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The Gull and Other Short Tales of Horror

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British horror author David Turton spins three short tales of terror, to keep you awake during the cold, dark nights. The Gull tells the tale of an alcoholic novelist who, in a desperate attempt to overcome writers block, stays on a remote Scottish island. The island's solitude is both a blessing and a curse, as a violent gull decides to make him unwelcome in the most horri British horror author David Turton spins three short tales of terror, to keep you awake during the cold, dark nights. The Gull tells the tale of an alcoholic novelist who, in a desperate attempt to overcome writers block, stays on a remote Scottish island. The island's solitude is both a blessing and a curse, as a violent gull decides to make him unwelcome in the most horrific of ways. The Demon's Stare is a story about a dying man, overcome with fear about the demon sitting at the foot of his hospice bed. The man revisits his past as he tries to work out what the demon wants. The Room of the Mad Nun is a haunted house story. Blake Baxter visits an old Nunnery that has been converted to a hotel, as part of his television series The Hotel Healer. Blake stays in the legendary Room of the Mad Nun and soon realises he has stepped into the stuff of his worst nightmares. *The short story collection also includes a bonus look inside Turton's upcoming post-apocalyptic novel The Malaise*


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British horror author David Turton spins three short tales of terror, to keep you awake during the cold, dark nights. The Gull tells the tale of an alcoholic novelist who, in a desperate attempt to overcome writers block, stays on a remote Scottish island. The island's solitude is both a blessing and a curse, as a violent gull decides to make him unwelcome in the most horri British horror author David Turton spins three short tales of terror, to keep you awake during the cold, dark nights. The Gull tells the tale of an alcoholic novelist who, in a desperate attempt to overcome writers block, stays on a remote Scottish island. The island's solitude is both a blessing and a curse, as a violent gull decides to make him unwelcome in the most horrific of ways. The Demon's Stare is a story about a dying man, overcome with fear about the demon sitting at the foot of his hospice bed. The man revisits his past as he tries to work out what the demon wants. The Room of the Mad Nun is a haunted house story. Blake Baxter visits an old Nunnery that has been converted to a hotel, as part of his television series The Hotel Healer. Blake stays in the legendary Room of the Mad Nun and soon realises he has stepped into the stuff of his worst nightmares. *The short story collection also includes a bonus look inside Turton's upcoming post-apocalyptic novel The Malaise*

30 review for The Gull and Other Short Tales of Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    James Hartley

    This is a collection of three short horror stories and a sneak peek at Turton´s upcoming post-apocalyptic novel The Malaise, due later in 2018. The first story is called The Gull and tells the story of an alcoholic writer who seeks refuge on a lonely Scottish island in an attempt to break a debilitating bout of writer´s block. The writing is precise and atmospheric and the tension builds to a suitably horrible and gory climax. The second story, The Demon´s Stare, tells the tale of a bed-bound gan This is a collection of three short horror stories and a sneak peek at Turton´s upcoming post-apocalyptic novel The Malaise, due later in 2018. The first story is called The Gull and tells the story of an alcoholic writer who seeks refuge on a lonely Scottish island in an attempt to break a debilitating bout of writer´s block. The writing is precise and atmospheric and the tension builds to a suitably horrible and gory climax. The second story, The Demon´s Stare, tells the tale of a bed-bound gangster enforcer, in hospital at the end of his life, who is forced to relive some of his violent past and for whom evil has one last twist in its scaly tale. The last story was my own favourite - about a modern TV producer who visits a reputedly haunted hotel in the north of England and has to confront the eerie remnants of the past which live on there. Throughout this collection (and don´t forget that sneak preview of the upcoming novel) the writing is crisp and precise and you feel that you are in the hands of a born storyteller. Each well-crafted little tale is creepy and intriguing and, when you consider the bargain price, no horror fan should miss the opportunity of opening the creaking door of the cover and stepping inside.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lulu

