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The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns (Little Books. Big Profits)

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The best-selling investing "bible" offers new information, new insights, and new perspectives The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is the classic guide to getting smart about the market. Legendary mutual fund  pioneer John C. Bogle reveals his key to getting more out of investing: low-cost index funds. Bogle describes the simplest and most effective investment st The best-selling investing "bible" offers new information, new insights, and new perspectives The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is the classic guide to getting smart about the market. Legendary mutual fund  pioneer John C. Bogle reveals his key to getting more out of investing: low-cost index funds. Bogle describes the simplest and most effective investment strategy for building wealth over the long term: buy and hold, at very low cost, a mutual fund that tracks a broad stock market Index such as the S&P 500. While the stock market has tumbled and then soared since the first edition of Little Book of Common Sense was published in April 2007, Bogle’s investment principles have endured and served investors well.  This tenth anniversary edition includes updated data and new information but maintains the same long-term perspective as in its predecessor.  Bogle has also added two new chapters designed to provide further guidance to investors:  one on asset allocation, the other on retirement investing. A portfolio focused on index funds is the only investment that effectively guarantees your fair share of stock market returns. This strategy is favored by Warren Buffett, who said this about Bogle: “If a statue is ever erected to honor the person who has done the most for American investors, the hands-down choice should be Jack Bogle. For decades, Jack has urged investors to invest in ultra-low-cost index funds. . . . Today, however, he has the satisfaction of knowing that he helped millions of investors realize far better returns on their savings than they otherwise would have earned. He is a hero to them and to me.” Bogle shows you how to make index investing work for you and help you achieve your financial goals, and finds support from some of the world's best financial minds: not only Warren Buffett, but Benjamin Graham, Paul Samuelson, Burton Malkiel, Yale’s David Swensen, Cliff Asness of AQR, and many others. This new edition of The Little Book of Common Sense Investing offers you the same solid strategy as its predecessor for building your financial future. Build a broadly diversified, low-cost portfolio without the risks of individual stocks, manager selection, or sector rotation. Forget the fads and marketing hype, and focus on what works in the real world. Understand that stock returns are generated by three sources (dividend yield, earnings growth, and change in market valuation) in order to establish rational expectations for stock returns over the coming decade. Recognize that in the long run, business reality  trumps market expectations. Learn how to harness the magic of compounding returns while avoiding the tyranny of compounding costs. While index investing allows you to sit back and let the market do the work for you, too many investors trade frantically, turning a winner’s game into a loser’s game. The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is a solid guidebook to your financial future.


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The best-selling investing "bible" offers new information, new insights, and new perspectives The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is the classic guide to getting smart about the market. Legendary mutual fund  pioneer John C. Bogle reveals his key to getting more out of investing: low-cost index funds. Bogle describes the simplest and most effective investment st The best-selling investing "bible" offers new information, new insights, and new perspectives The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is the classic guide to getting smart about the market. Legendary mutual fund  pioneer John C. Bogle reveals his key to getting more out of investing: low-cost index funds. Bogle describes the simplest and most effective investment strategy for building wealth over the long term: buy and hold, at very low cost, a mutual fund that tracks a broad stock market Index such as the S&P 500. While the stock market has tumbled and then soared since the first edition of Little Book of Common Sense was published in April 2007, Bogle’s investment principles have endured and served investors well.  This tenth anniversary edition includes updated data and new information but maintains the same long-term perspective as in its predecessor.  Bogle has also added two new chapters designed to provide further guidance to investors:  one on asset allocation, the other on retirement investing. A portfolio focused on index funds is the only investment that effectively guarantees your fair share of stock market returns. This strategy is favored by Warren Buffett, who said this about Bogle: “If a statue is ever erected to honor the person who has done the most for American investors, the hands-down choice should be Jack Bogle. For decades, Jack has urged investors to invest in ultra-low-cost index funds. . . . Today, however, he has the satisfaction of knowing that he helped millions of investors realize far better returns on their savings than they otherwise would have earned. He is a hero to them and to me.” Bogle shows you how to make index investing work for you and help you achieve your financial goals, and finds support from some of the world's best financial minds: not only Warren Buffett, but Benjamin Graham, Paul Samuelson, Burton Malkiel, Yale’s David Swensen, Cliff Asness of AQR, and many others. This new edition of The Little Book of Common Sense Investing offers you the same solid strategy as its predecessor for building your financial future. Build a broadly diversified, low-cost portfolio without the risks of individual stocks, manager selection, or sector rotation. Forget the fads and marketing hype, and focus on what works in the real world. Understand that stock returns are generated by three sources (dividend yield, earnings growth, and change in market valuation) in order to establish rational expectations for stock returns over the coming decade. Recognize that in the long run, business reality  trumps market expectations. Learn how to harness the magic of compounding returns while avoiding the tyranny of compounding costs. While index investing allows you to sit back and let the market do the work for you, too many investors trade frantically, turning a winner’s game into a loser’s game. The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is a solid guidebook to your financial future.

