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Jenny Barnes never guessed that she would be returning to America so soon, or under such circumstances. Arkham, Massachusetts, is a far cry from Paris, but when her sister’s regular correspondence became increasingly deranged before stopping entirely, Jenny could not shake the feeling that something terrible had happened to her. As Jenny begins the search for her sister, Jenny Barnes never guessed that she would be returning to America so soon, or under such circumstances. Arkham, Massachusetts, is a far cry from Paris, but when her sister’s regular correspondence became increasingly deranged before stopping entirely, Jenny could not shake the feeling that something terrible had happened to her. As Jenny begins the search for her sister, she quickly realizes that Isabelle is not the only girl in Arkham to have gone missing. How might the disappearances be connected? And why do the flyers for the local harvest festival depict the face on a medallion Jenny sent her sister? Isabelle’s trail leads Jenny from jazz-filled speakeasies to the famed Miskatonic University. She must seek out allies from among the strange and secretive citizens of Arkham or risk losing her sister forever.


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Jenny Barnes never guessed that she would be returning to America so soon, or under such circumstances. Arkham, Massachusetts, is a far cry from Paris, but when her sister’s regular correspondence became increasingly deranged before stopping entirely, Jenny could not shake the feeling that something terrible had happened to her. As Jenny begins the search for her sister, Jenny Barnes never guessed that she would be returning to America so soon, or under such circumstances. Arkham, Massachusetts, is a far cry from Paris, but when her sister’s regular correspondence became increasingly deranged before stopping entirely, Jenny could not shake the feeling that something terrible had happened to her. As Jenny begins the search for her sister, she quickly realizes that Isabelle is not the only girl in Arkham to have gone missing. How might the disappearances be connected? And why do the flyers for the local harvest festival depict the face on a medallion Jenny sent her sister? Isabelle’s trail leads Jenny from jazz-filled speakeasies to the famed Miskatonic University. She must seek out allies from among the strange and secretive citizens of Arkham or risk losing her sister forever.

30 review for Arkham Horror: Hour of the Huntress

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    "He was just standing there watching me while those dreadful screams went on and on and... Jenny folded the letter. It was insane." In Hour of the Huntress, socialite Jenny Barnes returns to America after years abroad to look for her sister, Izzy, who has gone missing. Jenny's last contact with her sister was a worrying letter which implied that someone or something in the town of Arkham, Massachusetts was stalking Izzy. It is the height of the 1920's and while Arkham may be small, it still has i "He was just standing there watching me while those dreadful screams went on and on and... Jenny folded the letter. It was insane." In Hour of the Huntress, socialite Jenny Barnes returns to America after years abroad to look for her sister, Izzy, who has gone missing. Jenny's last contact with her sister was a worrying letter which implied that someone or something in the town of Arkham, Massachusetts was stalking Izzy. It is the height of the 1920's and while Arkham may be small, it still has its fair share of speakeasies and mobsters among all the small farms. Finding Izzy will be no easy task. Despite that and the strained relationship between them, Jenny will stop at nothing to find her sister. For those familiar with any of the Arkham games put out by Fantasy Flight Games, the name Jenny Barnes will be quite familiar. One of FFG's newer games, the Arkham Horror Card Game, features Jenny as one of the playable characters and they released this novella along with some unique cards for the game as a promotional pack. As a big fan of the game, it was really fun to see some background on Jenny. The story moves a little slowly at first but quickly picks up speed as Jenny deals with some of the creepier characters in Arkham. It has nods to various characters and elements of the game and I found myself thoroughly enjoying this adventure. Not to mention the chance for more cards! If you're a fan of the game or Lovecraft lore, it's a good addition to the universe.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Taddow

    Jenny Barnes has been my long-time favorite character in both the Arkham Horror and Eldritch Horror board games, so I was definitely excited when I heard she was getting her own novella within Fantasy Flight's fictional library based on their H.P. Lovecraft inspired games. Unfortunately, the novella was good, but not that good. Perhaps it was because it was a novella and things felt rushed or too coincidental at times. Perhaps it was because I just had high expectations. I still enjoyed the litt Jenny Barnes has been my long-time favorite character in both the Arkham Horror and Eldritch Horror board games, so I was definitely excited when I heard she was getting her own novella within Fantasy Flight's fictional library based on their H.P. Lovecraft inspired games. Unfortunately, the novella was good, but not that good. Perhaps it was because it was a novella and things felt rushed or too coincidental at times. Perhaps it was because I just had high expectations. I still enjoyed the little tidbits of Jenny Barnes personality traits that the author brought to light, and would read the sequel should one come out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    W.D.

