web site hit counter Minds Make Societies: How Cognition Explains the World Humans Create - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Minds Make Societies: How Cognition Explains the World Humans Create

Availability: Ready to download

A watershed book that masterfully integrates insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and more to explore the development and workings of human societies “There is no good reason why human societies should not be described and explained with the same precision and success as the rest of nature.” Thus argues evolutionary psychologist Pascal Boyer A watershed book that masterfully integrates insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and more to explore the development and workings of human societies “There is no good reason why human societies should not be described and explained with the same precision and success as the rest of nature.” Thus argues evolutionary psychologist Pascal Boyer in this uniquely innovative book. Integrating recent insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and other fields, Boyer offers precise models of why humans engage in social behaviors such as forming families, tribes, and nations, or creating gender roles. In fascinating, thought-provoking passages, he explores questions such as, Why is there conflict between groups? Why do people believe low-value information such as rumors? Why are there religions? What is social justice? What explains morality? Boyer provides a new picture of cultural transmission that draws on the pragmatics of human communication, the constructive nature of memory in human brains, and human motivation for group formation and cooperation.


Compare

A watershed book that masterfully integrates insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and more to explore the development and workings of human societies “There is no good reason why human societies should not be described and explained with the same precision and success as the rest of nature.” Thus argues evolutionary psychologist Pascal Boyer A watershed book that masterfully integrates insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and more to explore the development and workings of human societies “There is no good reason why human societies should not be described and explained with the same precision and success as the rest of nature.” Thus argues evolutionary psychologist Pascal Boyer in this uniquely innovative book. Integrating recent insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and other fields, Boyer offers precise models of why humans engage in social behaviors such as forming families, tribes, and nations, or creating gender roles. In fascinating, thought-provoking passages, he explores questions such as, Why is there conflict between groups? Why do people believe low-value information such as rumors? Why are there religions? What is social justice? What explains morality? Boyer provides a new picture of cultural transmission that draws on the pragmatics of human communication, the constructive nature of memory in human brains, and human motivation for group formation and cooperation.

30 review for Minds Make Societies: How Cognition Explains the World Humans Create

  1. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    In Minds Make Societies, Boyer sets out to discuss six problems in light of research primarily in evolutionary biology and psychology. [1] What is the root of conflict: “[W]e make sense of very diverse, occasionally paradoxical behaviors in terms of evolved capacities for coalition building and coalitional defense…. [T]he evolved systems trigger very powerful motivations… the outcomes of these unconscious computations take the form of pride, suspicion, rage, or hatred” (p. 65). [2] What is informa In Minds Make Societies, Boyer sets out to discuss six problems in light of research primarily in evolutionary biology and psychology. [1] What is the root of conflict: “[W]e make sense of very diverse, occasionally paradoxical behaviors in terms of evolved capacities for coalition building and coalitional defense…. [T]he evolved systems trigger very powerful motivations… the outcomes of these unconscious computations take the form of pride, suspicion, rage, or hatred” (p. 65). [2] What is information for: “[E]pistemic value is not the only factor that motivates humans to spread information. The need to be seen as a reliable source, the requirement to detect threat information, the urge to recruit others in collective action… are powerful factors. As they are not directly affected by the value of the information transmitted, junk culture is in some conditions both epistemically disastrous and evolutionarily advantageous” (p. 92). [3] Why are there religions: “[R]esearch requires that we leave aside incoherent terms like religion…. [T]he fact that religions are central to the institutions of many large-scale societies does not imply that it is special in cognitive or evolutionary terms…. “[I]ncreased security favors indifference to religion, that some prosperity is required for spiritual interests, that coalitional recruitment is among the strongest forces in social interaction” (pp. 120, 124). [4] What is the natural family: “[H]umans had a moderate but real amount of sexual competition. More important, long-term, intensive paternal investment is a characteristic of human pairs. This would predict a general amount of mate guarding in humans” (p. 156). [5] How can societies be just: “Ownership intuitions result in a vigorous defense of what we extracted from the environment, and a robust motivation to help others guard what they extracted against intruders. Our free-rider detection system delivers a powerful desire to curb the activities of cheaters….” (p. 200). [6] Can human minds understand society: “Obviously, the study of the political mind does not by itself translate into policy recommendations. But it could help us bypass our entrenched notions of how societies work, our folk sociology. It could also lead to a different vision of the political debate, one where we can use what we know of evolved human capacities and dispositions – … the motivation to form coalitions, the disposition to form families, the propensity to strange beliefs, the urge to invest in kin and offspring, and the capacity for extensive cooperation” (p. 244). Boyer is fully aware of the danger in using the findings of biology and psychology to justify social conventions and prejudices (e.g., patriarchy, racism, eugenics, economic models, among other things). He emphasizes that evolution is not destiny. The human animal is the product of myriad evolutionary pressures that generate both cooperative and selfish behaviors. We can be masters of our fate to the extent that we promote policies and institutions that foster our better natures. I would recommend Minds Make Societies. It can be a dense read but, as Boyer laments, the issues can’t be reduced to bullet points or mathematical formulae. Human motivations are complex, nearly opaque, but we are beginning to understand the “whys” of them. That these data can be (and have been) manipulated to justify some of the worst evils in human history is the great danger but not an inevitable one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Simon Lavoie

