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The Truro Murders presents the shocking true story of Christopher Worrell, and his accomplice, James Miller. The events in this book unveil one of the worst serial killing sprees in Australian history. Over the course of two months in 1976-1977, seven young women were brutally raped and murdered. Worrell and Miller met in prison, and upon release, developed a dominant and The Truro Murders presents the shocking true story of Christopher Worrell, and his accomplice, James Miller. The events in this book unveil one of the worst serial killing sprees in Australian history. Over the course of two months in 1976-1977, seven young women were brutally raped and murdered. Worrell and Miller met in prison, and upon release, developed a dominant and submissive relationship that centred around feeding Worrell's sadistic urges towards women. Miller would deny any involvement in the murders, claiming his love for Worrell was the basis for his cooperation and silence. In the space of twelve months between 1978-1979, remains of two of the victims were found within 1km of one another. Police linked the two bodies with another five young females reported missing in the area. The police uncovered two more skeletons within the Truro region and now faced the difficult task of piecing together the evidence and finding the countries biggest serial killers. The Truro Murders portrays the sex-fuelled killing spree from the perspective of James Miller, the accomplice. Contained within this shocking true crime story are love, loss, manipulation, and extreme violence. If you are especially sensitive to accounts of suffering young females, it might be advisable not to read any further. If, however, you seek to understand the darker side of human nature by coming face to face with it, then this book is written for you. Scroll up and click on the Buy Now button at the top of this page.


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The Truro Murders presents the shocking true story of Christopher Worrell, and his accomplice, James Miller. The events in this book unveil one of the worst serial killing sprees in Australian history. Over the course of two months in 1976-1977, seven young women were brutally raped and murdered. Worrell and Miller met in prison, and upon release, developed a dominant and The Truro Murders presents the shocking true story of Christopher Worrell, and his accomplice, James Miller. The events in this book unveil one of the worst serial killing sprees in Australian history. Over the course of two months in 1976-1977, seven young women were brutally raped and murdered. Worrell and Miller met in prison, and upon release, developed a dominant and submissive relationship that centred around feeding Worrell's sadistic urges towards women. Miller would deny any involvement in the murders, claiming his love for Worrell was the basis for his cooperation and silence. In the space of twelve months between 1978-1979, remains of two of the victims were found within 1km of one another. Police linked the two bodies with another five young females reported missing in the area. The police uncovered two more skeletons within the Truro region and now faced the difficult task of piecing together the evidence and finding the countries biggest serial killers. The Truro Murders portrays the sex-fuelled killing spree from the perspective of James Miller, the accomplice. Contained within this shocking true crime story are love, loss, manipulation, and extreme violence. If you are especially sensitive to accounts of suffering young females, it might be advisable not to read any further. If, however, you seek to understand the darker side of human nature by coming face to face with it, then this book is written for you. Scroll up and click on the Buy Now button at the top of this page.

30 review for The Truro Murders: The Sex Killing Spree Through the Eyes of an Accomplice

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lyn❤Loves❤Listening #AUDIOBOOKADDICT

    Audio 5 Stars Story 4 Stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    5 stars audio 4 stars story

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bettye McKee

    This is an interesting story about a serial-killing pair in Australia. Christopher Worrell and James Miller met in prison. James fell in love with Chris while Chris, being a sociopath, was unable to love anyone. The duo cruised the streets looking for prey. Chris would use his charm to lure females into the car, and James would drive them to an isolated location. James would go for a walk while Chris raped and murdered their victim. Then James would return to help dispose of the body.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brandi

