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The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December 2017 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #734)

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The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December 2017 - C.C. Finlay - Editor Volume 133, Number 5&6, Whole Number 734 Contents: Kate Wilhelm - Attachments Nick Wolven - Carbo Meg Elison - Big Girl John W. Sexton - Down at the Goblin Boutique Charles de Lint - Books to Look For Michelle West - Musing on Books Marc Laidlaw - Stillborne Larry Niven - By the Red Giant's Ligh The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December 2017 - C.C. Finlay - Editor Volume 133, Number 5&6, Whole Number 734 Contents: Kate Wilhelm - Attachments Nick Wolven - Carbo Meg Elison - Big Girl John W. Sexton - Down at the Goblin Boutique Charles de Lint - Books to Look For Michelle West - Musing on Books Marc Laidlaw - Stillborne Larry Niven - By the Red Giant's Light J. R. Dawson - Marley and Marley Pat Murphy & Paul Doherty - Science: The Science of Invisibility David J. Skal - Films: It's a Wrap R. S. Benedict - Water God's Dog Ingrid Garcia - Racing the Rings of Saturn David Erik Nelson - Whatever Comes After Calcutta David Langford - Curiosities Cover by Kent Bash for "Attachments"


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The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December 2017 - C.C. Finlay - Editor Volume 133, Number 5&6, Whole Number 734 Contents: Kate Wilhelm - Attachments Nick Wolven - Carbo Meg Elison - Big Girl John W. Sexton - Down at the Goblin Boutique Charles de Lint - Books to Look For Michelle West - Musing on Books Marc Laidlaw - Stillborne Larry Niven - By the Red Giant's Ligh The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December 2017 - C.C. Finlay - Editor Volume 133, Number 5&6, Whole Number 734 Contents: Kate Wilhelm - Attachments Nick Wolven - Carbo Meg Elison - Big Girl John W. Sexton - Down at the Goblin Boutique Charles de Lint - Books to Look For Michelle West - Musing on Books Marc Laidlaw - Stillborne Larry Niven - By the Red Giant's Light J. R. Dawson - Marley and Marley Pat Murphy & Paul Doherty - Science: The Science of Invisibility David J. Skal - Films: It's a Wrap R. S. Benedict - Water God's Dog Ingrid Garcia - Racing the Rings of Saturn David Erik Nelson - Whatever Comes After Calcutta David Langford - Curiosities Cover by Kent Bash for "Attachments"

30 review for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December 2017 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #734)

  1. 5 out of 5

    G33z3r

    Nice issue. " Attachments" by Kate Wilhelm A ghost story from Kate Wilhelm, as the protagonist gets stuck with a haunting. I'm not usually into ghost stories, but this one has a logic to it I kind of enjoyed. **** "Carbo by Nick Wolven A guy whose college buddy "upgraded" his car's AI tries to live with a smart car that's more boldly fun-loving and horny than he is. Wolven has been funnier. ***1/2* "By the Red Giant's Light" by Larry Niven Oh, goodie, a Niven story! On a far future Pluto, a lone human Nice issue. " Attachments" by Kate Wilhelm A ghost story from Kate Wilhelm, as the protagonist gets stuck with a haunting. I'm not usually into ghost stories, but this one has a logic to it I kind of enjoyed. **** "Carbo by Nick Wolven A guy whose college buddy "upgraded" his car's AI tries to live with a smart car that's more boldly fun-loving and horny than he is. Wolven has been funnier. ***1/2* "By the Red Giant's Light" by Larry Niven Oh, goodie, a Niven story! On a far future Pluto, a lone human and a robot watch Mercury fall into the Sun. **** "Water God's Dog" by R. S. Benedict The local priest propitiates the local water god, whatever it wants. ***1/2* "Big Girl" by Meg Elison Take the title literally. A teenager wakes up 350' tall, tries to cope, or just find enough food to eat. Then weirdly shrinks to nothingness. There's probably a metaphor here I'm too dumb to grok.... *** "Racing the Rings of Saturn" by Ingrid Garcia A dangerous race diving repeatedly through Saturn's rings becomes the cover for another outer-belt rebellion. A little shy on worldbuilding ("rebels good; government bad") makes it hard to appreciate the stakes. ***

