web site hit counter Daughter Detox: Recovering from An Unloving Mother and Reclaiming Your Life - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Daughter Detox: Recovering from An Unloving Mother and Reclaiming Your Life

Availability: Ready to download

A self-help book based in science, the result of more than a decade of research, Daughter Detox offers the daughters of unloving mothers vital information, guidance, and real strategies for healing from childhood experiences, and building genuine self-esteem. Writer Peg Streep lays out seven distinct but interconnected stages on the path to reclaim your life from the effec A self-help book based in science, the result of more than a decade of research, Daughter Detox offers the daughters of unloving mothers vital information, guidance, and real strategies for healing from childhood experiences, and building genuine self-esteem. Writer Peg Streep lays out seven distinct but interconnected stages on the path to reclaim your life from the effects of a toxic childhood: DISCOVERY, DISCERNMENT, DISTINGUISH, DISARM, RECLAIM, REDIRECT, and RECOVER. Each step is clearly explained, and richly detailed with the stories of other women, approaches drawn from psychology and other disciplines, and unique exercises. The book will help the reader tackle her own self-doubt and become consciously aware of how her mother’s treatment continues to shape her behavior, even today.


Compare

A self-help book based in science, the result of more than a decade of research, Daughter Detox offers the daughters of unloving mothers vital information, guidance, and real strategies for healing from childhood experiences, and building genuine self-esteem. Writer Peg Streep lays out seven distinct but interconnected stages on the path to reclaim your life from the effec A self-help book based in science, the result of more than a decade of research, Daughter Detox offers the daughters of unloving mothers vital information, guidance, and real strategies for healing from childhood experiences, and building genuine self-esteem. Writer Peg Streep lays out seven distinct but interconnected stages on the path to reclaim your life from the effects of a toxic childhood: DISCOVERY, DISCERNMENT, DISTINGUISH, DISARM, RECLAIM, REDIRECT, and RECOVER. Each step is clearly explained, and richly detailed with the stories of other women, approaches drawn from psychology and other disciplines, and unique exercises. The book will help the reader tackle her own self-doubt and become consciously aware of how her mother’s treatment continues to shape her behavior, even today.

30 review for Daughter Detox: Recovering from An Unloving Mother and Reclaiming Your Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Travel Writing

    The concept of detoxing from your mean mother was really poignant. The realization that this is a process and it will not end if you go no-contact (NC) or when your mother dies. The gentle and firm way that these themes were repeated was very helpful and yet there is so much hope here. So many women who have experienced the darkest experiences of being emotionally abandoned and betrayed by their moms and yet made meaning of their lives without that support or adoration of a mom. I am so indebted The concept of detoxing from your mean mother was really poignant. The realization that this is a process and it will not end if you go no-contact (NC) or when your mother dies. The gentle and firm way that these themes were repeated was very helpful and yet there is so much hope here. So many women who have experienced the darkest experiences of being emotionally abandoned and betrayed by their moms and yet made meaning of their lives without that support or adoration of a mom. I am so indebted to these personal stories. Stories that our culture (as a whole) is not keen on hearing. The lay out of the chapters, how each built in such perfect form on each other and the poignant experiences of other women, who are in various stages and experiences of being un-mothered, swept me along. Some chapters I found myself reading over and over- there was so much amazing information. The last chapter "Engaged Detox" had questions to ponder and questions to journal and I found that especially helpful. I could read this book again, right now, and engage in all new ways with it. It is a book of healing and hope with new gifts in each reading. The chapter on forgiveness was probably the best I have ever encountered. This chapter was worth buying the whole book for. One truly thing I appreciated was that this book, unlike Mean Mothers, did not bang on about how having children is THE BEST way to heal, because a) not fucking true and b) that leaves those of us who have not deployed our mommy-selves bereft. This book addresses that being a mom can be one path to healing and also can be a path where you damage your kids just as much because you were damaged- and all the variations in between. The references are a goldmine of further reading. It's what a dismissive mother does not give her daughter that does the most damage. p47 Even high achieving daughters often feel deeply insecure, worthless, or not good enough. A dismissive mother robs a child of her sense of belonging... p47 Perhaps the most dangerous- and psychologically important- lesson the self involved mother imparts is that attention is earned, never given freely, or without condition. p56 Paradoxically, while the daughter feels unloved, she often can't see the ways in which she is wounded. The relationship I had with my mother was mostly insufferable. p.224

