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We Rule the Night

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Two girls use forbidden magic to fly and fight–for their country and for themselves–in this riveting debut that’s part Shadow and Bone, part Code Name Verity. Seventeen-year-old Revna is a factory worker, manufacturing war machines for the Union of the North. When she’s caught using illegal magic, she fears being branded a traitor and imprisoned. Meanwhile, on the front lin Two girls use forbidden magic to fly and fight–for their country and for themselves–in this riveting debut that’s part Shadow and Bone, part Code Name Verity. Seventeen-year-old Revna is a factory worker, manufacturing war machines for the Union of the North. When she’s caught using illegal magic, she fears being branded a traitor and imprisoned. Meanwhile, on the front lines, Linné defied her father, a Union general, and disguised herself as a boy to join the army. They’re both offered a reprieve from punishment if they use their magic in a special women’s military flight unit and undertake terrifying, deadly missions under cover of darkness. Revna and Linné can hardly stand to be in the same cockpit, but if they can’t fly together, and if they can’t find a way to fly well, the enemy’s superior firepower will destroy them–if they don’t destroy each other first. We Rule the Night is a powerful story about sacrifice, complicated friendships, and survival despite impossible odds.


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Two girls use forbidden magic to fly and fight–for their country and for themselves–in this riveting debut that’s part Shadow and Bone, part Code Name Verity. Seventeen-year-old Revna is a factory worker, manufacturing war machines for the Union of the North. When she’s caught using illegal magic, she fears being branded a traitor and imprisoned. Meanwhile, on the front lin Two girls use forbidden magic to fly and fight–for their country and for themselves–in this riveting debut that’s part Shadow and Bone, part Code Name Verity. Seventeen-year-old Revna is a factory worker, manufacturing war machines for the Union of the North. When she’s caught using illegal magic, she fears being branded a traitor and imprisoned. Meanwhile, on the front lines, Linné defied her father, a Union general, and disguised herself as a boy to join the army. They’re both offered a reprieve from punishment if they use their magic in a special women’s military flight unit and undertake terrifying, deadly missions under cover of darkness. Revna and Linné can hardly stand to be in the same cockpit, but if they can’t fly together, and if they can’t find a way to fly well, the enemy’s superior firepower will destroy them–if they don’t destroy each other first. We Rule the Night is a powerful story about sacrifice, complicated friendships, and survival despite impossible odds.

30 review for We Rule the Night

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨️ I yeet my books back and forth ✨️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I know I have a reputation for being a "Meanie McMeanerson" when it comes to book reviews, but honestly that's because my most popular reviews are all my negative ones! I wish my positive reviews were more popular because I'd really like to showcase the ones that wowed or surprised me-- case in point, this book. I almost didn't apply for WE RULE THE NIGHT because that breathless summary sound so much like many of the other Basic Girl YA™ Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I know I have a reputation for being a "Meanie McMeanerson" when it comes to book reviews, but honestly that's because my most popular reviews are all my negative ones! I wish my positive reviews were more popular because I'd really like to showcase the ones that wowed or surprised me-- case in point, this book. I almost didn't apply for WE RULE THE NIGHT because that breathless summary sound so much like many of the other Basic Girl YA™ books that have been coming out in droves. But I kept coming back to it, again and again, drawn by the cover and the idea of a bunch of girl fighter pilots in a world of forbidden magic. Girl, you know I'm a sucker for some fantasy, and if it's about female friendships and magic, I really can't say no. THIS BOOK WAS SO FREAKING GOOD THO. Seriously, why doesn't this have more of a buzz? Most of my friends either haven't read this or didn't like it, so I want to know who to address my complaints to for not hyping this up like it's Bottomless Mimosa day at the local brunch joint, avocado toast 50% off. I don't think I've felt this exhilarated about a book since reading THE HUNGER GAMES. The world building, the characters, the stakes were all done so right. It's modeled off a fantasy version of the Soviet Union and the persecution and suppression are REAL. Rather than going on and on about my squee in paragraph form (although I could totally do that), I'm just going to lay out everything I adored about WE RULE THE NIGHT in handy bullet point format. ✔️ That cover. It's gorgeous. Obviously a cover has no bearing on what's inside the book, but that's what made me pick it up in the first place, so good job, cover artist. You earned that paycheck. ✔️ The world building. As I said, it's set in a Soviet Russia-like fantasy counterpart called the Union of the North, which is at war with another country called Elda. The politics is pretty well done and even though we don't really get much about what the world-at-large is like, the landscapes and culture and intrigue were all really well done (the author apparently lives in Europe and serves as a tour guide, so this actually makes sense). Magic is forbidden, although there are exceptions, as the two female leads find out when they're forcibly enlisted in an experimental all-girls' squadron. ✔️ The girl power theme. Holy Glass Ceiling, Batman! The girls are not respected at all, and people try to undercut and sabotage them at every turn. They have to work 150% harder with 50% less than the men, and even when they succeed, nobody cares. It's soooo frustrating and I was right there with the characters the whole time. It's so relatable and I hate that, but love how it was represented here. ✔️ Female friendships. There's basically no romance, only friendship. The two leads, Revna and Linne, hate each other at first, but the book gradually develops their relationship so they come to an understanding of one another. Linne is a military brat who sneaked into a male academy, Mulan-style, to learn how to fight. When she was caught out, she was sent to the girls' squadron and she feels like this is a punishment. Revna is disabled and has prosthetic legs. She is constantly having to prove herself and have people either doubt her or baby her (and she hates both). When she's caught doing forbidden magic, it's either the squadron or treason, and at least the squadron will feed their family. We also get to meet other girls, and they're all so delightfully, well, girly. Their problems and personalities are done with such care, and with such realism, that they felt fully dimensional. Even the cat fights had reasons behind them, and it was never just hate for the sake of hate. ✔️ Disability rep. This could have been done so badly, but Revna was a great character. She wasn't just her disability although it features prominently because of the physical demands of training and how she constantly has to push against her limits to succeed. I loved that she was the most daring flier and the best magician, and how much that validated her. Her bond with her family and how it affects a tough decision she has to make at the end was also well done. She also isn't the one who breaks first, although there are several trying moments that test her psychologically. ✔️ Dangerous hot shape-shifter spies. The Skarov, man. I'm Team Tannov all the way. He reminds me of Dmitri from VAMPIRE ACADEMY-- smoldering and broody, but also charming. LOVE. ✔️ The ending. LOL JK, I HATE IT. THANKS. Please tell me there's more, because there's no way the book can end like that without a sequel. It was sequel-baiting like crazy. All I see in the author's bibliography right now is something called THE WINTER DUKE, which does not appear to be related to this series at all. Girl, I'm so down but also, and again, seriously, WHERE IS BOOK TWO. All in all, I really loved this book. I'm actually going to keep it because I think it will be really fun to reread the next time I'm craving a high stakes adventure. The battles, the navigation, the training, the friendship-- IT WAS SO FREAKING GOOD. Trust in me, and read this book. You'll thank me! Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review! 4.5 to 5 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Again