    Full review available in Anthropologica 16(2), 2019, https://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs... Pascal Boyer s'est imposé au monde académique et à l'attention générale par une analyse cognitive des concepts surnaturels, liant leur émergence et leur attrait à une combinaison de violation modérée et de confirmation des réglages de mécanismes tels la détection d'agence, la lecture d'intention et l'échange social (Religion Explained: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Thought). Il élargit à présent Full review available in Anthropologica 16(2), 2019, https://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs... Pascal Boyer s'est imposé au monde académique et à l'attention générale par une analyse cognitive des concepts surnaturels, liant leur émergence et leur attrait à une combinaison de violation modérée et de confirmation des réglages de mécanismes tels la détection d'agence, la lecture d'intention et l'échange social (Religion Explained: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Thought). Il élargit à présent l’analyse à d'autres dimensions, approchées par voie de synthèse de recherches multidisciplinaires, qu’il présente comme autant de questions en quête d'une science sociale naturalisée : Quelle est l'origine des conflits ethniques? Pourquoi succombons-nous aux rumeurs? Pourquoi, à partir d'une période récente, y a-t-il des religions ? Quelle est la famille naturelle? Une société peut-elle être juste ?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kim Symes

    Academically rigorous, but accessible to the general reader. The principal argument of the book is that society is the way it is because of how human minds work. The various cognitive processes, for which experimental evidence is accumulating, explains both the common and variable features of social phenomena such as religion, ritual, belief, politics, ethnic identity and groupishness, gender roles and morality. A central idea is that you cannot find out why people believe in certain things (eg th Academically rigorous, but accessible to the general reader. The principal argument of the book is that society is the way it is because of how human minds work. The various cognitive processes, for which experimental evidence is accumulating, explains both the common and variable features of social phenomena such as religion, ritual, belief, politics, ethnic identity and groupishness, gender roles and morality. A central idea is that you cannot find out why people believe in certain things (eg that ghosts exist or that different ethnic groups are essentially different) just by asking them. Much of the cognitive processing that produces our beliefs and norms takes place below the level of conscious awareness by systems created by natural selection. Also, different aspects of those beliefs and perceptions are dealt with by separate cognitive systems that don't necessarily communicate with each other. Therefore, when people are asked to explain their beliefs, they don't always provide accounts that make perfect sense. Their explanations are post-hoc rationalisations that attempt to impose coherence on the incompatible output of different cognitive systems. It is taken for granted that the way our minds work is a result of 2 million years of evolution, most of which took place during the millennia that Homo sapiens lived by hunter-gathering in small, related bands and tribes. This book is very interdisciplinary. It is basically saying that in order to understand society, you first need to understand a lot about individual psychology, and a little about hominid evolution. This generates an understanding of the sorts of cognitive biases and predispositions we have. It indicates why some kinds of beliefs and ritual practices are widespread and others are not. Boyer is primarily an anthropologist and so the book contains many examples of beliefs and practices in small scale societies. The strongest chapters are those that deal with religion and ethnic identity, where Boyer is in his element. The chapters on politics and economics are (in my view) not so strong and I felt that he revealed his own political bias somewhat here. For example, he discusses the economic advantages of the division of labour, without considering the psychological disadvantages. Also, when discussing the idea of redistribution he says 'some people may contribute a lot more than others but receive only a little more'. But of course, some people contribute nothing and get much, while others contribute every waking hour and receive nothing (eg carers). However, this is a minor criticism, and I would expect any book that ranges over so many topics to contain one or two dubious statements or generalisations. His main point in these chapters was to show that while humans the world over have a 'natural' sense of fairness that generates outrage when breached. Their interpretation of what constitutes a fair or unfair circumstance varies however - along political lines. Overall, the book is an easier read, with less repetition, than Boyer's previous book Religion Explained. Indeed, the central thesis of the earlier book is summarised in Chapter 3 of this one (so, no need to read Religion Explained really). The bibliography is huge and up to date, so very useful if you are inclined to read around this fascinating subject.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ziyad Hasanin

