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If you want to know how a young fighter pilot felt in his head and his heart as he was about to fly the enemy skies of WWII, this book is for you. Always afraid he was about to die, he climbed into the cockpit anyway ... and lived to tell you about it. How would you feel if you were a new guy in the sky ... attacked by four Messerschmitts? Let me tell you, no matter how m If you want to know how a young fighter pilot felt in his head and his heart as he was about to fly the enemy skies of WWII, this book is for you. Always afraid he was about to die, he climbed into the cockpit anyway ... and lived to tell you about it. How would you feel if you were a new guy in the sky ... attacked by four Messerschmitts? Let me tell you, no matter how much you prepare, no matter how much you read, how much you train, no matter how much you think of yourself as a 'Hot Shot Pilot,' you are never ready for life and death combat! How did it feel to say a 'last goodbye' to your bride believing you would never see her again, as you left to fight WWII? Author's Facebook page at: facebook.com/P38Flyer/ As reviewed by A. L. Hanks, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF (Ret) who said it perfectly: In "Brave and Funny Memories of WWII" Lyndon Shubert, to our great benefit, tells us his story, an engaging tale of his WWII experience as a fighter pilot in WWII. A member of the "greatest generation" he recounts his days (and nights) flying P-38 fighters in the wartime skies of Europe. The tale is told in a relaxed, conversational style, honest and personal. The reader will appreciate the authenticity and the easy humor. He tells us a story that is at once delightfully humorous and deadly serious. He shares that unfettered sense of flying a powerful aircraft free in the vast expanse of the sky. The special sense that pilots have when they "can reach out and touch the face of God". Shubert relates the feelings of men in combat, that gripping apprehension in your gut when you know you're going to die, your senses at full maximum intensity, and then that striking after mission fear when you look back and realize that you cheated death once again. Shubert was indeed a special fellow. We are indebted to him for his service and his book. He captures a special piece of the American character and our history that is essential to pass on to our children and grandchildren. Lt Shubert was exceptional, a USAF officer and a fighter pilot who fought the war and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross. The author reminds us once again why fighter pilots are special. Why they are ubiquitously viewed as swaggering "raconteurs", with big egos and big watches who can sometimes be insufferable. But his tale also captures the reality of one-on-one aerial combat, loser goes home.... to God.


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If you want to know how a young fighter pilot felt in his head and his heart as he was about to fly the enemy skies of WWII, this book is for you. Always afraid he was about to die, he climbed into the cockpit anyway ... and lived to tell you about it. How would you feel if you were a new guy in the sky ... attacked by four Messerschmitts? Let me tell you, no matter how m If you want to know how a young fighter pilot felt in his head and his heart as he was about to fly the enemy skies of WWII, this book is for you. Always afraid he was about to die, he climbed into the cockpit anyway ... and lived to tell you about it. How would you feel if you were a new guy in the sky ... attacked by four Messerschmitts? Let me tell you, no matter how much you prepare, no matter how much you read, how much you train, no matter how much you think of yourself as a 'Hot Shot Pilot,' you are never ready for life and death combat! How did it feel to say a 'last goodbye' to your bride believing you would never see her again, as you left to fight WWII? Author's Facebook page at: facebook.com/P38Flyer/ As reviewed by A. L. Hanks, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF (Ret) who said it perfectly: In "Brave and Funny Memories of WWII" Lyndon Shubert, to our great benefit, tells us his story, an engaging tale of his WWII experience as a fighter pilot in WWII. A member of the "greatest generation" he recounts his days (and nights) flying P-38 fighters in the wartime skies of Europe. The tale is told in a relaxed, conversational style, honest and personal. The reader will appreciate the authenticity and the easy humor. He tells us a story that is at once delightfully humorous and deadly serious. He shares that unfettered sense of flying a powerful aircraft free in the vast expanse of the sky. The special sense that pilots have when they "can reach out and touch the face of God". Shubert relates the feelings of men in combat, that gripping apprehension in your gut when you know you're going to die, your senses at full maximum intensity, and then that striking after mission fear when you look back and realize that you cheated death once again. Shubert was indeed a special fellow. We are indebted to him for his service and his book. He captures a special piece of the American character and our history that is essential to pass on to our children and grandchildren. Lt Shubert was exceptional, a USAF officer and a fighter pilot who fought the war and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross. The author reminds us once again why fighter pilots are special. Why they are ubiquitously viewed as swaggering "raconteurs", with big egos and big watches who can sometimes be insufferable. But his tale also captures the reality of one-on-one aerial combat, loser goes home.... to God.