    4 stars We Rule the Night completely caught me off guard with its immersive world and narrative of fierce women. I wasn’t sure how I’d react to the wartime fantasy setting, but I love how Bartlett used it to point out the flaws both in this world and our real world. This is a very understated book though, despite the action and adventure occurring. I honestly don’t think a lot of people will like it (the most common complaint will probably be “too slow”), but I really really enjoyed. This is one 4 stars We Rule the Night completely caught me off guard with its immersive world and narrative of fierce women. I wasn’t sure how I’d react to the wartime fantasy setting, but I love how Bartlett used it to point out the flaws both in this world and our real world. This is a very understated book though, despite the action and adventure occurring. I honestly don’t think a lot of people will like it (the most common complaint will probably be “too slow”), but I really really enjoyed. This is one of those fantasies that are a bit more of a slowburn—like Rachel Hartman’s Tess of the Road. And I love that, although it’s not for everyone. However, it’s . . . Fantastic for fans of military/wartime fantasies—but centering around women! I think people who liked the concept of Joanna Hathaway’s Dark of the West will definitely like this (plane-like things! military! wartime!). Or if you thought Dark of the West was cool but didn’t feature enough women and female friendships (aka me) and want more of female interaction. Either of these would be indicative that you should definitely pick up We Rule the Night. Because not only is it a wartime fantasy with alliances and hierarchies and people fighting on live-metal machines (more on that later), but it also has that sort of more measured tone that a lot of fantasies take on. It’s severe, and I think people who like older-feeling fantasies will like this. It’s still got action elements to it, but it’s also got training and a lot of struggling to work together. It’s messy, in a good way. Huge bonus points for female friendships and the complexity of that! One of my favorite parts of We Rule the Night would probably be how the story examined Linné and Revna‘s hatred/friendship. Linné is prickly and hard to get along with and she definitely does not want to be in this female-only group of women fighting in the war, especially given her history of dressing up as a boy and serving in the military. However, this is the only way she can fight in the war, and she’ll have to stick with it if she wants to contribute. Revna, on the other hand, is just there to help her family and do what’s best for them. Both girls are part of the squadron, and both have to stay. But despite being paired to fly a living-metal plane together—one girl to fuel it with her spark, and the other to navigate the Weave—they struggle working together. I thought it was really nice to see this gradual friendship as the focus of the novel. There’s no romance (I mean, I wasn’t going to oppose a queer romance but it’s not a romance book) and it’s all about Linné and Revna’s relationship, which I really enjoyed. I do want to note that Linné is one of the sources of where some of the disability-associated harassment comes from initially (Revna has living metal prosthetics below the knee on one leg, and ankle and below on the other), but she definitely isn’t doing that in the end of the book and learns better. However,if you think this might be triggering/not good to read for you, it’s probably a good idea to skip out on We Rule the Night. I personally can’t speak on how Bartlett portrayed Revna’s disability, and I would love to see an #OwnVoices review from an amputee using prosthetics, if someone has a review! There wasn’t anything glaringly harmful to me and the message did not seem problematic, but I also know that I have a lot of blind spots, and I can’t definitively say whether or not this was good rep. Interesting, metal magic and an industrial world with its own set of stigmas. The living-metal magic that I referenced a few times was really really cool! People have a sort of magic in them and there’s different types of magic, like using a spark (hot or cold) and the Weave. In their country, the Weave is banned for the way it can get tangled, however the military has allowed the girls’ squadron to use it for the purpose of flying their living-metal planes. The planes aren’t normal planes, they’ve got also living metal animal-shaped machinery and other mechanical stuff. Very industrial feeling. It’s very interesting, and Bartlett introduces it in a way that’s not info-dumpy, and more integrated, which I enjoyed. Plus, reading about this specific country’s issues with the Weave versus the country their fighting (who embrace it) added another interesting element to the story. The purpose of the war was a bit foggy to me. This is one of my biggest complaints, although I’m not sure how relevant it actually is. I don’t know what they’re fighting for. I know Linné and Revna’s country is at war with another, but I either missed when reading or it didn’t really say clearly what the war was caused by and why they were still fighting and if they were trying to negotiate peace. Some of the larger politics were a little bit blurry. The ending was kind of abrupt, and I felt like parts were unresolved. Also, it wraps up a bit quickly, and it feels like We Rule the Night has sequel potential, although it doesn’t really end on a cliffhanger. I just felt like a lot of the storyline besides the friendship (the war, certain side characters and families) was generally unresolved? I’m not sure if I’d recommend it to people who want every last detail resolved, because you don’t really get that. I would totally love if this book had a sequel, though *cough COUGH*. However— I can’t really say if either of the last two points are really necessary. Because ultimately, this is a book about female friendship and how it defies the patriarchy, and it’s not really focusing on a giant fantasy world’s politics. I think We Rule the Night is more of a friendship story among a fantasy backdrop, which a lot of people might not get based off of first glance. It’s about Linné and Revna. Not about the world or the war, it’s about them against the backdrop of the war. Overall, We Rule the Night is a book I really enjoyed, even though I don’t think it’s for everyone. I would definitely recommend people who like - Female-friendship oriented stories, even in fantasy settings - People who like slower fantasies, à la Tess of the Road - People who like military/wartime fantasies, à la Dark of the West - People who want a feminist story about characters who persevere Thank you so much to The NOVL for sending me an advance reader’s copy in exchange for an honest review! Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ayla C