    This year, I dived pretty deep into the new Arkham Horror card game from Fantasy Flight Games. It’s a new game based on the company’s take on the Cthulhu Mythos created by H.P. Lovecraft. The games are quite fun, whether you are a Lovecraft fan or not, but the intriguing aspect is the amount of lore FFG created through the life span of these games, including the multitude of characters you play. Hour of the Huntress is the first in a series of novel(la)s—more on this is a minute—that give us an This year, I dived pretty deep into the new Arkham Horror card game from Fantasy Flight Games. It’s a new game based on the company’s take on the Cthulhu Mythos created by H.P. Lovecraft. The games are quite fun, whether you are a Lovecraft fan or not, but the intriguing aspect is the amount of lore FFG created through the life span of these games, including the multitude of characters you play. Hour of the Huntress is the first in a series of novel(la)s—more on this is a minute—that give us an origin story, of sorts, of these characters an explains how they become the characters you play in the various games, investigating eldritch horrors beset upon the world by unknowable cosmic forces. First off, this is probably not a book you will want to read if you aren’t at least invested in the games, even if it’s small amount. As a media tie-in book, it’s designed for a specific audience and I can think of very few that can speak to anyone who picks it up and reads it. Now that is not to say you can’t, because Jenny Barnes, the main character, is a pretty awesome lady. As I read, I thought she would be an amazing partner for Peggy Carter of Avengers fame. She is an interesting character to read. But the book’s resolution doesn’t transition into another linear story, which hampers the enjoyment for a non-Arkham Horror fan. With other tie-in books, those stories wedge into another linear story and the book is an experience that informs the pre-existing story. Even RPG tie-ins are usually based on a meta-narrative and the characters of those stories the players will interact with, but the players won’t be in the game. Here, though, the story that comes after the book is one of five six different games that aren’t set stories and the reader could take control of Jenny Barnes in missions that are replayed over and over, each a different experience than the last. Trying to setup an open-ended transition isn’t inherently bad. In fact, Gross’s execution is well-crafted, but it’s a challenge that demands a compromise in storytelling because a more satisfying ending could’ve been possibly if it didn’t have to transition into a board game or five. Second, the length of the story felt off. I’m unsure of the exact word, but I’d be surprised if it was over 50,000 words, riding the line between novella and novel. And I really wish it was longer by another 10,000 words. Story structure-wise, everything is there you want in a story, but there was something noticeable missing that’s inherent in anything verging on Lovecraftian: atmosphere. From Lovecraft, to Clark Ashton Smith, to Brian Lumley, authors that have written in the Mythos always make atmosphere a central facet of the story, since it’s the atmosphere that best conveys the foreboding nature of cosmic horror that the basis of the Mythos. There are some great moments in Hour of the Huntress, but they few and far between that by the time you get to the climax of the story, payoff of the cosmic horror isn’t as strong as you’d hope if you are coming right off from At the Mountains of Madness. But, as a first offering of an ongoing series, it’s not a bad book. The writing is clear and well paced. I was an entertaining read and easily read in one sitting. I don’t know if the author played much of the new card game before writing this, but it was fun for me to be reading and think to myself, “Oh, that card was just played,” as the events unfolded. For what it’s supposed to do, which is give a short narrative of a fan favorite character of a board game, it did the job well. Could this be a way to get new people into the Arkham Horror games? I don’t know. I feel like that is always a test for media tie-ins. As much as you are giving back to the fans, you want to entice new people as well. I would love to hear if this book helped convince someone try one of the games, Because Jenny is a great character to read, and she is equally fun to play and book nails what it’s like to play her in those games.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Webb

