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The Explorations of Père Marquette

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How big was this New World? Was it just a narrow strip of land between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans? In 1670 no one knew the answers to these questions. Perhaps the settlers on the east coast were too busy to spend much time wondering. It was not so with Jacques Marquette, the missionary from France. Almost as great as his love for the New World was his curiosity about How big was this New World? Was it just a narrow strip of land between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans? In 1670 no one knew the answers to these questions. Perhaps the settlers on the east coast were too busy to spend much time wondering. It was not so with Jacques Marquette, the missionary from France. Almost as great as his love for the New World was his curiosity about it. Wondering about its size was not enough for him. He set out to learn for himself. From the Indians he discovered that there was a Big River to the west. Perhaps this Big River, that some tribes called the Mississippi, emptied into the Pacific Ocean. If he found that it did, what a great discovery that would be! Jim Kjelgaard, in The Explorations of Pere Marquette, tells the story of the missionary's travels and discoveries. Along with it he gives us vivid pictures of life among the Indians. Traveling with Pere Marquette are the laughing, hardy voyageurs whose knowledge and skill made his explorations possible. Here, too, is Louis Joliet, Marquette's good friend and companion in discovery. The exploration of the Mississippi River by Marquette and Joliet was a long step forward in the growing knowledge of the New World. To read about it in Jim Kjelgaard's story is to relive the wonder that the discoverers must have felt as they pushed their canoes down waterways that had never before been seen by white men.


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How big was this New World? Was it just a narrow strip of land between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans? In 1670 no one knew the answers to these questions. Perhaps the settlers on the east coast were too busy to spend much time wondering. It was not so with Jacques Marquette, the missionary from France. Almost as great as his love for the New World was his curiosity about How big was this New World? Was it just a narrow strip of land between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans? In 1670 no one knew the answers to these questions. Perhaps the settlers on the east coast were too busy to spend much time wondering. It was not so with Jacques Marquette, the missionary from France. Almost as great as his love for the New World was his curiosity about it. Wondering about its size was not enough for him. He set out to learn for himself. From the Indians he discovered that there was a Big River to the west. Perhaps this Big River, that some tribes called the Mississippi, emptied into the Pacific Ocean. If he found that it did, what a great discovery that would be! Jim Kjelgaard, in The Explorations of Pere Marquette, tells the story of the missionary's travels and discoveries. Along with it he gives us vivid pictures of life among the Indians. Traveling with Pere Marquette are the laughing, hardy voyageurs whose knowledge and skill made his explorations possible. Here, too, is Louis Joliet, Marquette's good friend and companion in discovery. The exploration of the Mississippi River by Marquette and Joliet was a long step forward in the growing knowledge of the New World. To read about it in Jim Kjelgaard's story is to relive the wonder that the discoverers must have felt as they pushed their canoes down waterways that had never before been seen by white men.

49 review for The Explorations of Père Marquette

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    Enjoyable historical fiction.

  2. 5 out of 5

    R.A. Danger

    Père Marquette is a black robe Jesuit that is best known for exploring the Mississippi River. Of course first he was a Jesuit that meant going among the tribes and teach “the book”. Surprising I only heard him talk to one tribe’s man, most of the time it was about him healing some one or fixing a broken bone. There was also mention that a small private war was going on between the Jesuit Priests and the medicine men. Marquette was quick (actually it didn’t say how long it took) to learn how to p Père Marquette is a black robe Jesuit that is best known for exploring the Mississippi River. Of course first he was a Jesuit that meant going among the tribes and teach “the book”. Surprising I only heard him talk to one tribe’s man, most of the time it was about him healing some one or fixing a broken bone. There was also mention that a small private war was going on between the Jesuit Priests and the medicine men. Marquette was quick (actually it didn’t say how long it took) to learn how to paddle a canoe and learn a language (two that I heard it mention, might have been three or four, since he come in contact with seven tribes that I remember reading ). This was the first part of the book the second is their trip to get to the Mississippi River. Marquette had already been drawing maps and hearing how enough people had died trying to go too far down the river. So when Joliet came with an order to explore the Mississippi (in order to look at more land), Marquette went, they stopped at villages along the way and were giving a calumet so they may pass safely on their journey. They got to 700 miles but turn around since they figure they were close to the gulf and that their was either a Spanish ship two days away or more then one ship. In the end Marquette died at 38 years old. Because of it been an old book or taken from old accounts the word “savage” appears enough. It was strange that they used the word why saying that a tribe would eat their meat half cook (the poor tribe was half starve to death; besides I know enough people that ate they meat half cook). I found it interesting that a lot of tribes would rather flee then fight the Sioux. Or that him and an other Jesuit had to kick a pack of dogs and half-wolves or they will not be given any respect (not to mention no would help them any way). Small intersting details like this are scattered threw out the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    Good story of history that's often overlooked. Good story of history that's often overlooked.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    A great read for a history of the Midwest and a few of it's rivers. A great read for a history of the Midwest and a few of it's rivers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leah Messer

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ted

  8. 4 out of 5

    Debby

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  10. 5 out of 5

    Path

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ange

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

  15. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne Lacasse

  17. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

  18. 4 out of 5

    CC

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hank

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Toni Wyatt

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark Vertin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Donald Fox

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  26. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alisha

  28. 5 out of 5

    Isaacsapphire

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jason Sprague

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Dreikorn

  31. 4 out of 5

    JC

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  33. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  34. 4 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  35. 5 out of 5

    Amy Stull

  36. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  37. 4 out of 5

    Jason Manford

  38. 4 out of 5

    Eckles7

  39. 5 out of 5

    Paul Jones

  40. 4 out of 5

    Shara

  41. 5 out of 5

    Loraine Creon

  42. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Glaze

  43. 5 out of 5

    Rory

  44. 4 out of 5

    Eva North

  45. 5 out of 5

    Janestrong

  46. 4 out of 5

    Noah

  47. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

  48. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

  49. 4 out of 5

    Titus Flaherty

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