    What this book is NOT about: - Big scale plot - Saving the world - Romance - Special Snowflakes - Magic system you're used to What this book is about: - Friendship - Female empowerment - Reality, light and dark - Obstacles - Loss - The power of will - Different mindsets and personalities - Living with prosthetics - A dash of magic with a big impact, which I found very unique If you're looking forward a the-world-revolves-around-me protagonist who must save the world and yada yada, then you'll be disappointed. T What this book is NOT about: - Big scale plot - Saving the world - Romance - Special Snowflakes - Magic system you're used to What this book is about: - Friendship - Female empowerment - Reality, light and dark - Obstacles - Loss - The power of will - Different mindsets and personalities - Living with prosthetics - A dash of magic with a big impact, which I found very unique If you're looking forward a the-world-revolves-around-me protagonist who must save the world and yada yada, then you'll be disappointed. This is a slow burn book with a subtle climax. While the accomplishments our MCs make and the hardships they face might be great for them, they're miniscule on a world scale. In fact, they don't get any recognition for what they do. Still, that's not stopping them. They're realistic and strong and very different. They do what they can in their power, and I really appreciated to see characters fall into helpnessness they couldn't simply magic away. It's the dark reality, people. Now, that doesn't mean this book was dark all the time. There's some humor, a silly celebration, appreciation of friendship and feminity and life and its joys. This is the kind of book you'd want to read when you feel lonely. You survive with the characters, root for them, feel for them, and you feel like you've forever known them. I really liked both of the MCs, but Linné's perspective was the most interesting to read. She seemed like an awful person on the outside (everybody in the book hated her in the beginning), but being in her head, you know she only has good intentions. She simply doesn't know how to express them and ends up offending the other girls over and over again. This is explained, of course: Linné had spent years pretending to be a boy so she could serve her country. She was trained to follow orders and be the perfect soldier, and the women's regimen is not nearly as strict. This, as you'd expect, makes her skeptical. The lack of order grates on her, and so does the girls' 'girliness' and, in the begining, childishness. Over all, I mostly loved this book for the characters and the writing. As I understood from the author's bio, this her debut. Possibly? I'm still not sure, but I would never tell from the writing. It's quality and flows beautifully. The character's voices are distinct as well. 5/5 stars from me. I can't promise you'd enjoy it, as character-focused stories aren't for everybody, but if you enjoy interesting characters and love to watch friendships develop--realistically!--give it a go.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    4.5 stars. A cool alt-world story that takes the amazing Russian, female pilots of WWII, known by the Germans as Night Witches, as its inspiration. Claire Eliza Bartlett gives us a story about young women who join the war effort and are trained as pilots. Except these planes are made of "living" metal, and are empathic, so each team of women (pilot and navigator) assigned to a plane must actually work in harmony, instead of just being colleagues. Revna and Linné are assigned together, and absolut 4.5 stars. A cool alt-world story that takes the amazing Russian, female pilots of WWII, known by the Germans as Night Witches, as its inspiration. Claire Eliza Bartlett gives us a story about young women who join the war effort and are trained as pilots. Except these planes are made of "living" metal, and are empathic, so each team of women (pilot and navigator) assigned to a plane must actually work in harmony, instead of just being colleagues. Revna and Linné are assigned together, and absolutely do not exemplify harmony. Linné had joined the army, dressing as a boy, her gender undetected for some years. She's given the option of returning home in ignominy, or joining this newly created squadron. Revna is a factory girl, and after slipping up one day during an attack by their enemies, comes under the scrutiny of the country's essentially secret police for her illegal use of magic to save herself and a policeman from death. Revna has artifical legs, crafted for her by her father from scraps of living metal, for which he was captured by the police and sent to the mines (essentially a death sentence.) Everyone around Revna underestimates her, including Linné, who, in addition to being the daughter of the General of the war effort, comes from a rich family, and has no social graces, which was only exacerbated by her time with the male troops. The two young women clash repeatedly, and seem like they'll never learn to work together. I loved the variety of women in this story, and the evolving dynamics between Revna and Linné. I also loved seeing Revna's frustration and fury at her treatment, even the well-meaning, when people see nothing but her prosthetics. And Linné's fury at being demoted in the brass' and soldiers' perceptions from tough and competent soldier to just a young woman is totally understandable, too. Though Linné and Revna grate on each other constantly, they and their fellow pilots demonstrate dedication and skill when they're sent out on missions to bomb their assigned targets, evoking fear and resentment in the male pilots are the training base, which is not at all a surprise. Much of the story is spent on the women's training and there are good descriptions of the conditions the women are experiencing when on missions, which were tense and claustrophobic. The story wraps up well, though I could easily imagine plenty of other stories in this world.

  5. 4 out of 5

    ♠ TABI⁷ ♠

    DNF @ p.67 until a later date when I can focus better on this book that needs more brain cells than I'm willing to give it now. DNF @ p.67 until a later date when I can focus better on this book that needs more brain cells than I'm willing to give it now.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I like the story but it can get really boring at times.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adah Udechukwu

    We Rule the Night was a bit interesting but I expected more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    DNF'ed at page 154 One of those books I thought I would love after reading the first pages but that turned out into a dragging book where nothing happens. I mean, I can like slow books if there is something, anything, going on, but if in 154 pages all I have been shown is some info about the Weave and living metals, how annoying and Rude one of the main characters is, and some vague points about the war and how much the male soldiers don't want the female ones around... it's not me, it's the book DNF'ed at page 154 One of those books I thought I would love after reading the first pages but that turned out into a dragging book where nothing happens. I mean, I can like slow books if there is something, anything, going on, but if in 154 pages all I have been shown is some info about the Weave and living metals, how annoying and Rude one of the main characters is, and some vague points about the war and how much the male soldiers don't want the female ones around... it's not me, it's the book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Toya (the reading chemist)

    I read this book in an afternoon, and when I finished, I was so conflicted with how I felt about the book. I wasn’t sure if just liked it or loved it. This was one of those books that I needed to digest what I read before I could even give it a rating. From start to finish, this story is chock full of non-stop action. The story opens with Revna and the other factory workers desperately trying to escape to the underground shelters as Tammin is under siege from enemy planes. The problem is that Re I read this book in an afternoon, and when I finished, I was so conflicted with how I felt about the book. I wasn’t sure if just liked it or loved it. This was one of those books that I needed to digest what I read before I could even give it a rating. From start to finish, this story is chock full of non-stop action. The story opens with Revna and the other factory workers desperately trying to escape to the underground shelters as Tammin is under siege from enemy planes. The problem is that Revna is in a wheelchair, and she must make a further trek than her coworkers since her family’s status as second-class citizens forbids them from entering the closer bomb shelters (the reason why is addressed). As time is running out, Revna decides to call on The Weave, magic that has been banned by the union, in order to save her own life and find her family. Unfortunately for her, a run in with a Union officer mid Weave jump betrays her secret magic use. Revna assumes that she will be thrown in prison alongside her father and labeled as traitor, but she is given a different opportunity instead. At this point, we switch gears and meet Linné who has been called in front of her superiors for impersonating a male in order to join the frontlines of war (Mulan anyone?). Linné comes from a well-known and respected military father who is under the impression that his daughter is doing well at her boarding school instead of fighting alongside her battalion on the frontlines. She is faced with the decision to either be sent back home to her father or to join a newly formed reigmen of women who will be trained to use The Weave to pilot war planes. Linné is one of the citizens who is adamantly against The Weave but signing up for this squad is the only way she will be able to fight for her country once again. Once Revna and Linné meet the other girls of their regimen, which is led by the famous Tamara Zima, they quickly learn what the military men really think of their team and mission. The men believe that Tamara is only leading this team and mission because her lover is a high ranking official, which is consistently brought up. To be fair, even the girls believe it at first as well. Immediately, Linné feels like she’s made a mistake and these girls are making mockery of what the military stands for. The girls want to alter their uniforms, wear their own fashionable shoes instead of the military grade boots issued to them, and refuse to be modest (Linné had to bind her breasts, shower when everyone was asleep, and hide her menstruation rags). This builds a HUGE rift between Linné and everyone else…especially Revna, who is the most gifted at controlling The Weave. This team had a long way to go if they were going to come together to help fight in the war, especially when all the men kept reminding them that they were not capable. I have to hand it to the author for creating a fantasy story, that aside from the actual magic, did not feel like fantasy. The blatant sexism that the girls face in this book pissed me off to absolutely no end. To make matters worse, Tamara has no sympathy on the girls because she herself is treated as an absolute joke by all of the commanding officers. The girls were purposefully given equipment that was expected to fail and never given the opportunity to succeed. I loved watching the girls’ band together against all odds; especially the extremely slow burn friendship that built between Revna and Linné. These girls would do whatever it takes to win the war, and they refuse to leave their own behind. I realized that I hadn’t even commented on much of the fantasy in the plot because I was so engrossed with the characters in this story. The magic is everything that I wanted in this remarkable debut. There are fire-breathing dragons that can decimate cities in seconds. The planes that the girls fly are comprised of living metal that adapts to the Weave user’s emotions. The fight scenes are incredibly descriptive and get your heart racing. Thank you to The NOVL for an advanced copy of this book. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    The Union of the North is at war with the Elda, in a brutal conflict that's roughly analogous to WWII. Revna works in a factory as a second-class citizen because her father is serving a life sentence as a traitor. When she's caught using a type of magic forbidden in he Union she fears that she'll join him, but instead she's recruited into a fledgling squadron of female air-crews. Linné is the daughter of a Union general, and for the last three years she's been enlisted as an infantryman in the U The Union of the North is at war with the Elda, in a brutal conflict that's roughly analogous to WWII. Revna works in a factory as a second-class citizen because her father is serving a life sentence as a traitor. When she's caught using a type of magic forbidden in he Union she fears that she'll join him, but instead she's recruited into a fledgling squadron of female air-crews. Linné is the daughter of a Union general, and for the last three years she's been enlisted as an infantryman in the Union army while pretending to be a man. When her true gender is discovered, she feats being forced back into a life of boring gentility by her father, but instead she gets recruited as well. The squadron comes together to fight the Elda, but has to overcome their own side's entrenched sexism first. Even though Revna is an amazing pilot her prosthetic legs keep her from being a preferred member of an aircrew, and she ends up with Linné as a navigator, and the two do not get along. But they do need each other and they're successful together, but both may go down because of the attention of the Union's elite police. This was great. There's so much going on here, female friendships in adverse situations for sure, but also treatment of handicapped people, sexism and the pointlessness and hypocrisy of war. Also obligations and expectations of family, country and duty. It's a great read that sets up well for a continuing series and thankfully without a cliffhanger.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sophie_The_Jedi_Knight