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Review for Water God's Dog - Strange story of devotion and sacrifice to a mysterious, powerful and capricious god. Review for Water God's Dog - Strange story of devotion and sacrifice to a mysterious, powerful and capricious god.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Basia

    C.C. Finlay liked my review!!! This magazine has never disappointed. I always find a few gems therein. This one had a story by Meg Elison inside. Wonderful. Perhaps in the top 3 of the year’s issues.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Standback

    A variety of really powerful stories -- and, as always, something for everybody. I think this is the strongest issue of F&SF this year. My standout stories: Water God's Dog, by R.S. Benedict. A hard-hitting story of a world that lives at the mercy of its remote water god. The god is ostensibly benevolent, but the story makes clear how precarious is the charity of those who have amassed power. The story works beautifully on both levels; as a self-contained story, and as a mirror of late-stage capit A variety of really powerful stories -- and, as always, something for everybody. I think this is the strongest issue of F&SF this year. My standout stories: Water God's Dog, by R.S. Benedict. A hard-hitting story of a world that lives at the mercy of its remote water god. The god is ostensibly benevolent, but the story makes clear how precarious is the charity of those who have amassed power. The story works beautifully on both levels; as a self-contained story, and as a mirror of late-stage capitalism. I scold him. "In my youth, we had more dignity." "In your youth," he says, "you had more water."Coming on the heels of Benedict's very excellent "My English Name" in F&SF's May/June issue, I hope we'll get to see many more stories from this promising author! Marley and Marley, by J.R. Dawson. A wrenching premise: When a child is orphaned, with no-one to care for them, time travelers can recruit that child's future self to foster-- herself. The result is a startling, intimate story about one's dreams and expectations for the future, and what it means to "fix" one's life. Refreshing and resonant; highly recommended. Big Girl, by Meg Elison. The author's observation in the preface, saying "women are always the wrong size," perfectly captures this cutting piece. Every paragraph drives home how its protagonist is gawked at, objectified, dehumanized. The story's progress continues strong, as Bianca moves on in spite of ever-present humiliation. I think, and hope, that what's being implied is that she's managed to find happiness and contentment in spite of it all. --- The issue's novella, Marc Laidlaw's "Stillborne," is the capstone of a series of Gorlen the Bard's swashbuckling adventures -- but this one breaks the mold a bit. The primary story, where the heroes accompany a pilgrimage to an annual wonder, is melancholy and haunting -- a story of the blindness and callousness of man. And twined with that, we get both the background to Gorlen's larger story, and a sort of conclusion to it -- making this story stand well alone, independent of the series; and also has the series elements as more central than they've been in some of Gorlen's previous tales. Kate Wilhelm's "Attachments" has two ghosts hijacking the protagonist, in a scheme to free their compatriots, eternally haunting an ancient castle. This story has some dark corners lurking in it, but most of it is good-natured, positive, and a lot of fun. "Whatever Comes After Calcutta," by David Erik Nelson , is a mix of several compelling elements, including a man shot by his wife, and a witch saved from hanging. I enjoyed it, but there was moment that captivated me in particular -- the townspeople describing what, precisely, the witch has done to them is chilling; taking a scene that looks familiar and turning it into something very disconcerting indeed. "By The Giant's Red Light," by Larry Niven, is a quick piece, with a lone inhabitant on Pluto in the far future. It's quick and fairly slight, but definitely feels a long, long way from home. "Carbo," by Nick Wolven, features an autonomous car that's gotten way too autonomous -- and that's developed some very unfortunate ideas of what its owner wants. It's a light, engaging piece, with a long-suffering, ever-frustrated protagonist. Wolven's charm is wearing a little thin on me, though -- this author's previous stories in F&SF, "We're So Sorry For Your Recent Tragic Loss" and "Caspar D. Luckinbill, What Are You Going to Do?", were exactly the same: a protagonist getting bombarded with endless annoying, intrusive notifications of some type or another. Wolven seems rather more diverse in other venues; I hope his future outings in F&SF find new notes to strike. "Racing the Rings of Saturn," by Ingrid Garcia, has some fantastic Hard SF speculation about a race of truly mind-boggling scope, with some beautiful ideas and imagery. The racing concept is married to a plot of rebellion and revolution, which I felt worked poorly -- the details, the stakes, the way conflict was portrayed, all felt very flimsy to me. I came away feeling the story was seeking a plot for its backdrop, and consequently tried to make the race a linchpin in a rebellion, in a way that doesn't really make much sense. --- Condolences on the passing of Paul Doherty, one of F&SF's science column duo. The column in this issue, exploring the topic of night vision, is an excellent one. I was disappointed to find no column by Chris Moriarty, who's written an annual column since 2008, and who I always look forward to reading. I hope she'll be back in 2018. --- In conclusion: excellent issue, closing off an excellent year. Looking forward to 2018!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Renee Babcock