30 review for The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns (Little Books. Big Profits)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keegan

    What did I think? I'll get back to you in about 30 years. What did I think? I'll get back to you in about 30 years.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    After hearing so many references to John Bogle and his followers, the Bogleheads, I decided I had to read this book. The author, John Bogle, invented the index fund and founded Vanguard. I really liked this book; it's one of the better investing books I've read. It contains just the right amount of empirical evidence in the form of statistics, graphs, and charts to be convincing, but not eye-glazingly boring. To back up his assertions, he points to "the relentless rules of humble arithmetic." Bog After hearing so many references to John Bogle and his followers, the Bogleheads, I decided I had to read this book. The author, John Bogle, invented the index fund and founded Vanguard. I really liked this book; it's one of the better investing books I've read. It contains just the right amount of empirical evidence in the form of statistics, graphs, and charts to be convincing, but not eye-glazingly boring. To back up his assertions, he points to "the relentless rules of humble arithmetic." Bogle comes across as very experienced and intelligent. In case you find yourself questioning Bogle, the end of each chapter contains a "Don't Take My Word For It" where well-known investors agree with Bogle on the chapter's topic. Bogle's main point is that the best (most efficient) investment strategy is to buy and hold all publicly traded US businesses at a low cost. He recommends this very simple approach as a superior alternative to the incredibly complex array of specific investment options available today. He describes this as Bogle's Corollary: "Don't look for the needle in the haystack. Just buy the haystack!" This book is definitely worth a read for anyone investing in the stock or bond markets. Notes • The average annual total return on stocks of 9.6% has been created almost entirely by enterprise, with only 0.1% created by speculation. • Rely on Occam's Razor and keep it simple; buy a portfolio that owns shares in every US business and hold it forever. • "Where returns are concerned, time is your friend. But where costs are concerned, time is your enemy." • Index funds don't trade from security to security, so they tend to avoid capital gains taxes. • Stocks and stock funds suffer from reversion to the mean (RTM): the tendency of above-average performance giving way to average or below-average performance in the long term. Selecting a fund adviser • fee-based, not commission-based • fee <1% of assets Keep costs low • expense ratio • loads, AKA purchase or sales charges • turnover • taxes • Use index funds for bonds and money markets too. • Focusing on growth or value funds isn't worthwhile, because all sectors still revert to the mean. Stick with the total stock market. ETFs • Total stock market ETFs can replicate or improve on index funds, if held long-term • ETFs are often too narrowly focused • ETFs incur brokerage and trading costs • Only use ETFs to diversify portfolio The 2 sources of the superior returns of index funds: 1. The broadest possible diversification (eliminates all risk except market risk) 2. The tiniest possible costs Portfolio 95-100% Serious Money • 50-100% total US stock market index funds 0-5% Funny Money • individual stocks • actively managed funds Acceptable variations: • max 20% total international index fund • "modest amount" emerging markets • 10% value • 5% small cap Asset allocation rule of thumb: hold a bond position equal to your age, or your age minus 10%.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    While it was indeed a little book, it was much longer than it needed to be. The whole book can be summed up in one sentence: Buy and hold a low cost index fund. You're welcome, you've essentially just read the book. While it was indeed a little book, it was much longer than it needed to be. The whole book can be summed up in one sentence: Buy and hold a low cost index fund. You're welcome, you've essentially just read the book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diego Leal

    One sentence summary: Invest in index funds.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stefania

    I regret buying this book so much - I should have invested the $19.99 instead. The whole book can be summarized in one sentence: index ETFs are better than mutual funds because they track the whole (or a good chunk of the) market and have very low costs. There. The whole book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eric Franklin