    Really redeemed itself in the second half. I had a surprisingly fun time with this, gradually coming to love these girls. This book is the opposite of girl hate. Also, the writing is excellent. Highly recommend, can’t wait for the sequel. 4/5 stars. 12/10/19: So I discovered that there might not be a sequel coming out and I'm scared. I loved this - I want more of these amazing girl soldiers! I guess with Five Feet Apart, Wilder Girls, The Kingdom, and now this, open endings are just coming back in Really redeemed itself in the second half. I had a surprisingly fun time with this, gradually coming to love these girls. This book is the opposite of girl hate. Also, the writing is excellent. Highly recommend, can’t wait for the sequel. 4/5 stars. 12/10/19: So I discovered that there might not be a sequel coming out and I'm scared. I loved this - I want more of these amazing girl soldiers! I guess with Five Feet Apart, Wilder Girls, The Kingdom, and now this, open endings are just coming back into fashion after Champion, Requiem, and Eleanor and Park. Agh. I don't like it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Coon

    Fierce. Feminist. Fearless. I loved, loved, loved WE RULE THE NIGHT. I want to BE a fighter pilot in this book. It recounts the tale of Revna, a traitor's daughter with prosthetic (living metal, omg) legs and Linee, the governor's daughter who dresses like a boy to get into the army. They couldn't be more different. Revna, afraid that she's a curse to her family, wants to keep her mother and sister safe, to provide for them because her father is gone, and Linee, closed off from her emotions so s Fierce. Feminist. Fearless. I loved, loved, loved WE RULE THE NIGHT. I want to BE a fighter pilot in this book. It recounts the tale of Revna, a traitor's daughter with prosthetic (living metal, omg) legs and Linee, the governor's daughter who dresses like a boy to get into the army. They couldn't be more different. Revna, afraid that she's a curse to her family, wants to keep her mother and sister safe, to provide for them because her father is gone, and Linee, closed off from her emotions so she can protect her heart, wants to be loyal to the Union. When they're paired together as pilot and navigator, using the magic of the Weave to fly the haphazard planes given only to girls, they decide to own the skies anyway and fight for their place in history. The fight scenes were breathtaking. The fantasy was incredible. And more than once, the depth of these characters made me breathless with admiration for Bartlett's literary prowess. I cannot say enough about this story. Put it on your TBR. You will absolutely root for these two fierce females who battle the Elda and each other right down to the gripping end.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Two girls told how they should behave and what they're worth. Two girls who say two hell with the stereotypes and do what's forbidden anyway. Revna was a factory worker, until the fateful night she used the illegal weave magic to save her life. Linne has been fighting as an infantry solider for months, until her secret is found out. When the two girls are faced with death/imprisonment or joining the all female flight squad, they know there's only one right option. This was such a dark and gritty Two girls told how they should behave and what they're worth. Two girls who say two hell with the stereotypes and do what's forbidden anyway. Revna was a factory worker, until the fateful night she used the illegal weave magic to save her life. Linne has been fighting as an infantry solider for months, until her secret is found out. When the two girls are faced with death/imprisonment or joining the all female flight squad, they know there's only one right option. This was such a dark and gritty read. The threat of death and war is always hovering in the atmosphere. I loved this fantastical world that was overrun with war machines and strange magics. Revna and Linne were similar in that they needed to do something for themselves, but they had very different strategies to go about their goals. Revna also suffers from a physical disability in her legs. She has prosthetics, but at times must use a wheelchair or crutches in order to get around. Linne is on her guard after coming from the front. She's not sure what to make of this all female squad that seems to have zero discipline or respect for the command chain. All of this is worsened when Linne is paired up to fly with Revna. Revna is a liability in Linne's eyes. While Revna is powerfully gifted to use weave magic, what would happen to the girls if they were shot down? As Linne and Revna have to sort out their differences and figure out how to work with each other and the other girls of the unit, they face discrimination for who they are and what they're doing. Plus, the threat of the information squad always looms above them. Any of them could be arrested for supposedly illegal magic use. This was such a wonderful story and I highly enjoyed seeing Linne and Revna become friends and establish trust between the whole unit. It was not an easy process and all of the girls had to realize they had preconceived notions of each other. There's nothing better than seeing a united front between girls in my mind. The ending was left very open ended, I'm really hoping for an eventual sequel, but I guess I will just have to wait.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    4.5 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tara (Spinatale Reviews)

