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Batman: Detective, Parte 2

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Whether it's facing off against the new villain Vox in a tense hostage crisis or teaming up against a rogue magician who hides a terrifying secret - the Dark Knight proves time and time again why he's the world's greatest detective in this collection of Gotham City tales.


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Whether it's facing off against the new villain Vox in a tense hostage crisis or teaming up against a rogue magician who hides a terrifying secret - the Dark Knight proves time and time again why he's the world's greatest detective in this collection of Gotham City tales.

30 review for Batman: Detective, Parte 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Don't go in looking for an overarching story arc. There isn't one, and there doesn't need to be. It's simply a collection of really good Batman stories, written mostly but not entirely by Paul Dini. There's the introduction of a new Ventriloquist, a continuation of the reformed Riddler arc, a newly reformed Harley Quinn, a team-up with Zatanna, and even a story with the Terrible Trio (those guys in the animal masks). Yes, they're all one or two issue stories, but they're solid and very enjoyable Don't go in looking for an overarching story arc. There isn't one, and there doesn't need to be. It's simply a collection of really good Batman stories, written mostly but not entirely by Paul Dini. There's the introduction of a new Ventriloquist, a continuation of the reformed Riddler arc, a newly reformed Harley Quinn, a team-up with Zatanna, and even a story with the Terrible Trio (those guys in the animal masks). Yes, they're all one or two issue stories, but they're solid and very enjoyable to read. The art, by Don Kramer and Andy Clarke, is uniformly excellent. And the covers? Amazing. Absolutely worth the price of admission.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Not great, but some decent stories in here. I don't know why Paul Dini can't write a large story arc though.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I almost didn't notice Death And The City on the shelf in my local library. Battered and worn, the book had fallen out of its "protective" plastic cover and disappeared behind Catwoman: Death Of The Family (like i'd take that out again). However, once I picked the book up it caught my attention for the contents inside, rather than its poorly-maintained exterior. As they say, don't judge a book by it's cover. Written by Paul Dini, with worthwhile fill-in tales from Stuart Moore and Royal McGraw, D I almost didn't notice Death And The City on the shelf in my local library. Battered and worn, the book had fallen out of its "protective" plastic cover and disappeared behind Catwoman: Death Of The Family (like i'd take that out again). However, once I picked the book up it caught my attention for the contents inside, rather than its poorly-maintained exterior. As they say, don't judge a book by it's cover. Written by Paul Dini, with worthwhile fill-in tales from Stuart Moore and Royal McGraw, Death And The City collects issues #827-834 of Detective Comics. It's a collection that you may not have heard of, but it's worth reading nonetheless. In fact, after reading so many depictions of the Caped Crusader it was refreshing to read a book that just focused on Batman being...well, Batman. There's an abundance of entertaining detective work, Batman solving cases that involve both long-standing allies and, in a pleasant surprise, two classic rogues working on the right side of the law (well, mostly). Tim Drake gets some time in the spotlight while Batman shows his versatility in helping to save others while out of the cape and cowl as Bruce Wayne. Harley Quinn, Zatanna, Riddler and a famous face from Batman's expansive rogues gallery all make appearances and each of these characters and their stories look great thanks to consistently strong artwork. Don Kramer, Wayne Faucher and John Kalisz provide the visuals for Dini's tales, while Andy Clarke and Nathan Eyring handle the issues in-between. While their styles aren't entirely similar, they still suit the tone of each story. Eyring and Clarke also impress by dropping to a darker tone for the 'Triage' murder investigation storyline, compared to the bolder look and colours they used in the 'Siege' two-parter set in Wayne Tower. In fact, there's very little to fault with this volume, other than a couple of weaker moments and a slight case of expositional recap (which never reads well in a trade). So while Death And The City may not have made it on to any 'Best Of Batman' lists, anyone looking for a solid run of the Dark Knight's detective adventures would do well to seek this one out.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    This is a collection of short stories about the Batman, featuring a return of Scarface, the death of an old friend, a politically motivated terrorist intent on bringing down the Wayne building through C4 explosives, a Harley Quinn escapade, and Zatanna joins Batman to hunt down a rogue magician with a dark secret. Some of the stories are ok like "Siege" which is more involving as it's longer than one issue and features Bruce Wayne unable to change into Batman so has to rely on Tim Drake as Robin This is a collection of short stories about the Batman, featuring a return of Scarface, the death of an old friend, a politically motivated terrorist intent on bringing down the Wayne building through C4 explosives, a Harley Quinn escapade, and Zatanna joins Batman to hunt down a rogue magician with a dark secret. Some of the stories are ok like "Siege" which is more involving as it's longer than one issue and features Bruce Wayne unable to change into Batman so has to rely on Tim Drake as Robin to take down the bad guy, or "Trust" the Zatanna story which had a nice twist and had some cool imagery. But on the whole, the stories are kind of average for Batman. Not very interesting, not too boring, just so so. Also the stories only underlined how worn out the characters of Harley Quinn and Scarface are - they don't do anything in these stories but play their usual roles and then the story ends. Maybe it's time to not bother with them or kill them off? The book is definitely only for Batman fans who must read everything Batman related, otherwise I wouldn't bother.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    I bumped this up from 3 to 4 stars, because I was actually surprised by one of the stories here and that doesn't happen to often. This time around 5 of the 8 stories are by Dini, and this time some of the stories are related which helps with the payoff. There's also a story featuring Zatanna that references Identity Crisis, letting you know just when in time this story takes place. It's such a small moment between the two but if you know what happened in IC, it has a big meaning. Again, just som I bumped this up from 3 to 4 stars, because I was actually surprised by one of the stories here and that doesn't happen to often. This time around 5 of the 8 stories are by Dini, and this time some of the stories are related which helps with the payoff. There's also a story featuring Zatanna that references Identity Crisis, letting you know just when in time this story takes place. It's such a small moment between the two but if you know what happened in IC, it has a big meaning. Again, just some really solid stories, but Dini is able to pack so much in such a little space. It's nice to have a story where Batman is just Batman being BATMAN.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    A random assortment of short stories featuring our favorite nocturnal master detective: Double Talk - the return of Ventriloquist & Scarface (yawn) and a cameo by the narcoleptic Mr. ZZZ (he's hilarious); I'm glad this somewhat lackluster opener didn't dissuade me from continuing with the book. On the plus-side - Bruce Wayne is undercover as 'Lefty' Knox. Shark Bite - another unplanned team-up of sorts with Mr. E. Nigma, private detective (a.k..a. Riddler), this time to investigate the odd murder A random assortment of short stories featuring our favorite nocturnal master detective: Double Talk - the return of Ventriloquist & Scarface (yawn) and a cameo by the narcoleptic Mr. ZZZ (he's hilarious); I'm glad this somewhat lackluster opener didn't dissuade me from continuing with the book. On the plus-side - Bruce Wayne is undercover as 'Lefty' Knox. Shark Bite - another unplanned team-up of sorts with Mr. E. Nigma, private detective (a.k..a. Riddler), this time to investigate the odd murder of Bruce Wayne's childhood friend. Siege (two chapters) - Bruce Wayne and argumentative foreign diplomats attending a conference in Wayne Tower are trapped by Vox the terrorist. Another Die Hard retread? Not exactly, but who cares? Featuring able assistance by 'johnny-on-the-spot' Robin. Kind of Like Family - Ventriloquist & Scarface again (snore), but a parole-seeking Harley Quinn is the actual star of the tale. Triage - featuring the Terrible Trio, those weird guys wearing the animal masks. Kind of thin. Trust (two chapters) - a "The Brave and the Bold"-inspired adventure (kicking off with the unexplained death of a magician's assistant) with Batman and Zatanna. Nice flashbacks to Bruce Wayne's childhood, plus other plot developments, to establish the duo's connection. Then there's the villain of the piece . . . The two multi-part stories had a lot of action and suspense, and were my favorites of the collection.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Panos

