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A book about what the Cambridge Analytica scandal shows: That surveillance and data privacy is every citizens’ concern An important look at how 50 years of American privacy law is inadequate for the today's surveillance technology, from acclaimed Ars Technica senior business editor Cyrus Farivar. Until the 21st century, most of our activities were private by default, pub A book about what the Cambridge Analytica scandal shows: That surveillance and data privacy is every citizens’ concern An important look at how 50 years of American privacy law is inadequate for the today's surveillance technology, from acclaimed Ars Technica senior business editor Cyrus Farivar. Until the 21st century, most of our activities were private by default, public only through effort; today anything that touches digital space has the potential (and likelihood) to remain somewhere online forever. That means all of the technologies that have made our lives easier, faster, better, and/or more efficient have also simultaneously made it easier to keep an eye on our activities. Or, as we recently learned from reports about Cambridge Analytica, our data might be turned into a propaganda machine against us.  In 10 crucial legal cases, Habeas Data explores the tools of surveillance that exist today, how they work, and what the implications are for the future of privacy.


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A book about what the Cambridge Analytica scandal shows: That surveillance and data privacy is every citizens’ concern An important look at how 50 years of American privacy law is inadequate for the today's surveillance technology, from acclaimed Ars Technica senior business editor Cyrus Farivar. Until the 21st century, most of our activities were private by default, pub A book about what the Cambridge Analytica scandal shows: That surveillance and data privacy is every citizens’ concern An important look at how 50 years of American privacy law is inadequate for the today's surveillance technology, from acclaimed Ars Technica senior business editor Cyrus Farivar. Until the 21st century, most of our activities were private by default, public only through effort; today anything that touches digital space has the potential (and likelihood) to remain somewhere online forever. That means all of the technologies that have made our lives easier, faster, better, and/or more efficient have also simultaneously made it easier to keep an eye on our activities. Or, as we recently learned from reports about Cambridge Analytica, our data might be turned into a propaganda machine against us.  In 10 crucial legal cases, Habeas Data explores the tools of surveillance that exist today, how they work, and what the implications are for the future of privacy.

30 review for Habeas Data: Privacy vs. the Rise of Surveillance Tech

  1. 4 out of 5

    Donia Al-Issa

    Surveillance law needs to catch up with the times. The fact that the government has been violating our privacy in ways many of us don’t understand is just disgusting. The most difficult part is not knowing which of these privacy-invasive activities the government is actually doing, and how we can even work on creating the right laws to end them. Some Big Brother shit is happening. George Orwell knew what the fuck was up when he wrote 1984, and thats on PERIODT.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Blazquez