30 review for BRAVE AND FUNNY MEMORIES OF WWII: By a P-38 Fighter Pilot

  1. 4 out of 5

    Robert DeZurik

    A different story This is a somewhat different look at aerial combat in that their flights were recon and only involved aerial combat when caught in the act. Good story. If you are a WWII reader you will enjoy this book. If you have flown planes yourself, it is easier to relate to circumstances. It is short and a quick read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Ann

    This book brings the reader on a roller coaster of emotions. Lyndon Shubert wrote his memories of the War before, during and after the experience. Schubert later became a writer and an actor. Today he is an Alzheimer patient, who no longer remembers his wife's name. Yet the legacy of memoirs and photos discovered by his wife, Betty, provide a poignant glimpse into the life and mind of a World War II pilot. Shubert talks about the turbulent emotions he felt before being deployed overseas. He was f This book brings the reader on a roller coaster of emotions. Lyndon Shubert wrote his memories of the War before, during and after the experience. Schubert later became a writer and an actor. Today he is an Alzheimer patient, who no longer remembers his wife's name. Yet the legacy of memoirs and photos discovered by his wife, Betty, provide a poignant glimpse into the life and mind of a World War II pilot. Shubert talks about the turbulent emotions he felt before being deployed overseas. He was far from a model soldier, often getting himself into trouble. Shubert found himself assigned to the 154th Squadron in Italy, which he admits the top brass saw them as expendable. Emotions are raw when he describes a battle as a neophyte with four Messerschmitt’s as he experienced engine failure. Shubert is angry when he feels that a comrade was cheated of a Congressional Medal of Honor; Schubert himself received the Distinguished Flying Cross. When Schubert discovers a friend from high school is nearby with the USO, he goes AWOL to find and meet her. He describes his fears when informed he would be flying home on a B-24, a plane he accurately predicted would fail to bring war veterans safely. At the end of the war, Schubert resumed a successful career as an actor and writer. He was disturbed that his wingman, Al did not want to come to his play. Schubert accepted that the war would always be a part of his life, but Al did not want to relive or be reminded of it. That part of his life was over and finished. The black and white photos add depth and understand to the memoirs. They were discovered along with Schubert's papers. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who wants an authentic glimpse into the life of a WWII veteran. The language can be raw, but is authentic and not offensive. Recommended for readers age ten and older particularly those who are interested in military history and psychology.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Little

    ‘Brave & Funny; Memories of World War Two by a P-38 Fighter Pilot’, by Lyndon Shubert, is a collection of stories from his time flying a Lockheed P-38 Lightning fighter aircraft from bases in Italy during the war. I knew I was going to love this book after the first few pages. There are two types of biographies out there; one is very detailed, almost technological, with more information about the events than the person. And then there’s this kind – the one I prefer – where by the time you’ve fin ‘Brave & Funny; Memories of World War Two by a P-38 Fighter Pilot’, by Lyndon Shubert, is a collection of stories from his time flying a Lockheed P-38 Lightning fighter aircraft from bases in Italy during the war. I knew I was going to love this book after the first few pages. There are two types of biographies out there; one is very detailed, almost technological, with more information about the events than the person. And then there’s this kind – the one I prefer – where by the time you’ve finished the book, the subject feels like an old friend who you’d enjoy having a coffee with. Brave & Funny, is an apt description for Shubert. First of all, the P-38, although a great aircraft when first produced, would be far down the list of fighters I’d want to be flying over Europe during the Second World War. With two engines, it was pretty fast, fairly maneuverable, and definitely possessed a heavy armament with four .50 calibre machine guns and a 20mm cannon, but by the time Lieutenant Shubert was flying it on unique weather missions ahead of Allied bombing raids, it was outclassed by the latest Messerschmitt BF-109 and Focke-Wulf FW-190 fighters of the German Luftwaffe. That is definitely where the ‘Brave’ part of the title comes in. The stories contained in the pages are sometimes poignant and other time hilarious. Shubert certainly led an interesting life and he does not hold anything back. He epitomizes the image of a Second World War fighter pilot, showing on more than one occasion where he had no qualms about speaking up, no matter who he was speaking up to. He also does not hide his thoughts and feelings, as he takes to the air on what many would consider near-suicide missions. Most of the flights were alone or with only one other aircraft along as a wingman. This certainly explains the antics we read about when Lieutenant Shubert was safely back on the ground. The stories from after the war are certainly an eye-opener into how different people react differently to post traumatic events. I’d like to think that I would be just like him. Anyone with an interesting in military history, Second World War aviation, or frankly, just looking for a good biography that will make you smile and even laugh out loud, will want to read Brave & Funny. I only wish I could have had that cup of coffee with Lynn. Review by Daniel Lloyd Little – November 7, 2017