    I’m loving all of the books coming out lately that are inspired by lesser known parts of history! We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett is a YA fantasy that was inspired by the women who flew for the Soviet Union’s 588th Night Bomber regiment. This one was a pretty quick read that was full of brave women and interesting magic. While I wish the magic system had been described a bit better, the concept was so fascinating. I particularly liked the living metal and how the connection between pi I’m loving all of the books coming out lately that are inspired by lesser known parts of history! We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett is a YA fantasy that was inspired by the women who flew for the Soviet Union’s 588th Night Bomber regiment. This one was a pretty quick read that was full of brave women and interesting magic. While I wish the magic system had been described a bit better, the concept was so fascinating. I particularly liked the living metal and how the connection between pilot and ship was formed. I also loved both of the main characters, they were so distinct and vibrant. Linné really grew throughout the story, her character development was great. And Revna was so determined, strong, and resilient. Plus the disability rep! I also liked how complex the friendship between them was and how it developed over time. While certain parts of the plot lagged a bit, I enjoyed We Rule the Night overall. It kept me intrigued and was a very quick read. I'm pretty sure this will be a series and, now that the groundwork has been laid in this book, I think the story will really take off (I’m sorry, I couldn’t resist one flying pun) *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Dacyczyn

    Ok, I'm still pondering this one....but I think I liked it? I wasn't expecting to because as usual I've been so disappointed by YA fantasies with pretty covers. Plus, a debut YA author no less? Yikes. Surely this is going to be some terribly written tripe with a yawn-worthy forced romance. But....it wasn't? There's going to be a lot of question marks in this review because I still can't quite believe it wasn't awful...? The gist is that in this world there's at least a few magic-like elements: som Ok, I'm still pondering this one....but I think I liked it? I wasn't expecting to because as usual I've been so disappointed by YA fantasies with pretty covers. Plus, a debut YA author no less? Yikes. Surely this is going to be some terribly written tripe with a yawn-worthy forced romance. But....it wasn't? There's going to be a lot of question marks in this review because I still can't quite believe it wasn't awful...? The gist is that in this world there's at least a few magic-like elements: some metal is "living" metal that retains feelings from people and responds to thought, so machines and vehicles are controlled by human "spark" (ie, magic)? People can also travel along and manipulate something called the Weave, which seems to be the invisible magical threads that run through the world? The magic was never really explained, but you get the feel for it through the story. I marked this book as fantasy AND sci-fi because all of the machinery made this feel almost steampunk, though it wasn't really science-based. Anyway, this is set in a Soviet-like country at war with other vague countries, and things aren't going great. Few men remain to be drafted, and women aren't allowed to join the army....until the need for air power becomes evident and there's barely anyone left to recruit except women. The enemy aircraft are terrifying flying beast machines of living metal that shoot fire. The women recruited basically have canvas covered crop dusters, called Strekoza. (As soon as I got to the description of the rickety aircraft, I realized this was loosely based off of the real life Night Witches in WWII, as confirmed in the author's note). Because of the slow, fragile nature of these aircraft, they'll only fly at night so they'll be less likely to be shot down as they attempt to drop bombs on enemy targets, and thus this regiment of women is called the Night Raiders. They have to learn how to fly these things in tandem (one person providing the spark to power it through the air, while the other pulls it across the Weave), while also dealing with their own concerns about their families, navigating their relationships between one another, worrying about being mistaken by traitors, and being looked down upon by chauvinistic men who don't think women belong in the service. The two main characters are Revna, who was a factory worker who got caught manipulating the Weave (technically illegal) and was given the forced choice to join the new regiment of female flyers, the Night Raiders. She also happens to have two prosthetic legs made of living metal, so she has a physical disability that some think makes her unfit to serve. The other main character is Linne, who had just been found out as a woman disguised as a boy, after already fighting in the service for three years. She was also given the forced choice to become a Night Raider. She's pretty bitter for being demoted to working alongside a gaggle of untrained women who don't even have uniforms that fit, and her disdain for the others makes her an outcast. Naturally, Revna and Linne end up on the same small flight crew, so they have to learn to work together to fly the Strekoza, despite the animosity that forms between them early on. (A note here about the names: I'm not from Russia, nor do I speak Russian, so I can't say if the Russian-sounding names are accurate. It's not a secret that this world is based on an alternate fantasy version of the Soviet Union around WWII, so I'm sure some people will grumble if the names and other proper nouns don't follow exact Russian rules. I never feel this way about fantasy worlds based loosely on real worlds. As long as it's not specifically named as a historical version of our actual world, and it's instead a fantasy world, then I'm fine with the author taking liberties with tweaking the details. This may SEEM like Russia, but it's NOT Russia, so differences are OK to me.) Overall, I liked the story. I won't say this book is flawless. I felt like there were a lot of secondary characters that didn't feel fully fleshed out, so (for example) when someone is killed and they're all sad about it, I had to remind myself of who that person was. A lot of the time I just kept going rather than flipping back and forth to remind myself who was who. It didn't help that I tend to read names by sight than by truly sounding them out. I see the first letter and the length of the name more than anything, so names like Tannov, Tamara, and Tammin tend to blend together for me unless I specifically stop and differentiate them in my mind. So, some of the character shallowness is that there were a lot of secondary characters, but some of it is also my fault. The world building also felt a little bit like we were just skimming the surface. In some ways, that was the nature of this story: it wasn't about some big saving-the-world plot like a lot of YA speculative fiction is, but instead it was about a small band of women as a small cog in the larger machine. This book covers just a brief time in their role fighting in one area of the war (view spoiler)[ and it doesn't end with them seeing the end of the war, let alone winning the war. There's no Mary Sue ending where Revna shows everyone how amazing she is and rises to the very top of the Union ranks and overthrows the government. It ends with her and Linne accomplishing a minor victory, escaping from behind enemy lines, nearly dying, and then getting interrogated as potential traitors before being told to bury their story because no one will believe what they did. (hide spoiler)] Which actually feels more realistic to me. Real war stories are often about courageous people doing daring things as part of a small piece in the overall war effort, and often having to keep their actions secret for decades afterwards. There aren't many real life examples of a single teenage girl overthrowing totalitarian regimes or saving the day all by themselves, like so many fantasy/dystopian books seem to have. SO, my point is....the general vagueness about the world beyond this small regiment didn't really bother me. If you were to set a book in real-life WWII, you wouldn't necessarily explain the entire layout of the whole war just for the specific story about specific people that you wanted to tell. This is really the story of a friendship between two women who hate each other, rather than a save-the-day kind of story. The writing in this book was fine, by which I mean that I barely noticed it. Thank goodness it wasn't told in first-person/present-tense, because we know how much I hate that. There were a couple of words/sentences here and there that could have been smoother (for example, using the technically-correct-but-way-more-awkward word "direr" in one instance instead of just "more dire"). It initially took me a little while to get into this book, which was a combination of my low expectations and me contracting a stomach bug right after I started reading this, so it took me four days to read when it should have been quicker. Once I got to around the halfway point (when they actually started flying) I breezed through the rest in a day. SO......I was surprised to like this book. I may find my rating shifting as I come down off of the "Oh my god, I think I like you" book high. I definitely appreciate that this is a standalone book. The ending is open ended with several questions still unanswered, but I'm OK with that. I don't need books to be stretched across trilogies and series in order to wrap up every single thread. I'll be keeping an eye on this author for future books. (Ten minute later update) Oh yeah! I almost forgot the best part! NO ROMANCE! No love triangles, no hate-to-love tropes, no lovey doveyness to distract our badass ladies from their mission! This is WAR, bitches, not some high school cafeteria! Booyah!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kalyn Josephson

