web site hit counter Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower

Availability: Ready to download

Phoebe Lane is a lightning rod for monsters. She and her mom are forced to flee flesh-eating plants, radioactive ants, and blobs from outer space. They survive thanks to Phoebe’s dad—an invisible titan, whose giant eyes warn them where the next monster attack will take place. All Phoebe wants is to stop running from motel to motel and start living a monster-free life in New Phoebe Lane is a lightning rod for monsters. She and her mom are forced to flee flesh-eating plants, radioactive ants, and blobs from outer space. They survive thanks to Phoebe’s dad—an invisible titan, whose giant eyes warn them where the next monster attack will take place. All Phoebe wants is to stop running from motel to motel and start living a monster-free life in New York or Paris. But when her mom mysteriously vanishes, Phoebe is left to fend for herself in small-town Pennybrooke. That's when Phoebe starts to transform… Christian McKay Heidicker, author of Cure for the Common Universe, returns with a book unlike any other, challenging perceived notions of beauty, identity, and what it means to be a monster.


Compare

Phoebe Lane is a lightning rod for monsters. She and her mom are forced to flee flesh-eating plants, radioactive ants, and blobs from outer space. They survive thanks to Phoebe’s dad—an invisible titan, whose giant eyes warn them where the next monster attack will take place. All Phoebe wants is to stop running from motel to motel and start living a monster-free life in New Phoebe Lane is a lightning rod for monsters. She and her mom are forced to flee flesh-eating plants, radioactive ants, and blobs from outer space. They survive thanks to Phoebe’s dad—an invisible titan, whose giant eyes warn them where the next monster attack will take place. All Phoebe wants is to stop running from motel to motel and start living a monster-free life in New York or Paris. But when her mom mysteriously vanishes, Phoebe is left to fend for herself in small-town Pennybrooke. That's when Phoebe starts to transform… Christian McKay Heidicker, author of Cure for the Common Universe, returns with a book unlike any other, challenging perceived notions of beauty, identity, and what it means to be a monster.

30 review for Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Garrett

    Phoebe is perfection! I love that I can relate to a 15 year old girl in the 1950s, as a thirty year old in, well, 2018. She’s self assured yet inhibited; open to new people yet cautious. The other characters are just as charming. Having read the book twice, I still can’t decide which character I love the most. They all feel like a little bit of home. Not to mention a completely fresh premise that took me by surprise every chapter. After 1980s nostalgia fatigue in pop culture, reading a novel tha Phoebe is perfection! I love that I can relate to a 15 year old girl in the 1950s, as a thirty year old in, well, 2018. She’s self assured yet inhibited; open to new people yet cautious. The other characters are just as charming. Having read the book twice, I still can’t decide which character I love the most. They all feel like a little bit of home. Not to mention a completely fresh premise that took me by surprise every chapter. After 1980s nostalgia fatigue in pop culture, reading a novel that immersed me in such a cool decade was super fun. Direct and indirect references to the time period had me googling subjects for more details. It’s silly, witty, strange, shocking, touching, and profoundly (somehow) current. I highly recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    One of those truly perfect books where an ingenious premise is actually pulled off, and with style! Absolutely pitch perfect in its depiction of the Golden Age of Monster Movies, not to mention small town life in the 1950's, and just well . . . the trials and tribulations of being a teenage girl! Loved this, and really want a Lucky-13, I mean Pan-Cake, of my own!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Max Baker