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tricia McBride Spaeth

    This is a very helpful book if you, unfortunately, have a very toxic mother and sisters and you are trying to understand why. It is more like a step by step method to begin to love yourself and move forward. I hope that no one else experiences what I have with my mother and that you have a happy, loving relationship. If you do not have a kind relationship with your mother and wonder why, read this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Divina

    The Pain is Great; The Peace and Insight are Worth It I purchased the Kindle and Audible versions of this book. I could not read it straight through. It was painful to recollect my childhood. However, with enough therapy and constant personal development, I could see how far I had come. Those daughters who have felt the pain of being unloved can spot a kindred spirit a mile away, and it is evident that Streep gets it. I love how she takes away its power by no longer being silent. I love how she v The Pain is Great; The Peace and Insight are Worth It I purchased the Kindle and Audible versions of this book. I could not read it straight through. It was painful to recollect my childhood. However, with enough therapy and constant personal development, I could see how far I had come. Those daughters who have felt the pain of being unloved can spot a kindred spirit a mile away, and it is evident that Streep gets it. I love how she takes away its power by no longer being silent. I love how she validated each of us, which we need after being gaslighted our whole lives and betrayed by our family—yes, even the “nice” ones. This book is difficult to journey through but is a soothing balm at the other end. It’s worth a read. I bought the workbook too.

  4. 5 out of 5

    MountainShelby

    Audio. I wish this book had been available 40 years ago, when I started the long detachment process from a very angry, violent, and vicious mother who could nevertheless charm a goldfish out of its water bowl. I finally cut her off completely over 16 years ago. To this day, she still sends me angry communications about once or twice each year (anonymous letters, the name and address typed on a manual typewriter, no return address--like I don't know who it's from), to which I have never and will Audio. I wish this book had been available 40 years ago, when I started the long detachment process from a very angry, violent, and vicious mother who could nevertheless charm a goldfish out of its water bowl. I finally cut her off completely over 16 years ago. To this day, she still sends me angry communications about once or twice each year (anonymous letters, the name and address typed on a manual typewriter, no return address--like I don't know who it's from), to which I have never and will never respond. Instead, I wish her well in my heart, then show the letters to one or two friends or co-workers, none of whom have ever met her. The response is one of universal shock, "That's from your MOTHER?" Yes, because as Streep boldly asserts, the motherhood myth is such a powerful cultural "given," people can't possibly conceive that these women who hate their children DO exist. People think the Susan Smiths of the world (the notorious woman who drove her two boys into a lake) are anomalies. I would suggest they are not so unusual as the culture believes, although mostly to a lesser extent. But what IS usual, sadly, is that for a daughter to acknowledge her mother didn't "do the best she could" is a disturbing departure from society's mother love narrative. For this reason, I kept my own no contact decision to myself, had a stock excuse when asked ("Oh, she has a very busy social life on the other side of the world"), and I never once looked back after I completely cut her off. Interestingly, for about 10 years she went silent, turning her rage onto another female family member, who eventually slapped my mother with a restraining order, took her to court--and won, with a very forceful admonishment from the judge to my mother about her behavior (he wasn't fooled by her outward charm). Others have told me that they have also experienced her rage (why this self-described pillar of her community still gets away with her rages is beyond me, but she does). My only regret is I didn't cut her off at 16 years old instead of 40. I found Streep's books only because somehow this woman got hold of my cell phone number and started sending messages so enraged and downright creepy, outsiders thought I'd made them up. Er, um, no, I'm not that good with technology. I needed a mini-dose of "therapy," and Streep's books helped. My point is these toxic women do exist, and for those of us who are unfortunate enough to be the daughter of one--we get Streep's message. My only advice is to read or listen to this book, stop beating yourself up, stop wasting your time trying to get into toxic mom's good graces (you won't), accept that you're not going to get that mother/daughter love in this life, and move the heck on. Streep offers many suggestions that don't necessarily require No Contact (although that was the only method I could possibly live with). Every time I receive an angry message from my mother, I silently wish her peace, and I will continue to do so, while protecting my own peaceful journey through life without her. I wish I could say I have my own family, children, and so forth, but the damage done was so severe (I'm leaving out 95% of the abuse) that I opted not to run the risk of perpetuating the cycle of abuse on my own children. Yes, it was that bad. If you are truly dealing with a toxic mother, you won't debate Streep's message--you will welcome it and be grateful for it. I also highly recommend The Daughter Detox Question & Answer Book: A GPS for Navigating Your Way Out of a Toxic Childhood. The Q&A book was more helpful to me because I'd already completed the No Contact process. Also very helpful for me years back was Understanding the Borderline Mother.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annette Fuller

