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This mystery set in the world of superheroes follows a reporter investigating what happened to her father: The Black Hammer, from New York Times bestselling author Jeff Lemire (Descender, Underwater Welder, Old Man Logan). All answers seem to lie in Spiral City's infamous insane asylum where some of its dangerous super-villain tenants reside. As she gets closer and closer t This mystery set in the world of superheroes follows a reporter investigating what happened to her father: The Black Hammer, from New York Times bestselling author Jeff Lemire (Descender, Underwater Welder, Old Man Logan). All answers seem to lie in Spiral City's infamous insane asylum where some of its dangerous super-villain tenants reside. As she gets closer and closer to the truth she uncovers the dark origin stories of some of Black Hammer's greatest foes and how they tie into the puzzle of what happened to Spiral City's greatest hero. Collects issues 1-4 of the Sherlock Frankenstein series & issue #12 of Black Hammer.


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This mystery set in the world of superheroes follows a reporter investigating what happened to her father: The Black Hammer, from New York Times bestselling author Jeff Lemire (Descender, Underwater Welder, Old Man Logan). All answers seem to lie in Spiral City's infamous insane asylum where some of its dangerous super-villain tenants reside. As she gets closer and closer t This mystery set in the world of superheroes follows a reporter investigating what happened to her father: The Black Hammer, from New York Times bestselling author Jeff Lemire (Descender, Underwater Welder, Old Man Logan). All answers seem to lie in Spiral City's infamous insane asylum where some of its dangerous super-villain tenants reside. As she gets closer and closer to the truth she uncovers the dark origin stories of some of Black Hammer's greatest foes and how they tie into the puzzle of what happened to Spiral City's greatest hero. Collects issues 1-4 of the Sherlock Frankenstein series & issue #12 of Black Hammer.

30 review for Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    The Black Hammer's daughter, Lucy Weber, tries to track down her dad's arch nemesis, Sherlock Frankenstein, hoping he will lead to her father. For the first time, we are introduced to the villains of Jeff Lemire's ode to comicdom. David Rubin's art is made for these villains. Cthu-Lou was amazing. He needs his own miniseries! The Black Hammer's daughter, Lucy Weber, tries to track down her dad's arch nemesis, Sherlock Frankenstein, hoping he will lead to her father. For the first time, we are introduced to the villains of Jeff Lemire's ode to comicdom. David Rubin's art is made for these villains. Cthu-Lou was amazing. He needs his own miniseries!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Eh. I thought it would be better. I thought this would be some new adventure with Sherlock Frankenstein, but it was actually just about Lucy finding out that he wasn't a bad guy anymore. Now, this all takes place before Lucy makes it to Rockwood in an attempt to free the heroes. So. Part of the problem is that I usually loathe prequels. I kind of figured that's what this was, but I thought it would be more of an untold adventure that he'd had, instead of a (kinda boring) origin story being uncovere Eh. I thought it would be better. I thought this would be some new adventure with Sherlock Frankenstein, but it was actually just about Lucy finding out that he wasn't a bad guy anymore. Now, this all takes place before Lucy makes it to Rockwood in an attempt to free the heroes. So. Part of the problem is that I usually loathe prequels. I kind of figured that's what this was, but I thought it would be more of an untold adventure that he'd had, instead of a (kinda boring) origin story being uncovered by someone else. I mean, I guess the story isn't bad, I just didn't care. In the course of her investigation, she also runs across a lot of villains and you get a silly/cute snippet of their origins, as well. Some panels were better than others, but overall the art didn't really impress me. There just wasn't a lot here that I liked, but hardcore fans of the Black Hammer universe will probably really enjoy this one.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    When the heroes of Spiral City disappeared fighting the Anti-God, Lucy Weber, the Black Hammer's daughter, was left fatherless. Now, fresh out of journalism school, Lucy tries to track down her father's greatest foe, Sherlock Frankenstein, for answers... I was wondering how Lucy eventually showed up on The Farm and this goes part of the way toward explaining it. Lucy goes tracking down her father's enemies in an effort to figure out if he survived the battle with the Anti-God. Her trail leaders h When the heroes of Spiral City disappeared fighting the Anti-God, Lucy Weber, the Black Hammer's daughter, was left fatherless. Now, fresh out of journalism school, Lucy tries to track down her father's greatest foe, Sherlock Frankenstein, for answers... I was wondering how Lucy eventually showed up on The Farm and this goes part of the way toward explaining it. Lucy goes tracking down her father's enemies in an effort to figure out if he survived the battle with the Anti-God. Her trail leaders her to super villains like Cthu-Lou and the Metal Minotaur before finally meeting Sherlock Frankenstein. It was pretty cool. The background of Spiral City is further fleshed out as Lucy plays detective. Analogues of The Shadow, Doc Savage, and Tarzan are touched upon, and various super villains are introduced. Sherlock Frankenstein's look reminds me of Mr. Freeze from Batman: The Animated Series if he lived in Victorian times. Part zombie, part mad scientist, Sherlock Frankenstein proved to be an interesting antagonist, for what little screen time he actually had. I didn't know what to think of David Rubin's art at first but I wound up liking it quite a bit, far from typical super hero art. It was cartoony and had a retro-horror vibe at times. Much like Kurt Busiek has done with Astro City, Jeff Lemire mines the human side of a world of superheroes for some interesting stories. Four out of five stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    So, this is a