web site hit counter Murders at the Crab Apple Café (Black Heath Classic Crime) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Murders at the Crab Apple Café (Black Heath Classic Crime)

Availability: Ready to download

The peace of the picturesque English village of Roseneath is shattered by a double murder at the Crab Apple Café, where the establshment's owner and her grand-daughter have been found shot dead. Sergeant Mellor is hopeful that the case will mean promotion. But even he has to confess himself baffled by the lack of positive clues and the overabundance of possible suspects, w The peace of the picturesque English village of Roseneath is shattered by a double murder at the Crab Apple Café, where the establshment's owner and her grand-daughter have been found shot dead. Sergeant Mellor is hopeful that the case will mean promotion. But even he has to confess himself baffled by the lack of positive clues and the overabundance of possible suspects, which include the local Vicar, the Vicar's chauffeur, the Vicar's chauffer's wife and the village constable's delinquent son. With the help of Inspector Hotchkiss of Scotland Yard, Mellor sets about unravelling the mystery. Originally published in 1933, this is the only crime novel from Gordon Manners (a pen-name of Australian author Mary Fullerton) and will delight all fans of golden age crime fiction!


Compare

The peace of the picturesque English village of Roseneath is shattered by a double murder at the Crab Apple Café, where the establshment's owner and her grand-daughter have been found shot dead. Sergeant Mellor is hopeful that the case will mean promotion. But even he has to confess himself baffled by the lack of positive clues and the overabundance of possible suspects, w The peace of the picturesque English village of Roseneath is shattered by a double murder at the Crab Apple Café, where the establshment's owner and her grand-daughter have been found shot dead. Sergeant Mellor is hopeful that the case will mean promotion. But even he has to confess himself baffled by the lack of positive clues and the overabundance of possible suspects, which include the local Vicar, the Vicar's chauffeur, the Vicar's chauffer's wife and the village constable's delinquent son. With the help of Inspector Hotchkiss of Scotland Yard, Mellor sets about unravelling the mystery. Originally published in 1933, this is the only crime novel from Gordon Manners (a pen-name of Australian author Mary Fullerton) and will delight all fans of golden age crime fiction!

30 review for Murders at the Crab Apple Café (Black Heath Classic Crime)

  1. 5 out of 5

    John

    Not a bad story considering it was the one and only detective story by this author. Like a previous reviewer. I would have liked to see how her style might develope over subsequent outings but we'll never know now. This one was a bit rough round the edges but there was plenty of detection with a few red herrings and a twist at the end. Quite enjoyable. Not a bad story considering it was the one and only detective story by this author. Like a previous reviewer. I would have liked to see how her style might develope over subsequent outings but we'll never know now. This one was a bit rough round the edges but there was plenty of detection with a few red herrings and a twist at the end. Quite enjoyable.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roddy Williams

    This, it seems, is the only detective novel by Australian born writer Mary Fullerton (1868-1946) who moved to England late in life in 1922. Old Mrs Ebury and her grand-daughter are found shot to death in their home, part of which had been converted into The Crab Apple Cafe. Sergeant Mellor's attempts to deal with the case himself are hampered by the fact that one of his men, Constable Galton, has been taken sick, the son of whom is also one of the chief suspects. He is forced to bring in help in This, it seems, is the only detective novel by Australian born writer Mary Fullerton (1868-1946) who moved to England late in life in 1922. Old Mrs Ebury and her grand-daughter are found shot to death in their home, part of which had been converted into The Crab Apple Cafe. Sergeant Mellor's attempts to deal with the case himself are hampered by the fact that one of his men, Constable Galton, has been taken sick, the son of whom is also one of the chief suspects. He is forced to bring in help in the form of Inspector Hotchkiss of Scotland Yard. Despite some occasional clunky characterisation it's not a bad read and despite her origins the author manages to provide a decent enough portrait of English village life. The cafe element seems a tad incongruous since it has no function in the narrative other than to provide a quirky title. Interestingly, the character of young Miss Ebury is slowly assembled during the investigations providing a fascinating character study of someone who only appears in the narrative as a corpse as well as some background on the morals of the time. Suspects abound but every lead that Hotchkiss and Mellor uncover seems to lead to a dead end. It is not until the finale that the truth is finally revealed. It's also interesting that this, as with some other novels of the time, tends to present Jewish people in a bad light, or at least suggests that Jews are not people with whom one should be keeping company. One of the murder suspects is a young Jewish man who extorted money for his rent from young Miss Ebury merely by dint of a charming manner. One could argue that there were other men in the novel who treated her far more badly but given the instances of other novels I am yet to find one where Jewish people are portrayed in a positive way.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

    Apart from annoying transcription errors created, no doubt, from failure to adequately proofread the text after scanning from the original 1933 print copy, this is a competently written story and enjoyable read, if a bit heavy on detail. The carefully laid false trails retain interest because the characters are well drawn and the author creates a credible sense of a local community. I chose to read it because it is the only detective work by Mary Fullerton, Australian poet, suffragist and prose w Apart from annoying transcription errors created, no doubt, from failure to adequately proofread the text after scanning from the original 1933 print copy, this is a competently written story and enjoyable read, if a bit heavy on detail. The carefully laid false trails retain interest because the characters are well drawn and the author creates a credible sense of a local community. I chose to read it because it is the only detective work by Mary Fullerton, Australian poet, suffragist and prose writer who moved to England in 1922, aged 52. She was therefore 63 when she wrote this book under the pseudonym of Gordon Manners. Did she write it for fun, for money or other reason? She lived another 13 years - why no more? My questions are likely to remain unanswered - but this is another woman whose story would, I’m sue, be worth knowing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mr P R Phillipson

  5. 5 out of 5

    mrs H.J. Cheadle

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christine Cannings

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ron

  8. 4 out of 5

    Margie

  9. 4 out of 5

    juliajeclayton.fsnet.co.uk

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Simmonds

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Charles johnson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ms S Lomax

  15. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Waters

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Diffley

  17. 5 out of 5

    jackbadger

  18. 4 out of 5

    Val Westerman

  19. 5 out of 5

    SUE LORD

  20. 4 out of 5

    barry wood

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jean Balmforth

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gillian I Foley

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Holmes

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angela Torlop

  25. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Wells

  26. 4 out of 5

    Glenys M. Gold

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonnie Patricia Goyer

  28. 4 out of 5

    angus watson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Philip Cox

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lorna Hillmann

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.