    For anyone who follows me, this is so far out of my realm of typical reads that I'm sure you think I accidentally added this to my "read" shelf. Alas, I have a bit of a thing for true crime and have always been interested to see a bit behind the scenes into the human psyche. The Truro Murders allowed me to do two things: the first, experience what it's like to be in an abusive relationship where fists are not involved. Only unrequited love and a misplacement of trust and kindness. And second, th For anyone who follows me, this is so far out of my realm of typical reads that I'm sure you think I accidentally added this to my "read" shelf. Alas, I have a bit of a thing for true crime and have always been interested to see a bit behind the scenes into the human psyche. The Truro Murders allowed me to do two things: the first, experience what it's like to be in an abusive relationship where fists are not involved. Only unrequited love and a misplacement of trust and kindness. And second, the twisted way a mind can warp that love and allow you to follow someone so blindly, even when they are committing heinous crimes. The Truro Murders happened in Australia in 1976-77. The country had never experienced a serial killer of this magnitude before, if at all. This story, from the eyes of James Miller, the accomplice, shows the manipulations of a serial killer. The terrifying way Miller was controlled, the way he was able to turn a blind eye to Worrell's crimes.... I don't have the words for this kind of behavior. But I do want to know more. Now I want to research, research, research these crimes and see them in a different light, a different perspective. I want to know it all--or at least as much as possible. Ryan Green has given us an easy to read/listen account of something that should never be easy to hear or read. But he does this flawlessly, explaining the behaviors of both Worrell and Miller, and making the reader want to know more. More about Miller and more about Worrell. **The audio of this is fantastic. The narrator makes you feel like you're there while offering a bit of detachment because no one really wants to be the accomplice of a serial killer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Lorenz

    I received a complimentary copy of this audiobook from the publisher/author in exchange for a voluntary honest review. Like many great true crime writers, Ryan Green does a fantastic job creating a strong narrative based on true events. I was fully gripped by his strong writing style and easily urged forward by the flow of the story telling. That being said, as a true crime story, the author missed a great opportunity to provide direct quotes from the subjects and provide regular citation through I received a complimentary copy of this audiobook from the publisher/author in exchange for a voluntary honest review. Like many great true crime writers, Ryan Green does a fantastic job creating a strong narrative based on true events. I was fully gripped by his strong writing style and easily urged forward by the flow of the story telling. That being said, as a true crime story, the author missed a great opportunity to provide direct quotes from the subjects and provide regular citation throughout. This caused me to doubt a good deal of information delivered, due to the fact that the author is writing from the direct perspective of the subject without having met him or directly quoting him. I strongly feel that the author should have changed the names and locations and developed a fictional story based on these events. In my honest opinion, I believe this would allow his creativity to better shine and would have resulted in a more impactful conclusion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily Ross

    I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review. 2018 First Read DNF at 34%. This book was terrible. It feels like the author read the accomplice's confession and fabricated a novel, guessing at what he thought or felt. It honestly felt like a badly done YA novel rather than true crime book. It wasn't engaging, it wasn't entertaining and it felt whiny and boring. 2019 Re-Read I enjoyed this book much more the second time around. The information given i I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review. 2018 First Read DNF at 34%. This book was terrible. It feels like the author read the accomplice's confession and fabricated a novel, guessing at what he thought or felt. It honestly felt like a badly done YA novel rather than true crime book. It wasn't engaging, it wasn't entertaining and it felt whiny and boring. 2019 Re-Read I enjoyed this book much more the second time around. The information given is good, and I really got into the book, and I wanted to know what happened next and how and why they were caught. Unfortunately, that was a little anti-climatic, but I suppose that it wasn’t the author’s fault. The only complaint that I have of this book is that the author says that Miller feels certain emotions when Worrill rapes and murders, but there’s no evidence given that he actually felt that way. If Green has read Millers confessions, it doesn’t come across very well, and it made me feel a little sceptical.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Renika Jacobs

