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World War II Leningrad: A History From Beginning to End

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World War II Leningrad History describes the 872-day Siege of Leningrad as the most devastating siege in history. The German army had made its way to Leningrad before the city had the opportunity to prepare for an assault and the consequences were lethal. Accompanied by one of the worst famines in history, as well as a brutally cold winter in 1941-1942, the civilians were World War II Leningrad History describes the 872-day Siege of Leningrad as the most devastating siege in history. The German army had made its way to Leningrad before the city had the opportunity to prepare for an assault and the consequences were lethal. Accompanied by one of the worst famines in history, as well as a brutally cold winter in 1941-1942, the civilians were doomed. Of the three million people living in Leningrad at the start of the siege, more than a million would be evacuated and approximately another million would die before the assault ended in 1944. Inside you will read about... - St. Petersburg: The City of Three Revolutions - The Fate of Leningrad under Stalin - Encircling Leningrad - Inside Leningrad - The Road of Life - The Leningrad Affair And much more! During those 872 days, Leningrad was rendered numb as people fell dead in the streets and were not placed in coffins because no one had the strength to bury them. People ate their pets and boiled leather for food; they committed murder to obtain ration cards for the meager provisions that the city could provide; some resorted to cannibalism. Kept alive by their fervent patriotism and an astonishing will to survive, the citizens of Leningrad greeted the end of the siege with jubilation. Although they outlasted the Nazis, they could not defeat Josef Stalin as the paranoid leader punished Leningrad and its prominent Party members and stilled the voices of the heroes who lived. But Leningrad did not remain silenced, and the truth finally emerged. It's a harrowing saga of bravery and brutality, but one that must be told.


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World War II Leningrad History describes the 872-day Siege of Leningrad as the most devastating siege in history. The German army had made its way to Leningrad before the city had the opportunity to prepare for an assault and the consequences were lethal. Accompanied by one of the worst famines in history, as well as a brutally cold winter in 1941-1942, the civilians were World War II Leningrad History describes the 872-day Siege of Leningrad as the most devastating siege in history. The German army had made its way to Leningrad before the city had the opportunity to prepare for an assault and the consequences were lethal. Accompanied by one of the worst famines in history, as well as a brutally cold winter in 1941-1942, the civilians were doomed. Of the three million people living in Leningrad at the start of the siege, more than a million would be evacuated and approximately another million would die before the assault ended in 1944. Inside you will read about... - St. Petersburg: The City of Three Revolutions - The Fate of Leningrad under Stalin - Encircling Leningrad - Inside Leningrad - The Road of Life - The Leningrad Affair And much more! During those 872 days, Leningrad was rendered numb as people fell dead in the streets and were not placed in coffins because no one had the strength to bury them. People ate their pets and boiled leather for food; they committed murder to obtain ration cards for the meager provisions that the city could provide; some resorted to cannibalism. Kept alive by their fervent patriotism and an astonishing will to survive, the citizens of Leningrad greeted the end of the siege with jubilation. Although they outlasted the Nazis, they could not defeat Josef Stalin as the paranoid leader punished Leningrad and its prominent Party members and stilled the voices of the heroes who lived. But Leningrad did not remain silenced, and the truth finally emerged. It's a harrowing saga of bravery and brutality, but one that must be told.