    Thank You Netgalley for Providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest review Attack off the 50 Foot Wallflower has been on my TBR list for a while. And I was EXCITED. Like, so much so I was actually afraid to read this, because if you don't read it it can never fall short of your expectations. Right? And, in a way, it didn't. Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower was everything I wanted with this premise. This is a very, very smart book, but the longer I thought about the story as a whole Thank You Netgalley for Providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest review Attack off the 50 Foot Wallflower has been on my TBR list for a while. And I was EXCITED. Like, so much so I was actually afraid to read this, because if you don't read it it can never fall short of your expectations. Right? And, in a way, it didn't. Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower was everything I wanted with this premise. This is a very, very smart book, but the longer I thought about the story as a whole the more I found myself poking holes in the story. Which is sort of odd, because this book accomplishes everything it wanted to do with remarkable success. The crux of the this entire book, the premise itself, is a meta examination of media, specifically 1950/1960s monster movies, while also commenting on voyeurism, violence, and female agency. So everything that happens within the story furthers that exploration. For example, nearly all the men in the story either attempt or allude to wanting a sexual relationship with Phoebe, a trope in films where women can't go outside without the threat of rape, while Phoebe just is expected to grin and bare it. Stuff like that covers this book, and Heidicker did a really good job at painting the world Phoebe lives in. A picture-esque Pleasentville sorta town that is pretty racist and ugly when you look beneath the surface. There's also Shivers, monsters that appear as naturally as earthquakes or tornadoes and leave devastation in it's wake. Phoebe's mother, Loretta, was once carried to the top of the Chrysler Building by a Shiver, a giant ape named Ook and has since relied on her infamy to move her and Phoebe from motel to motel avoiding Shivers with their unique ability to see the man in the sky, who is also Phoebe's father. (view spoiler)[The main plot of the story is that when Phoebe's mother goes missing, she accidentally unearths a shadowy organization hidden in the desert that is fully aware of Phoebe's father and works tirelessly to keep his interest less he either changes the channel or turns the TV off. The reveal that Phoebe is more or less a character in a TV show is not necessarily a spoiler, but what is a spoiler is how the novel progresses. Rather then be a sort of search for her mother, it then becomes a literal monster movie, with the organization zapping Phoebe so she grows at an alarming rate, hoping that the destruction she causes will keep her father sated for months. The exploration of violence and voyeurism is very well done here, as it is believe that only violence and conveniently attractive women can keep his interest. And I really appreciated Heidicker leaning into the sort of ridiculousness that those cheesy 1950s movies are known for. Giant ant fights, ridiculous screams, and all that fun stuff was dripping from every page. But, where this book looses me is in two places. The first is Beth, a side character that is implied to be from outside the TV. She's aware of movie monsters and tropes, but I could not for the life of me understand her purpose. Yeah, she was there, but nothing about her is explained. How did she get there? Why come? Is Phoebe's story a real thing or just another movie? Is the man in the sky a real person watching a TV or is it some overarching symbolic theme that's going over my head? Is she meant to be an interest from the future, putting their modern ideas into period pieces? She raised more questions then answered and just thought that particular reveal could have been cut. The other is Phoebe herself. Heidicker did almost too good of a job at exploring the lack of female agency in media. Phoebe is capable, shown very early on in the book, but by the time she becomes gargantuan she just...doesn't do anything. And it was frustrating because there's all these themes and reasons that she has for not doing anything, doesn't want to hurt people, not be a monster, that be a gentle woman mentality that exists within her due to an oppressive culture. But the entire time I couldn't help thinking "you are 50 feet tall. Slap some bitches and get shit done." Which is an issue because that was at the forefront of my mind whenever Phoebe encountered a very...let's just say human problem. The fact is, if Phoebe smashed a few things she'd get stuff done and reach her goals. But she never did because the story and the themes wouldn't let her. Her actions were hindered because the plot demanded it not because of her as a character. (hide spoiler)] Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower is a lot of fun and I would very much recommend it to people looking for something a little kooky, a little crazy, and a whole lotta brains. But, personally, the issues the book raised and the handicaps it put on the characters for the sake of story were enough to shake my rating.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    This is basically an alternate version of the 50's where all the classic sci-fi movie monsters and tropes are real and will 'randomly' attack different cities and towns. Phoebe and her mom can see a huge man in the sky that 'warns' them where the attacks will be so they are lucky enough to get away, but most people aren't. This was a really fun book for the most part. There was maybe a little bit too much focus on the period-typical racism and sexism for me, but the people who were perpetuating This is basically an alternate version of the 50's where all the classic sci-fi movie monsters and tropes are real and will 'randomly' attack different cities and towns. Phoebe and her mom can see a huge man in the sky that 'warns' them where the attacks will be so they are lucky enough to get away, but most people aren't. This was a really fun book for the most part. There was maybe a little bit too much focus on the period-typical racism and sexism for me, but the people who were perpetuating those views were always shown as being bigoted and wrong by the narrative so it wasn't necessarily 'bad', I just wasn't always in the mood to deal with it I guess. The end got a little bit too meta for me as well, but I don't think there was really another good way to end it. Overall a really enjoyable read though and I appreciated that it combined a lot of fun 50s monsters with heroes who were a little bit more ...forward-thinking I guess.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Crowinator

    I'm over the moon - here is another book for which I can apply the word "gonzo". This is amazing. I'm over the moon - here is another book for which I can apply the word "gonzo". This is amazing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I really don't know how to categorize this or even how to talk about it. I really loved the voice of the protagonist and the uniqueness of the concept: the novel takes place in a world where black and white, early 20th century monster movies are real. All the tropes are here, right down to the scientists and the secret government lab and the damsels in distress, but with a knowing, 21st century gaze: so, things that were so sexist and uncomfortable or unquestioning of authority or all of the thi I really don't know how to categorize this or even how to talk about it. I really loved the voice of the protagonist and the uniqueness of the concept: the novel takes place in a world where black and white, early 20th century monster movies are real. All the tropes are here, right down to the scientists and the secret government lab and the damsels in distress, but with a knowing, 21st century gaze: so, things that were so sexist and uncomfortable or unquestioning of authority or all of the things that might bug (heh) a modern audience about one of those movies are laid bare and made obvious here. So, I thought the story was awesome and engaging and awkward and uncomfortable and hard to define.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dallin Cerva

    Being a fan of Heidicker's first novel, Cure for the Common Universe, excitement to delve into his next was not sparse. Heidicker has done it again. He's the real deal. This book is better, more inventive, and more "out there" than, not just his first book, but most books on that market! All gushing aside, the setting for this new story is a world that is both terrifying and lovely, you want to be in it, and yet, you're glad you're not. The threats are horrific, fascinating, and energizing... the Being a fan of Heidicker's first novel, Cure for the Common Universe, excitement to delve into his next was not sparse. Heidicker has done it again. He's the real deal. This book is better, more inventive, and more "out there" than, not just his first book, but most books on that market! All gushing aside, the setting for this new story is a world that is both terrifying and lovely, you want to be in it, and yet, you're glad you're not. The threats are horrific, fascinating, and energizing... they feel like the all too familiar "boss battles" from one's favorite video game... ironic that this one isn't about video games! If you want a book that begins and ends in the way you expect, then this isn't for you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Octavia