    Good thing this book was free. I wouldn't recommend this book. It seems to be told from the perspective of the accomplice but does not make clear if the author every really met this man or not. There are no direct quotes or any interviews with James Miller. It's written like the author just read his confession and then fabricated the things he thought the guy should be thinking and feelings when the events occurred. I also am a firm believer that the author's personal opinions of his subjects sh Good thing this book was free. I wouldn't recommend this book. It seems to be told from the perspective of the accomplice but does not make clear if the author every really met this man or not. There are no direct quotes or any interviews with James Miller. It's written like the author just read his confession and then fabricated the things he thought the guy should be thinking and feelings when the events occurred. I also am a firm believer that the author's personal opinions of his subjects should be left out of his books and apparently this author does not feel that way.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Cramer

    This book focuses completely on the killers and their relationship, using what I suspect to be fictionalized dialogue embellishments. Chapters are named for the victims, but the girls are mere placeholders, barely registering as characters, let alone living, breathing human beings.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cleo Summers

    I enjoy reading about the psychology behind serial killers, as well as seeing what it was that got them caught, what might have lead them to be that way, and generally reading discussions on why they did what they did. Sadly this book was quite a let down, instead of fact and a telling of what happened, it was instead a subjective book telling of Miller’s thoughts and feelings as if they were fact. Describing his actions as if they were also fact when it is still debated whether he was actively I enjoy reading about the psychology behind serial killers, as well as seeing what it was that got them caught, what might have lead them to be that way, and generally reading discussions on why they did what they did. Sadly this book was quite a let down, instead of fact and a telling of what happened, it was instead a subjective book telling of Miller’s thoughts and feelings as if they were fact. Describing his actions as if they were also fact when it is still debated whether he was actively involved or not is not acceptable. The author creates a character with Miller to try and lure the reader into feeling sympathy for him by describing his thoughts and feelings, portraying him as a lost and broken human, when in actuality that can’t be truly known because only Miller’s account of the events exists and therefore cannot be trusted. So overall this book reads more like bad fiction based on the killings, and unacceptably embellishes and outright makes up a lot of the text. It would have been better to have written what Miller said happened, what was believed to have happened, and any other arguments allowing the reader to get more of an in depth idea of the case and to create a discussion around what happened with the known facts and why or how active or passive each man was based on speculation. Instead of passing this badly written clearly subjective piece of fiction presenting only the base facts that you could learn quickly from the internet (names, dates, etc). I will not be reading anymore from this author if he thinks this is an acceptable way to present ‘true’ crime books

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    This book is the true story of a couple of serial killers in australia. Actually, it was one serial killer and his sidekick who was just along for the ride. The killings took place in the 1970s, before there was any network set up to recognize and catch serial killers. They prowled the streets, picking up girls at bus terminals and other places where young, naive girls might be looking for rides. They'd then drive them out to the stick (Truro), rape, murder and bury them in shallow graves or jus This book is the true story of a couple of serial killers in australia. Actually, it was one serial killer and his sidekick who was just along for the ride. The killings took place in the 1970s, before there was any network set up to recognize and catch serial killers. They prowled the streets, picking up girls at bus terminals and other places where young, naive girls might be looking for rides. They'd then drive them out to the stick (Truro), rape, murder and bury them in shallow graves or just cover them with sticks and leave them. What makes the story unique is the relationship between the two killers. Actually only one was a killer. The other was in love with his younger partner and would do anything at all to keep him happy, including driving him around to pick up girls, driving them to the places they were killed and helping dispose of the bodies. There is no big story about a police pursuit of these killers. One of them died before they even knew a serial killer existed. The other would never have been caught had he not confessed. No great police work here. No great story line either. Just 2 messed up individuals who destroyed a lot of other lives.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ted Tayler

    "Steady but unspectacular" Only the second true crime novel I've read in the past eight years. It does exactly what it says on the tin. There's no mystery, just a steady but unspectacular appraisal of the events. I found I enjoyed the first few chapters and then it got repetitive. "Steady but unspectacular" Only the second true crime novel I've read in the past eight years. It does exactly what it says on the tin. There's no mystery, just a steady but unspectacular appraisal of the events. I found I enjoyed the first few chapters and then it got repetitive.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Perry