    BATMAN:DEATH AND THE CITY (4/5) A new collection of Detective Comics, compiling issues 827-834 and featuring writers Paul Dini, Stuart Moore and Royal McGraw is out and serves as sequel of sorts to BATMAN:DETECTIVE. The majority of its stories continue the several plot threads of its unofficial prequel. In issues #827 and #831, Dini adds the infamous Ventriloquist to his cast of villains. (Un)fortunately this one hasn’t gone straight like the Riddler and the Penguin and seems willing to make up fo BATMAN:DEATH AND THE CITY (4/5) A new collection of Detective Comics, compiling issues 827-834 and featuring writers Paul Dini, Stuart Moore and Royal McGraw is out and serves as sequel of sorts to BATMAN:DETECTIVE. The majority of its stories continue the several plot threads of its unofficial prequel. In issues #827 and #831, Dini adds the infamous Ventriloquist to his cast of villains. (Un)fortunately this one hasn’t gone straight like the Riddler and the Penguin and seems willing to make up for the time he was away. For those of you who haven’t been following the Batman continuity since the end of INFINITE CRISIS, the original ventriloquist Arnold Wesker was shot and killed by an assassin hired by Gotham’s new mob boss, the Great White Shark during the BATMAN:FACE THE FACE storyline. And although Dini initially plays a bit with the idea of a resurrected Wesker, the whole obvious truth is revealed by the end of the story. Scarface has attracted a new ventriloquist or better yet trapped a new victim. Issue #827 offers a strong introduction to a classic villain of the 90’s and presents Dini’s modern take on the duo of Ventriloquist/Scarface. To better appreciate the puns and references in this story, you might want to re-read Detective Comics #824 (“Night of the Penguin”). The next part of the new Ventriloquist’s tale comes with issue #831. Star of this story is Harley Quinn, Paul Dini’s greatest contribution to the Batman franchise. Since you probably haven’t been keeping up with her, Harley is imprisoned in Arkham Asylum after the events of Batman #663 (“The Clown at Midnight”). After being betrayed by her beloved “Mistah Jay”, Harley claims to be free of his influence and requests release from Arkham. And although her request is turned down by Bruce Wayne, a member of the asylum’s board who seems to have something personal against our girl, Harley eventually gets her wish in a more direct way. Much to her disdain, she is broken out by Scarface who needs her abilities to pull off a job. Dini “owns” the character of Harley Quinn, probably because he created her. She is the heroine of the story and extremely well-scripted. Plus, we get an extra bonus of a flashback scene from her first visit at Arkham as a patient. Remember that suggestion a few lines above about re-reading issue #824 of Detective Comics? Time to take it under more serious consideration since ‘TEC issues #833 and #834 are a two-part story that is essentially a direct sequel. Anyway, for those who remember, the magician Ivar Loxias appears again in Gotham for a number of performances. However, an awful lot of accidents happen with the latest being the tragic death of one of Loxias’ female assistants. Since the latter used to be one of Zatanna’s closest friend, Batman invites her to investigate together. Dini really does it this time, offering classic mystery coupled with amazing action scenes and character development. And let’s not forget the classic black humor, offered by a certain character of the story. The second part also shows Batman finally forgiving Zatanna for her actions that led to IDENTITY CRISIS, a few years back. To be done with Paul Dini and move on to other writers, a quick summary issue #828 must be given. A sequel to ‘TEC #822, it features good old Eddie Nigma in one more story of his days as private investigator. Much like the prequel, it presents a decent mystery, with well-written dialogues and more of Batman/Riddler scenes. Don Kramer is the penciller of all five issues and seems to have improved in the area of facial discrimination. Beautiful pencil work as usually with attention to details. Issue #834 also marks the end of his run in Detective Comics. Writer Stuart Moore presents a two-part story entitled “Siege”, first published in ‘TEC 829-830, which is included in this collection. During an international anti-terror conference at Wayne Tower, a terrorist named Vox gets into the building and causes a series of explosions, threatening to bring the whole place down. While Batman must remain in his Bruce Wayne persona along with his guests, Robin (Tim Drake) tries to stop the villain all by himself. This is a fast-paced, action-packed story through which the writer successfully sends clear messages against war. And lastly, writer Royal McGraw offers a one-shot story entitled “Triage”, published in ‘TEC #832. Have you heard of the “Terrible Trio”? A bunch of losers back from the ‘70s (or ‘80s, can’t recall). The story offers some background information on them and their past activities. Anyway, someone is targeting them, taking out one after the other and Batman tries to stop him. Guess what; he succeeds. This is not a boring story but kind of indifferent given how lame the villain(s) is. Andy Clarke draws both these stories. He hasn’t yet reached the level of his recent work in “Batman vs. Robin” here although both tales don’t suffer from any art problems.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bader Al Shirawi