    I had to DNF this one. I picked it up because I thought it would be a fun, light read that would help me get out of my reading slump. But a few pages in the MC casually mentions walking past a sign that said "No Coloreds"....which in itself isn't the issue if you're just trying to reference the time period. But the MC had literally JUST mentioned puddle skirts, a malt shop, and people standing in front of an appliance store with TV's in the window. Pretty sure I pieced together what era we're in I had to DNF this one. I picked it up because I thought it would be a fun, light read that would help me get out of my reading slump. But a few pages in the MC casually mentions walking past a sign that said "No Coloreds"....which in itself isn't the issue if you're just trying to reference the time period. But the MC had literally JUST mentioned puddle skirts, a malt shop, and people standing in front of an appliance store with TV's in the window. Pretty sure I pieced together what era we're in. That might sound petty but...that's my reason. So there.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Forever Young Adult

    Graded By: Brian Cover Story: BBW Drinking Buddy: Pass the Schlitz MPAA Rating: Sexual situations, intense action sequences, cartoonlike violence, alcohol and tobacco use Talky Talk: Far Out Bonus Factors: 1950s Monster Movies, Fetish Fuel Bromance Status: Film Club Read the full book report here. Graded By: Brian Cover Story: BBW Drinking Buddy: Pass the Schlitz MPAA Rating: Sexual situations, intense action sequences, cartoonlike violence, alcohol and tobacco use Talky Talk: Far Out Bonus Factors: 1950s Monster Movies, Fetish Fuel Bromance Status: Film Club Read the full book report here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Aw man, I felt this was doing some really great build-up and I liked the characters but the end ruined my positive feelings - it did NOT stick the landing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Funny, sweet, Imaginative twist on the old horror movie genre.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Teenreadsdotcom

    Run, run for your lives!...or at least run to your nearest library to check out ATTACK OF THE FIFTY FOOT WALLFLOWER. Then get comfy for the next three hours because Christian McKay Heidicker’s doozy of a novel is not a spectacle you will want to tear your eyes from. After CURE FOR THE COMMON UNIVERSE, which explores gaming culture, Heidicker certainly rises to the occasion with his wit and unique perspective to expose both the good, the bad and the ugly aspects of society. Phoebe Lane is sick of Run, run for your lives!...or at least run to your nearest library to check out ATTACK OF THE FIFTY FOOT WALLFLOWER. Then get comfy for the next three hours because Christian McKay Heidicker’s doozy of a novel is not a spectacle you will want to tear your eyes from. After CURE FOR THE COMMON UNIVERSE, which explores gaming culture, Heidicker certainly rises to the occasion with his wit and unique perspective to expose both the good, the bad and the ugly aspects of society. Phoebe Lane is sick of running from Shivers, the monsters that randomly appear, pillage and terrify humans. Why can’t a girl live an average, teenage life with her mom in New York or Paris, with friends (and maybe even a boyfriend?) However, Phoebe is caught in a cycle of moving, getting by and then running every time her father’s eyes in the sky warn them of the next attack. Phoebe is ready to take matters into her own hands…then suddenly, her mother disappears and she is faced with a deluge of questions and some foreboding answers. With the potential end of the world threatening, she is recruited by an underground research lab as the only person who can stop the ultimate disaster. But Phoebe feels small, insignificant against the evil out there --- monsters and humans alike. Not only that, Phoebe is starting to notice one growing problem… Reminiscent of the classic, ‘50s-era monster movies, this novel is rich with various “Easter eggs,” words and culture, combining to make a realistic and vibrant setting. However, ATTACK OF THE FIFTY FOOT WALLFLOWER is more than black-and-white, and the real monsters are not always hairy with sharp teeth. With the unique setting of a TV-world, Heidicker satirizes modern culture’s addiction to TV, and through this, explores how societal values can be found reflected in popular culture. When Phoebe’s world is turned upside down, she is forced to reinvent her outlook. She sees people for who they truly are; Heidicker uses this perspective to highlight not only the abuse of power by government, but the way that society manipulates itself to follow the status quo. Phoebe herself tries to fit into the mold that society prescribes for her, attempting to “become a wallflower” in order to fly under the radar. However, when Phoebe opens herself up to people who love her more than her size, she is taught by the example of others to remain true to who she is, despite her insecurities and haunted past. Heidicker does not shy away from identifying inequalities that have existed for ages, and does so in an equally comical and serious tone. Given the unique plot, these inequalities affect more than just freedom and respect; the judgements that people make of others can determine who lives and who dies. Stereotypes are pit against each other, exposing how a person can never truly judge a person by their appearance. As the stakes rise, pressure on Phoebe peaks as she grapples to overcome realize that she is indeed more powerful than she thinks --- and she does not have to be the monster everyone believes her to be. Like the protagonist, many characters hold some form of power in this novel --- and therefore, responsibility. So many characters in the novel claim that they have no choice but to sacrifice for “the greater good.” With help from those who care about her and her own determination, Phoebe struggles to alternate the rules of the devilish power struggle she has unwillingly become a part of. Through Phoebe, the reader begins to question perceptions and misperceptions, power struggles and the inevitable discrimination that occurs when individuals and groups decide to sacrifice for “the greater good.” ATTACK OF THE FIFTY FOOT WALLFLOWER is everything good about horror movies and more. The plot is quick-paced action, and Heidicker’s humor, relatable characters and imaginative solutions are enough to make this novel addicting. The raw emotion and overall analysis about societal, perceptions, human perseverance and inner beauty makes this novel a must-read. Reviewed by Lauren C

  13. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I tried so hard not to like this book. I tried in the bookstore before I gave in and bought it. And I tried again when I started reading it at home. It’s cheesy and nerdy, and that author pic and bio (come on, man)... But I enjoyed it so much. Despite my general current reading slump, I could not put it down. It’s funny, strange, pulpy, and addictive. It moves quickly and doesn’t try to be anything it’s not. It won me over for sure.