    Lack Of Documentation/Attribution By Author Undermines Authenticity Of Account As A "Through The Eyes Of" This story of an Austrilian serial killer (purportedly) told thru the perspective of his extremely accommodating wanna-be-boyfriend is a fairly well-written, fast moving true crime account that offers the reader the somewhat unique experience of being privy to the recollections and inner musings/rationalizations of a man who facililates murder as the cost of maintaining his relationship with Lack Of Documentation/Attribution By Author Undermines Authenticity Of Account As A "Through The Eyes Of" This story of an Austrilian serial killer (purportedly) told thru the perspective of his extremely accommodating wanna-be-boyfriend is a fairly well-written, fast moving true crime account that offers the reader the somewhat unique experience of being privy to the recollections and inner musings/rationalizations of a man who facililates murder as the cost of maintaining his relationship with the killer. The story moves so fast, gripping the reader with a narrative about each of the killer's 7 victims that is presented as if it was coming "straight from (one of) the horse's mouth's", that it, in fact, temporarily obscures the very significant fact that the story is not actually being told by the lovelorn boyfriend, but is rather the work of a third-party writer : and, most importantly, by a writer, who fails to document anywhere in his text, how he came to acquire the type of first-hand information that would enable him to presume to write from the perspective of the accomplice. Unless I missed something, there is no acknowledgement in the book by the author as to his research methodology - no references to interviews, or court documents, or anything else of substance. I will say the story was an interesting one, for which I am sure there is/was some factual basis. But the author's attempt to falsely suggest, as the title implicitly does, that this book is the work of, or has been done with the participation of, one of the criminal perpetrators undermines the credibility of the presented account, relegating it, more or less, to being a fictionalized crime story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Marlene♥

    Finished this book yesterday.Yes the writing is good but I just do not get why the author acknowledges (see my highlights) that what is known about this case is told by someone who has ample reason to lie but still he uses this narrative which to me sounds very unlikely as proof. Only for that reason I cannot give a high rating.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tony Parsons