    Death and the city consists of 5 Batman stories. The first three stories were okay but forgettable.I really loved the last two, so this review will basically be talking about the two stories that I loved. I'll try not to spoil. TRY. The fourth story is about Harley Quinn,Scarface and the Ventriloquist, well, Batman is there obviously but the story mostly focuses on Harley and Ventrilquist's relationship which I had no idea of, also what's really interesting is seeing how Batman treated Harley at Death and the city consists of 5 Batman stories. The first three stories were okay but forgettable.I really loved the last two, so this review will basically be talking about the two stories that I loved. I'll try not to spoil. TRY. The fourth story is about Harley Quinn,Scarface and the Ventriloquist, well, Batman is there obviously but the story mostly focuses on Harley and Ventrilquist's relationship which I had no idea of, also what's really interesting is seeing how Batman treated Harley at the end of the issue. Although I don't understand how the doll (Scarface) can speak without anyone holding or controlling him, is there any supernatural element going on with him? Need more info on this guy. The fifth story revolves around Batman and Zatanna going on a detective mission. However, it is the first mission they've been together after Zatanna betrayed him. (They don't mention how she betrayed him so you need to google that shit!) Batman has a hard time trusting her which resulted to a couple of consequences. This story told me so many things about Zatanna that I felt like I've known her very well from before. I HIGHLY recommended reading Batman:Detective before reading this so you'd feel more connected to these five stories. This novel is a great follow up.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mikhail