    أخيرًا وبعد 3 شهور أنهيت هذا الكتاب.. الكتاب من عنوانه يبين غرضه ونظرية الكاتب الأساسية: وهي كيف يمكن من خلال فهم عمليات وأواليات عمل العقل والإدراك البشري للأفراد فهم كيفية عمل وتكون الجماعات والمجتمعات والهياكل الاجتماعية، وهي فكرة كامنة لدي منذ زمن وإن كانت تعدلت كثيرًا. مبدأيًا الكتاب فيه الكثير من التكرار والحشو وأعتقد أنه كان بإمكانه اختصار الكثير من مناقشاته ولعل سبب إطالته هو أنه يحاول السير خطوة بخطوة وتحليل كل خطوة يقوم بها، ولكن بسبب أسلوبه غير المشوق بصراحة فقد كانت قراءة بعض الفصول أخيرًا وبعد 3 شهور أنهيت هذا الكتاب.. الكتاب من عنوانه يبين غرضه ونظرية الكاتب الأساسية: وهي كيف يمكن من خلال فهم عمليات وأواليات عمل العقل والإدراك البشري للأفراد فهم كيفية عمل وتكون الجماعات والمجتمعات والهياكل الاجتماعية، وهي فكرة كامنة لدي منذ زمن وإن كانت تعدلت كثيرًا. مبدأيًا الكتاب فيه الكثير من التكرار والحشو وأعتقد أنه كان بإمكانه اختصار الكثير من مناقشاته ولعل سبب إطالته هو أنه يحاول السير خطوة بخطوة وتحليل كل خطوة يقوم بها، ولكن بسبب أسلوبه غير المشوق بصراحة فقد كانت قراءة بعض الفصول منهكة ناهيك أن مناقشة المواضيع تختلف عن عناوين الفصول أو على الأقل تختلف عما يتوقعه القارئ (للأمانة لم أنه كل الفصول، آخر فصلين لم أقرأهما بسبب هذه الملاحظات ولأن الكتاب لم يكن كما توقعته) المهم، بالعودة لنظرية الكتاب فالكاتب هو باسكال بوير عالم نفس تطوري وعالم أنثروبولوجيا ويقدم في هذا الكتاب طرحًا لتطوير علم الأنثروبولوجيا والإنسانيات عمومًا عن طريق الاستفادة وربط العلوم ببعض، فالكتاب مليء بالأبحاث والكتابات النفسية والتطورية الأحيائية واللسانيات وعلوم الأعصاب. وفكرة الكاتب هي نقض الثنائية المشهورية في العلوم بين "الطبيعة" و"التربية" (nature vs. nurture) أو بين الطبيعة والثقافة ويكاد يكون الكتاب كله تفصيلًا لهذه الفكرة. فبعد أن بتطرق لفكرة "الماهوية" (أن هناك شيئًا ما في العالم الخارجي يدعى "بيئة" وشيء آخر منفصل يدعى "ثقافة" وينقضها ثم يعود لنفس النقض في الخاتمة، يبين وجهة نظره في أن المجالين متداخلان بشكل كبير وما هو "طبيعي" يشكل "ثقافتنا" وما هو "ثقافي" يقوم بدوره بالتأثير في بيئاتنا ومحيطنا. ينتقد الكاتب أيضًا الخوف من الاختزالية في العلوم ويدعو إلى "اختزالية صحية"، فلا يزال العلماء بالأخص في مجال العلوم الإجتماعية متخوفين من حشر علوم الأحياء والأعصاب والنفس في مجالاتهم خوفًا من "الاختزالية" reductionism لكن ذلك بالنسبة للكاتب عرقل البحث العلمي عن المجتمعات البشرية بسبب اقتصار تلك المجالات على منهجيات معينة وعدم الاستفادة من مجالات وعلوم أخرى ويرجع ذلك بنسبة ما إلى الفصل المنهجي الذي قام به بعض مؤسسي علم الاجتماع مثل إميل دوركايم حين فصل بين "البيولوجيا" و"السوسيولوجيا" --- مقدمة الكتاب عبقرية وهي تعتبر مقدمة منهجية لما سيقوم به الكاتب ويقدم فيها 3 قواعد تحت عنوان "المجتمعات البشرية عبر منظار الطبيعة": 1- لاحظ غرابة المعتاد: حسب نصيحة الاقتصادي بول سيبرايت: "علينا أن ننظر إلى عاداتنا البشرية من جهة نظر حيوانات أخرى"؛ الغوريلا مثلًا ستتعجب من أن قائد الجماعات البشرية ليس دائمًا أقواها عضليًا وكيف أن بعض القادة يفتقرون للقوة الجسمانية. يطرح الكاتب هنا فكرة أساسية في الكتاب وهي قدرة نظرية التطور على تفسير عادات إنسانية كثيرة (حبنا للسكر، حبنا للجنس، حبنا لصحبة الناس المصحكين، إلخ) بل إن الإجابات "البدهية" على هذه الأسئلة تقلب السبب والمسبب (نحن نحب السكر ليس لأن طعمه حلو، بل هو طعمه حلو بالنسبة لنا لأننا تطوريًا كنا نحتاجه في بيئات الإنسان الأول، وهكذا). في فقرة تالية يوضح مقدمة مهمة لفهم هذا التفسير وهي أن إدراك المعلومات المتوفرة في البيئة يحتاج إلى إمكانية لرصدها، المعلومات موجودة لكننا ربما لا نتمكن من رصدها Information is there only if you have the right detection system 2- Information requires evolved detection، المعرفة تحتاج إدراكًا متطورًا في هذه الفقرة يقدم الكاتب فكرته عن عدم وجود شيء اسمه "بيئة"، هناك فقط بيئات معينة من وجهة نظر مخلوقات مختلفة. بعض الطيور تعدل من مواسم تزاوجها وروتينها اليومي بناءً على عدد ساعات الشمس في اليوم وبالتالي فمدة الصباح في يوم معين يشكل جزءًا من بيئة هذا الطائر ويكون مدركًا له بشكل كبير في حين أن كائنات كثيرة اخرى ربما لا تدرك هذا الفرق في عدد ساعات الصباح أصلًا. يناقش الكاتب كيف أن هذه القاعدة تتأثر أيضًا بتاريخ المجتمع والنوع وتشكل جزءًا مهمًا من عمليات إدراكنا، البشر -حتى الأطفال منهم- يستطيعون تمييز الاتجاه الذي ينظر إليه احدهم عن طريق النظر إلى عينيه وتحديد مكان البؤبؤ والحدقة والبياض، وهذا يشتمل ما-قبليات عن أن هناك خطًا مستقيمًا بين العين والجسم وأن هذا الخط لن يعبر من خلال أجسلم صلبة مثلًا. يمكن للكلاب -بسبب تاريخها التطوري مع البشر- أن تحدد أيضًا أين ينظر البشر لأنهما شاركا البشر في الرعي والصيد حيث كانت تلك المهارة مهمة، بينما كان من الصعب جدًا على الشمبانزي أن يفهم اتجاه رؤية البشر - لأنهم ببساطة لم يمارسوا أنشطة تعاونية مع البشر (نفس الحال مع القطط بالمناسبة (. الشاهد: بالضبط لأن لدينا آليات إدراك مناسبة تعمل بانسيابية دون أن نعي بها، يكون وجودها غير مرئي بالنسبة إلينا. هذه النظرة تجعلنا نظن أن هناك معلومات في العالم الخارجي بانتظارنا لكي نحصلها -ضرب من الواقعية الساذجة كما يعبر الكاتب. 3- وهي نقطة خطيرة: لا تؤنسن البشر Don't anthropomorphize humans! باختصار شديد فالكاتب بناءً على النقاط السابقة يقرر أن هناك عوامل وقوانين غير خاضعة للنوايا تعمل في العالم - نظرية جبرية إلى حد كبير-، فالأشجار تنمو والأنهار تجري لكن ليس لأنها تريد ذلك. ومع تطور العلم أزيحت الأنسنة والحيوية (التعامل مع الطبيعة كأنها كائنات لها إرادة) جانبًا. وينتقد الكاتب أن هذه النظرة للتاريخ البشري (أنسنته) هي ما يعيق تكوين علم حقيقي لدراسة الأفعال الإنسانية. انتقاد الكاتب أننا نظن أن الأفعال البشرية محكومة بإرادة بشرية، وأن