amazing new speculative fiction by emerging writers with voices from all walks of life. Winners come from Finland, England, Nigeria, and across the US. You will find suspense, mystery, deep contemplation about our place in the universe, and the full extent of human relationship. It's great. This is some amazing new speculative fiction by emerging writers with voices from all walks of life. Winners come from Finland, England, Nigeria, and across the US. You will find suspense, mystery, deep contemplation about our place in the universe, and the full extent of human relationship. It's great.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael Drakich

    I picked up this book at the AD ASTRA Conference in Toronto. There were a number of successful authors there to promote the book. Not only are there seventeen short stories to enjoy, but a number of anecdotal reports on writing and illustrating. These reports were: SEARCH FOR RESEARCH by L. Ron Hubbard, A THOUSAND OR SO WORDS OF WISDOM by Anne McCaffrey, and HOW TO BECOME AN ILLUSTRATOR by Larry Elmore. I am not including a review of these reports as I suspect most readers are only interested in I picked up this book at the AD ASTRA Conference in Toronto. There were a number of successful authors there to promote the book. Not only are there seventeen short stories to enjoy, but a number of anecdotal reports on writing and illustrating. These reports were: SEARCH FOR RESEARCH by L. Ron Hubbard, A THOUSAND OR SO WORDS OF WISDOM by Anne McCaffrey, and HOW TO BECOME AN ILLUSTRATOR by Larry Elmore. I am not including a review of these reports as I suspect most readers are only interested in the stories. I rate the stories from 1 to 5 stars and came to a collective average of 3.3 stars, but there is a caveat. Three stories in this collection are strictly ghost/supernatural stories. The cover reads "THE BEST NEW SF & FANTASY OF THE YEAR". Although ghost/supernatural stuff may be considered alternative fiction, in my opinion they do not fall into the categories of SF or FANTASY. As a result these stories, regardless of their content and writer's skill only received 2 stars as they did not meet the criteria I applied. Should they have been ranked without the criteria, the average would have been higher. Therefore, my ranking of four stars is based on that detail and the fact that there were a plurality of 5 star pieces. All in all, a good collection worth buying. A big bonus is the wonderful artwork throughout the book. It's something you don't normally see. Here are the individual ratings. MOONLIGHT ONE by Stephen Lawson. A good start to a collection. This near future tale involves the first full-time inhabitants on the moon. Throw in some covert actions, a killing, some politics and you get one heck of a scifi thriller. 5 stars THE ARMOR EMBRACE by Doug C. Souza. Military scifi with a flair. What happens inside a super soldier exoskeleton when the inhabitant is sorely injured? How does one deal with such a combo when they go AWOL? Home is where the heart is. 5 stars ENVOY IN THE ICE by Dustin Steinacker. So some gigantic alien thingy lands in the Antartic, hates visitors, for some reason cannot be photographed from space and allows delegates once a year. I found the politics of the situation highly unlikely, the submissiveness of humanity totally unbelievable and the ending disappointing. 2 stars THE DEVIL'S RESCUE by L. Ron Hubbard. I know this collection is sponsored by his estate and they deserve the right to include some of his work as well as an analogy on doing homework as a writer entitled SEARCH FOR RESEARCH, but I have difficulty accepting what I consider a ghost story with a supernatural flare as either science fiction or fantasy. A tale about the Flying Dutchman and the devil does not fit. 2 stars TEARS FOR SHULNA by Andrew L. Roberts. Stories with selkies (mermaids) always have a fanciful aspect to them and this one is no different. It is not love that drives the story, but respect. 4 stars THE DRAKE EQUATION by C. L. Kagmi. The equation doesn't deal with dragon-like creatures, but the number of technologically advanced species that exist. It addresses the age old premise of what other intelligent species think of humanity. 3 stars ACQUISITION by Jake Marley. And so I understand the reason behind the L. Ron Hubbard ghost story as it lends support to this ghost tale and a man who can capture them. This one lacked enough details to flow well and still isn't scifi or fantasy in my book. 2 stars. OBSIDIAN SPIRE by Molly Elizabeth Atkins. Standard Sword and Sorcery affair with a female warrior lead and the expected unskilled sidekick. Battle with a magically enhance grizzly bear is ho-hum. 3 stars GATOR by Robert J. Sawyer. Robert was kind enough to autograph my copy of this compendium at the start of his short story. Gators in the sewers of New York. One of the great urban myths. But what if it is true? Or maybe something not quite a gator, but similar? 5 stars A GLOWING HEART by Anton Rose. The struggle of a youth to have to kill a majestic magical light-hawk to save his mother. 4 stars THE LONG DIZZY DOWN by Ziporah Hildebrandt. So far, this collection has been pretty good. I guess somehwere they figured they needed to throw in a stinker. The story is told from the POV of a character who receives chemical impulses from a ship to induce happiness, sadness, strength, violence and more. The character thinks and speaks in such a disjointed way to make the entire story unenjoyable. 1 star THE WOODCUTTERS' DEITY by Walter Dinjos. This piece sounded so much like an old folklore tale. Old gods, chosen ones, the intervention of creatures of the wild, all lend essence to this story. Because of its folklore nature I was tempted to discount this as neither science fiction nor fantasy and score it low for failing to meet the criteria, but in the end I relented and accepted it. 5 stars THE DRAGON KILLER'S DAUGHTER by Todd McCaffrey. Very standard dragon fare with the highly predictable supposedly surprise ending. It's a meh. 3 stars USELESS MAGIC by Andrew Peery. Old witches and warlocks are unable to pass on their skills to their children. Some accept it, some don't. It was tough to relate to the characters and the story failed to excite. 2 stars. ADRAMELECH by Sean Hazlett. A story of demonic possession and the curse associated with it. Clearly a story falling into the supernatural genre and once again something that falls outside the criteria I consider necessary to qualify as either science fiction or fantasy. 2 stars THE FOX, THE WOLF, AND THE DOVE by Ville Merilainen. A nice piece of high fantasy with three young girls on a mission to revive the world tree. Although the longest piece in this collection, I feel the author could achieve so much more converting this work to a full length novel. There were a few places where things could have been fleshed out more and I was left with too many unanswered questions at the end. 4 stars THE MAGNIFICENT BHAJAN by David VonAllmen. What's left in the career of an old magician losing his mojo. Chasing phantoms? Or is the threat real? 4 stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Witt