    There are a lot more books out there about healing from narcissistic abuse than I originally realized. I read Daughter Detox in audiobook format, and I’ve since gone back to listen to it a second time, and also to reference specific sections. This is the kind of book that will only appeal to people who share the background that informs it—but the intended audience is of course those very people. And if you’re a daughter who grew up with a narcissistic mother of one kind or another, you owe it to There are a lot more books out there about healing from narcissistic abuse than I originally realized. I read Daughter Detox in audiobook format, and I’ve since gone back to listen to it a second time, and also to reference specific sections. This is the kind of book that will only appeal to people who share the background that informs it—but the intended audience is of course those very people. And if you’re a daughter who grew up with a narcissistic mother of one kind or another, you owe it to yourself to read this book. The subtitle doesn’t disappoint. The book follows a really logical progression, from identifying the unloving behaviors your mother employed while you were growing up (and in your adult life, if you are still in contact with them), to discerning whether you should keep them in your life, to how to heal from the trauma, set up and maintain healthy boundaries, grieve for the loving mother you never had, and view your trauma as a beautiful part of your narrative, not a chronic injury that keeps you from your best self. Reading this book was immensely validating, and it gave me real, actionable tactics to help recover from trauma. If you’ve suffered from emotional abuse at the hands of an unloving mother, or if you are the loved one of someone who has that trauma in their past, this book is a valuable and important read. This and other reviews by me can be found at www.annaimber.com

  6. 4 out of 5

    Deena Thomson

    over 3 hrs in and I can't.... who the hell isn't a horrible mother according to this book?? And I can't stand how it is all on the mother to mess up a kid. I can't RELATE at all and I have an extreme narcissistic mother.... one of the worse things (and there are so many) is her forcing me and my brother over and over and over on a father and his family who did not want anything to do with us and she did it so she could be closer to him. Like we were bait to get closer to him. OVER and over we we over 3 hrs in and I can't.... who the hell isn't a horrible mother according to this book?? And I can't stand how it is all on the mother to mess up a kid. I can't RELATE at all and I have an extreme narcissistic mother.... one of the worse things (and there are so many) is her forcing me and my brother over and over and over on a father and his family who did not want anything to do with us and she did it so she could be closer to him. Like we were bait to get closer to him. OVER and over we were abandoned and rejected by their entire family. The symptoms of all these different definitions of unloving mothers -- they seem indulgent-- and how women of these mothers are as grownups is too cookie cutter. Some of us succeed DESPITE our upbring -- honestly all the things listed as abuse in this book makes my head spin. What isn't abuse. Who is this perfect mother that doesn't do ANY of these things? Seriously?? You are a bad mom if you tell your kid they are having a certain food over another??? Example being mash potatoes over yogurt??? I just can't..... I had great hopes with this book because it was recommended to my from a good friend who understand how sometimes you just have to let go of a parent who is toxic in your life-- that this doesn't make you a bad person if that person happens to be your mother. That life is too short to always feel bad under a person who sucks the very soul out of a room. All this did was make me frustrated and a bit annoyed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lee E

    This book is the most comprehensive book on mother/daughter trauma I could hope to find. It hit every chord for me and I think it is an excellent source for change and healing. I would recommend a therapist go through this with you as it is overwhelming information that can trigger a lot and leave you feeling more alone if you don’t engage someone who understands you. I also think baby steps is a must.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eva Melchor

    Very helpful The book is very well structured and has a clear process. It makes reference to studies and what socuetal expectations are. It provides practical exercise s to do but doesn t promise the panacea, work to be done with a therapist. It needs re-reading a few times.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Odd to finish this book on Mother’s Day. If this book is relevant to your life, it’s going to be tough. A bit too simplified at points, most certainly, but it nudged some self-awareness and offered what might be useful next steps. Relative to the self help genre, it spoke to me and felt useful.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gerri