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

    In 1950’s America Phoebe Lane and her mother Loretta travel with carnivals, playing on the fame from her mother’s abduction by a giant ape called ‘Ook’. (This may just be a reference to something.) Currently the carnival is in the town of Pennybrooke. They are able to see the image of Phoebe’s father in the sky, which alerts them to the events called ‘Shivers’ when the aliens and monsters attack small towns, causing them to constantly be on the move. But when Phoebe returns to their hotel room, h In 1950’s America Phoebe Lane and her mother Loretta travel with carnivals, playing on the fame from her mother’s abduction by a giant ape called ‘Ook’. (This may just be a reference to something.) Currently the carnival is in the town of Pennybrooke. They are able to see the image of Phoebe’s father in the sky, which alerts them to the events called ‘Shivers’ when the aliens and monsters attack small towns, causing them to constantly be on the move. But when Phoebe returns to their hotel room, her mother has gone missing and she must step up to playing a lead role in her own narrative… Okay, this is obviously playing around with the tropes of 1950’s science fiction and horror movies. One character appears from a notorious 1950’s work (you’ll realise it even if you don’t spot the name, straight away) . The writer is clearly having a lot of fun with playing around with the tropes and the conventions also referring to the horror comics of the time. But the writer also realises that he can not just go back to presenting an idealised world, referring to the attitudes and prejudices of the time that get glossed over. The story keeps referring to the people who get caught in the crossfire of these monster attacks. Phoebe isn’t happy with her assigned options and keeps trying to move out of them, including being creeped on by men. Then she is faced with the choice of becoming the monster or the victim unless she finds another way. I realise that I’m not the target age for this, but would have enjoyed it when I was. A fun fan tribute and examination of 1950’s monster movies with an engaging heroine.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Krista Ivy

    What if King Kong was real and called Emperor Ook? What if the beautiful blond woman he wanted to just love and protect became famous and had a child? What if monsters attacking towns and decimating them was a common occurrence? What if it was 1950's America? This is the world that we step into for Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower. The Lane women are strong and fierce. The mother is famous and undeniably beautiful. The daughter, Phoebe, is unsure of herself and still just a teenager. They move fr What if King Kong was real and called Emperor Ook? What if the beautiful blond woman he wanted to just love and protect became famous and had a child? What if monsters attacking towns and decimating them was a common occurrence? What if it was 1950's America? This is the world that we step into for Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower. The Lane women are strong and fierce. The mother is famous and undeniably beautiful. The daughter, Phoebe, is unsure of herself and still just a teenager. They move from town to town when they see the titan father's eyes (who's invisible and only select people can see) go to the town they are in. He looks for the chaos and watches it unfold with a smile. The mother is kidnapped while they are in Pennybrooke and Phoebe comes looking for her. An organization has taken her captive. Phoebe just wants her mother back. She meets her half sister that explains that some of the monster attacks have been constructed by the government. She watches their titan father and when his finger starts to get close to pressing one of the button on his remote; she tells them and a town is attacked. Phoebe's giant/titan genes are activated and she grows to an enormous size and fights a swarm of giant ants and flying saucer that the military have unleashed upon Pennybrooke. This book is fresh, set in the 1950's without being dated, and fun. Recommende for: everyone with eyes/ears/brain.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather (The Sassy Book Geek)