    Over all I liked the book. There were stories that had me fully immerged, while others I just didn't like or couldn't get through. I liked that they all were so different and unique. They had good illustrations that helped me envision things. There is a lot of talent in this book. I did jot down brief thoughts on each story, but don't worry no spoilers. Moonlight One; I liked it. There was enough detail that I felt like I was there. I felt for the characters. I wanted Gwen to be safe. I was mad t Over all I liked the book. There were stories that had me fully immerged, while others I just didn't like or couldn't get through. I liked that they all were so different and unique. They had good illustrations that helped me envision things. There is a lot of talent in this book. I did jot down brief thoughts on each story, but don't worry no spoilers. Moonlight One; I liked it. There was enough detail that I felt like I was there. I felt for the characters. I wanted Gwen to be safe. I was mad that Ehrly shared secrets. I would have liked Jonas and Gwen to get back together. The plot was done well, easy to follow and understand. Things didn't seem rushed, although it could have been a longer story with more details on how they ended up on the moon mission and life on the moon. Things leading up to where this story starts. But that's just me wanting more. The Armor Embrace; I felt that it was rushed and for me it was a little hard to keep up with what was going on, what he was talking about and weather it was in the now or past. It was interesting and kept my attention. Envoy in the Ice; It was good. Different then other things I have read. It kept my interest and I was eager to find out how it ends. The characters were believable and interesting. The devils rescue; It was very slow going, to slow for me to continue on. To much time and over detail/thought was spent on him being lost at sea. Just wasn't for me. Tears for Shulna; It was a cute, heartwarming little story. The Drake Equation; It was a decent enough story about humanity and how human beliefs about life after death and the possibility of life on other planets is perceived. Acquisition; It had me interested the whole way through. It was a very cool story. Had me excited to continue reading. I was actually hoping for it to be longer. Obsidian Spire; It was a good short story. Had good details of things. The story moved at a good pace and was kept simple, making it easy to follow. Gator; I liked that it played off of a known Myth and turned it into something unexpected. It was well written with enough detail to keep my interest. A glowing Heart; I couldn't stop reading this story. It had good characters that kept my interest. I felt the feelings they felt. I wasn't thrilled the ending though. Seemed like it was cut off short or something. A cliff hanger like ending in my opinion. The long dizzy down; I just couldn't get through this one. It started out with what I call jibberish baby talk. I know that is probably the point going by the title, but I just couldn't get onto the story because of it. Skimming through it seemed to be a theme and just wasn't for me. The woodcutters' deity; Hmm, I did like this story. It was a interesting one. It was easy to follow and understand. It had me interested from beginning to end. I felt it was easy to relate to from other stories about gods. And had ended deferentially then what I had been expecting. The dragon killers daughter; It was not what I was expecting, in a good way. It kept my interest. It was detailed without going overboard and stuck to a good story line. It took a twist near the end that I was not expecting. Useless Magic; A interesting story about magic in a family. I did like the story line and descriptions used. I was able to picture things going on. Good ending and good writing. Adramelech; It is a story that I like and the first few pages really had me hooked. It was going in such a great direction. But then it seemed to have gotten rushed like. Like the writer realized he was going to have to cut out things in order to keep it in the short story category. And that in turn caused some of the excitement of the story to putter out. I could see this story becoming a full story. The fox, the wolf and the dove; What a good story. It was a little slow going but it was easy to understand what was going on. I felt like I got to know the characters. The detailing was enough to help paint a picture in my mind. There is a sad par near the end but the ending was on a good note. I really liked this one. The magnificent Bhajan; This was a nice simple story. It had good detail and a cute storyline. Nothing fancy or over the top. I was able to follow and understand the story with no issues. I liked it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shelli