البشر يمكنهم فهم وإدراك هذه الإرادة، ويمكنهم التعبير عنها. طبعًا ينبه إلى أنه خلال التعامل اليومي والعادي مع الناس فيجب احترام إرادتهم وتفضيلاتهم وأن هذا أساس الأخلاق اليومية بالطبع، لكن ليس في مجال دراستهم علميًا. "المشكلة هي أننا كبشر نعتقد أننا نعرف أصلًا كيف يعمل تفكيرنا. مثلًا، نعتقد -دون الإفصاح بذلك بالضرورة- أن التفكير يقع في معالج مركزي حيث تقيّم الافكار المختلفة -الشبيهة بتلك التي نعيشها بشكل واعٍ- وتدمج مع المشاعر لتقدم إرادة وخطط للعمل. نظرية العقل "البدهية\البدائية" هذه تفيدنا في الحياة اليومية (مثلًا، نحن نقول أن الكمبيوتر أرسل لي إشعارًا أو أنه لا يريد أن يعمل، في حين أننا إذا أردنا تحليل ومعالجة أسباب هذه "الأفعال" فسنستعمل مفردات مختلفة تمامًا.) أنسنة البشر بهذه الطريقة حسب الكاتب توقعنا في فخ عمى إدراكي، -وهي فكرة لدي منذ زمن بعيد-: فالعقل والإدراك البشري يعمل عن طريق آليات وعمليات متعددة -حتى في أبسط الأفعال اليومية-، وكل تلك العمليات متخصصة في مجال معلومات معين وتحفز وتعمل بناءً على محفزات مختلفة. (بمعنىً آخر، بناءً على المقدمات السابقة، فالإدراك البشري غير واعٍ بكل العمليات والتفاصيل والعوامل التي يتعامل معها، وبالتالي هو غير واعٍ بكل ما يشكل تفكيره وأفعاله وربما تكون هذه الأفعال مبنية على عوامل ومؤثرات لا يعيها الفرد، أو على رأي هبة رؤوف عزت: "المشاكل اللاواعية التي تشكل الوعي") 4- تخطى أشباح النظريات الماضية يحاول هنا أن يزيح أشباح وركام تصورات ونظريات سابقة، مثل ثانئية "البيئة\الثقافة" أو "التربية\الطبيعة" والنظرة الشائعة عن علم الجينات أن هناك جين ما معين يؤدي إلى فعل ما، أو فكرة أنه ما دام هناك صفة ما تم اكتسابها عن طريق التطور فهذا يعني أن ها "جينية" أو وراثية. يقوم الكاتب بمناقشة 6 أسئلة: لماذا نشكل الجماعات ونتعاون ونتصارع؟ لماذا تنتشر الشائعات والمعلومات الخاطئة؟ لماذا يوجد الدين؟ كيف يمكن للمجتمعات ان تكون عادلة؟ ما هي الأسرة؟ هل يمكننا فهم المجتمعات البشرية؟ في كل فصل (أو الأربعة الذين قرأتهم على الأقل) يناقش من وجهة نظر تطورية كيف يعمل العقل البشري وكيف تنشأ نظم اجتماعية اكثر تعقيدًا والعلاقة بين الاثنين وكيف يساهم هذا الاشتباك بين إدراكنا وبين العالم في تكوين الجماعات أو في انتشار الشائعات أو في وجود الدن أو في الاحساس بعدم العدل، طبعًا هناك ملاحظات عديدة على هذه الفصول، منها أنه يميل بشكلٍ ما إلى اختزال وتبسيط بعض الظواهر(مثل الدين)، لكنه يقدم وجهة نظر جديدة ومثيرة جدًا في بعض الفصول (مثلًا، يرفض فكرة أنالبشر يسهل خداعهم -الفصل 2-، وأن تاريخ الأديان عامةً ليس مشابهًا لما نتصوره اليوم "كدين"). خاتمة الكتاب تقع في حوالي 30 صفحة وهي شبه مراجعة وتفصيل أكثر لنظرية الكاتب عن تعقيد عملية الإدراك والتفكير البشري. كنت أتمنى أن أحد مناقشة أو ندوة ما للكاتب يتحدث فيها عن فصول الكتاب، هو كتاب مثير جدًا للتفكير لكنه منهك جدًا ولو كنت أستطيع الاحتفاظ بالكتاب لفترة أطول لكنت كتبت مراجعة أطول :D