    I NEED THIS BOOK IN MY LIFE ASAP!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was all over the place. There were a lot of wtf am I reading moments, and I still can't decide if I liked it or not. First let's start with the good things. Heidicker makes his own rules when writing. I have never seen a book more perfectly, or even at all, pull off a song montage. I have also rarely, if ever, read a book to just throw in an 8 page comic in the middle of the story. The book even takes place in a black and white film style color world, which we don't really know about t This book was all over the place. There were a lot of wtf am I reading moments, and I still can't decide if I liked it or not. First let's start with the good things. Heidicker makes his own rules when writing. I have never seen a book more perfectly, or even at all, pull off a song montage. I have also rarely, if ever, read a book to just throw in an 8 page comic in the middle of the story. The book even takes place in a black and white film style color world, which we don't really know about till the end, but what a concept! I can be sure to say I have not read a book like this one before. The story as a whole was just so creative I'd be frightened to see this man on drugs. Phoebe did not feel like the same insert-here-female-YA-protagonist, but rather had her own very distinct voice in my head. The nuclear-red scare-monster movie-50s era the book (mostly) takes place in was so much fun to be in, (except of course the 50s style racism) Now on the not so good things. This book was really messy. So many loose ends never get wrapped up, so many question never get answered. It's like this book had a page limit and by the end had to shut up and close it all as soon as possible. Like Beth, don't get me wrong I loved her as a character, but wtf was going on with Beth? She was from the "real world" or at least a world like ours, but how did she get there? How did she know the channel they were on, or what the others were like? what happened to her when she died? What was the relevance of Pan-Cake? I guess to lead her to the lab, but why did she? and if that was her only purpose, why was she in the whole book just yapping and being cute? What was the point of Liz being pregnant? So they had an excuse to make Pheobe big instead of her? why did the person they made big have to be able to see "Daddy" at all? What ever happened to her and her baby? Where did they go? If "daddy" was a real person watching tv this whole time, how did her legitimately get two separate girls pregnant? and they're actually his because pheobe says that she looks like him. Is he a god? because other than getting girls pregnant and having the "remote" he has no other abilities. None of these questions really get answered and that's frustrating since this is a really complex and unique world. I didn't really ship Phoebe and Lear, I much more shipped Beth and Phoebe, and now one of the most dtf female YA protagonists I've met can never be with either of them, because she's 50ft tall forever. I also felt that Phoebe's character was a little inconsistent. One of the things that really hooked me was the first chapter. She was so edgy and confident, smoking a cigarette, talking circles around some perv, then putting it out with her pump and walking away with a sweet comeback. But we never really see her as being the kind of person to do that for the rest of the story. All in all this book had enough cool stuff to offer that it got a 3.0 rating despite the ending falling a little flat.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    A Man's Reach Should Exceed His Grasp, Or What's A Meta-for? This is a very cool book that is as deep as you'd like it to be. On one level it's a 50's drive-in horror movie based lark, with echoes of that old John Ritter comedy movie "Stay Tuned". Go deeper and it's a feminist manifesto, a cultural critique, a sci-fi parallel universe tale, or a teen love story. However you slice it, and however far you want to go, it's a hoot. The setup is that our heroine, Phoebe, and her mom, are always running A Man's Reach Should Exceed His Grasp, Or What's A Meta-for? This is a very cool book that is as deep as you'd like it to be. On one level it's a 50's drive-in horror movie based lark, with echoes of that old John Ritter comedy movie "Stay Tuned". Go deeper and it's a feminist manifesto, a cultural critique, a sci-fi parallel universe tale, or a teen love story. However you slice it, and however far you want to go, it's a hoot. The setup is that our heroine, Phoebe, and her mom, are always running from Phoebe's mystical titan-in-the -sky Dad, whose eyes seem to signal the imminent arrival of some horror movie creatures. So it's a monster goof book with a lot of sly references to the classics of that genre, (the Blob, King Kong, Godzilla, the pods, giant radioactive ants). But it's also a next level government conspiracy "thriller". And it's a parallel universe tale. And there's a drop-in gay character. And a teen romance. And a suggestion that we are all just running around providing entertainment for some higher level consciousness. It's arguably, and interestingly, a very subtle commentary on religion. And it's certainly a commentary on the messed up priorities of 50's American culture. What especially matters is that our heroine is an appealing host as we wander through all of these thickets. And our author keeps a clear eye and clear head as we cover that territory. Phoebe is a resourceful, gimlet eyed, feisty survivor, (like all of the best horror movie heroines), and while she has her ups and downs you will always root for her to not get eaten. So, if you like, this is just a horror suspenser. Or, it's a withering social commentary. Or it's a bit of a cultural goof. Or it's an action/adventure tale with a sense of humor. However you choose to go, the writing is crisp, the pace is fast, and the plot keeps you on your toes and on alert. This book has style, and substance, and staying power, with a nice sense of humor and just the right amount of edge. Like our heroine you can channel surf the zeitgeist, and get a lot out of the experience. As a reader, I was delighted to follow the author's lead wherever he cared to take me. (Please note that I received a free ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm

    Pheobe Lane’s mother, Loretta, is a circus performer in a touring show of small town America of the 1950s, who was once held captive by a giant ape atop a tall building. What’s more, Pheobe is concerned that some of the locals in their current stop-off point of Pennybrooke, somewhere in the south-west, may have emerged from pods (at least one oozes plant-like goo), and towns seem at random to have been destroyed by attacks by giant ants and blobs of goop…. When added to the title, this is clearl Pheobe Lane’s mother, Loretta, is a circus performer in a touring show of small town America of the 1950s, who was once held captive by a giant ape atop a tall building. What’s more, Pheobe is concerned that some of the locals in their current stop-off point of Pennybrooke, somewhere in the south-west, may have emerged from pods (at least one oozes plant-like goo), and towns seem at random to have been destroyed by attacks by giant ants and blobs of goop…. When added to the title, this is clearly an homage to classic Cold War sci-fi pulp fiction and movies, all rolled into the traumas of being teen-aged made worse when 15 year-old Pheobe’s mother disappears, and Pheobe finds herself drawn into a secret government (it seems, we can’t be entirely sure) facility. Not only is this homage drolly constructed, there is intermittent breaking of the fourth wall where characters get to comment on their own situations and posit the likelihood of a happy ending (usually these are very low odds). Despite, at least at the outset, Pheobe being as much done to as doing – at key moments authority figures exploit her weaknesses to manipulate her – she also fights back. In the spirit of the genre, events cause her worldview to be totally upended as her father, a giant figure in the sky, becomes less of an observer and protector that active player in the turmoil that surrounds Pheobe – although not quite in the way she’d originally understood. As the story progresses, however, she discovers her power, her ability to act and its limits – so don’t expect an all-back-to-normal ending. This is thoroughly entertaining and well-pitched to the media savvy teen audience with a penchant for old black and white Cold War sci-fi horror as well as to a slightly nostalgic X-Files generation. It makes great use of different media, breaking into a ‘50s horror comic format for several pages, and has a shameless sense of come-uppance for the excessively self-interested – making this an entertaining tale of solidarity because of as well as despite the differences. Rollicking good fun, with more than a hint of self-aware irony.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Destiny Henderson

    Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower is thoroughly weird, slow, and entertaining and should appeal to any lover of sci-fi oldies. Phoebe's narrative is believable and relatable, every man in this book is a creep and you feel as uncomfortable as Phoebe, but for the American 1950/1960's era there really was no mention of racism save for a "no coloreds" sign. All of Phoebe friends and family are really open-minded besides thinking that Native-Americans are "godless and sinful." Okay ... What I'm trying Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower is thoroughly weird, slow, and entertaining and should appeal to any lover of sci-fi oldies. Phoebe's narrative is believable and relatable, every man in this book is a creep and you feel as uncomfortable as Phoebe, but for the American 1950/1960's era there really was no mention of racism save for a "no coloreds" sign. All of Phoebe friends and family are really open-minded besides thinking that Native-Americans are "godless and sinful." Okay ... What I'm trying to say is you have to have some suspension of belief. I'm just surprised Phoebe didn't have any preconceived notions about different races and a blink-and-you-miss-it (view spoiler)[ reference to gayness (hide spoiler)] . Anyway, the "4th-wall breaking" (view spoiler)[ magical being, her dad, controlling the world through the TV remote (hide spoiler)] is unique. That premise kept me interested through all the long drawn-out eating binges. I have never been so tired of reading about someone eating. I think my favorite part of this story is the familial relationship Phoebe and her mother have and how it contrasts with her other family members. *wink* Another great part is the backstory of a character named Lear. It's dark and really made me feel for this character. The added surprise of (view spoiler)[ the comic book strips was welcomed! A great way to tell Lear's story in a different medium. I hadn't been expecting that. (hide spoiler)] Overall, it was good. Sometimes, Beth seemed a little too perfect and her story's a little open-ended (view spoiler)[ she's from the future??? (hide spoiler)] , and I don't really care too much about the forced (view spoiler)[ Phoebe/Lear connection (hide spoiler)] . Still, a nice change of pace from other YA stories with a cool cover. 2.5

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Lynch

    Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower is a unique book, with a fascinating universe, likable characters, and a number of fun homages to 50s monster movies. Phoebe Lane is the girl with the famous mother: Loretta Lane, the woman who was once abducted by a giant ape and dragged to the top of the Chrysler Building. She also has a famous father, although Phoebe is one of only a handful of people who can see him. Phoebe's father is a giant living in the sky, and it's his gaze that keeps Phoebe and her moth Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower is a unique book, with a fascinating universe, likable characters, and a number of fun homages to 50s monster movies. Phoebe Lane is the girl with the famous mother: Loretta Lane, the woman who was once abducted by a giant ape and dragged to the top of the Chrysler Building. She also has a famous father, although Phoebe is one of only a handful of people who can see him. Phoebe's father is a giant living in the sky, and it's his gaze that keeps Phoebe and her mother one step ahead of the Shivers, the variety of horrible monsters that attack humanity. Her unusual upbringing has kept her from being a normal teenage girl, but her mother's sudden disappearance pushes Phoebe further from normal in her search for answers. And that's before she begins to grow... While Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower is certainly a fun read, there are enough bit and pieces that don't seem to make sense and are left open-ended that I walked away from this book with a bit of a frown. I did really enjoy Phoebe as the main character. She's sassy and straightforward, and she knows how to handle herself; her life has always revolved around monsters, and she's not afraid to speak up when that good ol' 1950s sexism comes into play. That being said, although the situation she gets herself thrown into is quite fun, there was too much background left unexplained to let myself just enjoy the shenanigans. Between the logistics of Phoebe's existence (actually, I think that one might actually be better left alone) and the presence of Beth (how did she get into the TV world?), I felt like I was missing something, and not in a fun "maybe we'll get a prequel or sequel" way. The ending does, however, does leave some smaller plot threads dangling, and I wonder if Heidicker will follow up on this book. It does have a unique premise, and the 1950s monster movie world is kind of fun, but I don't know that I really care enough about Phoebe and her friends to read another book even if one is released.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Soulfire

    I don’t watch B movies but they’re so a part of our lexicon that it would be impossible for you to not be aware of what they are. So, for those of you who aren’t familiar with them as well, I did not feel lost or like I was missing something, though, I probably did. Phoebe was not a particularly interesting person. She had an interesting backstory and parents, but her response to everything was to cry. She was world weary and in the beginning came off spoiled, but she also just wanted to find her I don’t watch B movies but they’re so a part of our lexicon that it would be impossible for you to not be aware of what they are. So, for those of you who aren’t familiar with them as well, I did not feel lost or like I was missing something, though, I probably did. Phoebe was not a particularly interesting person. She had an interesting backstory and parents, but her response to everything was to cry. She was world weary and in the beginning came off spoiled, but she also just wanted to find her mom, except when she was distracted. She was easily lied too, but then she was young, except, again, when she wasn’t. I found the world more interesting than her character, until I realized it wasn’t going to change. I spent most of the time I was reading wishing she’d do something instead of just going about her life trying to stay below the radar. I felt constricted while reading, I just kept on waiting for her to force the world to stop being so horrible. She knew the way people were acting was bad, but she was not a hero, and not trying to change anything. By far the most intriguing part of the story was Phoebe’s father, but you get no real explanation about him or his world or how hers came to be or much of anything. The ending was very underwhelming. I was hoping for answers or a happily ever after, but there were still questions unanswered and Phoebe’s life was back to what it had been originally, with a small change. The cover on this book is phenomenal, and I thought the concept was fun, but I don’t feel like the book delivered. It was underwhelming. 3/5