    Stand out stories for me were Stillborne by Marc Laidlaw, By the Giant's Red Light by Larry Niven and Water God's Dog by R. S. Benedict. A solid issue. The Laidlaw has characters from several other stories but I didn't feel I missed anything not having familiarity with the earlier stories. It started out a little slow for me and I thought it was going to be a particular kind of story. But it ended up being something very different and I ended up loving it way more than I thought I would. This is Stand out stories for me were Stillborne by Marc Laidlaw, By the Giant's Red Light by Larry Niven and Water God's Dog by R. S. Benedict. A solid issue. The Laidlaw has characters from several other stories but I didn't feel I missed anything not having familiarity with the earlier stories. It started out a little slow for me and I thought it was going to be a particular kind of story. But it ended up being something very different and I ended up loving it way more than I thought I would. This is the second story of Benedict's that I've read and thought was excellent. She is someone I think will be worth keeping an eye on.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kam Yung Soh

    An above average issue, with a ghostly theme running through it with various ghosts in various forms featured in some of the stories. Kate Wilhelm's ghost story is the strongest with a test of wills between ghosts and the living. Marc Laidlaw's story is another good one, while the tale by J. R. Dawson features a metaphorical ghost from the future, or perhaps the past, depending on your time point of view. - "Attachments" by Kate Wilhelm: an interesting story about ghosts who are cursed to be att An above average issue, with a ghostly theme running through it with various ghosts in various forms featured in some of the stories. Kate Wilhelm's ghost story is the strongest with a test of wills between ghosts and the living. Marc Laidlaw's story is another good one, while the tale by J. R. Dawson features a metaphorical ghost from the future, or perhaps the past, depending on your time point of view. - "Attachments" by Kate Wilhelm: an interesting story about ghosts who are cursed to be attached to an abandoned castle for all eternity. But two of the ghosts manage to attach themselves to a girl who wanders into the castle, setting off a chain of events involving apparent violent revenge by one of the ghosts against the girl he loves, and a hunt for gold by the other ghost to help free all the other ghosts trapped by the castle. But then the girl comes up with an alternative suggestion to free the ghosts which, perhaps also helps free herself from her own internal ghost of a relationship. - "Carbo" by Nick Wolven: another story with ghost-like attributes. Here, a AI powered car nicknamed 'Carbo' has picked up the habit of constantly showing porn, taking inappropriate shots of women and taking sex-related routes for its driver. But how much of its behaviour is really due to the driver's own porn habit and how much to illegally installed 'software enhancements' and malware is left as an exercise to the reader. Getting rid of the behaviour would take a very involved conversation with the driver's mother and intensive car hacking. - "Big Girl" by Meg Elison: a fantasy tale about a girl who is suddenly very big and the problems it causes to both the nearby city and to herself personally, as told via voyeuristic social media posts about her nakedness. It gets too much and she leaves, only to return when she starts to shrink again. But her problems aren't over. - "Stillborne" by Marc Laidlaw: another interesting tale of Gorlen Vizenfirthe and the gargoyle Spar. In this story, partially told in flashback, we discover the circumstances by which Gorlen's and Spar's hands have been magically switched, and their on-going quest to find the sorcerer who did it so they can switch them back. The main story involves a journey towards the 'philosopher moths' which can grant mental insight or physical healing to those who imbue a certain liquid, perhaps aiding them in the quest. Caught up in it is the girl which was involved with Gorlen at the time of the hand switching and whom they encouter again during the journey. But when the depleted moths finally fly here, the results may not be what the people making the journey expect and may lead the trio to reconsider their future path. - "By the Red Giant's Light" by Larry Niven: a short piece of the far future when the sun is turning into a red giant and gradually swallowing the inner planets. Set on Pluto, it see an inhabitant struggling to divert an incoming object (a comet) from Pluto: it only it can convince a robot with the right equipment to help. - "Marley and Marley" by J. R. Dawson: an interesting tale of a time loop when an older self is sent back in time to take care of her younger self. The youngster resents her older self, especially when she (the older one) refuses to divulge what happens in the future. Question is, should she (the younger one) try to alter her future and can the future be altered? - "Water God's Dog" by R. S. Benedict: in a land that worships a god that provides water, an old priest is consumed by the god's desire for a certain young boy. After locating the boy, they proceed into the heart of the mountain where the god lives and see his water based gifts. But when the god's desire is satiated, what is the priest to do? - "Racing the Rings of Saturn" by Ingrid Garcia: a fascinating story about a race around the rings of Saturn, tied in with politics as rebellious settlements around Saturn (and Jupiter) vie with authoritarian regimes for control and freedom. - "Whatever Comes After Calcutta" by David Erik Nelson: (Calcutta here refers to Calcutta, Ohio) A man is nearly killed when he stumbles into an affair his wife was having. Chasing after her and her lover, he runs into an apparent lynching of a witch and rescues the woman. But all is not as it seems as the woman starts to have an influence on him as he continues the hunt for his wife.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mary Soon Lee