    Many people have complained that these stories are of the one-and-done fashion, but that's partly why I love the two Dini collections as well as the rest of his run--including Heart of Hush, which was a five-issue arc and far superior to the overrated RIP debacle handled by Morrison. What I found most interesting about these two trades was, despite the one-and-done format, there were countless amounts of entertaining threads running through the whole Dini run such as The Riddler going straight, Many people have complained that these stories are of the one-and-done fashion, but that's partly why I love the two Dini collections as well as the rest of his run--including Heart of Hush, which was a five-issue arc and far superior to the overrated RIP debacle handled by Morrison. What I found most interesting about these two trades was, despite the one-and-done format, there were countless amounts of entertaining threads running through the whole Dini run such as The Riddler going straight, the repeated appearance of Scar Face, the interesting flirtations between Batman and Zatana, and etc. Although the book may seem as if Dini wrote these things as he went along, in my eyes, this was a fully realized and wholly enjoyable run on Detective Comics. Kudos, Mr. Dini!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Well-written detective stories.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Padilla

    This was a decent collection of stories. They are all pretty much stand alone tales with the slightest of references to each other besides two of them being directly connected. “Shark Bite”, “Siege” 1&2 and “Triage” were pretty terrible. But thankfully, “Double Talk” which centers around Scarface, “Kind of Like Family” involving Harley Quinn and especially both parts of “Trust” with Zatanna were enjoyable and made the book tolerable. The art was serviceable but not nothing spectacular. Overall i This was a decent collection of stories. They are all pretty much stand alone tales with the slightest of references to each other besides two of them being directly connected. “Shark Bite”, “Siege” 1&2 and “Triage” were pretty terrible. But thankfully, “Double Talk” which centers around Scarface, “Kind of Like Family” involving Harley Quinn and especially both parts of “Trust” with Zatanna were enjoyable and made the book tolerable. The art was serviceable but not nothing spectacular. Overall it was an ok read but nothing memorable either.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jin

    With Paul Dini writing Batman, what could go wrong? This is a collection of interesting Batman stories circling back to the main premise about Scarface. An entertaining read with the elements that complete a Dark Knight Detective story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris Orme

    4/120 (2020 Reading Challenge) An okay collection, the best was the two parter with Zatanna & Batman. & hey Harley is always entertaining but I like a bigger arc & this was more a collection of in between stories but still entertaining enough for a Batman fan. 4/120 (2020 Reading Challenge) An okay collection, the best was the two parter with Zatanna & Batman. & hey Harley is always entertaining but I like a bigger arc & this was more a collection of in between stories but still entertaining enough for a Batman fan.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andy Dainty

    The 1st 3 issues were good detective storylines; unfortunately I just wasn't feeling it with the 2nd 3 storylines; I have read much better Batman - Zatanna team ups before, this seemed too contrived.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    A laugh out loud collection of short stories that had an overarching theme - basically my favourite of any of the Batman formats. Saw cameos of Scarface, Harley Quinn, Joker and others. Loved it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Seth

    I finished this like a week ago. It was a really great and entertaining story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mitsu

    Infinitely superior artwork compared to the last comic I read (and I am only just starting dip my toe into the DC world)- the colours, portraits and illustrations really enjoyable. Found this one also far more engaging and interesting in terms of story (although collection of short stories).