    I absolutely LOVE the magic system in this book. Living metal (it’s so cool!), the Weave, hot and cold spark—they’re all parts of the same whole, which Claire does a fantastic job of working into the character’s daily lives. Everything about the world is wonderfully fleshed out, which is one of the many things I really liked about the book. After the great worldbuilding, I’d have to say my other favorite part was the characters. Revna is strong, brave, and determined. Linne is coarse and fierce I absolutely LOVE the magic system in this book. Living metal (it’s so cool!), the Weave, hot and cold spark—they’re all parts of the same whole, which Claire does a fantastic job of working into the character’s daily lives. Everything about the world is wonderfully fleshed out, which is one of the many things I really liked about the book. After the great worldbuilding, I’d have to say my other favorite part was the characters. Revna is strong, brave, and determined. Linne is coarse and fierce in all the ways I absolutely love. They both grow in a lot of ways throughout the story, and Claire really keeps you rooting for them all the way through, while maintaining a fluctuating tension between all the characters that’s really well done. The harrowing ending had me speeding through the last hundred pages nonstop. I had to know what was going to happen next, and the ending does not disappoint! Plus, that title <3 <3

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    2 extremely disappointed stars. This book had so much potential but it never got there. Linne was an impossible character to like for much of the book and Revna didn't have enough depth. Actually none of the characters had enough depth. The bigger problem though was none of the world gets explained. Who are the two factions, why are they at war? How do things like the living metal work? What exactly is the weave? Very little of the world building was explained. The story was getting moving and th 2 extremely disappointed stars. This book had so much potential but it never got there. Linne was an impossible character to like for much of the book and Revna didn't have enough depth. Actually none of the characters had enough depth. The bigger problem though was none of the world gets explained. Who are the two factions, why are they at war? How do things like the living metal work? What exactly is the weave? Very little of the world building was explained. The story was getting moving and there was some character growth in the last 25% or so but then the story just ends. There is no real closure and it felt like a terrible spot to end things for me. There was more story to be told, even if it took too long to get there. Again, tons of potential but it just did not work.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard

    3.5/5 Okay so I get the comparison to Code Name Verity but I'm totally failing to understand the Shadow and Bone comparison. I really liked that we got a main character who was physically disabled. She's very independent, genuine, smart, capable and so damn strong. She was easily my favourite of all the characters. It took me some time to not hate the other main character who was pretty ignorant and rude for the book (no matter the justifications given). I found the world building and political con 3.5/5 Okay so I get the comparison to Code Name Verity but I'm totally failing to understand the Shadow and Bone comparison. I really liked that we got a main character who was physically disabled. She's very independent, genuine, smart, capable and so damn strong. She was easily my favourite of all the characters. It took me some time to not hate the other main character who was pretty ignorant and rude for the book (no matter the justifications given). I found the world building and political conflict to be REALLY lacking in development. It needed much more explanation. The ending plot was also kind of unsatisfying and abrupt. It needed another 2 chapters at least.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Oh, holy hell, this book. Never in my life did I think that I'd read a book so bleak, and so maddening, and love it so damn much. I don't know know what kind of magic Clarie Eliza Bartlett wove to create this story, but it worked. Oh, it worked. Strap yourself in for some rambling, my friends, because that's all I know how to do at this point. Look, I'm all for likable characters. It's nice when the MC is sweet, or snarky, or any manner of traits that are easy to connect with. Linne is not that c Oh, holy hell, this book. Never in my life did I think that I'd read a book so bleak, and so maddening, and love it so damn much. I don't know know what kind of magic Clarie Eliza Bartlett wove to create this story, but it worked. Oh, it worked. Strap yourself in for some rambling, my friends, because that's all I know how to do at this point. Look, I'm all for likable characters. It's nice when the MC is sweet, or snarky, or any manner of traits that are easy to connect with. Linne is not that character. Linne is difficult. She's not just rough around the edges, she's a solid block of stone. And yet, I fell in love with her all the same. Linne felt realistic to me, because she was a multi-faceted human being. Someone who looks so hard on the outside, but is really just trying to protect everything inside of her that she's afraid to let out. As the story progressed, I saw her cracks. I saw her flaws. I loved her more for it. Then there was Revna. The exact opposite of Linne in the beginning, but with her own imperfections. A woman who had constantly been told she wasn't enough, but managed to push through anyway. A woman buried under self doubt and shame, but being pressed into a diamond without noticing it. The love I felt for Revna was instantaneous, unlike with Linne, but Bartlett didn't let Revna stay in her shell for long. These two girls were like fire and ice when they met. Completely different, and yet linked together in ways that they couldn't see. This isn't a happy story. Sure, there are portions of it that are lighthearted. There are moments of light in the darkness. However, this is a story about war. It's about women who are willing to risk everything for the good of their country, even when the men around them take away every shred of their credit. I won't lie, I cried while I read this book. Linne and Revna, plus all of the other women in their division, go through hell and back during the course of this story. What I loved more than anything though was that it didn't take away their individual personalities. Sure, they grew and adapted. Just like in real life though, they were still always very much themselves. My hard, stony Linne and my sweet, unsure Revna. Battered, but not completely broken. We Rule The Night is a lightning fast read. There isn't a moment to breathe really, from the second you read that first sentence. I know it's kind of cliche to say things like "ALL THE FEELINGS." but that basically sums up this book better than anything else I could say to you. This story is full of intense emotions. It's bleak, it's frustrating at times, but it's beautiful too. The women in this story are stronger than I could ever be, and I loved them for that. I can't thank Claire Eliza Bartlett enough for writing a book that doesn't try to make her female characters bad ass assassins, or smart-mouthed space pirates, but just takes women who are already amazing and makes them even more impressive as they grow. I felt like I knew these women intimately by the end, and that's why this book stole my heart. Read this. I'm sure that you'll love it too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    K.A. Doore

    Two girls from entirely different backgrounds, with entirely different motives, and entirely different personalities must fly a plane together. What could possibly go wrong? While on the surface this is a story about two girls who hate each other but are forced to work together, just beneath that surface you'll find another story: one about girls working together, girls in all their many shapes & flavors & sizes being strong as only they can be; one about earned trust, blind faith, and expedient l Two girls from entirely different backgrounds, with entirely different motives, and entirely different personalities must fly a plane together. What could possibly go wrong? While on the surface this is a story about two girls who hate each other but are forced to work together, just beneath that surface you'll find another story: one about girls working together, girls in all their many shapes & flavors & sizes being strong as only they can be; one about earned trust, blind faith, and expedient lies; one about hard choices and harder compromises; and one about family, both lost and found. The writing was exquisite, the world fully fleshed and bitingly cold, and every character felt like they meant something to someone. Like they had a life beyond the pages. Plus, I mean you've got living! metal! airplanes!! that react to emotion and have their own wants and desires, a really nifty & original magic system, shape shifters, real & complex emotions, and a proper bar brawl. What more could you possibly want??