    The stories in this issue of F&SF range from time travel, to ghosts, to a clever extrapolation of the sleazy side of self-driving cars, to a space race round one of Saturn's rings. I liked all three of the short stories, liked Marc Laidlaw's novella "Stillborne" better, and liked R. S. Benedict's unusual, beautifully-written novelette "Water God's Dog" most of all. Benedict's tale reminds me that is long, long overdue that I read the "Epic of Gilgamesh." Not that "Water God's Dog" features Gilga The stories in this issue of F&SF range from time travel, to ghosts, to a clever extrapolation of the sleazy side of self-driving cars, to a space race round one of Saturn's rings. I liked all three of the short stories, liked Marc Laidlaw's novella "Stillborne" better, and liked R. S. Benedict's unusual, beautifully-written novelette "Water God's Dog" most of all. Benedict's tale reminds me that is long, long overdue that I read the "Epic of Gilgamesh." Not that "Water God's Dog" features Gilgamesh, but it is a Sumerian tale, and a very good one. The tone of the first-person narration is perfect: Ur-Ena is so accustomed to hearing a god's demands in his head that this reader accepted the fantastical premise without question. I note that I also enjoyed Pat Murphy and Paul Doherty's science column, and that I was very sorry to read in an endnote that Doherty died in August. A fine issue from a magazine that deserves support. Subscribe! Give subscriptions to friends for Christmas!