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    3.5 I'm not always a big Sci-Fi fan but I did enjoy this book, it managed to take the genre of scifi and mix it with enough contemporary elements that I was able to easily follow the storyline. The plot was fairly straightforward in terms of Phoebe and her journey but it was the world building that left me with a lot of questions. That being said I enjoyed this novel and if you're a scifi fan or just getting into scifi I think it's a good choice! I feel like part of the genre really is the not kn 3.5 I'm not always a big Sci-Fi fan but I did enjoy this book, it managed to take the genre of scifi and mix it with enough contemporary elements that I was able to easily follow the storyline. The plot was fairly straightforward in terms of Phoebe and her journey but it was the world building that left me with a lot of questions. That being said I enjoyed this novel and if you're a scifi fan or just getting into scifi I think it's a good choice! I feel like part of the genre really is the not knowing, and I was alright with not understanding why there was a giant man in the sky that happened to be the main characters father. But it was the smaller details I would've like explanation on like Beth for example. Without spoiling it, I definitely needed more from her character and her place in this world. I liked Phoebe as a main character, she was just awkward enough that I could relate but not so awkward it was painful to read about. I appreciated how she was insecure about herself but didn't let it stop her. She was thrown a crappy hand of cards but she learned to use it. I appreciate her for that. Also I applaud the author for not making me feel like his young female protagonist was written by a man, it's unfortunate I have to point that out but it felt like a breath of fresh air to read. Because this was a standalone novel I would like to have a more solid ending to this book because I don't think I would read it as a series, but I can appreciate the what if's ? that seem to follow the genre.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeanine

    The thing I love about Christian Heidicker's books is that they always end in a different place than where your brain thinks they should. His set-up and world-building and character development all track like they logically should. Then you hit a point about 5/6 of the way through and the rug is pulled out from under you. But not in a bad way. More in a, "we pulled up this okay carpet that you thought you liked and underneath is original hardwood floors!" kind of way. Also, he brings an element The thing I love about Christian Heidicker's books is that they always end in a different place than where your brain thinks they should. His set-up and world-building and character development all track like they logically should. Then you hit a point about 5/6 of the way through and the rug is pulled out from under you. But not in a bad way. More in a, "we pulled up this okay carpet that you thought you liked and underneath is original hardwood floors!" kind of way. Also, he brings an element of philosophy to his books about teenagers. Philosophies that they desperately need to help understand this crazy world we all live in. In this case, the world we live in might not be perfect, but no other option is, and the best we can do is live our life the best we can and learn from the sadness. Yeah. That gem is tucked inside a young adult novel based on classic-era-monster-cinema. Really. Anyway, this book brings all of Heidicker's signature twists and turns and thoughtful philosophies, as well as his weird, twisted imagination. What could be better? Pick it up! It's a fun read! (The only reasons I didn't give it 5 stars is because it felt slow to begin with, and the voice of the main character sometimes sounded like a guy trying to sound like a girl. Not in an offensive way. Just a little reaching.)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower by Christian McKay Heidicker, 299 pages, Simon & Schuster BFYR, 2018, $19. Language: PG-13 (21 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: PG-13; Violence PG BUYING ADVISORY: HS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Phoebe Lane is always in the shadow of her beautiful and famous mother, who was taken by King Kong to the top of the Empire State Building. That is, she was in her mother’s shadow until her ma goes missing in the small town of Pennybrooke. Phoebe has another problem: Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower by Christian McKay Heidicker, 299 pages, Simon & Schuster BFYR, 2018, $19. Language: PG-13 (21 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: PG-13; Violence PG BUYING ADVISORY: HS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Phoebe Lane is always in the shadow of her beautiful and famous mother, who was taken by King Kong to the top of the Empire State Building. That is, she was in her mother’s shadow until her ma goes missing in the small town of Pennybrooke. Phoebe has another problem: her dad. Phoebe and her mother seem to be the only ones who can see him in the clouds, and when he turns his gaze to them, bad things happen-like flesh eating plants and monster attacks. Think anything from old B movie monster movies, and it’s there. As Phoebe tries to find her mother, she begins to transform. Really transform. Like 50 feet of transforming. If you like old monster movies, then this book is for you. Phoebe is a great character who grows on you. Literally. I like that Phoebe struggles with her looks (which she gets from her dad) her growing pains, and self-discovery. This is a fun, well-written read. The ending, while satisfactory, leave a loose story line, so perhaps we haven’t seen the last of Phoebe, and that’s okay. Michelle in the Middle, Teacher https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2019...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ang