    The life & times of Australian Caucasian serial killers: Christopher Robin Worrell & James William Miller I do not receive any type of compensation for reading & reviewing free books from publishers & authors. Therefore, I am under no obligation to write a positive review, only an honest one. Warning: This book contains descriptive accounts of extremely graphic adult content violence, murder, or expletive language &/or uncensored sexually explicit material (gay, rape, minor/adult verbal, psychol The life & times of Australian Caucasian serial killers: Christopher Robin Worrell & James William Miller I do not receive any type of compensation for reading & reviewing free books from publishers & authors. Therefore, I am under no obligation to write a positive review, only an honest one. Warning: This book contains descriptive accounts of extremely graphic adult content violence, murder, or expletive language &/or uncensored sexually explicit material (gay, rape, minor/adult verbal, psychological, emotional, physical & sexual abuse, BDSM) which is only suitable for mature readers. It may be offensive or have potential adverse psychological effects on the reader. If you are especially sensitive to this type of material, it is strongly advised not to read any further. An awesome book cover, great font & writing style. A very professionally written serial killer book. They were quite easy for me to read/follow from start/finish & never a dull moment. There were no grammar/typo errors, nor any repetitive or out of line sequence sentences. Lots of exciting scenarios, with several twists/turns & a huge description list of unique characters, settings, facts etc. to keep track of. They all could also make another great serial killer movie, a classroom PP presentation, or better yet a mini-TV series or even a documentary (Crime Museum; True Crime; American Crime Story; Investigative Discovery. There are no references, works cited, or endnotes so I will only rate it at 3/5 stars. Thank you for the free author; Amazon Digital Services LLC.; book Tony Parsons MSW (Washburn)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Absolutely chilling… Love makes fools out of us all. That is the final sentence of this book and it is fitting because this story is told from the perspective of a man hopelessly enamored with a serial killer. For that love he is willing to ignore his own conscience and his own perceptions of right and wrong. For that love he pays a heavy price, but was it heavy enough? Ryan Green tackles this psychologically complex case with the astute insight for which he is known and offers his readers/listen Absolutely chilling… Love makes fools out of us all. That is the final sentence of this book and it is fitting because this story is told from the perspective of a man hopelessly enamored with a serial killer. For that love he is willing to ignore his own conscience and his own perceptions of right and wrong. For that love he pays a heavy price, but was it heavy enough? Ryan Green tackles this psychologically complex case with the astute insight for which he is known and offers his readers/listeners yet another chilling but irrefutably absorbing glimpse into the minds of the infamous Australian serial killer team of Christopher Worrell and his infatuated accomplice, James Miller. The exhaustive research, the solid writing, and the psychological analysis combine seamlessly to produce a mesmerizing tale told in the unique style of this author which sets this and all his other books apart in the true crime genre. I could not pull myself away from this story until I had finished the very last sentence. I chose to read along as I listened to the audio version, which was expertly narrated by Steve White who, in my opinion, has a proven track record for excellent delivery of stories such as these. The crimes are heinous but this detailed narrative of the events is provocative and compelling. Definitely worth your time. While I did purchase a copy of this book, I was given an audio copy by the author and I am offering my honest and unbiased review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A great true crime read! Just a couple of typos, and a few parts I would have changed for clarity, but other than that, it was great. It was shorter than the average TC because it didn't have the background and childhood of the perpetrators, which sometimes really helps us to understand them better. Many of these guys were abused by their parents or, believe it or not, in the military. That has always surprised me. And, I'm one of those who likes to read about the trial, yet there was nothing her A great true crime read! Just a couple of typos, and a few parts I would have changed for clarity, but other than that, it was great. It was shorter than the average TC because it didn't have the background and childhood of the perpetrators, which sometimes really helps us to understand them better. Many of these guys were abused by their parents or, believe it or not, in the military. That has always surprised me. And, I'm one of those who likes to read about the trial, yet there was nothing here about it. I don't know about Australia, but in the U.S. you can't just use a person's confession. You need to back it up with evidence. So I would have been interested to know what evidence they had against Chuck. But, the story doesn't tell us that. For the loss of that information (which I personally take as laziness on the part of the author for his lack of research), I only gave three stars. But for what information IS here, it's good. There just needs to be MORE to make it as good as the other TC books on the market. I'd still read him, if he ever came out with something on a crime that hasn't been write about a million times already (which his other books have), but only on the Kindle Unlimited. I wouldn't pay much for them due to the lack of information.

  17. 4 out of 5

    odedo1

    Out of all of Greens books this one is the hardest for me to review. The author Ryan Green have an amazing talent researching, filling in the gaps and turning all the facts into a story which anyone can understand. This is the first time that I actually felt for one of the characters: I thought about Australia in the 70th, a small town how unlucky a person like James had to be to be born gay, not in the 70th and not in Australia which was late to develop and move forward like most of the rest Out of all of Greens books this one is the hardest for me to review. The author Ryan Green have an amazing talent researching, filling in the gaps and turning all the facts into a story which anyone can understand. This is the first time that I actually felt for one of the characters: I thought about Australia in the 70th, a small town how unlucky a person like James had to be to be born gay, not in the 70th and not in Australia which was late to develop and move forward like most of the rest of the world. I feel that circumstances gave James no chance especially after meeting Chris who knew how to manipulate, find the weaknesses in people and abuse that power so perfectly that James truly had no hope. I actually think that this is not a bad true story at all, that people can learn from it, how evil will use anything to get its deeds done, just like it uses the internet today. Steve White is an excellent narrator and a perfect choice for this book. I do recommend this audiobook and the rest of Greens audiobooks, people need to know about the monsters out there, not pretend that they don’t exist or think that horrible things happen to others not to them till it’s to late.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Beverly Laude