    At the core of this book lays a simple but important question: is the law enforcement allowed to capture and review your digital data in the absence of a specific warrant, issued by a judge, who in turn sees probable calls and approves it? The book is broken down into chapters, each one of them covering a high-profile case such as the iPhone in the San Bernardino case, license plate readers, and the usage of GPS recorders. For instance, it is understood that if you are under arrest, the police ca At the core of this book lays a simple but important question: is the law enforcement allowed to capture and review your digital data in the absence of a specific warrant, issued by a judge, who in turn sees probable calls and approves it? The book is broken down into chapters, each one of them covering a high-profile case such as the iPhone in the San Bernardino case, license plate readers, and the usage of GPS recorders. For instance, it is understood that if you are under arrest, the police can go through your pockets and backpack without a warrant, just by virtue of ensuring safety and preserving evidence the arrested might have on him. But what happens with your smart phone? Should it fall with the elements that can be searched upon arrest without a warrant? Similarly, license plates readers automate data collection taking advantage of the lack of privacy expectations when outside. Because of that expectation of no privacy, police can follow on the street you without a warrant. Now the question is, can the police "automate the action of following you" and install a GPS tracker in your car without a warrant? after all, there is no expectation of privacy outside. This is the kind of dilemmas the book describes. This book is not for everyone, at times it was hard to follow due to the very detailed description of existing jurisprudence. Other times because of long descriptions of characters in the story. In sum, it would benefit from extensive editing for clarity, while keeping all the content and main ideas.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    I found this a fascinating and well-written book. I work in IT dealing with eDiscovery, records management, and archiving. I have an interest in how the laws on privacy impacts the electronic traces we leave behind in the world, often hidden in the corporate repositories I work with. And, I have some history reading mysteries and watching Perry Mason, so there’s an interest in the law. “Habeas Data” provides details on the issues I face at work, and does it in an approachable style, a mix of “Pe I found this a fascinating and well-written book. I work in IT dealing with eDiscovery, records management, and archiving. I have an interest in how the laws on privacy impacts the electronic traces we leave behind in the world, often hidden in the corporate repositories I work with. And, I have some history reading mysteries and watching Perry Mason, so there’s an interest in the law. “Habeas Data” provides details on the issues I face at work, and does it in an approachable style, a mix of “Perry Mason” and Malcolm Gladwell. The author discusses a number of legal cases in the history of privacy and surveillance in the US. Some I had heard of, some not, but all are told as stories. Also, because the issues in privacy are being caused by the indelible march of technology, the author describes the technology of the time of each case, and also reflects on how that technology has changed since the original case. The oldest cases covered are a few decades old, the newest just a year or two – relatively fresh out of the headlines (think 2016 elections). It seems that a big issue, perhaps the biggest issue enabled by this march of technology is the incredible volumes of information we now routinely carry. Court decisions that allowed, say, search of the photos in the pockets of a suspect back in the 50s now don’t (or may not) allow search of photos in an iPhone in the pocket of a suspect, in part because there’s just too many photos for a person to consider searchable, and too much of their life enclosed in that piece of metal, plastic, and glass. While the increasing issues of privacy are troubling, “Habeas Data” provides the background to understand how changes in technology have driven changes and new definitions in law. If you have an interest in the topic of the legal aspects of privacy and surveillance in our modern world (from the American perspective), this is an excellent book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I purchased my own copy to write the definitions of words I didn't understand on the page, which I think helped me much better than when I would copy words into notebooks when I was using the library. There were three: abrogate (which is also a super-snazzy GRE word! ♥). recuse, and writ. Abrogate: to abolish by formal or official means; annul by an authoritative act; repeal: to abrogate a law. to put aside; put an end to. Recuse: to reject or challenge (a judge, juror, or attorney) as disqualified I purchased my own copy to write the definitions of words I didn't understand on the page, which I think helped me much better than when I would copy words into notebooks when I was using the library. There were three: abrogate (which is also a super-snazzy GRE word! ♥). recuse, and writ. Abrogate: to abolish by formal or official means; annul by an authoritative act; repeal: to abrogate a law. to put aside; put an end to. Recuse: to reject or challenge (a judge, juror, or attorney) as disqualified to act in a particular case, especially because of potential conflict of interest or bias. to disqualify or withdraw (oneself or someone else) from any position of judging or decision-making so as to avoid a semblance of personal interest or bias: The senator has recused himself from the vote because of his prior association with the company. verb (used without object), re·cused, re·cus·ing. to withdraw from any position of judging or decision-making so as to avoid a semblance of personal interest or bias. Writ: Law. a formal order under seal, issued in the name of a sovereign, government, court, or other competent authority, enjoining the officer or other person to whom it is issued or addressed to do or refrain from some specified act. (in early English law) any formal document in letter form, under seal, and in the sovereign's name. something written; a writing: sacred writ. I took the GRE in the course of reading this text. Later on, I have been pondering taking the LSAT, but maybe not right now, as it is such an expensive endeavour. I need to get my periodic migraine issue under better control. I remember how vexing taking the GRE was - the latter third of it had become more of a marathon to the end than a test of knowledge. However, I think to myself, there are people out there who might benefit from what I can do... I am conflicted. In any event, the topic of this text is how excessive technology usage has become pervasive by authority figures. I decided enough of that since it is just making me paranoid to check my phone.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    For the cover, I would have used the visual of Mark Zuckerberg sitting on a cushion as all the senators ogled him wishing they could take him home to set up their TV remote. This is a book about the intersection of government, courts and technology. The 4th amendment gives us protection from unreasonable searches by our government. But technology is moving so fast and our court system is meant to be slow and meticulous. There are no answers here, just lots more questions. I would read it quickly For the cover, I would have used the visual of Mark Zuckerberg sitting on a cushion as all the senators ogled him wishing they could take him home to set up their TV remote. This is a book about the intersection of government, courts and technology. The 4th amendment gives us protection from unreasonable searches by our government. But technology is moving so fast and our court system is meant to be slow and meticulous. There are no answers here, just lots more questions. I would read it quickly since it will soon be obsolete.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Really good overview of the history of the Fourth Amendment as it pertains to 21st century surveillance. The author's ability to explain both the legal and technological facets was great. However, the title is a misnomer as the book is primarily about surveillance, not data. It doesn't address questions of whether the government should be allowed to data mine, retain information, search private databases etc. It also doesn't really deal with non-government surveillance or data-rights as property Really good overview of the history of the Fourth Amendment as it pertains to 21st century surveillance. The author's ability to explain both the legal and technological facets was great. However, the title is a misnomer as the book is primarily about surveillance, not data. It doesn't address questions of whether the government should be allowed to data mine, retain information, search private databases etc. It also doesn't really deal with non-government surveillance or data-rights as property rights