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    3.2 Out Of 5 STARS ๏  Highlights ๏  A Different Kind of Magic but Confusing A War Between Nations Fantasy Steampunk-ish Girl Power With Audio Performed by Chloe Cannon ๏  My Thoughts ๏  This will appeal to many out there who are tired of the special snowflakes in fantasy novels but still crave strong female characters and the ones who don't care for any romance or info-dumping.  This is a character-driven steampunk fantasy that centers on female relationships and the trials of war with an interesting 3.2 Out Of 5 STARS ๏  Highlights ๏  A Different Kind of Magic but Confusing A War Between Nations Fantasy Steampunk-ish Girl Power With Audio Performed by Chloe Cannon ๏  My Thoughts ๏  This will appeal to many out there who are tired of the special snowflakes in fantasy novels but still crave strong female characters and the ones who don't care for any romance or info-dumping.  This is a character-driven steampunk fantasy that centers on female relationships and the trials of war with an interesting but confusing magic system. But beware...because sadly, for me, I just didn't get this world that the Author created.  I had no clue what was going on half the time and the rest, I just didn't care.  This nation that they are going to war for didn't feel like a nation worth fighting for...I mean if you're considered a traitor after surviving a day and a half in enemy territory...then seriously, WTF?  This had the potential to be so much more than it was because what I did glean of this world felt super-cool.  But overall, it just felt super-unrealized.  The Narration was decently done, but of course, I would've liked a second narrator for each of the two female narrators.  She did give a little distinction between Linné and Revna's voices, though. ๏  MY RATING ๏ ☆3.2☆STARS - GRADE=C+ ๏ Breakdown of Ratings ๏  Plot⇝ 3/5 Narration Performance⇝ 4/5 Main Characters⇝ 3.5/5 Secondary Characters⇝ 3.7/5 The Feels⇝ 2.5/5 Pacing⇝ 3/5 Addictiveness⇝ 3/5 Theme or Tone⇝ 3.5/5 Flow (Writing Style)⇝ 2.5/5 Backdrop (World Building)⇝ 2/5 Originality⇝ 4/5 Ending⇝ 3/5 Cliffhanger⇝  ๏ ๏ ๏ Book Cover⇝ Gorgeous Setting⇝ The Union Source⇝ Audiobook (Library) ๏ ๏ ๏

  23. 5 out of 5

    carol

    this isn't a war book. not in way we normally see in YA fiction, in which an ordinary girl saves the world. it is, though, about war. about war, and sacrifices, and friendship, and reality, and loss. the good: - NO ROMANCE - DID YOU HEAR ME SAY NO ROMANCE? - THIS BOOK HAS NO ROMANCE - disability rep which i can't judge properly, but seemed really well-done - the magic system is incredibly creative - russian setting inspired by the soviet union - enemies-to-lovers-except-they-just-become-friends - all-fema this isn't a war book. not in way we normally see in YA fiction, in which an ordinary girl saves the world. it is, though, about war. about war, and sacrifices, and friendship, and reality, and loss. the good: - NO ROMANCE - DID YOU HEAR ME SAY NO ROMANCE? - THIS BOOK HAS NO ROMANCE - disability rep which i can't judge properly, but seemed really well-done - the magic system is incredibly creative - russian setting inspired by the soviet union - enemies-to-lovers-except-they-just-become-friends - all-female pilot squad! they fly living metal! female empowerment! sorority bonding! - FEMINIST AF the bad: - the writing is awkward at times - the ending was too abrupt for me - the magic system still confuses me i expected more, i'll admit, but it's still a really fucking solid debut.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Well, wow. That was incredible! This is a sort of fantasy version based off an actual squadron of women fighter pilots that gave the Germans hell at night. The female friendships are #goals, the characters evolve and learn and change. I do wish more had been tied up at the end, it’s a pretty open ending. This is a pretty inadequate review, but I’m just gonna say: go read it. Also, I need a sequel!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stella ☆Paper Wings☆

    So this isn't wlw. Just getting that out of the way. I'm still trying to decide if I would classify this as queerbaiting. The blurb alone doesn't imply anything either way, but the character development almost tricked me into thinking there would be a romance. It's almost as if this was written as a romance and then edited to take out anything blatantly romantic, leaving us with an enemies-to-friends relationship that's just a bit touchy-feely. I mostly wish the relationship between the two MCs ha So this isn't wlw. Just getting that out of the way. I'm still trying to decide if I would classify this as queerbaiting. The blurb alone doesn't imply anything either way, but the character development almost tricked me into thinking there would be a romance. It's almost as if this was written as a romance and then edited to take out anything blatantly romantic, leaving us with an enemies-to-friends relationship that's just a bit touchy-feely. I mostly wish the relationship between the two MCs had been more clearly defined, because from the way it ended, I swear they're going to end up as a couple in the sequel (There is a sequel, right? Right? ...Right?!?) and it's rather frustrating that we don't get to see that. I don't just say this as a sapphic person who always loves that f/f rep, but also because I think putting Linné and Revna in a romantic relationship would have genuinely strengthened the book. However, I have to accept that that is not the book I read. What I got was a book that had practically zero romance, and I actually love that. I don't even know when I last read a book in which neither of the main characters and none of the major side characters are romantically involved with anyone, and that's really refreshing. In fact, I kind of headcanon Linné as aromantic or somewhere on the ace/aro spectrum because a) she's completely oblivious to that one jerk's flirting and isn't at all interested in him (although honestly with that guy, who would be) and b) I think Tannov kind of likes Linné but she also doesn't notice or care. Of course, this would also work if she only liked girls and ended up with Revna, but that's fine. This is a very character-driven story, and I'm (almost) always here for that. For the most part, the development of our main two characters and about 75% of the side characters is very well done. There are a few side characters that I got mixed up and that probably could have used a bit more development, but it was decent. Unlike many similarly-structured books I've read, (most recently Black Wings Beating and The Past and Other Things that Should Stay Buried *cough cough*) Linné and Revna's arguments are somewhat logical and I could sympathize with both of them... in other words, they didn't irritate me, which is always the goal. I think the main issue I have is with the pacing. There could definitely have been some editing near the middle as some of their interactions became a bit repetitive. Some of the training scenes arround the 100 page mark probably could have been cut down, and I might have liked to have the action scenes come a bit earlier in the story. The immensely-foreshadowed event that happens near the end of the book is very well done, but I almost wish that had come earlier as well. I did enjoy just about every page of this book, though, so I guess it worked out. When I first read the blurb, I immediately thought of the Soviet Night Witches, so it was immensely gratifying to have my hopes about this book be true! I always love history-inspired fantasy, and this novel does an excellent job of both incorporating steampunky magic that fits the time and place, and using just enough reality ("the Union"??) to hint at its inspiration (which is confirmed in the author's note). So I did like this book a lot, and it was a surprisingly fun read. I think if you go into it knowing it isn't explicitly f/f (although it's an easy headcanon), the relationship between Linné and Revna should work. And if you're a fan of historical fantasy, definitely do not sleep on We Rule the Night! CWs: ableism, sexism, mention of torture, interrogation, mention of suicide if captured by the enemy, sexual harassment, sexual assault (all challenged); sort-of queerbaiting? PRE-REVIEW: This probably could have been 5 stars if it was f/f. Just saying.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Klancy