    Bogle deserves a million stars for starting Vanguard and bringing us the concept of low-cost index funds. I'll even go one better and agree with the fundamental premise of this book, that almost everyone should have broad-based indexing as the foundation of their investment plans. This book is essentially a dismantling of vast swaths of the financial industry, especially the mutual fund. Step by step, and through the relentless application of real-world performance numbers and statistics, Bogle s Bogle deserves a million stars for starting Vanguard and bringing us the concept of low-cost index funds. I'll even go one better and agree with the fundamental premise of this book, that almost everyone should have broad-based indexing as the foundation of their investment plans. This book is essentially a dismantling of vast swaths of the financial industry, especially the mutual fund. Step by step, and through the relentless application of real-world performance numbers and statistics, Bogle shows investing for what is it is - a zero sum game where people who don't index, take money from each other while also paying the entire industry that is in place to chase mythical outperformance via mutual funds. The result? Underperformance. Rather than try to find a needle in a haystack, why not just buy the haystack (he's full of colloquialisms and folksy charm)? Boom. Indexing. My biggest issue with the book is that it pokes a stick at the largest turd in the industry (mutual funds) and then says, "indexing is a heck of a lot better than this." He's right, of course; but he neglects including other allocation possibilities. He quotes Buffett several times without mentioning that his market-crushing performance is still in full effect and investors are still being rewarded by it or that stock picking services like the Motley Fool have a great track record of consistently outperforming market averages on most of their real-money portfolios. Clearly, there are some ways to invest that do beat the market - I just wish that Bogle had spent a little time getting into what it takes to be successful in those other areas. I think there's a way of doing that without diminishing the awesome power of the main thesis.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Soheil

    In all my ventures into the books on stock market, I had never come across a book as useless as this one. The author keeps telling you that from the first page to the last that you should follow his advise on chucking mutual stocks and become passive nobody that only invests on index funds and sits for the next 10 years to earn an average profit. To support his statement (while claiming that he invented the index funds) he uses arguments such as tax, agent fees, half quotes from famous people, s In all my ventures into the books on stock market, I had never come across a book as useless as this one. The author keeps telling you that from the first page to the last that you should follow his advise on chucking mutual stocks and become passive nobody that only invests on index funds and sits for the next 10 years to earn an average profit. To support his statement (while claiming that he invented the index funds) he uses arguments such as tax, agent fees, half quotes from famous people, stupid examples on why this worked (you may be able to find many more on why this did not work!), etc. The writing is awful. The author's futile at humor fail to create the slightest of smiles. He keeps repeating phrases such as the "relentless rules of humble arithmetic" as many as what feels like a million times (there is even a chapter with that name). I have only one recommendation to anyone reading this. Stay well away from this book. Your time has more value...

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Chou

    I get it. Invest in index funds that are low cost, broadly diverse, and hold hold hold. Great idea, but much of the book is spent smacking you over the head with the idea.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Wengerd

    "The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan." Stick to the good plan. Index funds are those good plans that will save you from failing in the dreams of a perfect plan. "The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan." Stick to the good plan. Index funds are those good plans that will save you from failing in the dreams of a perfect plan.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    (4.0) Big long sell on low-expense ratio broad index funds. Logic makes sense and if I weren't already a convert, would definitely take seriously. It's so interesting that so many investors do not. - things that cost investors in actively managed mutual funds: — expense ratio — turnover (fees cut into profits and cap gains lead to premature taxation) — higher taxes — [something about consuming nearly all dividend gains?] — transaction/load/redemption fees — investor emotion: buying funds when market up (4.0) Big long sell on low-expense ratio broad index funds. Logic makes sense and if I weren't already a convert, would definitely take seriously. It's so interesting that so many investors do not. - things that cost investors in actively managed mutual funds: — expense ratio — turnover (fees cut into profits and cap gains lead to premature taxation) — higher taxes — [something about consuming nearly all dividend gains?] — transaction/load/redemption fees — investor emotion: buying funds when market up, picking mutual fund ‘winners’ who inevitably regress to the mean and lose them money — also note that avg tenure as a fund manager is 9 years, and tons of funds close when they have a poor performance period...so likelihood of finding a true winner manager AND it she still leading it 30 years later is exceedingly slim. Plus, you’d have to wait about 25 years to know who that is, by which time you’ve already missed out! Heading into 2017 and beyond: brace yourself for lower than historical returns (lately very low dividend yield (companies chasing growth?), very high P/E ratio that will probably regress to the mean). With inflation at ~2%, returns will be very slim. Fees on mutual funds historical based on big days of 70s and 80s but will now result in negative expected return. Corey raised a very interesting point: is the fact that so many people are in index funds turning /it/ in to a 'fad' to the point that it artificially inflates the value of S&P500 stocks? Can this imbalance cause problems / result in some sort of correction down the line that makes S&P index funds dangerous?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    I'm posting the last of my 2017 reads here this month without reviews, so that they'll count towards this year's Goodreads Reading Challenge. Full review coming in early 2018. I'm posting the last of my 2017 reads here this month without reviews, so that they'll count towards this year's Goodreads Reading Challenge. Full review coming in early 2018.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jyotishka Misra