    OUCH. Daughters of narcissists and psychos rejoice: Here is your Bible. It's hard to address, but this book will help you soothe your rattled soul. Your mom was a jerk, but you are not her. If you have a shit relationship with your mom, this book might open your eyes. OUCH. Daughters of narcissists and psychos rejoice: Here is your Bible. It's hard to address, but this book will help you soothe your rattled soul. Your mom was a jerk, but you are not her. If you have a shit relationship with your mom, this book might open your eyes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Diana Lynn,

    Peg Nailed it!! In this book I have found all of the answers to my confusing crazy life! While the reality exposed is somewhat a jagged pill to swallow, my mind is receptive and open to the possibilities exhibited by the author. Very thought provoking, captivating and interesting theory. I am not even halfway through the read and felt compelled to rate so that some other lost daughter may benefit from this incredible information.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Just What I needed! There is so much good I can honestly say that after decades of not feeling great about myself and gobs of therapy, this book was like a light calling me from that dark place that unloved daughters often live. In my second session with a new therapist, she recommended this book to me. All I can say is wow. Through this book, I have gained so many insights into myself and how I relate to others. Thank you for going where most won't speak about. Just What I needed! There is so much good I can honestly say that after decades of not feeling great about myself and gobs of therapy, this book was like a light calling me from that dark place that unloved daughters often live. In my second session with a new therapist, she recommended this book to me. All I can say is wow. Through this book, I have gained so many insights into myself and how I relate to others. Thank you for going where most won't speak about.

  13. 4 out of 5

    E. Amato

    I appreciated this book so much. I'm grateful it exists. The stories, statistics and quotes were so affirming. It was eery how much others' stories mirrored my own. I admit I have not done too many of the exercises, but I know they are there! Eventually, I will get to them. Recommend slow reading. Much of the content contains things that might need to be defused. I appreciated this book so much. I'm grateful it exists. The stories, statistics and quotes were so affirming. It was eery how much others' stories mirrored my own. I admit I have not done too many of the exercises, but I know they are there! Eventually, I will get to them. Recommend slow reading. Much of the content contains things that might need to be defused.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joellyn Schwerdlin

    Best book ever on this topic! This book is an indispensable resource in helping unloved daughters to understand the root cause behind the brokenness of the relationship with their mothers, and offers a practical step-by-step plan for healing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Great book to help you recover from a toxic family. Really helped me to solidify my decision to never contact my family again. I'll never get any kind of accountability. Helped explain their confusing illogical behaviors too. Great book to help you recover from a toxic family. Really helped me to solidify my decision to never contact my family again. I'll never get any kind of accountability. Helped explain their confusing illogical behaviors too.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sofia The Great

    This was helpful and had a lot of good ideas.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nymeria

    Daughter Detox has been a very helpful book to me. Plus, the author has written several articles about this subject which I find quite interesting. Estranged daughters usually feel guilty about their experience with their mothers. Sometimes, they are even told they have 'a fake portrait of their mothers'. Some recurring thoughts are: 'my mother isn't so cruel after all', 'her childhood has been too hard', 'she will never change', 'nobody will understand my situation or attempt to believe it'. Soc Daughter Detox has been a very helpful book to me. Plus, the author has written several articles about this subject which I find quite interesting. Estranged daughters usually feel guilty about their experience with their mothers. Sometimes, they are even told they have 'a fake portrait of their mothers'. Some recurring thoughts are: 'my mother isn't so cruel after all', 'her childhood has been too hard', 'she will never change', 'nobody will understand my situation or attempt to believe it'. Society has always portrayed mothers as people who have to be loved and respected, women who always deserve the best. These ideas have a great impact on daughters, who usually forget something: some mothers don't fit in with the prototype of 'loving, responsible, involved with their sons/daughters'. A normal situation doesn't provoke these thoughts or behaviours. This book is a very hard, but realistic, eye-opener. Some mothers are unable to prove love or responsibility towards their daughters. You may like it or not, but this is a hidden truth that people don't want to talk about. Peg Streep has been able to do it and she has nailed it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marjon