    Despite having spent the entirety of my education and career in STEM, I was never really into reading science fiction or fantasy. It was probably mostly just an unfortunate coincidence that I was reading things that weren't particularly well-suited to my tastes. Recommendations from my friends (all male) included Robert A. Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land, which I'm convinced I was just too old to appreciate correctly, and Friday, which I was too old not to notice the blatant sexism. In the Despite having spent the entirety of my education and career in STEM, I was never really into reading science fiction or fantasy. It was probably mostly just an unfortunate coincidence that I was reading things that weren't particularly well-suited to my tastes. Recommendations from my friends (all male) included Robert A. Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land, which I'm convinced I was just too old to appreciate correctly, and Friday, which I was too old not to notice the blatant sexism. In the fantasy genre, I tried several books that were just too ungratifyingly esoteric for me, including C.J. Cherryh's series The Chronicles Of Morgaine and Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light. I did, however, gobble up television science fiction, from Star Trek onward, and I did eventually find some written science fiction that I really enjoyed, including the epic In Conquest Born. But my initial ambivalent reaction to those early reads just prevented me from fully digging into the genre at any future point in my life. And so, it was with bit of trepidation that I received my Goodreads Giveaways win, Writers of the Future: Volume 33. I had planned to read a short story here and there between my other reads, but this sucker was huge! As it turned out, there was nothing for me to worry about. I absolutely adored this collection; there was not a single bad story in the bunch, and only one or two that I could even muster a minor quibble about. The stories are as imaginative as I could hope for, but so much more accessible and heartfelt than the books I'd read earlier in life and failed to connect with. Don't be fooled: this may be genre, but it is literature in the fullest sense of the word. And although my ARC only had black and white prints of the winning artwork, those of you getting the finished version will get a 16-page color gallery of some really incredible art. Also, don't be put off by the attached L. Ron Hubbard name or the Scientology printing house; this ongoing competitive anthology has as little to do with wacky religious stuff as the Christian Science Monitor does. I really don't feel like I can recommend my very favorites among these stories to readers of this review, because they're pretty much all excellent! I myself just started at the beginning and read forward linearly, but there's a concise two-line synopsis for each in the early pages of the book that you can refer to, to pick and choose the ones that most tickle your fancy, if you want to approach reading it that way. But if I had to name a few that were especially outstanding, I would probably point you to "Moonlight One" (a whodunnit on a Moon station), "The Long Dizzy Down" (for its amazingly inventive writing style), and "The Fox, The Wolf, and the Dove" (a beautiful and heart-rending fairy tale). I'm thrilled that there are 32 more volumes before this that I can go back and read, and that they'll keep coming out each year henceforth. I received a pre-publication ARC of this book via Goodreads Giveaways, courtesy of the publisher, in return for my unbiased review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Galaxy Press

    I have been reading Writers of the Future since volume 3. What I find most amazing about these books is the quality of storytelling with new concepts and ideas. And I have been thoroughly disabused of any idea that great new story ideas aren't possible. What has been most rewarding, in addition to today's great authors who got their break with this Contest, has been being able to see changes in the SF&F genres 5-10 years ahead of the curve. These are the authors who are setting the trends! For e I have been reading Writers of the Future since volume 3. What I find most amazing about these books is the quality of storytelling with new concepts and ideas. And I have been thoroughly disabused of any idea that great new story ideas aren't possible. What has been most rewarding, in addition to today's great authors who got their break with this Contest, has been being able to see changes in the SF&F genres 5-10 years ahead of the curve. These are the authors who are setting the trends! For example, I was reading steampunk stories 5 years before the rage. So Volume 33 once again surprises and amazes with a fresh look on science fiction and fantasy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Pankau

    This is a really good collection of short stories - and considering that these are writer's just starting their professional journey, these are really exceptional. If you like short fiction, if you love sci-fi/fantasy, I really recommend it. Also very encouraging to see so many stories where the protagonist is not a white male. More specific ratings: Moonlight One - 2* Armor Embrace - 3* Envoy in the Ice - 3.5* Search for Research - good info, full of the bravado of Hubbord The Devil's Rescue - 4* Tea This is a really good collection of short stories - and considering that these are writer's just starting their professional journey, these are really exceptional. If you like short fiction, if you love sci-fi/fantasy, I really recommend it. Also very encouraging to see so many stories where the protagonist is not a white male. More specific ratings: Moonlight One - 2* Armor Embrace - 3* Envoy in the Ice - 3.5* Search for Research - good info, full of the bravado of Hubbord The Devil's Rescue - 4* Tears for Shulna - 5* Drake Equation - 3* Aquisition - 5* (the best of the bunch) Obsidian Spire - 5* A Thousand or So Words of Wisdom - YES! Gator - 3.5* A Glowing Heart - 3.5* The Long Dizzy Down - 5* The Woodcutter's Diety - 4* How to Become an Illustrator - meh. The Dragon Killer's Daughter - 3.5* (well-written, but obvious ending) Useless Magic - 4.5* Adramelech - 5* The Fox, The Wolf, and The Dove - 5* The Magnificent Bhajan - 4*