    Yet another of the Arkham Horror / Lovecraftian short stories that follow characters from Fantasy Flight's Arkham Horror universe. This was the first in this series and it recently went back in print so I picked up a copy. In comparison to the later novellas, this one is pretty weak on the horror. It mostly unfolds as a straight pulp detective story with a strong female cast. The actual horror element to the story is confined to the very end only. Overall, I like getting backstory to the character Yet another of the Arkham Horror / Lovecraftian short stories that follow characters from Fantasy Flight's Arkham Horror universe. This was the first in this series and it recently went back in print so I picked up a copy. In comparison to the later novellas, this one is pretty weak on the horror. It mostly unfolds as a straight pulp detective story with a strong female cast. The actual horror element to the story is confined to the very end only. Overall, I like getting backstory to the characters from these games and the novella suffices to do that, but as an example of the genre I would put it sub-average. Only for those invested in the characters and setting of AH.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Boillyyed

    Story was pretty good, but I thought the writing style was a bit plain. Id read next book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    Pretty fun novella. In a few places it felt a little cliche... but... it's also a board/card-game tie-in book, and playing up to the tropes that are a mainstay of the games, is kindof important. The writing was solid, while not exceptional. I have zero complaints, but it did not knock my socks off, and i suspect that's largely because I've been a little spoiled with a few of the Sci-fi/Fantasy authors I've been reading lately. I enjoyed it, mostly i'm disappointed it wasn't longer. I felt like I o Pretty fun novella. In a few places it felt a little cliche... but... it's also a board/card-game tie-in book, and playing up to the tropes that are a mainstay of the games, is kindof important. The writing was solid, while not exceptional. I have zero complaints, but it did not knock my socks off, and i suspect that's largely because I've been a little spoiled with a few of the Sci-fi/Fantasy authors I've been reading lately. I enjoyed it, mostly i'm disappointed it wasn't longer. I felt like I only started to get to know Jenny Barnes and her allies by the end, and i'm eager for a followup story (sure, i know that the search for her sister is the motivation for her in the games, and Jenny will likely never actually find her or learn what truly happened to her in Arkham... but i need more! I petulantly demand a sequel!). It also succeeded in making me want to break out a new campaign of Arkham Horror the Card Game and use Jenny Barnes as my investigator, so it certainly does what it should. (oh, and new cards for the game to tie her character in to the story? twist my arm whydoncha!) I'm excited that FFG is releasing these as a series. There are some terrific characters in the FFG Arkham Mythos, and i'm looking forward to reading more about them.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    My initial mistake was to expect this to feel like Lovecraft. Once I got past that and fell into the authors pacing I throughly enjoyed this tale. The situational humor cracked me up and the lore was great and now I want to create a deck for Jenny in Arkham Horror LCG!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    After reading a few in Fantasy Flight's Arkham Horror fiction series, I had essentially decided to stop reading any more for a bit. I plan to finish the Dark Waters trilogy possibly, but the overall poor quality, mismatched cosmic horror with faux pulp action [note, there have been successful blends of pulp+weird, but these didn't hit it], and forced tie-ins to the board/dice/etc games have left me south of lukewarm about the collection. Then this one showed up, the launch of a new series of nov After reading a few in Fantasy Flight's Arkham Horror fiction series, I had essentially decided to stop reading any more for a bit. I plan to finish the Dark Waters trilogy possibly, but the overall poor quality, mismatched cosmic horror with faux pulp action [note, there have been successful blends of pulp+weird, but these didn't hit it], and forced tie-ins to the board/dice/etc games have left me south of lukewarm about the collection. Then this one showed up, the launch of a new series of novellas that promised to expand upon the Arkham Horror Card Game characters while including expansion cards that gave new flavor to those characters in-game, and somewhere between having a decent vibe that these might be a step in the right direction and the collector's twitch to not miss out on some unique deck building I decided to buy it and give it a shot. If it hit as flatly as the previous volumes, it wasn't too much of investment. If it was at least fair, then it would make a quick read and have some nice tie-in potential. Having finished it, I would say it is at least fair. Fact is, I am leaning towards it being good-with-caveats. I liked it. Not so much that I would run out and recommend it to everyone, but enough that I would recommend it to folks who have investment in the Arkham Horror series of games, especially the card game (though get the physical if you want the cards, the digital does not have any sort of redemption code as far as I know). In it, Guinevere "Jenny" Barnes - the "Dilettante" character from Arkham Horror and others - comes to Arkham to find her missing sister and ends up investigating a number of missing girls while making a few allies. Though, this being cult-drenched Arkham, there are doubts about who she can trust in her quest. As the protagonist, Jenny does fairly well. The author seems to struggle a bit with a take on proto-feminism, but at least seems to try and make her more than just-a-rich-gal. Jenny's mild experience with the weird leading to a deep diver in the narrative makes a nice entry point for the presumed reader of the volume: who has quite a bit of lore for the extended Lovecraft universe but is up for seeing this series' particular take. There are only a couple of scenes of any real tension, even with the quasi-paranoia inherent, but the final show down feels an appropriate blend of "game tie-in" and fiction and is probably the best such scene I've read in any of Fantasy Flight's Lovecraftian oeuvre. There is name-dropping, of course. A few "Ia!" get tossed in. There are the standard tomes. Armitage, Lovecraft's very own Van Helsing, is invoked. Jenny and another female character smoke the strong, unfiltered Gauloises [a third smokes cigars]. There's a reference to French Hill, a scene on the Miskatonic U. campus, a board house scene or two, a speak-easy scene. It is like a puzzle put together from known pieces from other sets, but it mostly works. It is what it is. The addition of Call of Cthulhu like "props" at the end was nice, and added a few bonus scenes and concepts. To sum up, I liked it. I want to see where it is going - and make no mistake, this is very much the opening of a series so if you want a pat ending then maybe look elsewhere - and look forward to the next volume. It reads fast. It illuminates some elements from the tie-in game and adds some nice pieces to the collection. Overall, not too bad. Now, the question is, did it give me enough faith back in Fantasy Flight tie-in fiction to finish Dark Waters? I don't know. Maybe.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Todd Ross