30 review for World War II Leningrad: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    It has often been stated that history repeats itself. This aphorism can’t have a better example than the German invasion of the Soviet Union (codename: Operation Barbarossa) on June 22, 1941. Napoleon Bonaparte’s invasion in 1812 should have warned the German’s about the risks involved in invading a country that spans two continents. The initial thrust went even better than expected, with vast miles of territory being conquered and tens of thousands of ill-equipped, under-trained, and poorly fed It has often been stated that history repeats itself. This aphorism can’t have a better example than the German invasion of the Soviet Union (codename: Operation Barbarossa) on June 22, 1941. Napoleon Bonaparte’s invasion in 1812 should have warned the German’s about the risks involved in invading a country that spans two continents. The initial thrust went even better than expected, with vast miles of territory being conquered and tens of thousands of ill-equipped, under-trained, and poorly fed Soviet troops were either captured or killed by advancing Wehrmacht forces. History should have told them that this could not last. Mother Russia has two undefeatable allies, distance, and the unforgiving winter. Thanks to Catherine the Great, St Petersburg (Petrograd) became a jewel in the Romanov crown. Architectural masterpieces were erected to spotlight the grandeur of the Russian Empire. As the capital of Russia, St Petersburg rivaled any European capital city. With the fall of the Romanov dynasty in 1918, the capital was moved by the new Soviet government to Moscow. In 1924 the city was renamed Leningrad. Before the siege of Leningrad, the city boasted a population of just over three million. Eight hundred and seventy-two days later, a mere seventy thousand survived. The horrors experienced by the population can’t be accurately described as it is too horrible for human comprehension. Two novels by Paullina Simons, The Bronze Horseman and Tatiana and Alexander, although fictitious, are based on enough facts and presents the siege on a personal level, to give any reader the magnitude of the suffering and stoic resolve of the people of this very special city in the north. This book covers this great northern city from its concept by Tsar Peter the Great, through years of discontent and revolution, to the siege that would forever mark it in the hearts and minds of the Russian people. This short summary doesn’t delve into the deeper side of a people’s fight for survival but it does crack open a door and provide a glimpse of mankind at its best and worst.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Terri Gostola

    Although this one hour history to be very informative, a lot of it is heartbreaking and very hard to read. I can't imagine the brutality of war that the people of Leningrad suffered. The harsh winter with no heating fuel, no food, starvation, cannibalism, even eating their own pets. There were three million residents of Leningrad at the beginning of the siege. By the time the siege was broken, the city had 700,000 residents, 3/4 of them women, still alive. Approximately one million died during t Although this one hour history to be very informative, a lot of it is heartbreaking and very hard to read. I can't imagine the brutality of war that the people of Leningrad suffered. The harsh winter with no heating fuel, no food, starvation, cannibalism, even eating their own pets. There were three million residents of Leningrad at the beginning of the siege. By the time the siege was broken, the city had 700,000 residents, 3/4 of them women, still alive. Approximately one million died during the assault. That number is ten times higher than people killed when the atom bomb fell on Hiroshima. For many years during Communist rule, much of the siege of Leningrad was unknown to the general public. The book is worth the read, but prepare yourself to be shocked and very saddened.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Randolph A Rossi

    Leningrad a City That Refused to Die The valiant defense of Leningrad was truly remarkable. The deaths of many civilians were unnecessary because Stalin hated the city and did little to supply it with food.

  4. 5 out of 5

    George Polansky

    A brief review of the siege of Leningrad.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Renee Svendsen

    Wonderful as all others - love being able to learn about these critical historical events in capsule form that are amazingly complete in spite of their brevity.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Star Gater

    Hard to swallow and follow So many dates and less known cities made it difficult to follow. Tragically, I found myself wondering what will be written about US President Trump and both political elected officials. How many in office would follow Hitler, Stalin, etc. For self-preservation. The suffering leading to cannibalism paralleled Puerto Rico and their plight following a hurricane. How does the human race sleep?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Delis

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ron Jacob Radcliffe ( Scorpion King )

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dale Williams

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gaurav Gupta

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marc Shefelton

  12. 4 out of 5

    kerry wilkinson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Darren

  14. 4 out of 5

    D W Wood

  15. 5 out of 5

    LaVera Davison

  16. 4 out of 5

    Glen R. Renfrew

  17. 5 out of 5

    DAVID J LOGAN SR

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris Hebditch

  19. 4 out of 5

    robert keehn

  20. 4 out of 5

    Boggle

  21. 4 out of 5

    phani

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rowena Lynch

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angel L. Torrado

  24. 5 out of 5

    Debra L Davis

  25. 4 out of 5

    James Atwell

  26. 5 out of 5

    Madan

  27. 4 out of 5

    james keddie

  28. 4 out of 5

    MR K KITTO

  29. 5 out of 5

    HJ

  30. 4 out of 5

    Percy Marceau

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