    This is another great true crime book by author Ryan Green. Over a two month period in 1976-1977, Christopher Worrell and his accomplice, James Miller, killed seven young women in one of the worst serial killing sprees in Australian history. The two men met in prison and after their releases, a dominant and submissive relationship was formed. Worrell's sadistic urges led to a string of violent rapes and murders. Miller, who was hopelessly in love with Worrell, claimed innocence since he wasn't ac This is another great true crime book by author Ryan Green. Over a two month period in 1976-1977, Christopher Worrell and his accomplice, James Miller, killed seven young women in one of the worst serial killing sprees in Australian history. The two men met in prison and after their releases, a dominant and submissive relationship was formed. Worrell's sadistic urges led to a string of violent rapes and murders. Miller, who was hopelessly in love with Worrell, claimed innocence since he wasn't actively involved in the killings. Since the book deals with violence against women, sensitive readers should beware. But, if you want to know more about the dark side of human nature and the lengths that a person might reach in order to find love, give this book a go. Mr. Green has a way with writing about true crimes in a manner that nearly reads like fiction. Unfortunately, this story isn't fiction and will haunt the reader long after finishing the book. The narrator, Steve White, does a good job with the pacing and adds a lot to the listener's enjoyment. I was given the chance to listen to the audiobook version of this book by the author, but the opinions expressed are totally my own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dianna R. Phillippe

    Sex crazed killer... This story is set in Australia and is about Chris Worrell (the killer), and James Miller (the accomplish), who meet in prison and become fast friends. Chris was a young good looking guy and very self confident with women. James, was an older gay man in love with Chris. Unfortunately, for James, Chris did not return the affection. Chris and James would go cruising at night and pick up women that Chris wanted. James would go for long walks while Chris stayed behind in the car wi Sex crazed killer... This story is set in Australia and is about Chris Worrell (the killer), and James Miller (the accomplish), who meet in prison and become fast friends. Chris was a young good looking guy and very self confident with women. James, was an older gay man in love with Chris. Unfortunately, for James, Chris did not return the affection. Chris and James would go cruising at night and pick up women that Chris wanted. James would go for long walks while Chris stayed behind in the car with the girl. Chris would violently rape the girl and then kill her. When James came back to the car, he was forced to help Chris get rid of the body. This behavior went on almost nightly and became more violent each time. James had seen Chris in his dark moods and was somewhat afraid of him. Because James loved Chris so much, he would keep his mouth shut about Chris' activities. I won't tell you the whole story, but GOD has a mysterious way of setting things right. I enjoyed the book very much and recommend it to all true crime readers. Dianna, Prescott, AZ.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zelda

    Gripping, disturbing, intriguing from start to finish. Told mainly from the point of view of James Miller, the older, more submissive partner in the Truro murders. The author has the knack of being able to get into the minds of his characters and showing what makes them tick. The author gives just enough description of the murders for the horror and cruelty of them to get through. The codependent relationship between Christopher Worrell and James Miller is depicted from all angles. The dominant, Gripping, disturbing, intriguing from start to finish. Told mainly from the point of view of James Miller, the older, more submissive partner in the Truro murders. The author has the knack of being able to get into the minds of his characters and showing what makes them tick. The author gives just enough description of the murders for the horror and cruelty of them to get through. The codependent relationship between Christopher Worrell and James Miller is depicted from all angles. The dominant, cold hearted psychopath and his willing, submissive servant. James Miller consistently and persistently presents himself as the innocent party who merely drove Christopher Worrell around to pick up girls so he could rape and murder them, and so James Miller would help in burying and covering up the bodies. However, by the end, I was left wondering whether James Miller had perhaps had a more active role in the murders than he was willing to admit. The fact that this is a true story fills me with horror and sadness.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Beth Shuler