    This is less of a book and more of a short story. its only 109 pages long and moves incredibly quickly. I think the story would be much better if it was extended another 50 pages at minimum to help build a few of the characters and expand on the resolution / climax. but the cards it came with are a nice bonus. Even if they aren't really anything special. This is less of a book and more of a short story. its only 109 pages long and moves incredibly quickly. I think the story would be much better if it was extended another 50 pages at minimum to help build a few of the characters and expand on the resolution / climax. but the cards it came with are a nice bonus. Even if they aren't really anything special.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    **3/4: some clunky writing here-and-there but an otherwise serviceable Arkham Horror romp. One could almost hear the dice rolling in the background.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    "Hour of the Huntress," by Dave Gross, is a novella set in the "Arkham Horror" gaming universe. If that sentence convinces you that you're in the wrong review, hit the back button quickly. That "Arkham Horror" universe extrapolates from the works of H.P. Lovecraft's "Cthulhu Mythos." Still with me? Honestly, I suspect most people who bought this slim hardcover volume did so for the Arkham Horror Card Game promo cards (from Fantasy Flight Games) for the protagonist--Jenny Barnes--and the novella "Hour of the Huntress," by Dave Gross, is a novella set in the "Arkham Horror" gaming universe. If that sentence convinces you that you're in the wrong review, hit the back button quickly. That "Arkham Horror" universe extrapolates from the works of H.P. Lovecraft's "Cthulhu Mythos." Still with me? Honestly, I suspect most people who bought this slim hardcover volume did so for the Arkham Horror Card Game promo cards (from Fantasy Flight Games) for the protagonist--Jenny Barnes--and the novella was a secondary consideration. Guinevere "Jenny" Barnes is called--in my mind, unfairly--a dilettante. She's a well-traveled heiress who has seen the world and had many adventures in her young life before coming to Arkham, Massachusetts to find her lost sister, Izzie. These Arkham Horror adventures are set in the 1920s, so a wealthy young single woman who seeks out adventure is called a dilettante (and probably worse things behind her back). Jenny has plenty of grit and moxie--and eventually twin .45 pistols--to go with her Paris fashions. Having read all of the previous Arkham Horror universe novels, I'd say that "Hour of the Huntress" is pretty darn good. I have always liked the character of Jenny Barnes, whom I have played many times in various Arkham Horror universe board/card/mobile games (Arkham Horror, Eldritch Horror, Mansions of Madness, Elder Sign, and so on). Her quest to find her missing sister has always been intriguing and relatable. The author does a good job expanding Jenny's story to include new characters not seen before. These new faces fit seamlessly into her tale of finding all sorts of otherworldly horrors while trying to reunite with her lost sister. And since it's a novella, there isn't any of the "padding" some of the Arkham Horror novels have been guilty of in the past. The story is lean and gets to the point quickly. But anyone who isn't familiar with the character of Jenny Barnes shouldn't have too much trouble getting to know her by reading "Hour of the Huntress." I mean it as a compliment to the author when I say the scenario in this novel--particularly the final confrontation with wicked cultists and a beastie from beyond--would probably be a lot of fun to play in one of those Arkham Horror universe games (most likely Mansions of Madness). This novella is the first of several from Fantasy Flight Games. Let's hope the rest of them are just as good.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Adam Nowicki