    "Phoebe Darrow is a lightning rod for monsters. She and her mom are forced to flee flesh-eating plants, blobs from outerspace, and radioactive ants. They survive because Phoebe's dad is an invisible titan with giant eyes that warns them where the next monster attack will take place. All Phoebe wants is to stop running from motel to motel and start living a monster-free life in New York or Paris. But when her mom mysteriously vanishes, Phoebe is left to fend for herself in small-town Pennybrooke. "Phoebe Darrow is a lightning rod for monsters. She and her mom are forced to flee flesh-eating plants, blobs from outerspace, and radioactive ants. They survive because Phoebe's dad is an invisible titan with giant eyes that warns them where the next monster attack will take place. All Phoebe wants is to stop running from motel to motel and start living a monster-free life in New York or Paris. But when her mom mysteriously vanishes, Phoebe is left to fend for herself in small-town Pennybrooke. That's when Phoebe starts to transform..." - inside left jacket flap This is the first book in MONTHS that I've been able to start and actually finish. This was enteraining, captivating and just a rather fast read. If you love campy horror flicks from early Hollywood then you'll enjoy reading this book. There are golden moments that are funny, weird, touching and just all out CRAZY. I recommend this book to anyone who's just in a weird mood for a different book that is both as intriguing as it is well written.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gracemary Allen

    Really close to a four ! :0 This book, even from the bonkers synopsis on the flap, turned out to be something I was not at all expecting. It was fast paced, and easy enough to breeze through in a couple hours. The 50's aesthetic was wonderful and the atmosphere of the small town really drew me in. I appreciate the mentions of bigotry in the 50's (especially the plot lines with the Native Americans) because although the era is remembered for rock and roll and cute roller rinks rampant racism was j Really close to a four ! :0 This book, even from the bonkers synopsis on the flap, turned out to be something I was not at all expecting. It was fast paced, and easy enough to breeze through in a couple hours. The 50's aesthetic was wonderful and the atmosphere of the small town really drew me in. I appreciate the mentions of bigotry in the 50's (especially the plot lines with the Native Americans) because although the era is remembered for rock and roll and cute roller rinks rampant racism was just as present. Phoebe is sexually harassed a LOT almost to the point of parody but as the plot develops I came to believe this was likely an intentional critique of a notorious film trope. I would have liked to give this a four but unfortunately the ending left a few notable loose ends. I'm not sure if this was setting up for a sequel (and if it was i'll certainly be tuning in) but I would have enjoyed being given a clear explanation of how our lovely little dressmaker got into Phoebe's world in the first place as well as what Lear did to himself in the lab.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I'm not sure how I feel about this one... It get's top scores for setting; 1950's/60's where all those bad sci-fi flicks are real is a super cool idea! I have no real complaints about the characters. But... there were a few things that leave me less than satisfied. I kept feeling like there was/should be be commentary on various social issues. Woman's place is society, how much space women (literately and figuratively) take up, whites vs non-whites, PTSD, etc. And it was almost there but it wasn I'm not sure how I feel about this one... It get's top scores for setting; 1950's/60's where all those bad sci-fi flicks are real is a super cool idea! I have no real complaints about the characters. But... there were a few things that leave me less than satisfied. I kept feeling like there was/should be be commentary on various social issues. Woman's place is society, how much space women (literately and figuratively) take up, whites vs non-whites, PTSD, etc. And it was almost there but it wasn't really there; I was left wondering if I was trying to find these messages, or if the author had commitment/communication issues regarding these topics. I was also hoping for a standalone. The ending really leaves you feeling like there should be and will be more to come. Which... Had I left like that was coming more than 5 pages out... Might not have bothered me. But it mostly felt like it was a last second add-on. And the cover. Such a lovely cover! Full of spoilers.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book had me at the beginning, I really wanted to know where Ma was and what was going to happen. I just had to know how Daddy and the remote came to be and have the world explained... except it wasnt, not even a little bit. The main character Pheobe also was very whiney and just cried all the time but then would bust out very sexual lines and seemed out of character. Beth's character was also never explained, it was hinted she talked differently and seemed from the future or something and t This book had me at the beginning, I really wanted to know where Ma was and what was going to happen. I just had to know how Daddy and the remote came to be and have the world explained... except it wasnt, not even a little bit. The main character Pheobe also was very whiney and just cried all the time but then would bust out very sexual lines and seemed out of character. Beth's character was also never explained, it was hinted she talked differently and seemed from the future or something and then completely dissapeared when she died and knew the exact channel number but not even a slight explanation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

    Really intriguing premise and beginning, but I lost interest in the middle. I think it's because I wasn't into the details of (view spoiler)[(not sure if it's a spoiler for obvious reasons) Pheobe growing into a giant. I think the focus on those details turned me off because of my unwanted exposure to a writing site I used to frequent being taken over by 'giantess' fetish stories. (hide spoiler)] . I did stick it out to the end, so I guess the pacing picked back up. I don't need a happy ending to Really intriguing premise and beginning, but I lost interest in the middle. I think it's because I wasn't into the details of (view spoiler)[(not sure if it's a spoiler for obvious reasons) Pheobe growing into a giant. I think the focus on those details turned me off because of my unwanted exposure to a writing site I used to frequent being taken over by 'giantess' fetish stories. (hide spoiler)] . I did stick it out to the end, so I guess the pacing picked back up. I don't need a happy ending to be satisfied, but I wasn't a huge fan of the ending, however.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.