  13. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    For 34 years, the Writers of the Future contest has sought out the best new, amateur authors of science fiction and fantasy, publishing an annual anthology of stories by three winners per quarter (plus occasional stories by contest judges and by contestants who almost made the top twelve). For 29 years, the Illustrators of the Future contest has identified a dozen new illustrators as well and given them a chance to illustrate stories in the anthology – now in phenomenal color! Winners of this con For 34 years, the Writers of the Future contest has sought out the best new, amateur authors of science fiction and fantasy, publishing an annual anthology of stories by three winners per quarter (plus occasional stories by contest judges and by contestants who almost made the top twelve). For 29 years, the Illustrators of the Future contest has identified a dozen new illustrators as well and given them a chance to illustrate stories in the anthology – now in phenomenal color! Winners of this contest have gone on to win all of the major prizes in science fiction and fantasy, and also to hit bestseller lists. Major careers have been launched by this series, including many authors who have returned as judges. And as the competition has grown, we often find winners who have already published in other markets, and are on the verge of being new professionals when they win. This is the series to read if you want to know who you’ll be reading in the future. And this year’s Volume 33 fits well in that tradition. It contains 6 science fiction stories and 11 fantasy/horror stories. (This year’s entries seem a bit shorter than usual, so there are two Published Finalist stories and three judge stories.) I read this one faster than past volumes because the stories drew me in and wouldn’t let me go. The cover, a classic Larry Elmore dragon illustration, makes the experience complete! I highly recommend this book. Details for each story follow. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Moonlight One” I like hard science fiction. I like mysteries. And so I REALLY like hard science fiction mysteries (as witness my own "Murder on the Aldrin Express"). So Moonlight One is aimed squarely at me -- but the rest of you should read it, too! In this exotic twist on a classic locked room mystery, Lunar explorer Gwen Kennedy wakes to a nightmare: Her husband Ehrly is dead, and the two of them are the only humans on the Moon. Did she kill him in her sleep? Did he have an accident? Have aliens attacked? Or... This is a fine, short hard science fiction mystery. It was written by Stephen Lawson and illustrated by Jason Park. Highly recommed for readers of science fiction and mystery. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Armor Embrace” A wounded soldier struggles against his own damaged powered armor to break orders and return home to his daughter Flora. Meanwhile, police and military close in, hoping to shut him down and drag him back to war. Flora helps him to remember his distant past -- as well as darker, more recent memories. I don't normally think of powered armor stories as tender, but that's exactly what author Doug Souza has accomplished here, with help from illustrator Christopher Kiklowicz. The ending is haunting. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Envoy in the Ice” Pilots Sang and Lukas transport two ambassadors to Antarctica to meet the Envoy, a mysterious alien presence who has lived there for decades but who refuses most contact and all attempts to record it. Very little is known about the Envoy, though Sang grew up in a cult that worships the giant alien. For Sang and Lukas, the Envoy is not a mystery to be solved. It's just a fact in their lives -- until the ambassadors go missing, and the pilots put together a rescue mission. Written by Dustin Steinacker and illustrated by Yader Fonseca. The sense of wonder (and of cold!) is powerful in this one! ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Devil's Rescue” Edward Lanson is the last commander of the Gloucester Maid, bound for the Cape of Good Hope. When the ship is lost to a storm, Edward and a small handful of survivors flee in a lifeboat. Over the next three weeks, the rest of the crew pass away, one by one, until only Edward survives. As his fate grows bleak, he decides that it may be simplest just to die -- but his life takes an even stranger twist when he encounters the fabled Flying Dutchman. Is Lanson doubly cursed? Or will he find salvation in the most unlikely of rescuers? This is a story from the archives of contest founder L. Ron Hubbard, illustrated by Preston Stone. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Tears for Shülna” This is another great story for fans of the sea (like me). Seaman William Ghallchoir returns home to care for his dying father, the man who taught him to sail; but what his father wants most can only come from his first love, the selkie Shülna. Once William finds Shülna, she teaches him about his own past, his father, and the ways of the selkies. Written by Andrew Roberts and illustrated by Rachel Quinlan. The ending is touching and bittersweet, exactly what the story called for. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Drake Equation” Like Moonlight One by Stephen Lawson, this story is one of my favorites in this volume, because it's the sort of hard science fiction I like best. Only the science in this one is a BIT more advanced: as the title implies, this story explores the question of why we haven't been visited by aliens. The structure and setting are unique: the entire story starts when Carol is yanked from her ship into empty space, and it all takes place in the moments between the accident and her imminent death. Alien presences surround her and try, as best she can comprehend, to answer her questions -- and their own. The story has faint echoes of Contact and 2001, but stands on its own in the same tradition. Written by CL Kagmi and illustrated by Golden Brush winner Michael Michera. The illustration excellently captures the moment of crisis. Between the words, the ideas, and the picture, this is the perfect combination. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Acquisition” This story falls somewhere on the edge between fantasy and horror. My own tastes run to science fiction (and usually the harder, the better), but there's room on my palate for a few bites of fantasy now and then. And this one is tasty indeed! Barlow is a most unusual collector. I can't say much beyond that without spoiling the story, but I can say his work is guided by troubled ghosts, and not to their benefit -- until one ghost disturbs his sleeping conscience, and Barlow must decide if there is a line he will not cross. Written by Golden Pen winner Jake Marley and illustrated by Ryan Richmond. This is one creepy, atmospheric little tale. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Obsidian Spire” Varga is sent by her father, Lord Ulvran, to investigate the mysterious sightings made by the villagers and to assuage their fears. They are sure that the mage has returned and will soon send glass beasts to assault them once more. With the help of Fiske, a hapless hunter, she sets out to prove herself, though she is sure the fears are groundless. Each of them has something to prove -- and unforeseen dangers will give them the chance. SPOILERS I said earlier that I'm not much into fantasy these days. This is a very traditional fantasy quest, so it's not my thing. But it's very well written, with two engaging characters who play off each other well. And the descriptions are effective: I have a phobia about broken glass, and I _felt_ every slice by the glass beast. Every cut made me wince. This story gave me the creeps! Written by Molly Atkins and illustrated by Aituar Manas. (At least there's no broken glass in the illustration. Brrr...) ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Gator” Ludlum wanders through the sewers of New York, searching for something. Through flashbacks, we learn what he seeks and why; and it's much more ominous than the gator in the title. The story takes an unusual twist near the end, and becomes... something else. I think it raises more questions than it answers, and I'd like to see more. Written by contest judge Robert J. Sawyer and illustrated by Joshua Meehan. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “A Glowing Heart” This is another traditional fantasy, another hard sell to me; but the core image is vivid, and used nicely throughout the story. And the core dilemma is powerful and high-stakes: the narrator can get the medicine needed to save their mother's life, but only at the cost of the heart of a light-hawk, the most beautiful bird this falconer has ever seen. Family pressures mount, and the falconer cannot escape the decision. The story is lyrical, and the emotion is strong. Written by Anton Rose and illustrated by Anthony Moravian. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Long Dizzy Down” This is the oddball of the anthology, very difficult to describe. Bill, the narrator, is not all there. Literally. Part of Bill's mind is given over to Ship, an artificially intelligent starship with an agenda of its own. This leads Bill to think and talk in a non-linear, not-quite-simple-minded fashion which starts out difficult to follow but soon draws you in. The more you read Bill's thoughts, the more you learn to think like he does -- and the more you figure out what's really going on. This story is more on the experimental side than the rest. It took me a while to get into the language; but once I did, the story progressed nicely to a surprising conclusion. Written by Ziporah Hildebrandt and illustrated by Asher Ben Alpay. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Woodcutters' Deity” This is a story of myths long-past -- or are they past? Young Nduka is beset on all sides. His cruel, laughing brothers torment him (though he sometimes gets the better of them); and at the same time, the forces of nature themselves seem out to get him. His only confidant is... the Tree. No ordinary tree, the Tree talks to him, and listens to his troubles. Is it his ally? Or something darker? This story is told in the form of African folklore, with hints of a story told by a campfire; but through the strong voice of Nduka, it feels current as well. And the ending has a nice, satisfying twist that I never saw coming. Written by Walter Emeka Dinjos and illustrated (very effectively!) by Chan Ha Kim. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Dragon Killer's Daughter” Another traditional fantasy (What's a poor hard SF guy to do?), but one that's surprisingly small and personal. A generation ago, a village hired the knight Calbert to slay the dragon that menaced their village. Today, Calbert and his daughter Paksa live in wealth as a result; but the villagers are learning the Law of Unintended Consequences, and that there are worse things than having a dragon in the neighborhood. Calbert, meanwhile, prepares Paksa for some future change of fortune that he has known was coming since the day the dragon died. This personal dragon story was written by contest judge Todd McCaffrey (for whom dragons are very personal indeed) based on the cover by Illustrator judge Larry Elmore. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Useless Magic” John is a doctor, but just a little bit more. The world of this story is an unusual one: recognizably a rural corner of our present world, but a world where everyone can do magic. Unfortunately, the magic fades with each generation: each person in John's generation can do only one spell, and not necessarily even a large one; so John finds he can do more and help more with medicine than with magic. This makes him a disappointment to his father, a much more powerful magician who always expected more from his children. This story is the most literary in the collection, with small action but large emotion. It's about loss and acceptance and finding your place in a changing world. The mood is compelling, and the rural setting is nicely conveyed. Written by Andrew Peery and illustrated by Hanna Al-Shaer. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “Adramalech” This story is dark. Dark, dark, dark, dark, dark. Did I mention dark? But well done. Mr. Brooks is tricked into accepting an ancient book in a mysterious language; and his life only goes downhill from there. Despite his best efforts, he is possessed by the demon Adramalech (look it up -- dark, dark, dark, dark, dark) and drawn deeper and deeper into a series of dark deeds that he tries in vain to stop. Can he win his freedom? And at what cost? Written by Sean Patrick Hazlett and illustrated by Aituar Manas. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove” Another fantasy (sigh), but just exotic enough to surprise me. Rooted (SPOLIER: that's a joke) in Finnish folklore, this is the story of three young sisters on a quest to revive the world tree and bring an end to endless winter. Along the way, they face dangerous terrain, biting cold, and the hungry, cunning wolves. They fight back with stories, with magic, with weapons, and with persistence -- and especially with loyalty to each other and to their absent parents. The structure is folklore, reminding me of Tolkien and Grimm, while the relationships are modern and relevant. I loved the surprise at the end. It was very satisfying. Written by Ville Meriläinen and illustrated by David Furnal. ---------------------------------------------------------------- “The Magnificent Bhajan” This story has coincidental similarities to Useless Magic in that a person with limited magic must find new ways to get by; but that's where the similarities end (well, except that they're both well-written and enjoyable). The Magnificent Bhajan was once the Maharaja's court magician, and saved his lord from Ranjeet the Usurper; but Bhajan never understood court politics, and thus he was dismissed. Through the ensuing decades, his powers have faded, until today he can create only simple illusions; but when he learns that Ranjeet has returned, Bhajan must use his diminished powers plus his wits and experience to defuse another plot against the Maharaja. I mentioned in other reviews that I'm not much into fantasy, but this one struck me right. The recreation of ancient India is very rich for a short story, just enough for flavor without overpowering. The magic had the perfect flavor for the setting. And the court politics were well-handled. This was my favorite of the fantasies in the anthology. Written by David VonAllmen and illustrated by Chan Ha Kim. ---------------------------------------------------------------- Advice As always, Writers of the Future includes advice for writers and artists. I'm going to cover these in a single review. In "Search for Research", L. Ron Hubbard teaches of the importance of research as well as several research methods. Some of these pre-internet methods may seem quaint today, when whole libraries are just a click away, but they're still effective. I particularly like where he discusses research as a way of generating story prompts, a practice I have always found effective. In "A Thousand Or So Words of Wisdom", Anne McCaffrey teaches of the importance of story. She gives a nod to other virtues -- grammar, voice, structure -- but she also points out how a strong story can make up for a lot of weaknesses. In "How to Become an Illustrator", Larry Elmore touches on the business side of an art career; but his main emphasis is on how passion and work and sacrifice will help you to get that business, while business alone won't lead to great art. In "Notes on Art Direction", Bob Eggleton discusses how the illustrators are selected. He also discusses the delicate dance through which he suggests ideas and enhancements on the way to their final art while maintaining their freedom to create art that is uniquely their own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David V.