    Hour of the Huntress is heavy on the pulp and light on the horror. As a fan of the Arkham series of games by Fantasy Flight, I had middling expectations for this novella, but was overall pleasantly surprised. I feared this would be longer flavor text, but it was a competently told story. Competently may not be the most ringing endorsement ever, but this is firmly average. The plot moves from A to B to C, and doesn’t rely on weird twists that come out of nowhere. I’m giving this a 3, when in actu Hour of the Huntress is heavy on the pulp and light on the horror. As a fan of the Arkham series of games by Fantasy Flight, I had middling expectations for this novella, but was overall pleasantly surprised. I feared this would be longer flavor text, but it was a competently told story. Competently may not be the most ringing endorsement ever, but this is firmly average. The plot moves from A to B to C, and doesn’t rely on weird twists that come out of nowhere. I’m giving this a 3, when in actuality it should be a firm 2.5. There were somethings that did annoy me with the manner in which it was written, however. There are a couple of instances where references are made to the state of America in the 1920s that are never picked up again. I would prefer there be no comment on race in America as opposed to one throw away line, for an example. The character of Lonnie was schizophrenic in her characterization to a distracting amount. There were multiple times I had to double check that Jenny was actually interacting with Lonnie, as it seemed to be a different character in every conversation. This is not a case of a character being forced to cover multiple story beats that don’t seem to fit with the character, this is a character that just wildly vacillates to the point that it is distracting. At some points she’s presented as a strong woman, then others acting like a 9 year old girl, then a person who doesn’t even understand the simplest of idioms, then a character who understands a complex vocabulary. It’s all over the place Overall this was a quick read and was resoundingly alright. I understand it’s fleshing out a reoccurring board game character, from a series of board games I love, but that only gives it a little slack. Frankly, I picked this up as a little intermission until another book I was waiting for was released, and it filled the gap admirably.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Decent short story. I bought it for the exclusive cards for the corresponding game. I didn't go into it expecting much and it easily met those expectations. I was fearful of the editing given FFG's lack of it recently but only spotted one error (in the main story). The color pages at the back were a nice addition and might be interesting to delve into. But they aren't necessary to read with the story and at first blush seemed more filler than anything. The story itself was fast-paced and entertai Decent short story. I bought it for the exclusive cards for the corresponding game. I didn't go into it expecting much and it easily met those expectations. I was fearful of the editing given FFG's lack of it recently but only spotted one error (in the main story). The color pages at the back were a nice addition and might be interesting to delve into. But they aren't necessary to read with the story and at first blush seemed more filler than anything. The story itself was fast-paced and entertaining enough. Though it mentions many of the places from the board games' version of Arkham, it didn't have the same feel as the original run of Cthulhu Mythos by Lovecraft, Derleth, et. al. The main purpose seemed to be an extended intro to the character and her endless quest to find her sister than any real meaningful addition to the mythos.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dale Russell