    So the description of the book sounds awesome. Fierce females who can use magic conducting air raids at night? Amazing. I was here for it. I was ready for them all to show the men in the book constantly telling them they're not good enough that women can do anything, and that them 'distracting' the men was just an excuse crafted by men with bruised egos to get them off the war base. But honestly, that part of the plot didn't even happen until maybe 50% into the book. It took forever for the story So the description of the book sounds awesome. Fierce females who can use magic conducting air raids at night? Amazing. I was here for it. I was ready for them all to show the men in the book constantly telling them they're not good enough that women can do anything, and that them 'distracting' the men was just an excuse crafted by men with bruised egos to get them off the war base. But honestly, that part of the plot didn't even happen until maybe 50% into the book. It took forever for the story to get to the point where the women were flying, and maybe that was a commentary on how many obstacles they had to go through to even get into the plane, but the story just felt like it dragged. Nothing really happened the first 50% other than Linnae constantly offending one of the girls on accident. I really liked the last portion of the book, though, because it showed how deep the girls' friendship with each other was and how fierce they were on their missions. I just wish the super slow beginning had balanced with the fast-paced action at the end.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    There were so many things that I loved about this book. I HATE that I can’t share all my thoughts because then I’d give too much away and I definitely don’t want to spoil this book for you. This book wrecked me. I was distressed and had so many emotions and I was not prepared, especially for that ending. I really hope that a second book comes from this because I need more of this story. We Rule the Night releases April 2, 2019. This is one that I HIGHLY recommend. It’s got magic, war, intrigue, There were so many things that I loved about this book. I HATE that I can’t share all my thoughts because then I’d give too much away and I definitely don’t want to spoil this book for you. This book wrecked me. I was distressed and had so many emotions and I was not prepared, especially for that ending. I really hope that a second book comes from this because I need more of this story. We Rule the Night releases April 2, 2019. This is one that I HIGHLY recommend. It’s got magic, war, intrigue, and survival. Truly things one needs when hoping for a great fantasy. You definitely don’t want to miss this stunning debut.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kip

    I'm sure many people will love this book for the magical elements, but for me, it was the realistic elements that absolutely hooked me. I loved the strong female leads, their messy friendship, and the details of life in a male-dominated military. Plot-wise, the story is fast-paced and full of action. Fans of YA fantasy will surely love this, and it should also appeal to fans of YA historicals like Gwen Katz' AMONG THE RED STARS (about the Night Witches in WWII). I'm sure many people will love this book for the magical elements, but for me, it was the realistic elements that absolutely hooked me. I loved the strong female leads, their messy friendship, and the details of life in a male-dominated military. Plot-wise, the story is fast-paced and full of action. Fans of YA fantasy will surely love this, and it should also appeal to fans of YA historicals like Gwen Katz' AMONG THE RED STARS (about the Night Witches in WWII).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This one's tough. I think the premise is strong and interesting - living metal that reacts to the emotions and spirits of those who use it. But I found a lot of the flying formations/happenings hard to imagine and the whole middle bit of the book is extremely slow. More could have been done with the Skarov secret information agents too. Overall the book had strong characters but kind of a weak plot. This one's tough. I think the premise is strong and interesting - living metal that reacts to the emotions and spirits of those who use it. But I found a lot of the flying formations/happenings hard to imagine and the whole middle bit of the book is extremely slow. More could have been done with the Skarov secret information agents too. Overall the book had strong characters but kind of a weak plot.

  30. 4 out of 5

    laurel [the suspected bibliophile]

    The Elda have nearly breached the defenses of the Union—but now the Union has flying machines of their own, and they are using women to pilot them. Revna and Linné come from very different backgrounds and must try to set aside their differences if they want to continue flying...and to survive. This was a really unique take on the Night Witches. For one, there's magic instead of technology, and living metal that has feelings and emotions, along with telepathy, shapeshifting and strange magic that The Elda have nearly breached the defenses of the Union—but now the Union has flying machines of their own, and they are using women to pilot them. Revna and Linné come from very different backgrounds and must try to set aside their differences if they want to continue flying...and to survive. This was a really unique take on the Night Witches. For one, there's magic instead of technology, and living metal that has feelings and emotions, along with telepathy, shapeshifting and strange magic that bends reality. And for another, there's some fantastic disability rep, with a protagonist who is the equal or more in terms of her magical abilities, but must fight to keep up physically due to her amputated legs and prosthetics. There's enough parallels to the Soviet Union that following along with the plot isn't hard (plus, there are a lot of similarities to other Night Witch YA books—the inclusion of magic and fantasy is what sets this one apart). Alongside the new technology and very strange magic are secret police, the loyalty to the Union above all else, the talk of equality despite very real evidence against it, the stifling propaganda, the idea of a Good Union Girl—although unlike in the Soviet Union, in the Union women weren't allowed to fight at all, although they were drafting boys beginning at thirteen to serve in the military. The sexism the women faced was similar to what many women working in male-dominated professions and societies deal with every day, heightened by the fact that these pilots and men didn't want women there at all and would do anything they could to stop it...even sabotaging their planes. But what really hooked me in were the emotions and very real feelings. Revna and Linné both have things to hide and something to prove, and both are stifled under the rules and regulations of the Union. Revna's father had been labeled a traitor for stealing living metal to make her prosthetics, and she struggles with learning to work the Weave (the very thing that had him arrested and had been illegal to use up until literally three minutes ago), and fears for the safety of her mother and younger sister. She was easy to sympathize with and relate to—struggling to be the equal to her peers when all they saw was her disability and tried to help but only emphasized her fragility instead of her strengths. Linné was a much harder character to sympathize with, although I understood where she was coming from. The daughter of a general, she had disguised herself as a boy and had fought on the front for three years before she was caught—and sent to this new flying regiment. After having spent so long fighting to fit in and trying to be the absolute best soldier possible, dealing with a lack of discipline and girliness—and watching the men laugh at her peers—rankled like hell and she isolated herself to set herself apart from what she saw as weak, frivolous and undisciplined. Both characters were so different from what I've been seeing in YA fantasy recently, and it was incredibly refreshing. Neither want to be friends, and neither want to work together—but they must if they want to survive. The only thing I was disappointed with was that ending, but hopefully there's a sequel coming? FYI: even though it does end abruptly, it's not a cliffhanger ending. But there's definitely a lot more that could be written. PS—Isn't that cover the most gorgeous thing you've ever seen??

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