    Once again another great read I am always so pleased when I read another one of Ryan Green books. But it seems each book I read gets better and better!! I am also a true crime buff and love reading about it but I get so tired of the same cases over and over. Ryan Green is one of the few that has no problem writing about something different. But what really impressed me was his writing skills and how he is very open about his books. He tends to not judge and not take aides like some authors and I Once again another great read I am always so pleased when I read another one of Ryan Green books. But it seems each book I read gets better and better!! I am also a true crime buff and love reading about it but I get so tired of the same cases over and over. Ryan Green is one of the few that has no problem writing about something different. But what really impressed me was his writing skills and how he is very open about his books. He tends to not judge and not take aides like some authors and I think that is so important. You get more facts like that I believe. If you are looking for a great author and a good book then he's that author and this book is def great. You won't be disappointed.... Keep up the great work Ryan and I can't wait for another amazing book to read!!! So not to rush you but I am another fan waiting, lol....

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kupres

    Ryan Green brings another torturous tale of love, sex and murder. This murder spree is told third person through the eyes of a weak oppressed accomplice from south Australia. This is not a memoir or a biography and reads more like a true crime story you would see on an A & E special. Told through the eyes of Jerry Miller, you sympothize with him as to how he became caught up in such a horrible string of murders but not for his pleas of inocennce as he was capable of knowing the difference between Ryan Green brings another torturous tale of love, sex and murder. This murder spree is told third person through the eyes of a weak oppressed accomplice from south Australia. This is not a memoir or a biography and reads more like a true crime story you would see on an A & E special. Told through the eyes of Jerry Miller, you sympothize with him as to how he became caught up in such a horrible string of murders but not for his pleas of inocennce as he was capable of knowing the difference between right and wrong. Overall Green does a great job of bringing you Jerry's story without interjecting any outside opinion, whether his own or soceity's and helps reaffirm that no matter who we are, where we come from, we are all seeking acceptance and love.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex Shelby

    Interesting enough, but it reads like fiction rather than true crime, hence the low rating. It is told from the POV of one of the killers, who is not the author, so that right there makes it a little sketchy. How could Green possibly know the innermost thoughts of Miller in the most life-altering moments of his life? It does not mention them ever meeting, nor are there any direct quotes, which leads me to believe they have never spoken to each other either. The fact that this book is marketed as Interesting enough, but it reads like fiction rather than true crime, hence the low rating. It is told from the POV of one of the killers, who is not the author, so that right there makes it a little sketchy. How could Green possibly know the innermost thoughts of Miller in the most life-altering moments of his life? It does not mention them ever meeting, nor are there any direct quotes, which leads me to believe they have never spoken to each other either. The fact that this book is marketed as a true crime discredits any of the writing, which itself was not bad. I read a review saying they felt this book would have delivered more if it had been pursued as based on a true story (because that's what it truly is) rather than nonfiction/true crime. I couldn't agree more.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jodie

    I was given this free review copy audio book by the author at my request and have voluntarily left this review. The Truro Murders is told from the perspective of Murderer’s accomplice. James thinks because he didn’t actually kill anyone, he isn’t guilty of anything. He blindly follows along with whatever Chris says. At first he is disgusted, but he quickly just goes along with all of the brutal rapes and killings of so many women. He loved Chris and wanted to be with him more that anything. The w I was given this free review copy audio book by the author at my request and have voluntarily left this review. The Truro Murders is told from the perspective of Murderer’s accomplice. James thinks because he didn’t actually kill anyone, he isn’t guilty of anything. He blindly follows along with whatever Chris says. At first he is disgusted, but he quickly just goes along with all of the brutal rapes and killings of so many women. He loved Chris and wanted to be with him more that anything. The whole story was sad and disturbing. I did feel sympathy of James, but that doesn’t excuse his behavior.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen Bullock