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Dale Keck

    kindle unlimited but got it on freebie day {and as epub a while back}, some issues had to try to overlook, thinking at first it was the epub on chromebook but did look through on kindle for android on tablet and they are still there, maybe a bit worse; it is a good decent enough story but between the 'orphan' {one was all by itself the only thing on a page, then it went to a different page with a new chapter} pictures that would be on a page by itself with no other story text, etc, but what I ac kindle unlimited but got it on freebie day {and as epub a while back}, some issues had to try to overlook, thinking at first it was the epub on chromebook but did look through on kindle for android on tablet and they are still there, maybe a bit worse; it is a good decent enough story but between the 'orphan' {one was all by itself the only thing on a page, then it went to a different page with a new chapter} pictures that would be on a page by itself with no other story text, etc, but what I actually dropped a star off for is...yes, understand the man is much much older now and has health and possible memory issues, but the coming home and afterwards parts lacked any type of actual winding up, from the sudden mention that his first wife had died which was only mentioned when the second wife was brought in to the story, to if he had medals stolen in Canada while on layover why did it mention him wearing those same medals for a parade when he returned shortly after the other, to some other issues including it obviously needed some fleshing out for the gaps/omissions/issues mentioned plus more of a wrapping up and winding down of the story which made it seem only a partial story basically, and while it's still worth a read the issues did detract from what could have been a better story overall If you want to know how a young fighter pilot felt in his head and his heart as he was about to fly the enemy skies of WWII, this book is for you. Always afraid he was about to die, he climbed into the cockpit anyway ... and lived to tell you about it. How would you feel if you were a new guy in the sky ... attacked by four Messerschmitts? Let me tell you, no matter how much you prepare, no matter how much you read, how much you train, no matter how much you think of yourself as a ‘Hot Shot Pilot,’ you are never ready for life and death combat! How did it feel to say a ‘last goodbye’ to your bride believing you would never see her again, as you left to fight WWII?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robert Enzenauer

    What a great first-person memoir of a World War II combat aviator. As a military physician 1979-1994, I had the occasion to care for many (at that time) combat veteran pilots, and the vast majority were some of the most interesting people on the planet. And like this aviator, pilots are healthier than the infantry ground pounders to start with, so many have survived longer than the other veteran groups. But this is a wonderful first-person sharing of what it was like to be a young 20-something p What a great first-person memoir of a World War II combat aviator. As a military physician 1979-1994, I had the occasion to care for many (at that time) combat veteran pilots, and the vast majority were some of the most interesting people on the planet. And like this aviator, pilots are healthier than the infantry ground pounders to start with, so many have survived longer than the other veteran groups. But this is a wonderful first-person sharing of what it was like to be a young 20-something pilot fighting against the Germans in Europe 1944-1945. And for me was definitely best devoured in one sitting. More than most, this veteran admits not to fear but TERROR when describes the dogfights with Messerschmidts and the dangerous duty of escorting damaged bombers back "home." For those readers that aren't veterans also, it is worth noting that this author received the DFC - the Distinguished Flying Corss, the second highest award for valor below the Medal of Honor (Also awarded to Lindbergh after his incredible flight). His "attitude" reminds be of another renegade - Pappy Boyington, who was a marine aviator in the Pacific theater. Although probably not a TV series, this guy's story would definitely make a great movie. The question really comes down to which dashing young actor should play Shubert., And, as a military senior flight surgeon myself for 30 years (1984-2015) I salute you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Dawson