    The book reiterated the same point from start to finish. What could have been a much smaller book, was stretched to the very limits. While there were a scant number of ideas presented, with the entire focus pretty much being on ETFs, there was well presented data to explain why the solitary conclusion had been drawn for a range of scenarios.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    I’ll let you know what I really think in about 30+ years!

  14. 4 out of 5

    ScienceOfSuccess

    This book is based on The Intelligent Investor, John C. Bogle did a good job explaining investment options with pros and cons. This would be a great book to start since this book was written for normal people, not financial specialists. This comes with a cost of nothing extraordinary if you are looking for something more than basic information about stocks and bonds you should pick another book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marta Sarrico

    Simple analysis showing why investing in low-cost index funds should be the main approach to follow as an investor. A littler bit repetitive in the first chapters but some very interesting points towards the end about ETFs and (brief) asset allocation. Definitely makes a convincing point, sharing a handful of opinions given by experts in the field that agree and (some) also adopt it in their own portfolios. Not an extensive guide as it could have compared this passive strategy to invest in the m Simple analysis showing why investing in low-cost index funds should be the main approach to follow as an investor. A littler bit repetitive in the first chapters but some very interesting points towards the end about ETFs and (brief) asset allocation. Definitely makes a convincing point, sharing a handful of opinions given by experts in the field that agree and (some) also adopt it in their own portfolios. Not an extensive guide as it could have compared this passive strategy to invest in the market with some other strategies but a strong guidebook nevertheless.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    What can I even say. We do live in a society and need to save money, and the general concept to invest in index funds rather than playing the stock market seems sound. However, this book presents an individual solution to a systemic problem and doesn't seem to seriously consider that there are any inherent flaws in this capitalist system that leads people to have to invest money to be able to retire in the first place. Like, he keeps on talking about how Main Street can make investing work for i What can I even say. We do live in a society and need to save money, and the general concept to invest in index funds rather than playing the stock market seems sound. However, this book presents an individual solution to a systemic problem and doesn't seem to seriously consider that there are any inherent flaws in this capitalist system that leads people to have to invest money to be able to retire in the first place. Like, he keeps on talking about how Main Street can make investing work for it, but like, what is this "Main Street?" Really it just seems to refer to rich and upper middle class white people who can afford to invest money in the first place. Furthermore he constantly conceptualizes taxes as theft which is just like ... taxes lead to services that benefit everyone!! He's also really into explaining investment income as "earning our fair share of whatever returns our businesses are generous enough to provide" and there's just so much going on there that I can barely handle breaking it down. Where does generosity come in to this???? Are taxes not exactly what he is describing here in a way that would positively impact everyone, rather than just the lucky few who can afford to invest?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    This is surprisingly a good book. I thought it was going to be extremely basic beginners guide and only scratch the surface of the investment world. This book does not really talk about the investment world, it just talks about index funds within the stock market. I feel like they should have chosen a better title. It is all about proving that index funds are the best (profitable while being safe) bet for investing, with hard factual evidence. Get rid of all your money managers, consultants, fin This is surprisingly a good book. I thought it was going to be extremely basic beginners guide and only scratch the surface of the investment world. This book does not really talk about the investment world, it just talks about index funds within the stock market. I feel like they should have chosen a better title. It is all about proving that index funds are the best (profitable while being safe) bet for investing, with hard factual evidence. Get rid of all your money managers, consultants, financial advisors, brokerages, fee's, mutual funds and just buy low cost index funds like Vanguard. It's that simple lol This is not a beginners book. One needs an intermediate level of knowledge on the stock market for this book. Definitely a re-read because it's hard to listen as an audiobook, I'd rather read about ROI %'s than hear them. FYI the audiobook does not follow the book