    Began this book(3-24-17) just 2 days after having right knee replacement surgery, but between pain pills and subsequent "naps," exercises, resting and icing my leg, in-home physical therapists, general pain, and a need for new glasses prescription, it's been tough to focus on reading. But I'm still hoping to finish this. Received as an ARC via my employer Barnes & Noble. I used to read a lot of short stories, specifically science fiction, until my 30's then I preferred long involved novels. So t Began this book(3-24-17) just 2 days after having right knee replacement surgery, but between pain pills and subsequent "naps," exercises, resting and icing my leg, in-home physical therapists, general pain, and a need for new glasses prescription, it's been tough to focus on reading. But I'm still hoping to finish this. Received as an ARC via my employer Barnes & Noble. I used to read a lot of short stories, specifically science fiction, until my 30's then I preferred long involved novels. So these were the 1st short fiction I've read in decades. Several of the stories were quite good, others just so-so, but volumes like these do give the reader a chance to read the up and coming new writers. Also in this case, new book illustrators. Hubbard the founder of these awards was a good SF author until he began the creation of Scientology and then his SF became more and more bizarre. He's an interesting character all by himself.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Anthologies are not usually my thing. I like novels better than short stories, and I've just never really gotten into magazines or collections of stories. That said, reading through these short stories, winners of the Writers of the Future contest, has made me reconsider. There was honestly no story here that I didn't enjoy at least a little bit, and some of them stuck in my head as really great. "Envoy in the Ic I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Anthologies are not usually my thing. I like novels better than short stories, and I've just never really gotten into magazines or collections of stories. That said, reading through these short stories, winners of the Writers of the Future contest, has made me reconsider. There was honestly no story here that I didn't enjoy at least a little bit, and some of them stuck in my head as really great. "Envoy in the Ice," in particular, was especially enjoyable. Some of the stories were things I would never have chosen to read on my own. Stories about ghost hunters and other things that I guess could be called "urban fantasy" are rarely my cup of tea, but the authors featured here are winners of an international competition for a reason, and I liked some of the stories even if I would not have chosen them by myself. As an avid reader, I always like finding new authors to watch for, and many of these contest winners fit the bill. As someone who aspires to write someday myself, I also enjoyed the fact that there were essays on writing from some of the major names in fantasy and science fiction. Tips from the experts are always good, even if they are necessarily a bit general or vague. Overall, I definitely liked reading this collection of stories, and I may well try to dig up past editions of this anthology or seek out other, similar collections.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ziporah Hildebrandt