    Jenny Barnes was determined not to let her sister down again. She had not been there when she was Izzie was suffering through the emotional issues that almost tore her apart. Now, Izzie's last letter to her had brought Jenny to Arkham, Massachusetts to save her sister from "...the man in the dark cloak..." and whatever horror he had planned for her. In Arkham, though, things are rarely what they seem, and man made terror is the least of those. But "man" has nothing to do with what she must face Jenny Barnes was determined not to let her sister down again. She had not been there when she was Izzie was suffering through the emotional issues that almost tore her apart. Now, Izzie's last letter to her had brought Jenny to Arkham, Massachusetts to save her sister from "...the man in the dark cloak..." and whatever horror he had planned for her. In Arkham, though, things are rarely what they seem, and man made terror is the least of those. But "man" has nothing to do with what she must face to bring her sister to safety. HOUR OF THE HUNTRESS is another great entry in the ARKHAM HORROR series produced by Fantasy Flight Games in support of their game of the same name. Dave Gross turns his normally fantasy directed juices to horror as he gives us a smart little story that adds to the legend and mystery that is Arkham.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Hall

    An interesting insight into an investigator from the Arkham horror card game, I enjoyed getting to learn more about Guinevere's back story. This is the first fiction I've read based in a Lovecraftian world that wasn't written by Lovecraft himself, so it was fun to see the pulpy spin. This book is roughly what you'd expect from a novel telling the back story for a board game character, the writing is simple although a bit confused at times. The story was very tropey and made heavy use of foreshadow An interesting insight into an investigator from the Arkham horror card game, I enjoyed getting to learn more about Guinevere's back story. This is the first fiction I've read based in a Lovecraftian world that wasn't written by Lovecraft himself, so it was fun to see the pulpy spin. This book is roughly what you'd expect from a novel telling the back story for a board game character, the writing is simple although a bit confused at times. The story was very tropey and made heavy use of foreshadowing, It felt quite rushed, especially towards the end, and seemed a bit too coincidentally perfect - things lined up too tightly and too quickly - but I do lack experience with pulpy Lovecraftian fiction so that may be typical. I'm rating relative to my expectations and the genre.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pugsie

    It's a good story for those who love the board games Arkham and Eldritch Horror (and everything else related). I really enjoy playing the games and the book felt like it was one game being played but told in a storytelling way. Not the best fiction I've read, but quite enjoyable. I haven't played the character yet though. While reading I couldn't help seeing the cards in my mind, and for a fan of the board games I can see the big appeal in these kind of books. If I were more invested, which I mig It's a good story for those who love the board games Arkham and Eldritch Horror (and everything else related). I really enjoy playing the games and the book felt like it was one game being played but told in a storytelling way. Not the best fiction I've read, but quite enjoyable. I haven't played the character yet though. While reading I couldn't help seeing the cards in my mind, and for a fan of the board games I can see the big appeal in these kind of books. If I were more invested, which I might become, I'll continue reading the books. It was not a great standalone, but it is a good way to get to know the character and get the hang of how to play her.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Charles Etheridge-Nunn

    A solid addition to the Arkham Files universe. While the cosmic horror is a bit less than you’d get in Lovecraft’s works or even those of people like Ruff, the supernatural elements build nicely to a big crescendo which feels in keeping with FFG’s Arkham Games. The world presented feels more alive, full and of course, inclusive, than the man himself would have written. I admit I bought the Arkham Files novellas initially because of the Arkham Horror cards, but they’re good reads so far and I hav A solid addition to the Arkham Files universe. While the cosmic horror is a bit less than you’d get in Lovecraft’s works or even those of people like Ruff, the supernatural elements build nicely to a big crescendo which feels in keeping with FFG’s Arkham Games. The world presented feels more alive, full and of course, inclusive, than the man himself would have written. I admit I bought the Arkham Files novellas initially because of the Arkham Horror cards, but they’re good reads so far and I have found myself invested in the personalities and plights of the AF protagonists,