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bidhan

    “The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan.” This should be the first investment book that everyone reads. I think it paints a pretty good picture of how an individual should be investing - all the while re-iterating that his way is not the only way. I really enjoyed Bogle's writing style. Whatever he presented were backed by just enough facts so as to not get boring. Start early, create a good plan and stay the course! “The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan.” This should be the first investment book that everyone reads. I think it paints a pretty good picture of how an individual should be investing - all the while re-iterating that his way is not the only way. I really enjoyed Bogle's writing style. Whatever he presented were backed by just enough facts so as to not get boring. Start early, create a good plan and stay the course!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Wilde Sky

    This book provides a basic guide to investing for the long term. Some of the points made, such as have diverse investments, that past performance can be misleading and minimise costs, were interesting, but overall this book was a bit simplistic and it was very repetitive.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Readmont-Walker

    You know it makes sense.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    Worth mentioning that index funds generally require a $3000 initial investment. As is often the case (buying a house, for example), you need to be in good shape (have $3000 to spare) to get in on the "good stuff." Worth mentioning that index funds generally require a $3000 initial investment. As is often the case (buying a house, for example), you need to be in good shape (have $3000 to spare) to get in on the "good stuff."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Samarth Agnihotri

    Right books for intermediate and not for beginners. Deals with wide range of factors in investing. How emotions can lead to profit and loss. Importance of index funds and much more. How hiring a stockbroker is a bad decision. Only downfall is repetition of same points over and over again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Satterfield

    John Bogle is a legend not only in the investment world, but also the personal finance world. He recently passed so many have lauded praise on him and it is all true. He changed the investment world more than perhaps any other person of the last 30 years. I have been wanting to read this book for many years and recently picked up a copy. Given his recent passing I thought it was a good time to read. Let me start by saying that I do this (investing and personal finance) for a living. This review John Bogle is a legend not only in the investment world, but also the personal finance world. He recently passed so many have lauded praise on him and it is all true. He changed the investment world more than perhaps any other person of the last 30 years. I have been wanting to read this book for many years and recently picked up a copy. Given his recent passing I thought it was a good time to read. Let me start by saying that I do this (investing and personal finance) for a living. This review has less to do with whether or not the concept of "index investing" is correct or not and more to do with the actual writing/book itself. My personal belief is that the majority of investors should be using a component of index investing in their portfolio, but is by no means a panacea. One nit pick I have with the book is that for the first 200+ pages Bogle says nothing of this. It is not until the final 10-20 pages when he ultimately says that index investing should be a significant component of all financial plans, but he also says a component should be outside of that as well. What this results in is 200 pages of content that likely could have been shared in 100 pages or less. My concern is many readers will get bogged down with the early content and give the book up before getting to the good recommendations at the end. This was a loss of one star in my eyes. The other star was lost because Bogle almost completely ignores a significant drawback to index investing - investor behavior. This could be for two reasons: 1) it was written in 2007 before the Great Financial Crisis during which we saw the perfect example of human behavior wrecking an investment plan and/or 2) over the past 10 years the concept of "behavioral investing" has come to the forefront (again due to #1 and some high quality research studies). But make no mistake - the poor behavior of investors cannot be ignored when considering an index approach. No mention of behavior and no corresponding mention of why an advisor might be important at controlling this, setting an asset allocation, etc. Bogle founded Vanguard and even Vanguard has issued a white paper on the important of an advisor for investors. Bottom line - Bogle is a legend. This book has a ton of merit at explaining why index investing is an important part of a financial plan. However, it leaves a lot to be desired as a book about investing outside of explaining the merits of indexing. "A Wealth of Common Sense" still remains the best book I have read that completely covers this topic.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Good book about traditional index fund investing. Over audiobook, it is a bit hard because there are many percentage returns listed that are hard to keep track of without looking at it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alpha