  18. 5 out of 5

    M

    Paul Dini brings his acclaimed writing chops from the animated Batman to the comics version in this collection of tales. The opening tale returns Scarface to the fore, paring him with a new female Ventriloquist. The second story teams the reformed Riddler with Batman as they separately investigate the murder of an old acquaintance of Bruce Wayne. Tim Drake dons his Robin costume to prevent a terrorist attack on Wayne Tower, proving his worth a a hero and a Robin. After being denied parole, Harle Paul Dini brings his acclaimed writing chops from the animated Batman to the comics version in this collection of tales. The opening tale returns Scarface to the fore, paring him with a new female Ventriloquist. The second story teams the reformed Riddler with Batman as they separately investigate the murder of an old acquaintance of Bruce Wayne. Tim Drake dons his Robin costume to prevent a terrorist attack on Wayne Tower, proving his worth a a hero and a Robin. After being denied parole, Harley Quinn is broken out of Arkham Asylum for Scarface's latest plot. Choosing to assist Batman instead, Harley demonstrates a true desire to reform; as such, Bruce Wayne changes his deciding vote and decides to given Harleen Quinzel a chance at going straight. The Terrible Trio return in a tale that sees all three members attacked by a mysterious assailant. The twisted scheme leads to the former Shark finding himself at the mercy of the new Great White Shark. The final story sees Batman and Zatanna team up to investigate the deaths that have been surrounding extreme magician Ivan Loxias. While both heroes find themselves at the mercy of another Joker plot, they prove to be a dynamic duo of their own. Paul Dini continues to impress with his characterizations, infusing the fictional residents of Gotham with human desires, needs, and wants. The revolving door of artists is to be expected with a collection like this, showcasing a variety of talents and styles. Fans of the classic animated Batman series will feel right at home with this volume.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Read this review and more on my blog. Batman: Death And The City collects issues #827 - #834 of Detective Comics. This was a very enjoyable collection of Batman stories. None of them connected too much (which honestly did not bother me) but they still had a logical flow to them. My favourite story arc that was within Death And The City was with Tim Drake in the Wayne Tower. It was nice too see the billionaire side of Bruce Wayne at work and not just Batman. The art style was simple with backgrounds Read this review and more on my blog. Batman: Death And The City collects issues #827 - #834 of Detective Comics. This was a very enjoyable collection of Batman stories. None of them connected too much (which honestly did not bother me) but they still had a logical flow to them. My favourite story arc that was within Death And The City was with Tim Drake in the Wayne Tower. It was nice too see the billionaire side of Bruce Wayne at work and not just Batman. The art style was simple with backgrounds complimenting the story and characters. It was nice to see different locations that normally are not shown in the comics. I would recommend Death And The City to anyone who enjoys Batman.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Star

    Like the previous book, Detective, this is another book full of brilliant stories by Paul Dini. Again, it's the fill in stories that are the weakest, and again, it doesn't help that the art style is so different, especially in the two part 'Siege'. Once more, there is another team up with The Riddler, which is one of the best stories, as is the Harley Quinn story. The last two stories, the two part 'Trust' focuses on Batman and Zatanna's relationship, and neatly ties together several hinted plots Like the previous book, Detective, this is another book full of brilliant stories by Paul Dini. Again, it's the fill in stories that are the weakest, and again, it doesn't help that the art style is so different, especially in the two part 'Siege'. Once more, there is another team up with The Riddler, which is one of the best stories, as is the Harley Quinn story. The last two stories, the two part 'Trust' focuses on Batman and Zatanna's relationship, and neatly ties together several hinted plots lines from the previous stories, with a twist, of course. Another solid collection of Batman stories, and one of my favorites.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    A 3.5 book. I enjoyed most of these stories - it was nice to see Batman working as a detective, with rather a lot of Bruce Wayne moments. Especially because Batman seems more sensible here and less, well, like a dick than in other stories I've been reading recently. I also liked the semi-reformed versions of the Riddler and Harley Quinn here. What I didn't like at all was the Bruce/Zatanna thing - this pairing still baffles me. It seems very contrived, and while I like Zatanna, it makes me wishin A 3.5 book. I enjoyed most of these stories - it was nice to see Batman working as a detective, with rather a lot of Bruce Wayne moments. Especially because Batman seems more sensible here and less, well, like a dick than in other stories I've been reading recently. I also liked the semi-reformed versions of the Riddler and Harley Quinn here. What I didn't like at all was the Bruce/Zatanna thing - this pairing still baffles me. It seems very contrived, and while I like Zatanna, it makes me wishing her to disappear because I really, really don't want to see this.