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Good presentation of current computer privacy issues from a US legal perspective. Covers third-party doctrine, the difference in kind (due to quantity, etc.) of digital surveillance, particularly mobile phones, and various other privacy concerns. More aimed at professionals and academics than end-users, but it's a solid presentation of current state of play as well as what legal questions will need to be decided over the next few years. Good presentation of current computer privacy issues from a US legal perspective. Covers third-party doctrine, the difference in kind (due to quantity, etc.) of digital surveillance, particularly mobile phones, and various other privacy concerns. More aimed at professionals and academics than end-users, but it's a solid presentation of current state of play as well as what legal questions will need to be decided over the next few years.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrienne

    Great stuff to read about why people should not be so lenient when it comes to their digital footprint. There are plenty of examples to sift through to create an urgency for awareness. Access to review copy provided by the publisher.

  9. 5 out of 5

    JustEvan

    A good read. Note to those freaked out about the executive power now in the hands of Donald Trump: Y'all should have paid attention when people were shouting about it during the previous administration instead of calling people racists. A good read. Note to those freaked out about the executive power now in the hands of Donald Trump: Y'all should have paid attention when people were shouting about it during the previous administration instead of calling people racists.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aleka

    Had to read it for a Social Media and Law class, but I'm glad I did because it was genuinely interesting and eye-opening. Had to read it for a Social Media and Law class, but I'm glad I did because it was genuinely interesting and eye-opening.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cal Evans

    Eye-opening read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily Bragg

    clear cut and informative, but the kind of book that's destined to be fairly out of date soon. clear cut and informative, but the kind of book that's destined to be fairly out of date soon.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Cahillane

    Outstanding summary of privacy law related to tech and warrants, with just the right amount of backstory/anecdotes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sanjeev

    Pretty good book. Makes one think.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex Nagler

    Constitutional law! Supreme Court cases! Privacy rulings! DATA!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    In this age of data breeches, hacking and government overreach, Cyrus Farivar's Habeas Data is an essential read. Farivar, a reporter for Ars Technica, explores several real-life cases and shows how, in many cases, we've allowed this governmental and corporate over-reach to happen. I recently did a Q&A with Farivar, looking at how these issues crop up in science fiction. We talked about Minority Report, Philip K Dick novels and more. You can read my Q&A with Cyrus here: http://bit.ly/TheAPHabeasDa In this age of data breeches, hacking and government overreach, Cyrus Farivar's Habeas Data is an essential read. Farivar, a reporter for Ars Technica, explores several real-life cases and shows how, in many cases, we've allowed this governmental and corporate over-reach to happen. I recently did a Q&A with Farivar, looking at how these issues crop up in science fiction. We talked about Minority Report, Philip K Dick novels and more. You can read my Q&A with Cyrus here: http://bit.ly/TheAPHabeasData

  17. 4 out of 5

    InfiniteStratas

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eli

  19. 4 out of 5

    Juul

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edwin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Rose

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steffen Diedrichsen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  27. 4 out of 5

    Piero

  28. 5 out of 5

    David

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maria Rodrigues de Oliveira

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

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