    A collection of three short stories by the up and coming British author David Turton, plus an extract from his forthcoming novel. An absolute bargain on amazon - each story filled me with a sense of dread which is exactly what you what from a horror story! The Gull especially scared me, coming from a coastal town (the same as Mr Turton in fact!) we have thousand of seagulls and I don’t think I’ll ever look at them in the same way! Definitely worth a look if you’re looking for a quick but scary re A collection of three short stories by the up and coming British author David Turton, plus an extract from his forthcoming novel. An absolute bargain on amazon - each story filled me with a sense of dread which is exactly what you what from a horror story! The Gull especially scared me, coming from a coastal town (the same as Mr Turton in fact!) we have thousand of seagulls and I don’t think I’ll ever look at them in the same way! Definitely worth a look if you’re looking for a quick but scary read and to discover a new author. I predict big things for David Turton!

  3. 5 out of 5

    The Gehenna Post

    Turton opens up the collection with “The Gull,” a story that hearkens to Stephen King’s work and following a writer who seeks seclusion to pen his next work. In his solitude, the writer finds horrors of his worst nightmares, the seagulls flying along the isle a source of his terror. Turton has thus far displayed a malleability in his work, a flexibility in language that is not only necessary for his continued success, but an envious ability that many writers fail to attain. “The Gull” is no exce Turton opens up the collection with “The Gull,” a story that hearkens to Stephen King’s work and following a writer who seeks seclusion to pen his next work. In his solitude, the writer finds horrors of his worst nightmares, the seagulls flying along the isle a source of his terror. Turton has thus far displayed a malleability in his work, a flexibility in language that is not only necessary for his continued success, but an envious ability that many writers fail to attain. “The Gull” is no exception. Whereas Turton’s fiction regularly delves into character’s facing the karma from their decisions and the just dues they deserve, “The Gull” is a step towards literary fiction. The horror aspects of the story are maintained within the patient narrative, while the story itself expels any expectations. Of the three stories in this collection, “The Gull” easily earns its first place and prepares the readers for a morbid albeit manic journey into the mind of David Turton. “The Demon’s Stare,” originally published in Massacre Magazine, returns to form for Turton’s unique voice, exploring retribution and the coming around of one’s misdeeds. We follow an ex-gangster enforcer facing a demon that sits at the edge of his bed, unbeknownst to everyone else in the room. This entity brings back the sins of our protagonist, bringing his family full circle into the violence that encompassed his life. Turton has a knack for creating characters whom we are never expected to root for, morally questionable people who linger closer to the edge of antihero rather than protagonist. “The Demon’s Stare” offers a troubling vision of a man on his deathbed, face-to-face with his sins. Mix in a bit of magical occurrences, and we are given a story that is disturbing, and in a strange sense, gratifying. Closing the three-story collection, is “The Room of the Mad Nun,” originally published in Dark Fire Fiction. Turton utilizes the classic ghost-hunting-gone-wrong theme, while intermixing his own unique voice and questionable characters. Immediately, Turton douses the embers of cliches, offering a new, refreshing vision. The story follows an investigation of an old hotel room that housed the “Mad Nun,” and the investigators’ troubling discoveries therein. Turton’s ability to write entertaining fiction, despite the use of old archetypes, is present, and we are given a shocking finale that, may be expected to some, but nonetheless holds a chilling grasp onto the readers’ conscience. David Turton has proved again and again that he is not only one of the most riveting new voices working today, but that his work bears a unique quality that is seldom seen. His ability to transform his style of writing, work within varying genres, be it Lovecraftian fiction or literary horror, separates Turton from the pack. The Malaise is on the horizon, and we are thrilled to see where David Turton finds himself on the eve of 2018.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Raul Gil Marquez

    Interesting one Deadly birds, burning kids, serial killers and demons A bit of everything to spend a good time reading while you are travelling

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brooks

    Three short and fun short stories: a seagull harasses a writer, a demon torments a terminally ill man, and a ghost haunts a hotel room.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luis

    The good stuff... The Gull, plus two others tales really delivers in the way good short horror stories should. The writing is immediate and crisp, the supernatural is presented as an intrusion into reality which makes it unsettling and the stories themselves never overstay their welcome. A quick read but very satisfying, recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kay Oliver

    Turton is quite a talent. Not only is he an absolute wordsmith, but the voice in his stories is unique in each and very clear. He does a superb job eith his characters and his worlds. I loved all three stories immensely and found a new favorite author.