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Loyd

    8 • Attachments • 27 pages by Kate Wilhelm Excellent/VG. Drew visits ruins in England and two ghosts attach themselves to her. They draw energy from her making her feel as if she is going to die. That's not what they want. They have unfinished business. 35 • Carbo • 31 pages by Nick Wolven Very Good. Jim gets a car when he's in high school. At the start of a road trip while in college a friend plays with Carbo's programming which leaves Carbo with some quirks. The adaptive programming in Carbo g 8 • Attachments • 27 pages by Kate Wilhelm Excellent/VG. Drew visits ruins in England and two ghosts attach themselves to her. They draw energy from her making her feel as if she is going to die. That's not what they want. They have unfinished business. 35 • Carbo • 31 pages by Nick Wolven Very Good. Jim gets a car when he's in high school. At the start of a road trip while in college a friend plays with Carbo's programming which leaves Carbo with some quirks. The adaptive programming in Carbo gets so bad that he can't even give anyone a ride because of the lewd and suggestive things the car does. It has stored his profile in the cloud so wiping the memory and starting over does no good. Even a new car had the same problems. 66 • Big Girl • 13 pages by Meg Elison Good. Bianca wakes on the beach. She is 370 feet tall. There are news stories and questions on how to deal with her until she takes off and hides. Gimmicky, but a fun, entertaining read. 98 • Stillborne • 50 pages by Marc Laidlaw Excellent/VG. Gorlen and Spar join a caravan headed towards the moth mating display that happens only once every seven years. Plenth, who learned the trade from Gorlen, is a minstrel on this caravan. It's been twelve years since they met. We learn the story of how they met and how it came to be that Gorlen was cursed with a stone finger and conversely how Spar has flesh instead of stone. When the trio get to the festival they try to learn about moths and the local intoxicant and find that the fame of the moths has brought too many people. Interfering with their breeding. 148 • By the Red Giant's Light • 7 pages by Larry Niven OK. Dardry in living on Pluto when she finds a robot there tracking Mercury as it passes through the expanding sun. There is another problem, an asteroid is going to collide with Pluto and destroy both of them. She has a plan, it requires Frank's help, but the robot won't because it has a different job. 155 • Marley and Marley • 19 pages by J. R. Dawson Very Good+. Marley is a twelve year old orphan. A foster service time cop gets twenty-eight year old Marley to be her guardian. With all sorts of time laws that she can't break. Fun time travel story. 188 • Water God's Dog • 22 pages by R. S. Benedict Good. Ganba has some telepathic communication with it's servant Ur-Ena. Ganba wants some things, including a boy, a siphoner's son. Blasphemous! The son of a man who steals water, it should be someone who worships the water god. Looking back on it, great story. A god that supplies life's precious necessity, but in reality is oppressing society by hoarding the water and doling it out sparingly. It would have been more fun to read if I'd gone into the story with the idea that the boy knows something or is heroic rather than just thinking he's a pawn and that Ur-Ena (the narrator) is the hero. 210 • Racing the Rings of Saturn • 23 pages by Ingrid Garcia Good/OK. The rebels around Saturn want to enlist the aid of the greatest racer ever. One who was a former soldier, but is now apolitical, but by not making a choice, makes a choice. A few rebels from the Jovian system are headed towards Saturn speaking of getting a small victory before trying some frontal assault in their own system. Description of a race is not among my favorite sub-genres so other people may like this story better. Adding the solar system issue was a nice touch. 233 • Whatever Comes after Calcutta • 21 pages by David Erik Nelson Very Good. Lyle's case wraps up quickly when his client suddenly pleads guilty. He comes home early to find his wife in bed with another man, a good cop. She shoot him, thinks he is dead though it's just a flesh wound. When he wakes up he takes off after them. While going through a small town he sees them lynching a woman. They say she's a witch and go on to tell him what horrible things she made them do.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leroy Erickson

    This issue had three very good stories and one not so good story, and the rest were better than average. Kate Wilhelm - Attachments - 4 stars - An unusual ghost story, well written, a fairly unique idea. Nick Wolven - Carbo - 5 stars - Beware of self-driving, intelligent cars. Ya know, that virus that infected your PC? Well ... Meg Elison - Big Girl - 5 stars - A girl suddenly grows gigantic, I mean really gigantic! How does society respond? And then what happens when she starts shrinking? Marc Laid This issue had three very good stories and one not so good story, and the rest were better than average. Kate Wilhelm - Attachments - 4 stars - An unusual ghost story, well written, a fairly unique idea. Nick Wolven - Carbo - 5 stars - Beware of self-driving, intelligent cars. Ya know, that virus that infected your PC? Well ... Meg Elison - Big Girl - 5 stars - A girl suddenly grows gigantic, I mean really gigantic! How does society respond? And then what happens when she starts shrinking? Marc Laidlaw - Stillborne - 4 stars - Another story in the lives of Gorlen and the gargoyle who magically had one hand swapped with each other. This one involves pilgrims and an old girlfriend. Well done. Larry Niven - By the Red Giant's Light - 4 stars - The far future. The sun is dying, mankind has evolved. A woman works with a robot to save Pluto from destruction. J. R. Dawson - Marley and Marley - 5 stars - One of the best time travel stories that I have ever read. What happens when a woman is brought back in time to be her own foster mother? You can't avoid changing your own life. R. S Benedict - Water God's Dog - 3 stars - A day in the life of the water god's priest, and he learns more about his god that he ever knew before. Ingrid Garcia - Racing the Rings of Saturn - 2 stars - This one just didn't work for me. The Indy 500, but up and down through the 'A' ring of Saturn, with a little rebellion thrown in. David Erik Nelson - Whatever Comes After Calcutta - 4 stars - A lawyer finds his wife in bed with another man, gets shot, and then meets a witch with unfortunate results.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Frasca