    This is the 2nd time I read this book. The author promoted some common sense behind indexing, 1. Market return is composed of investment return and speculative return; and over long term, speculative return can be ignored. 2. Indexing is better because of diversification and cost. 3. Simple is beautiful. However, he also presented some biased opinions, intentionally or not. In chapter 5, he said that (non-index) fund return and investor return are different because one is time-weighted and dollar-wei This is the 2nd time I read this book. The author promoted some common sense behind indexing, 1. Market return is composed of investment return and speculative return; and over long term, speculative return can be ignored. 2. Indexing is better because of diversification and cost. 3. Simple is beautiful. However, he also presented some biased opinions, intentionally or not. In chapter 5, he said that (non-index) fund return and investor return are different because one is time-weighted and dollar-weighted, but index funds have this problem too. In chapter 8, he implied that those 15 funds that outpaced market by 1 to 2 percent per year were not significantly better than index. For a single year or a few years, 1 or 2 percent may not be a big deal. But for 36 years, that difference is huge. In chapter 13, the data provided is not convincible. In chapter 14, he implied that fundamental-weighted index won't be better than cap-weighted index if the market is efficient. But we know that market is not always efficient, otherwise Graham and Buffett couldn't find any undervalued stocks. In chapter 15, he focused on a disadvantage of ETF, trading cost, but neglected its advantages, lower operation expenses and tax efficiency. In chapter 16, he implied Graham would support indexing for the reason of diversification, but Graham's approach of seeking undervalued stocks is quite different.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    I rate this book highly because it is a quick read and convincingly outlines some very important foundations of stock investing. I took two key points away from the book: 1. Minimizing fees by utilizing low-cost index funds will almost certainly be more profitable over the long term than actively managed funds. Yearly fees on some of the cheapest index funds are around .1% - Actively managed funds usually range from .7% - 2%. 2. Tax minimization is one of the most important factors in investment s I rate this book highly because it is a quick read and convincingly outlines some very important foundations of stock investing. I took two key points away from the book: 1. Minimizing fees by utilizing low-cost index funds will almost certainly be more profitable over the long term than actively managed funds. Yearly fees on some of the cheapest index funds are around .1% - Actively managed funds usually range from .7% - 2%. 2. Tax minimization is one of the most important factors in investment success. The best way to minimize taxes is by investing in 401k accounts or Roth IRA accounts. In taxable accounts, the best way to minimize taxes is to purchase stocks and hold them for decades. Tax on gains is not paid until stocks are sold. Holding index funds for very long periods of time is a great strategy in taxable accounts for this reason.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Davy

    Sad to say this was one of my first finance books, but happy to report that I picked up a good one. Bogle hammered in the idea of safe and steady investing through index funds and explained how over time, buying index funds that track the S&P 500 is the way to go. I appreciated the manner in which he explained how he started the first index fund at Vanguard, but didn't necessarily push his own product too much. Although my one complaint of the book was he repeated alot of the same concepts over Sad to say this was one of my first finance books, but happy to report that I picked up a good one. Bogle hammered in the idea of safe and steady investing through index funds and explained how over time, buying index funds that track the S&P 500 is the way to go. I appreciated the manner in which he explained how he started the first index fund at Vanguard, but didn't necessarily push his own product too much. Although my one complaint of the book was he repeated alot of the same concepts over and over, it really did bring the point across and made the idea stick. Next up, Bogleheads' Guide to Investing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Schmidt

    This book can be summarized as: Point 1: Index funds are better than ETFs, mutual funds, individual stocks, etc. Here are 7 chapters using statistical and historical data to prove it. Don't believe me? Here's a chapter cap from another source that agrees with me. Point 2: Money managers have their own best interest in mind, and have fees. Avoid them and do your own managing. Here are 7 chapters using statistical and historical data to prove it. Don't believe me? Here's a chapter cap from another s This book can be summarized as: Point 1: Index funds are better than ETFs, mutual funds, individual stocks, etc. Here are 7 chapters using statistical and historical data to prove it. Don't believe me? Here's a chapter cap from another source that agrees with me. Point 2: Money managers have their own best interest in mind, and have fees. Avoid them and do your own managing. Here are 7 chapters using statistical and historical data to prove it. Don't believe me? Here's a chapter cap from another source that agrees with me. The information in the book is useful, but it seriously could've been written in ten pages, with an optional additional 20 chapters of, "Here are the numbers if you want proof."

  29. 5 out of 5

    beingCristina

    Truly a simple book with plenty of historical data and analysis which are truly worth spending time with. Yet, at the end of the day, it's just mainly about one thesis: "Buy and hold a low cost index fund" - which btw, I am now a practitioner by reducing my individual stocks and gearing more on Indexing. Truly a simple book with plenty of historical data and analysis which are truly worth spending time with. Yet, at the end of the day, it's just mainly about one thesis: "Buy and hold a low cost index fund" - which btw, I am now a practitioner by reducing my individual stocks and gearing more on Indexing.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Johnston

    Buy highly diversified index funds with lowest possible fees and hold indefinitely. End of story.

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