    Only 3 stars for this true crime; disappointed that this seemed to be more of a fact finding & reveal then discussion(s) of how these young women were so entranced to hop in the car with 2 strange guys in the 1970's in Australia. Very little focus on the actual victims and more so on the rapist/murderer and his accomplice. Most of the true crime books I have read focus on the victims & then the reader gets the in depth view of the guilty person. No one should glorify the killers and dismiss the Only 3 stars for this true crime; disappointed that this seemed to be more of a fact finding & reveal then discussion(s) of how these young women were so entranced to hop in the car with 2 strange guys in the 1970's in Australia. Very little focus on the actual victims and more so on the rapist/murderer and his accomplice. Most of the true crime books I have read focus on the victims & then the reader gets the in depth view of the guilty person. No one should glorify the killers and dismiss the victims.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    This is a great account of a true story from the person who loved the killer. It was very interesting that he claimed he didn't have any part in the killings despite being able to stop him by informing the police. It shows how one can believe in love in such a sick way that he will forget his own morals to protect his lover. I liked how the author wrote the book. I am interested in true crime and why people do what they do. He explained this and wrote where you could feel the emotions. I am goin This is a great account of a true story from the person who loved the killer. It was very interesting that he claimed he didn't have any part in the killings despite being able to stop him by informing the police. It shows how one can believe in love in such a sick way that he will forget his own morals to protect his lover. I liked how the author wrote the book. I am interested in true crime and why people do what they do. He explained this and wrote where you could feel the emotions. I am going to be looking into more books from this author.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    While I understand the reviews that were critical of this book because it contained fictional conversations and/or did not present much information about the victims, I gave the book four stars because the characteristics of the two murderers rang true to me. I could picture the submissive partner accepting whatever small amounts of attention he received from the dominant murderer. It also seemed likely to me that the submissive partner would rationalize his situation and participation in the ma While I understand the reviews that were critical of this book because it contained fictional conversations and/or did not present much information about the victims, I gave the book four stars because the characteristics of the two murderers rang true to me. I could picture the submissive partner accepting whatever small amounts of attention he received from the dominant murderer. It also seemed likely to me that the submissive partner would rationalize his situation and participation in the manner the book portrayed. Finally, It seemed obvious to me that the dominant one would think of no one but himself. I enjoyed the read. Perhaps someday someone else will write more about the victims and we will be able the revisit the crimes.

  28. 4 out of 5

    April

    The Truro Murders : Ryan Green A true life crime drama. The author takes us through the development of the murderers and shows how their crimes progressed as time passed. Very interesting to hear some of the details of the crimes. These people were vicious. The narration was well done. Steve White did a fine job with the subject matter. I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lorie

    I have this book three stars, not because it's average, but because it was a short, novella type read. The content, or story, written by the author is deserving of 4 stars. It's a good read for when one doesn't have the time to commit to a more in-depth, full book. It is a very interesting case, I wish there had been more on the background of the two main characters, but the author did acknowledge that more on James wasn't available. Definitely worth the time to read. I have this book three stars, not because it's average, but because it was a short, novella type read. The content, or story, written by the author is deserving of 4 stars. It's a good read for when one doesn't have the time to commit to a more in-depth, full book. It is a very interesting case, I wish there had been more on the background of the two main characters, but the author did acknowledge that more on James wasn't available. Definitely worth the time to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tom Schulte

    Ryan Green here explores a fascinating and little-known serial killer duo. In this matchup, a homicidal maniac is abetted by an older, would-be homesexual lover. Murderer and hanger-on pick up women and bury corpses. With the killer dead and the clinger convicted, how guilty is the love-lorn. Could all those corpses end up interred with him no more than a gravedigger. Is the world's most dangerous wingman as guilty as his sentence? Ryan Green here explores a fascinating and little-known serial killer duo. In this matchup, a homicidal maniac is abetted by an older, would-be homesexual lover. Murderer and hanger-on pick up women and bury corpses. With the killer dead and the clinger convicted, how guilty is the love-lorn. Could all those corpses end up interred with him no more than a gravedigger. Is the world's most dangerous wingman as guilty as his sentence?

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