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jon Cooper

    This was a lot of fun to read, with lots of Easter eggs for fans of FFG’s Arkham Horror line of table top games. Probably not a fun read for folks not as familiar with this IP, however. But for those who play Arkham Horror (board game or LCG), Eldritch Horror, etc., absolutely worth a read - especially if one plays the LCG, the bonus cards are super fun.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Scott Frank

    Not a bad short little pulp romp; unless you have a specific horse in the game on the Lovecraft Mythos, you wouldn't get much from it; but if you do - especially the pulpier treatments - then it's worth picking up. It's technically a game tie-in, but I don't play the game (Arkham Horror), but do run a Call of Cthulhu game, which is why I picked it up; not sorry that I did. Not a bad short little pulp romp; unless you have a specific horse in the game on the Lovecraft Mythos, you wouldn't get much from it; but if you do - especially the pulpier treatments - then it's worth picking up. It's technically a game tie-in, but I don't play the game (Arkham Horror), but do run a Call of Cthulhu game, which is why I picked it up; not sorry that I did.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    This was a short introduction into Fantasy Flight Games Lovecraftian universe that many of their games are based in. Jenny Barnes comes to Arkham to find her estranged sister and gets sucked into a plot to raise a magical monster. It definitely makes me want to play the games and read more about other investigators.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    It was good, but I wouldn't say it was great. The writing was very good, and I was very happy to have some background for some of the in-game characters, but (perhaps due to limitations on the size of the book) the story felt too rushed, too short, and I was left wanting more. Totally worth a read, however, so would recommend it to anyone interested in more tales from the Mythos. It was good, but I wouldn't say it was great. The writing was very good, and I was very happy to have some background for some of the in-game characters, but (perhaps due to limitations on the size of the book) the story felt too rushed, too short, and I was left wanting more. Totally worth a read, however, so would recommend it to anyone interested in more tales from the Mythos.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jye

    I’m currently playing as Jenny Barnes, the main character of this book, in the Arkham Horror card game at the moment, so this whole novella served as some fun and thrilling backstory for my character. I’m not sure if you’ll like this as much if you aren’t into the world of HP Lovecraft or the investigators of Arkham Horror, but I had a good time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leandro Couto

    A novella set in the lovecraftian Arkham Horror board games universe. The writing is unambitious pulp fiction, and I wish it was a bit longer and had a better conclusion, but I think the source material and format limit that. With the "room to maneuver" it has, it does a good job. The characters are paper thin, but likable, and the stories carries on at a great pace. A novella set in the lovecraftian Arkham Horror board games universe. The writing is unambitious pulp fiction, and I wish it was a bit longer and had a better conclusion, but I think the source material and format limit that. With the "room to maneuver" it has, it does a good job. The characters are paper thin, but likable, and the stories carries on at a great pace.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charles Lupo

    This was another novella set in the Arkham Horror game universe. I liked this for the most part. The ending was a little meh. It has a bit of a cliffhanger ending, when we know that there will never be a sequel, so why bother?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    Great, quick read. Good mythos-inspired, pulpy fun. I need more of these.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kriss

    Guess it’s a novella so should be too harsh. Ok but not worth $25au. Would love it to be more developed.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Odds are it's the last book I'll read this year, and well worth it. Odds are it's the last book I'll read this year, and well worth it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dev Sodagar

    Enjoyed this a lot for a pulpy mystery novel.

  29. 5 out of 5

    John Longeway

    A fun romp, if you like both the Arkham Horror game and Lovecraftian pulp horror. Very brief read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    A surprisingly decent read for a game tie-in.

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