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Incredible perspective - skeptical, pragmatic, first principles thinking. More valuable as a demonstration of how to think than for any specific social insight (although there are some good ones in here).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    "Evolution designed..." is not a useful bi-gram. 🙄 "Evolution designed..." is not a useful bi-gram. 🙄

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kumar Raghavendra

    An interesting book that sets out to systematically identify the reason why many of our social practices have come into existence today - from religious affiliations to fairness in treating others. The narrative weaves between the make up of the human mind and how that has resulted in shaping our social structures today.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jukka Aakula

    Nice book on how the cognitive intuitive inference systems affect the society. This is not a tutorial on cognitive science. Rather start with Boyers "Religion Explained" which is also more fun and easier to read, Nice book on how the cognitive intuitive inference systems affect the society. This is not a tutorial on cognitive science. Rather start with Boyers "Religion Explained" which is also more fun and easier to read,

  9. 5 out of 5

    Olivier Asselin

    Fascinating in its scope, but often frustrating to read due to its unnecessarily complicated language.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Fascinating concept of how culture and society evolve according to the same scientific principles used in biology. But I found it hard to digest and didn't understand much more of the concept after I finished it. Doubtless the fault is mine, but nevertheless. Fascinating concept of how culture and society evolve according to the same scientific principles used in biology. But I found it hard to digest and didn't understand much more of the concept after I finished it. Doubtless the fault is mine, but nevertheless.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David

    From an informative perspective, this should be a 6 star review. Boyer rang so many bells in my curiosity tower. I'm knocking it down to 4 because I found the text a little dense, and I could have used more attribution and anecdotes. That said I took more notes than with any book in years. I love the metaphor he poses at the end of the book, that helped me think about his overall thesis. Think of the way human societies form as water trickling down an uneven, inclined surface. Where we can see t From an informative perspective, this should be a 6 star review. Boyer rang so many bells in my curiosity tower. I'm knocking it down to 4 because I found the text a little dense, and I could have used more attribution and anecdotes. That said I took more notes than with any book in years. I love the metaphor he poses at the end of the book, that helped me think about his overall thesis. Think of the way human societies form as water trickling down an uneven, inclined surface. Where we can see the water pooling in predictable pattern across different types of societies we can infer biological bases for these patterns. Some of the specific patterns he brings up that I found most interesting: • Human cognition is all about coalition building. We create in groups and out groups out of the flimsiest of excuses (lots of great scholarly back up here). With tribal warfare responsible for as much as 20% of the death rate among primitive males it makes sense this would be the case. • Men became the dominant gender in human societies because they were best suited for intergroup conflict (warfare) and thus had the most skin in the game when it came to coalition management. • What Boyer calls junk culture or low quality information (cultural ideas that don't seem to aid in biological aims at all) pervade human societies in part because of our inability to validate bad news. We are overly cautious because we don't know when danger is around. • Personal spirituality, the way most humans think of their religious experience today (with souls and salvation) is a relatively recent innovation. The connection between emotional episodes and personal belief actually typical goes in the opposite direction most, evangelicals say, would predict. One woman who studies evangelicals characterized the society as "islands of belief in a sea of doubts." Belief is thought of as a goal not a starting point.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Zakharov