    I haven't read all the stories yet, this is a fat book full of great writing! I love that it is pulled together from thousands of submissions to a contest. I love that the winners who are published here are chosen by blind judging. There is so much here to enjoy! I haven't read all the stories yet, this is a fat book full of great writing! I love that it is pulled together from thousands of submissions to a contest. I love that the winners who are published here are chosen by blind judging. There is so much here to enjoy!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve Pantazis

    I received an advanced reading copy of select stories from this year’s Writers of the Future anthology, Volume 33. As with each anthology, editor David Farland chooses a veritable mix of speculative fiction of superb quality and variation. The first thing I noticed with Volume 33 was the cover—in a word, gorgeous. Renowned artist Larry Elmore’s “Crimson Dawn” is a sublime representation of what got me into fantasy long ago: dragons. The cover serves not only as a prelude to the stories inside, b I received an advanced reading copy of select stories from this year’s Writers of the Future anthology, Volume 33. As with each anthology, editor David Farland chooses a veritable mix of speculative fiction of superb quality and variation. The first thing I noticed with Volume 33 was the cover—in a word, gorgeous. Renowned artist Larry Elmore’s “Crimson Dawn” is a sublime representation of what got me into fantasy long ago: dragons. The cover serves not only as a prelude to the stories inside, but an invitation to the reader to prepare for an unforgettable adventure ahead. But enough about the artwork…onto the stories! Two stories in particular stand out, “Adramelech” by Sean Hazlett and “Envoy in the Ice” by Dustin Steinacker. “Adramelech” is grimdark, a subgenre of fantasy that contains darker elements, much of the way horror instills dread in our hearts. In this case, it tells of a man who has made an unwitting pact with the demon lord, Adramelech. (On a side note, this demon is one of the more obscure ones you’ll find in apocryphal lore, which bumps up the “fascination factor” quite a bit if you’re interested in angelology, fallen angels and such.) The more our hero (or should I say, antihero) attempts to free himself of his infernal bond, the more it drags him toward his inevitable end. Can he break the pact? You’ll have to read the story to find out. (Evil laugh.) The language is gorgeous and crafted of the Victorian era. You won’t be disappointed with this cautionary tale. “Envoy in the Ice” is a story about a visiting alien entity (called Envoy) and its effect on us earthly beings in a subliminal sort of way. Fans of the movie “Arrival” will find this piece intriguing in how the hero, who has worshipped Envoy since childhood, must uncover its secret. What will he find that causes him to lose faith and find it again? You’re right: you need to read the story! I enjoyed the dialogue between the different players and the unfolding of the mystery behind the identity and purpose of Envoy. It has a natural feel that draws you in…well, much the way “Arrival” did for me. Bon appetit! Now that I’ve given you a taste of what’s inside Writers of the Future 33, what are you waiting for? Dive in!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sheldon R