  22. 4 out of 5

    J.M. Hushour

    "Death and the City" is an uneven hodge-podge of mostly unrelated stories collected together under one title I guess to secure a solid run of Detective Comics stuff. Crammed here are good bits such as the return of Scarface with a mysterious blonde bombshell Ventriloquist, Harley Quinn trying to rehabilitate herself, and Batsy and Zatanna (sporting the greatest superhero costume ever) tangling with the Joker. The rest of the stories here are ho-hum. Not bad, just nothing terribly necessary unles "Death and the City" is an uneven hodge-podge of mostly unrelated stories collected together under one title I guess to secure a solid run of Detective Comics stuff. Crammed here are good bits such as the return of Scarface with a mysterious blonde bombshell Ventriloquist, Harley Quinn trying to rehabilitate herself, and Batsy and Zatanna (sporting the greatest superhero costume ever) tangling with the Joker. The rest of the stories here are ho-hum. Not bad, just nothing terribly necessary unless you're a completist like me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Paul Dini's run of Batman stories in Detective Comics focuses heavily on the Detective in the title, and with great results. Each issue (or two-issue arc) is a nice, self-contained story with Batman triumphing over evildoers. There are some great villains, including a new Scarface that makes the toy doll much more malicious. And the two-part team up with Zatanna has a great surprise villain as well as nice character interaction in the wake of Identity Crisis. Paul Dini's run of Batman stories in Detective Comics focuses heavily on the Detective in the title, and with great results. Each issue (or two-issue arc) is a nice, self-contained story with Batman triumphing over evildoers. There are some great villains, including a new Scarface that makes the toy doll much more malicious. And the two-part team up with Zatanna has a great surprise villain as well as nice character interaction in the wake of Identity Crisis.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    A really good taste of Batman with lots of delicious cameos. I squeed because three of my favorite Batman-related female characters are in this. I won't tell you which ones, but if you follow my DC Comics reading, you could probably guess. The artwork was beautiful and these were legitimate detective/mystery stories. I enjoyed each one of them. Nothing too high brow or confusing. Just plain good storytelling and artwork. Glad my library had this!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Some very good short stories included in this volume. It introduces a new villain with an old twist, and has some good detective yarns. My favourite was the teaming up with Zatanna, the first such working together since Batman found out what she did. Some very good character moments there. A good read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rahuel

    A really enjoyable collection of separate stories featuring the Dark Knight. While stories featuring the Caped Crusader tend to focus mainly on villains, 'Death and the City' features a great balance between Bruce and his more personal involvement with the events in each story. Would definitely recommend!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Noah Soudrette

    Another solid collection of Batman comics from Dini and friends. I love that Dini picks up little plot points from past issues and revisits them down the line. We get another Riddler/Batman team up, two stories of the new Scarface, a Harley Quinn story and a good Joker performance. Solid.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This is a great collection of single issues. Including a brand new dummy for Scarface, an awesome short with Harley Quinn, Tim defusing a bomb molded to his own body, and a beautiful Zatanna team up story featuring the Joker the way he's meant to be.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    I love these Paul Dini short stories! They are just freaking incredible. The Harley story, scarface and the new ventriloquist, it's all great. A nice appearance by the terrible trio as well! And a Zatanna sighting? Huzzah! Great work and artistry overall, what a great set of stories.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Paul Dini is on fire. His newest collection of stories has a few whodunit mysteries, and a few interesting team-ups. He wraps things up with a nice Zatanna/Batman story that clears the air between them after what happened in Identity Crisis. Another good collection of Batman stories.

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