    In “Minds Make Societies” Pascal Boyer takes an approach similar to Jon Elster in “Explaining Social Behavior” – recognize from the start that social science is hard, and then use examples from various domains to shed light on aspects of observed behavior. Arguably, the ultimate goal of social science should be explanation, not prediction. To that effect Elster concentrated on identifying mechanisms, however imperfect, that lead to behavior and then categorized conditions under which a mechanism In “Minds Make Societies” Pascal Boyer takes an approach similar to Jon Elster in “Explaining Social Behavior” – recognize from the start that social science is hard, and then use examples from various domains to shed light on aspects of observed behavior. Arguably, the ultimate goal of social science should be explanation, not prediction. To that effect Elster concentrated on identifying mechanisms, however imperfect, that lead to behavior and then categorized conditions under which a mechanism works or fails. Elster’s book is fantastic, but he was wise enough to mostly restrict himself to individual behavior, and even there it can get hairy quite rapidly. Elster’s examples of collective behavior are almost exclusively reserved for illustrations of failures of explanatory framework. Pascal Boyer shoots for society-level dynamics, so his starting point is group behavior - ballsy! In each chapter he reaches into a new area (religion, information, family, markets) and attempts an explanation in terms of often-subconscious cognitive computations which are bread and butter of cognitive anthropology. Of course, Boyer is aware that nature, nurture, culture and evolution will all have an effect here, but the man is bold – he states that purely “cultural” explanations are unsatisfactory, as are purely “evolutionary” or “genetic” explanations – as such it is meaningless to talk about nature or culture! Great, so Boyer saws off ‘nature’ and ‘nurture’ out of his vocabulary, and spends 300 pages redefining them on his own terms through cognitive computations. Yeah… Predictably a large chunk of the book is a disaster, despite the fact that many ideas are actually pretty good. So overall, what is interesting in the book is better covered elsewhere, while the original parts are a self-inflicted mess.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Boutté

    This has to be one of the most underrated books I've ever read, and I'm upset with myself that it took me so long to read it. Pascal Boyer takes a completely unique perspective with his theories about how minds create societies through the lens of evolutionary psychology. I've read many books on this subject, but Boyer offered something fresh with this one. He dives into topics about in-group cooperation, tribalism, why minds create religions, and so much more. I think what I loved the most abou This has to be one of the most underrated books I've ever read, and I'm upset with myself that it took me so long to read it. Pascal Boyer takes a completely unique perspective with his theories about how minds create societies through the lens of evolutionary psychology. I've read many books on this subject, but Boyer offered something fresh with this one. He dives into topics about in-group cooperation, tribalism, why minds create religions, and so much more. I think what I loved the most about this book is that each chapter starts with a series of questions that really get your wheels turning about human behavior. Throughout the book, Boyer isn't cocky about his theories, either. He takes a humble approach that helps us start thinking in new ways, and I absolutely loved it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rimas

    4,5 iš 5. Labai įdomi knyga kurioje visuomenės procesai, tokie kaip religija, šeima, konfliktai, galios siekimas ar teisingumas aiškinami iš evoliucinės psichologijos ir antropologijos mokslo perspektyvos. Po kai kurių skyrių norėjosi padėti knygą į šalį, suvirškinti ką sužinojau ir su kuo nors aptarti pateiktą informaciją. Nevertinu penkiais vien dėl to, kad ne kartą, kaip man pasirodė, autoriui tvirtai užbaigti vienos ar kitos tezės aiškinimą pritrūko dviejų trijų sakinių. Na, bet gal kitiems 4,5 iš 5. Labai įdomi knyga kurioje visuomenės procesai, tokie kaip religija, šeima, konfliktai, galios siekimas ar teisingumas aiškinami iš evoliucinės psichologijos ir antropologijos mokslo perspektyvos. Po kai kurių skyrių norėjosi padėti knygą į šalį, suvirškinti ką sužinojau ir su kuo nors aptarti pateiktą informaciją. Nevertinu penkiais vien dėl to, kad ne kartą, kaip man pasirodė, autoriui tvirtai užbaigti vienos ar kitos tezės aiškinimą pritrūko dviejų trijų sakinių. Na, bet gal kitiems tai neužklius.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Svetlana Shadrina