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It was hard, reading the book till the end. But In spite of the cruel reality, the book gives the right kind of hope: if I stop hoping the mother I had will ever become the mother I needed, I can still hope that I will be able to establish warm and caring relations with others. Babies cannot choose a mother, adults can choose to get love from anyone else in the world. False hopes are not helping, so let them go! Instead, I'll first will need to learn lessons that my mom never thought me, like th It was hard, reading the book till the end. But In spite of the cruel reality, the book gives the right kind of hope: if I stop hoping the mother I had will ever become the mother I needed, I can still hope that I will be able to establish warm and caring relations with others. Babies cannot choose a mother, adults can choose to get love from anyone else in the world. False hopes are not helping, so let them go! Instead, I'll first will need to learn lessons that my mom never thought me, like the fact that I AM worth to be loved.... And another lesson to learn is that letting go the thought that I'm not lovable, will deprive her of the excuse she used for not loving me.... well, and thinking about that any further is putting her in the middle of my attention and energy again - I don't need to do that anymore. Instead I need to think about me and about what I need to achieve growth in the quest of becoming a loving and beloved member of my world.... Will do!:-)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael-David Sasson

    This book shares useful information about attachment, the repetition compulsion, emotional intelligence, etc. I trust the authors description of her own experience. That being said I think the complete pass given to father's (heterosexual co-parenting is assumed) in the tone something like "Of course, Dad had limited involvement or impact, he's just a Dad. Even had he wanted to be more involved, that controlling demon of a mother would have blocked him." Anyway, that ruined it for me. This book shares useful information about attachment, the repetition compulsion, emotional intelligence, etc. I trust the authors description of her own experience. That being said I think the complete pass given to father's (heterosexual co-parenting is assumed) in the tone something like "Of course, Dad had limited involvement or impact, he's just a Dad. Even had he wanted to be more involved, that controlling demon of a mother would have blocked him." Anyway, that ruined it for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    MeganRuth - Alohamora Open a Book

    Insightful in some ways, but a bit repetitive as well. I appreciated the book and felt it is valuable, but it is definitely not an end all be all. It's most likely a book full of hope and some ideas for healing. Insightful in some ways, but a bit repetitive as well. I appreciated the book and felt it is valuable, but it is definitely not an end all be all. It's most likely a book full of hope and some ideas for healing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth Badenhop

    I found some parts of this book super helpful, but other parts were very “so-so.” I had to really push myself to finish the last 1/3 of the book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Renée Roehl

    The book had some well researched information and nicely put together ideas about the mother/daughter wound, like the author's eight types of toxic mothers. I'm a fan of attachment theory as is Streep so all that worked for me. Even though her book was about unloving mothers specifically, the impact of fathers upon the mothers in a patriarchal paradigm was basically untouched. In the years of my work, the internalized misogyny that ALL women carry (including myself) can have more or less weight The book had some well researched information and nicely put together ideas about the mother/daughter wound, like the author's eight types of toxic mothers. I'm a fan of attachment theory as is Streep so all that worked for me. Even though her book was about unloving mothers specifically, the impact of fathers upon the mothers in a patriarchal paradigm was basically untouched. In the years of my work, the internalized misogyny that ALL women carry (including myself) can have more or less weight in relation to a mother's mental health depending on the type of mate she has. More than a few women have Stockholm Syndrome and that plays out around the world in women carrying out the paradigm's ideas about the role of girls. For instance, in Africa, the genital mutilation is done only by the women to the young girls. That information often goes a long way in the healing of daughters when they realize this larger abstract at play. The main reason I gave this book 3 stars was the circular repetition that made it a little hard to finish but also, it felt as if the author has some more work to do regarding her mother wound as I believe I detected an agenda here that made me 'distrust' some of the ideas or points made. I wish this were an article so the information could be consolidated. Sadly, in this book form, I don't feel comfortable referring it to clients.