    I’m always looking for a good memoir on World War Two. This is not one. The story is about Lyndon Shubert a P-38 pilot. Do to his high-jinks and basically bad attitude, he is relegated to a weather squadron in Italy. He does have a few encounters with ME-109’s. One of them is quite hair raising. Other than that, the only thing I found about Mr. Shubert is, he hated regulations and to be honest, should have been drummed out of the service or court-martialed for his disregard for authority. I guess I’m always looking for a good memoir on World War Two. This is not one. The story is about Lyndon Shubert a P-38 pilot. Do to his high-jinks and basically bad attitude, he is relegated to a weather squadron in Italy. He does have a few encounters with ME-109’s. One of them is quite hair raising. Other than that, the only thing I found about Mr. Shubert is, he hated regulations and to be honest, should have been drummed out of the service or court-martialed for his disregard for authority. I guess the funny memory is when he planned on hooking up with an old flame in Rome while he as on R & R. Besides that, this story falls flat. Now, this part is about the promotion of the story, I was contacted by Glenda Mae, not once or twice or three times. In fact, I lost count. Nothing puts a bad taste in reviewer’s mouth more than being hit up for a review after already accepting the offer. I responded that I had received a copy. Didn’t matter. Kept getting invites until I replied with a fiery response. It should never come to that, sadly it did and I have to make it part of the review. Two Stars

  7. 4 out of 5

    JLTucker

    Powerful, funny and sad all in one It took me far too long to finally read this book. The author's wife had written me quite awhile back asking me to read and review the book but life got in the way. I finally started reading it this week and couldn't put it down. It's not your typical war story. It's more real than that. It's more like sitting down with a respected old warrior who starts to tell you stories about a war you've only heard about. But this time the stories become real. I'm not going Powerful, funny and sad all in one It took me far too long to finally read this book. The author's wife had written me quite awhile back asking me to read and review the book but life got in the way. I finally started reading it this week and couldn't put it down. It's not your typical war story. It's more real than that. It's more like sitting down with a respected old warrior who starts to tell you stories about a war you've only heard about. But this time the stories become real. I'm not going to knock anything. It's not a novel by an award winning professional writer. It's a book by someone who lived through very hard and scary times and wasn't afraid to tell you that. My only regret as I write this is that I didn't get to meet the man whose stories his beloved wife compiled and graciously shared with us as a tribute to her husband. A true American hero.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Juan Rivera

    Just an OK book It is fine to write the memories of your 50 missions as a weather scout pilot flying a twin engine machine, but that might as well could have been delivered through live speech presentations to interested listeners. The book lacks all the background (geographical, political, social, environmental conditions) which must accompany a book about the WWII to really understand the nature, scope and consequences of that war. True literary research for the book is missing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    andrew davey

    Just about one of the worst world war 11 autobiographies I've read.Constant clashes with authority and self-centred attitude has you wishing he was blown out of the sky at the earliest opportunity and his place given to another pilot with a much smaller chip on his shoulder. Overall not worth the time wasted reading it Just about one of the worst world war 11 autobiographies I've read.Constant clashes with authority and self-centred attitude has you wishing he was blown out of the sky at the earliest opportunity and his place given to another pilot with a much smaller chip on his shoulder. Overall not worth the time wasted reading it

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    A short, but good book This book is a collection of stories and adventures of one man's journey through WWII. There was so much more he could have written, but he never intended to publish this book. It was only after he got Alzheimer's that his wife found his collected experiences and published them. I'm glad she did. A short, but good book This book is a collection of stories and adventures of one man's journey through WWII. There was so much more he could have written, but he never intended to publish this book. It was only after he got Alzheimer's that his wife found his collected experiences and published them. I'm glad she did.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chaplain Stanley Chapin

    Ok Not thrilling but of interest as had two family members fly P-38s during WW II. This author was more lucky than brave.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Charles McClure

    Sorry to see him go. Air Corps was not MASH, but his stories are a good rival for that other set of war stories. Enjoy!

  13. 5 out of 5

    SCOTT H ABRAMSON

    Well written... A well written easy read that combined both humor and the horrors of war that was fought in the airspace over Europe.

  14. 5 out of 5

    D. Mark Detrixhe

    Great tales Anything any of these guys have to say, I want to hear. The detail of his memories after years its amazing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard Shaffer

    Great

  16. 4 out of 5

    Scott Reeves

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lorelei Willems

  18. 4 out of 5

    james r. Taris

  19. 5 out of 5

    M.J. Gardner

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gerald W Ford

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Trujillo

  22. 5 out of 5

    William Bunce

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Phillips

  24. 4 out of 5

    C.K. ROY

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sherrell Reefer

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Walton

  27. 5 out of 5

    James Lopez

  28. 5 out of 5

    Walt Strow

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Kipp

  30. 4 out of 5

    C J R HARDMAN

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