    "План постройки каяка определенно не закодирован в наших генах. И это, конечно, верно в отношении практически всего человеческого поведения." Очень интересная, но сложная книга. Иногда настолько сложная, что ты теряешь нить повествования и забываешь, о чем вообще шла речь. Но после нее уходит соблазн легко и поверхностно говорить о процессах в обществе. Мне особенно понравились главы о возникновении религии и веры (туда же теории заговора), о естественной модели семьи для человека (спойлер - сери "План постройки каяка определенно не закодирован в наших генах. И это, конечно, верно в отношении практически всего человеческого поведения." Очень интересная, но сложная книга. Иногда настолько сложная, что ты теряешь нить повествования и забываешь, о чем вообще шла речь. Но после нее уходит соблазн легко и поверхностно говорить о процессах в обществе. Мне особенно понравились главы о возникновении религии и веры (туда же теории заговора), о естественной модели семьи для человека (спойлер - серийная моногамия) и фолк социологии.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David

    At first, it seemed as though the book was going to take a bio-cultural approach to cognition and the construction of reality, but in the end, although giving a nod to biology & evolution, it became just another hymn to cultural constructionism. If you are a fan of the cultural constructionist model you will enjoy this book, but if you feel the model too limited and occasionally dangerous (offering a disconnect between narrative and objective reality) this book will not be for you. Rating: 3 out At first, it seemed as though the book was going to take a bio-cultural approach to cognition and the construction of reality, but in the end, although giving a nod to biology & evolution, it became just another hymn to cultural constructionism. If you are a fan of the cultural constructionist model you will enjoy this book, but if you feel the model too limited and occasionally dangerous (offering a disconnect between narrative and objective reality) this book will not be for you. Rating: 3 out of 5 Stars

  17. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Blackledge

    Minds Make Societies is author Pascal Boyer’s survey of findings from anthropology, cognitive science, evolutionary psychology (and oh so much much more) posited as the fundament for an evolutionarily driven science of sociology. Henry ford said: ‘whether you think you can or can’t, you’re right’. Applying this clever logic and turn of phrase to the special case of this book, I posit the following: ‘If you think you’d like or hate the book based on my previous description, you’re right’.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Arash

    A fantastic book! Only has major weakness in the lack of comparitove introspection of American culture as opposed to others near the middle of the book (I was shocked that he pointed out the "random" workers unite flags in Soviet produce sections without mentioning the often present American flags in similar circumstances). I feel like this form of analysis could fruitfully be applied to our more familiar culture (maybe Dr. Boyer is saving it for their next book) A fantastic book! Only has major weakness in the lack of comparitove introspection of American culture as opposed to others near the middle of the book (I was shocked that he pointed out the "random" workers unite flags in Soviet produce sections without mentioning the often present American flags in similar circumstances). I feel like this form of analysis could fruitfully be applied to our more familiar culture (maybe Dr. Boyer is saving it for their next book)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Diana Pollard

    The author implies that he will offer answers to his many questions about society and how it evolved. He does not. Instead, he states the views and conclusions of many others who have researched this and related fields. He consistently fails to offer his own original research or conclusions and leaves it up to the reader to figure it out on his or her own. Very disappointing book. Do not recommend it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emma Veitch

    Very quick comments. Interesting in particular the bits where Boyer talks about the purpose of making grandiose claims and the role of myth making in human societies... but a bit convoluted and he rarely gets down to making a central thesis or clearly stating his point.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul Sand

    my report my report

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stefaan Sterck

    i

  23. 4 out of 5

    IamSattam

    Many topics with a weak narrative. Has its ups and downs.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tobi Lawson

    A thorough tour of the current landscape of evolutionary psychology, and a brilliant addition to the cultural cognition school. Boyer combines simple and clear prose with a careful nudge on readers to think broadly and systematically.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    153 B7915 2018

  26. 5 out of 5

    Antti Jukka

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andy Adkins

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Ross

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julia B-P

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edward Woeful

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.