    I received an advanced reading copy with four stories. Overall the four authors are very talented, the themes very interesting and I can't wait to read the novel when it comes out. Envoy in the Ice- Dustin Steinacker I like the originality of this story. Definitely science fiction but not your typical 'first contact' and 'alien encounter' theme. However I felt that there was too much to fit in a short story. Would have been better developed in a longer story format. Obsidian Spire - Molly Elizabeth I received an advanced reading copy with four stories. Overall the four authors are very talented, the themes very interesting and I can't wait to read the novel when it comes out. Envoy in the Ice- Dustin Steinacker I like the originality of this story. Definitely science fiction but not your typical 'first contact' and 'alien encounter' theme. However I felt that there was too much to fit in a short story. Would have been better developed in a longer story format. Obsidian Spire - Molly Elizabeth Atkins One of my favorite stories. Very imaginative and engaging. Feel like its only part of a greater story to tell. I look forward to more from this author and from the story's characters. A Glowing Heart - Anton Rose This story manages to stay within the science fiction theme, but really is a story about the character and struggles of the protagonist. Well written and enjoyable reading but don't think it fits as well within the overall theme of the book as the others. Adramelech - Sean Hazlett The best story of the lot. This work combine science fiction with mythology and little bit of horror. Told in the first person, the author is able to add a surprising level of character development within the short story length. The author takes a familiar theme, and spins it into an original and engaging story with the right amount of pace and imagination. Oh and a terrific ending. I've read some the author's previous works and have no doubt that he will have a very successful future in this genre.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I have really enjoyed most of the stories I have read so far. I am impressed with the varied types of writing and even more impressed that there has only been one story (out of about 15) that I had a hard time getting into. More info on my blog http://howtoburnwater.blogspot.com/20... I have really enjoyed most of the stories I have read so far. I am impressed with the varied types of writing and even more impressed that there has only been one story (out of about 15) that I had a hard time getting into. More info on my blog http://howtoburnwater.blogspot.com/20...

  20. 5 out of 5

    J.C. Pillard

    This is the first Writers of the Future that I have read, and it was pretty good! The short stories were mixed, ranging from alright to very good. Possibly my favorite short story was "Obsidian Spire" by Molly Elizabeth Atkins, which presented a rich, detailed world without feeling the need to explain all the rules to the reader. I also greatly enjoyed the last story in the collections, "The Magnificent Bhajan" by David VonAllmen. This is the first Writers of the Future that I have read, and it was pretty good! The short stories were mixed, ranging from alright to very good. Possibly my favorite short story was "Obsidian Spire" by Molly Elizabeth Atkins, which presented a rich, detailed world without feeling the need to explain all the rules to the reader. I also greatly enjoyed the last story in the collections, "The Magnificent Bhajan" by David VonAllmen.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Adams

    WOTF Vol. 33 Always a treat to read new up and coming authors and see them get the recognition they deserve! A more thorough review will be posted to my laughable blog. http://www.nicholasadamswrites.com/my... WOTF Vol. 33 Always a treat to read new up and coming authors and see them get the recognition they deserve! A more thorough review will be posted to my laughable blog. http://www.nicholasadamswrites.com/my...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jason Bleckly

    A bit patchier than other years. There's a couple of bad stories which I don't think deserved a place when the 2 published finalists were actually better. A bit patchier than other years. There's a couple of bad stories which I don't think deserved a place when the 2 published finalists were actually better.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Some good stories.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anand Narayanaswamy

    Writers of the Future - Volume 33 is a set of 17 stories written by several writers exclusively authored not only to fascinate and terrify but also to delight readers. The book features 14 best tales from the Writers of the Future international writer’s program with illustrations from the winners of the Future international illustrator’s program. The book begins with a short and crisp introduction by David Farland. He talks about how he started to write along with other information. The next chap Writers of the Future - Volume 33 is a set of 17 stories written by several writers exclusively authored not only to fascinate and terrify but also to delight readers. The book features 14 best tales from the Writers of the Future international writer’s program with illustrations from the winners of the Future international illustrator’s program. The book begins with a short and crisp introduction by David Farland. He talks about how he started to write along with other information. The next chapter titled Moonlight One examines the significance of telescopes, mission commands including the petroleum-based lubricant. The author talks about NASA's internship program in detail. In page 23, you will view an amazing stuff. In the next chapter titled, The Armor Embrace, the author talks about the presence of crackling external speakers, Airstream camper, Vege-protein pumps, screen flickering and much more. The Search for Research, which is the next chapter has been authored by Ron Hubbard in an adventurous tone. He outlines an incident which occurred in the New York Public Library with special reference to research activities. He also authored the next chapter named The Devil's Rescue. It talks about the wind and sea related developments. An interesting point to note is that each chapter includes an illustration drawn with the caption below it. This will help readers, particularly children to grasp the content easily. You will find one page full of illustration. I would suggest the publisher provide more than one illustration in between content to attract readers. The remaining chapters covered on the book includes Tears for Shulna, The Drake Equation, Acquision, Obsidian Spire, A thousand or so words of Wisdom, Gator, A Glowing heart and more. The author also examines how you can become an illustrator written by Larry Elmore. He provides a detailed overview of the various aspects of an illustrator with quotes from reputed personalities. Towards the end of the book, you will find specific notes related to art direction authored by Bob Eggleton. At the end of each chapter, you will find illustrations in Black and White. However, at the end of the book, you will view colored illustrations, which looks excellent and great. The illustrator deserves full credit since the designer has created them so accurately with perfection and beauty. Writers of the Future - Volume 33 is an excellent book for students, novelists, kids and for all those who are interested in exploring the wonderful world of science fiction. I received the book for free in return for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    S.J. Reisner