  23. 4 out of 5

    KM

    I was drawn to this book out of curiosity because of an article that the author wrote about unhelpful questions people (daughters in particular) need to stop asking themselves to facilitate moving on from painful childhood experiences. After reading Daughter Detox, I'm immensely grateful that my own relationship with my mother has been largely positive, and the relationship has survived and improved after the rough times we did go through. That being said, I most certainly did not come out of ch I was drawn to this book out of curiosity because of an article that the author wrote about unhelpful questions people (daughters in particular) need to stop asking themselves to facilitate moving on from painful childhood experiences. After reading Daughter Detox, I'm immensely grateful that my own relationship with my mother has been largely positive, and the relationship has survived and improved after the rough times we did go through. That being said, I most certainly did not come out of childhood unscathed and uninjured, and the parts of the book that were relevant to my experiences were helpful in giving me things to consider, and avenues of psychological research to look into further. I even had a breakthrough reconciling an extremely painful memory of my high school graduation that's haunted me for years. If I get nothing else out of this book, it will have been well worth reading for that piece of mind.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

    I am surprisingly impressed by this book. It covers all the key areas in terms of moving forward from difficult mothers. The tactics described in the book are all the common technics; so there isn't any new content if you like reading about attachments, motivations, and techniques to manage ourselves. However, I still love this book, add it to my re-reads. I also score five stars as I found very difficult to find books on mother daughter relationships and appreciate the attempt; the content is v I am surprisingly impressed by this book. It covers all the key areas in terms of moving forward from difficult mothers. The tactics described in the book are all the common technics; so there isn't any new content if you like reading about attachments, motivations, and techniques to manage ourselves. However, I still love this book, add it to my re-reads. I also score five stars as I found very difficult to find books on mother daughter relationships and appreciate the attempt; the content is very valuable for those daughters that really want to make a different in their lives and may not know where to begin.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jane The Pale

    I liked the list of types of mothers, the list of similar traits among daughters, and her focus on working on yourself. Her discussion of forgiveness seemed to go in a circle. There are a lot of exercises, some of them a bit complex. I liked her talk about our unconscious guiding our reactions. You could also think of this as our training how we are taught and how we practice our responses—what we’ve learned to tolerate and what we’ve decided makes us bristle with anger. Parents are powerful, it I liked the list of types of mothers, the list of similar traits among daughters, and her focus on working on yourself. Her discussion of forgiveness seemed to go in a circle. There are a lot of exercises, some of them a bit complex. I liked her talk about our unconscious guiding our reactions. You could also think of this as our training how we are taught and how we practice our responses—what we’ve learned to tolerate and what we’ve decided makes us bristle with anger. Parents are powerful, it’s worth healing yourself in order to not pass that on.

  26. 5 out of 5

    As3 Na70

    The topic is indeed taboo as the author pointed it out in the opening of the book. I am so relieved that I found this book. I did find some experience specific to location and race, but again the author had anticipated this by reminding the readers that each of unloved daughter’s experience is unique yet there are many common grounds. To other fellow unloved daughters out there, read this one, and know that you are not alone!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    My mother wasn't and isn't abusive however she is emotionally closed off and doesn't seek connection as I do which is extremely hurtful. This book will break down the reason why you feel the way you do and explain your behavior as a result. The more I see my mother as a human rather than God, the more confident I am about myself and my decisions. My mother wasn't and isn't abusive however she is emotionally closed off and doesn't seek connection as I do which is extremely hurtful. This book will break down the reason why you feel the way you do and explain your behavior as a result. The more I see my mother as a human rather than God, the more confident I am about myself and my decisions.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anna Dominguez

    I genuinely didn't know there were others with the same kind of mother I had. As I read the book, I encountered heavy triggers that, at the end, allowed me to heal in a productive way. After this book my relationship with my mother feels different and better in my terms. Definitely recommend reading this if you struggle with a relationship of such kind. I genuinely didn't know there were others with the same kind of mother I had. As I read the book, I encountered heavy triggers that, at the end, allowed me to heal in a productive way. After this book my relationship with my mother feels different and better in my terms. Definitely recommend reading this if you struggle with a relationship of such kind.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zoe May

    Very well-written and sensitive book. The author has personal experience of the issues at hand which makes this a more intimate read. It helped me understand things I'd been through a lot better - thank you Peg! Very well-written and sensitive book. The author has personal experience of the issues at hand which makes this a more intimate read. It helped me understand things I'd been through a lot better - thank you Peg!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    I liked this book and it really helped mento understand that I’m not alone. I don’t recommend just reading this book, you should read this book alongside therapy because it can trigger sad memories. It’s great for reflection and to forgive yourself and your mother.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.