  8. 4 out of 5

    R K

    Enjoyable horrors. I like this author’s style. Might even buy the final book sampled. I think I’m hooked

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kandice

    The Gull - This was simply too short and then too quick of a gross out to be anything but cheezy. The Demon - I didn't even buy that the dying man was a bad guy in his life. There was too little set up and just a smattering of facts dropped in. Not enough detail or inner turmoil to really sell his character. The end was too quick and the aftermath only a paragraph, so I just didn't care. The Nun One - This felt like a poor rip-off of Stephen King's Room 1408 with, again- SURPRISE, not enough detai The Gull - This was simply too short and then too quick of a gross out to be anything but cheezy. The Demon - I didn't even buy that the dying man was a bad guy in his life. There was too little set up and just a smattering of facts dropped in. Not enough detail or inner turmoil to really sell his character. The end was too quick and the aftermath only a paragraph, so I just didn't care. The Nun One - This felt like a poor rip-off of Stephen King's Room 1408 with, again- SURPRISE, not enough detail or set up to make me care. This book was in desperate need of an editor. You can't use the word "face" three times in 15 words and not come across as a lazy writer. Just one example of the lack of craft.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Great, small collection of 3 horror shorts. There's a scene in The Gull with that is so imaginative, kind of gross-but in an imaginative way...so that's good. I won't give you spoilers, just say you might want to "cover your eyes" (hee hee). The Demon is another with great imagery. I could so easily "see" the demon in my head. I could see his smile and his eyes looking from one person to another. Very effective. Of the three stories, The Gull and The Demon were my favorites. Great, small collection of 3 horror shorts. There's a scene in The Gull with that is so imaginative, kind of gross-but in an imaginative way...so that's good. I won't give you spoilers, just say you might want to "cover your eyes" (hee hee). The Demon is another with great imagery. I could so easily "see" the demon in my head. I could see his smile and his eyes looking from one person to another. Very effective. Of the three stories, The Gull and The Demon were my favorites.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason Brock

    Superb I highly enjoyed this anthology of short stories... the first one the gull is quite hair raising and makes me think twice about feeding alkaseltzer to the winged rats anymore ...but to me the mad nun was the best one in this book of tales..and am quite curious to check out the full book that's previewed at the end Superb I highly enjoyed this anthology of short stories... the first one the gull is quite hair raising and makes me think twice about feeding alkaseltzer to the winged rats anymore ...but to me the mad nun was the best one in this book of tales..and am quite curious to check out the full book that's previewed at the end

  12. 5 out of 5

    Athena

    Decently creepy but not stellar. And this book follows the formula I see pretty often now where the last quarter is the author trying to get you to buy their new novel. I recommend these stories for a quick, unsettling read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Average. Stories were a bit dull. Some good build up. But overall.... college level story writing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Despite this book starting out well; I abandoned it because of the vulgar language. 🤨

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bill Halpin

    Quick, spooky read Three short stories that fly by, in a good way. Each has its own unique scares and situations that you would not want to find yourself in.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Murphy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Beard

  18. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Carlson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Ray

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ann McCarthy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Deborah McConnell

  22. 4 out of 5

    Terry Feltner

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jeia

  24. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  25. 4 out of 5

    TRACEY ANNE CARLTON

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Dawn Drenning

  27. 5 out of 5

    Iain

  28. 4 out of 5

    TamWilson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Keith Dawber

  30. 5 out of 5

    Darren Phasey

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