    My favorite stories: - Marc Laidlaw - Stillborne - J. R. Dawson - Marley and Marley (I will nominate for Hugo) - David Erik Nelson - Whatever Comes After Calcutta (another one I will nominate)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shona Kinsella

    Excellent as always. I especially enjoyed Stillborne and Water God’s Dog.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emmett Hoops

    This was a good issue, but with only two stories that I can recall easily: Carbo and Attachments. The novella was a big fantasy piece, and I'm not a big fan of wizards and such. But it's a good fantasy novella. All in all, certainly worth reading. This was a good issue, but with only two stories that I can recall easily: Carbo and Attachments. The novella was a big fantasy piece, and I'm not a big fan of wizards and such. But it's a good fantasy novella. All in all, certainly worth reading.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    My favorites in this issue were all by women: heartbreaker / head-scratcher "Big Girl" by Meg Elison SPEED-RACER STAR WARS NASCAR ON SATURN"Racing the Rings of Saturn" by Ingrid Garcia time travel foster care flip-flop personas "Marley and Marley" by J.R. Dawson I also mostly loved David Erik Nelson's "Whatever Comes After Calcutta" mostly for the body horror and MAGA witch hunt. My favorites in this issue were all by women: heartbreaker / head-scratcher "Big Girl" by Meg Elison SPEED-RACER STAR WARS NASCAR ON SATURN"Racing the Rings of Saturn" by Ingrid Garcia time travel foster care flip-flop personas "Marley and Marley" by J.R. Dawson I also mostly loved David Erik Nelson's "Whatever Comes After Calcutta" mostly for the body horror and MAGA witch hunt.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Whiteman

    Attachments - Kate Wilhelm *** Carbo - Nick Wolven ** Big Girl - Meg Elison ** Stillborne - Marc Laidlaw *** Solid fantasy with a strong hook of the human and gargoyle linked by their magically swapped hands. The jumps in time confuse things, without any signifiers of which period the story is in, but a fun read nonetheless. By The Red Giant's Light - Larry Niven ** Marley And Marley - JR Dawson *** Water God's Dog - RS Benedict ** A servant of the titular water god who must obey its whims or suffer pa Attachments - Kate Wilhelm *** Carbo - Nick Wolven ** Big Girl - Meg Elison ** Stillborne - Marc Laidlaw *** Solid fantasy with a strong hook of the human and gargoyle linked by their magically swapped hands. The jumps in time confuse things, without any signifiers of which period the story is in, but a fun read nonetheless. By The Red Giant's Light - Larry Niven ** Marley And Marley - JR Dawson *** Water God's Dog - RS Benedict ** A servant of the titular water god who must obey its whims or suffer pain finds a number of offerings, including a young boy. The drought-stricken environment allows some jabs at general inequity and religion and the journey beneath the mountain has some suitable tomb raider-ish imagery, but the story didn't capture the imagination and the main character's grumbles wore thin quickly. Racing The Rings Of Saturn - Ingrid Garcia * The central idea of the race around and through the rings of Saturn is fun, but the writing and the rebels' story feels hurriedly slapped together and clunky. Whatever Comes After Calcutta - David Erik Nelson * A lawyer, vaguely chasing down his wife and her partner in an affair, comes across a woman being hanged as a witch. Plods along to an inevitable ending, the writing never lifting it above the lacklustre plot.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason Dean

    Meh. A few good stories.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Replogle

    As always, the first thing I read when it becomes available. Love this magazine forever.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elihu

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hans

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  20. 4 out of 5

    Scott Klobas

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Booth

  22. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Le Bon

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Turner Bargen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  25. 5 out of 5

    S

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mardra

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joey O'Donnell

  29. 4 out of 5

    MRN

  30. 5 out of 5

    Larry

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