    I am a bit biased. I have friends whose work appears in this anthology. However, if I didn't like it, I would have simply not reviewed it at all. The Writers of the Future anthologies always have a wide variety of stories by talented new voices in the fantasy and sci-fi genres. This one is no exception. Wonderful authors, great stories. I was impressed to find a fantastic ghost story in this one, Acquisition by Jake Marley. It was probably one of my favorites in the entire book. I also enjoyed C I am a bit biased. I have friends whose work appears in this anthology. However, if I didn't like it, I would have simply not reviewed it at all. The Writers of the Future anthologies always have a wide variety of stories by talented new voices in the fantasy and sci-fi genres. This one is no exception. Wonderful authors, great stories. I was impressed to find a fantastic ghost story in this one, Acquisition by Jake Marley. It was probably one of my favorites in the entire book. I also enjoyed C.L. Kagmi's Drake Equation which I found rather thought-provoking. If you love speculative fiction - you can't go wrong with this anthology. The artwork is amazing, too.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    Engaging compilation of science fiction and fantasy, two of my favorite genres. Each story is very well written that will catch you from beginning to end. To enjoy an evening at home alone, to read in the company of the couple or family. In addition each story is accompanied by a magnificent illustration that greatly enriches this book. An excellent book full of adventures to feed our imagination, in general all stories are pleasant, although I do not like the horror so much. The stories really c Engaging compilation of science fiction and fantasy, two of my favorite genres. Each story is very well written that will catch you from beginning to end. To enjoy an evening at home alone, to read in the company of the couple or family. In addition each story is accompanied by a magnificent illustration that greatly enriches this book. An excellent book full of adventures to feed our imagination, in general all stories are pleasant, although I do not like the horror so much. The stories really caught me and brought me different feelings, I was surprised by some plot twists. What I love most about these genres is that it allows me to contact possible inner realities, which are connected with deep emotions and desires, with a part of my subconscious that emerges when stimulated by the figurative narrative, and sometimes I discover certain aspects of my own that I dared not bring to light. My gratitude to the Publisher and NetGalley for allowing me to review the book

  27. 5 out of 5

    Krystal Lumsdon

    I read only a few since there is so many to choose from and I actually enjoyed them. I'm not too into Sci-Fi stories but the fantasy ones were quite intriguing and I had a hard time putting it down to deal with real life lol. I received this product free in return for my honest unbiased opinion. I read only a few since there is so many to choose from and I actually enjoyed them. I'm not too into Sci-Fi stories but the fantasy ones were quite intriguing and I had a hard time putting it down to deal with real life lol. I received this product free in return for my honest unbiased opinion.

  28. 5 out of 5

    BiblioGlow

    A really enjoyable little mix of science fiction stories. Some were better than others, but they were each imaginative and pushed some sort of boundary. Moonlight One - There are two people on the moon, and one of them has been murdered. A really fun sci-fi take on the locked room mystery. I enjoyed it a lot, until the main character turned into an asshole. He's had a creepy crush on the woman since college, but when it turns out she was lied to by her husband, suddenly the shine is off that diam A really enjoyable little mix of science fiction stories. Some were better than others, but they were each imaginative and pushed some sort of boundary. Moonlight One - There are two people on the moon, and one of them has been murdered. A really fun sci-fi take on the locked room mystery. I enjoyed it a lot, until the main character turned into an asshole. He's had a creepy crush on the woman since college, but when it turns out she was lied to by her husband, suddenly the shine is off that diamond? What? The Armor Embrace - An AWOL future soldier struggles to reach his daughter in his damanged power armor, but soon has to deal with the dark repercussions of his latest battle. Loved this one, and wish it could be longer, but it's the sort of thing that almost only works as a short story. It's a pretty perfect short story though. Envoy in the Ice - There is a large, mysterious alien in Antarctica. It's arrival decades ago has sent ripples through all of humanity, but for two pilots, their main problem is that the two latest ambassadors they dropped off to visit it have disappeared. A tense, optimistic, and really well developed story. I could easily see this turned into a whole novel. The Drake Equation - Another perfect little sci fi short story that takes a speculative shot at the question of why we haven't been visited by aliens yet. Acquisition - This one felt a little...fuzzy, and could have used a tad more editing, but the core of it is clearly very strong, and it has major Stephen King vibes. Obsidian Spire - A badass princess and a nerdy hunter/guide kicking enchanted monster butt? Sign me up. Gator - Felt a little like a fun riff on monster B-movies. I was glad it was short though, cuz it is pretty dumb. A Glowing Heart - Really fantastic imagery and scene setting in this one. Could easily turn into a whole novel. I'd love to read more about the light-hawk and the MC's home and family. The Long Dizzy-Down - One of my two favorites. This is by far the most daring story in the collection, with weird prose and vocabulary. The reader really has to work at understanding anything, and many will probably get frustrated and give up along the way. The story asks a lot, but it's totally worth it. The Woodcutter's Deity - Very fableish, complete with dark streak. The Dragon Killer's Daughter - I was a little confused about how the main twist in this worked, because the past is never fully explained, but I did love the set up of the story. Useless Magic - Loved it! Magical realism with modern elements of generational anger and acceptance. Definite hints of The Night Circus here, too. Such a fun story, I'd love to see it expanded. Adramalech - Most of it was well done, but this is really not my thing. I guess the goal was a super dark, atmospheric story with a depressing ending, so...mission accomplished? The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove - Easily my favorite of the collection.Three young sisters are on the quest their parents failed at, to revive the world tree and end the brutal killing winter that has gripped their land for decades. The sisters are each distinct, with believable personalities, purposes, goals - and grievances. The story is beautifully written, and the magic is very satisfying. I really hope the author expands it, or at least keeps writing. The Magnificent Bhajan - Another story I'd love to see expanded. Bhajan is one of the most famous magician in his country's history, after saving the Maharajah from a rogue magician, but he was dismissed from the royal court ages ago and is now old and magically limited. The author plays with ideas of age, legacy, human relationships, and risk-taking, and does a great job. It's well-written and developed and each of the characters we meet, however briefly, is engaging and realistic.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Penny Cockrell

    I was very impressed with the body of sci-fi/fantasy stories in this short story collection! Great stories and some of them were by well-known authors like Anne McCaffrey. I would highly recommend this to all sci-fi/fantasy fans!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This is a Goodreads win review. This is a sci fy and fantasy book with the stories being written by 28 award winning authors. It is a very good book.

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