spin-off volume from Jeff Lemire's Black Hammer series, which gives us some opportunity to get some side stories and back stories. Black Hammer is about a bunch of aging superheroes--Abraham Slam, Golden Gail, Colonel Weird, Madame Dragonfly, and Barbalien--from a town named Spiral City who find themselves in some kind purgatory, living in an idyllic, timeless farming village. Before they got to the Farm there was some kind of war with the Anti-God [how I love that name that is so So, this is a spin-off volume from Jeff Lemire's Black Hammer series, which gives us some opportunity to get some side stories and back stories. Black Hammer is about a bunch of aging superheroes--Abraham Slam, Golden Gail, Colonel Weird, Madame Dragonfly, and Barbalien--from a town named Spiral City who find themselves in some kind purgatory, living in an idyllic, timeless farming village. Before they got to the Farm there was some kind of war with the Anti-God [how I love that name that is so stupid for a villain it is actually funny] and their presumed leader, Black Hammer, is now more than likely dead, who knows with these superheroes? The first two volumes are beautifully made but not that much happens. Lots of brooding and nostalgia and questions. Then Black Hammer's daughter Lucy comes into the picture and becomes anointed the new Black Hammer, gets spirited away to some para-zone, and the action seems to begin to pick up. That for me is the backdrop for the wild and crazy trip to the past that Lucy takes to try and find out just what happened to her father. In the process she finds the Hall of Hammer where she can find all this missing history, and then meets James Robinson, Doctor Star, who used to hang with Lucy's Dad. The Hall and Doc Star take her back in time to the Golden Age of comics where we meet, in addition to Anti-God, other ludicrous super villains with crazy silly names such as Sherlock Frankenstein, and a few other bad guys the Black Hammer crew took on in those days. In the process of inventing villains Lemire says he just came up with weird names, sent them to Rubin and the artist imagined the characters: Tenter Hooks, Black Stallion, Manaconda, Concretestador, and my favorite, Chthu-Lou. Funny, right? How do you think Stan Lee and the boys did it?! They made up stupid names for stuff. Those were the days of goofy pulpy invention. The art is the real superhero of this goofy volume, which David Rubin got an Eisner nomination for, a crazy stew of steampunk glasses, Chthulu-tentacled monsters, surrealistic eyeballs, psychedelic colors, cartoony characters. But underneath all the madness is the heartfelt Lemirean story of a girl's search for what happened to her Dad. I had some fun, quite a ride!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    This Black Hammer spin-off stays true to the spirit of the main book and, I suspect, contains plot elements that are going to be crucial to future issues of the core book. It really doesn't feel like 'additional reading'. The quality is just as good as the main book and the art, while stylistically individual, is in a similar vein, so the change isn't jarring. If you're a fan of Black Hammer, don't make the mistake of skipping this spin-off; you'll kick yourself. This Black Hammer spin-off stays true to the spirit of the main book and, I suspect, contains plot elements that are going to be crucial to future issues of the core book. It really doesn't feel like 'additional reading'. The quality is just as good as the main book and the art, while stylistically individual, is in a similar vein, so the change isn't jarring. If you're a fan of Black Hammer, don't make the mistake of skipping this spin-off; you'll kick yourself.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Honest, wacky, and brilliantly intelligent, a companion volume in the Black Hammer Universe, it’s a love letter to superheroes and super-villains, a meta-commentary, a magnifying glass on the important but scarcely asked thoughts and feelings. It’s also where Black Hammer’s daughter investigates the mystery surrounding his disappearance. It’s socially inclusive, starring an educated young black woman, refreshingly populated by other POC and WOC, simultaneously commenting upon and remedying their Honest, wacky, and brilliantly intelligent, a companion volume in the Black Hammer Universe, it’s a love letter to superheroes and super-villains, a meta-commentary, a magnifying glass on the important but scarcely asked thoughts and feelings. It’s also where Black Hammer’s daughter investigates the mystery surrounding his disappearance. It’s socially inclusive, starring an educated young black woman, refreshingly populated by other POC and WOC, simultaneously commenting upon and remedying their scarcity in the comic genre.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Wow what a turn around. The first volume of Black Hammer was good to me but not great. But volume 2? Awesome. Sherlock Frankenstein? AWESOME. Funny enough this title features very little of Sherlock. It's mostly focused on Black Hammer's daughter as she tries to crack the mystery on what happened the day she lost her father and the other heroes. Lucy is basically like Jessica Jones here and begins to search as many possible places, including villains that her father fought, to find out where She Wow what a turn around. The first volume of Black Hammer was good to me but not great. But volume 2? Awesome. Sherlock Frankenstein? AWESOME. Funny enough this title features very little of Sherlock. It's mostly focused on Black Hammer's daughter as she tries to crack the mystery on what happened the day she lost her father and the other heroes. Lucy is basically like Jessica Jones here and begins to search as many possible places, including villains that her father fought, to find out where Sherlock is. Will she get the answers she needs? or is this all for nothing. What I loved was Lucy as a character. Determined and strong willed, everything you want in a lead. I also thought the idea of having Sherlock's past be brought up by bringing multiple witnesses to his actions and such was perfect. The art is also really strong and plenty tribute to DC heroes too. My only negative is maybe it's predictable and not all that "needed" to get the Black Hammer story but it's still very much a fun read. A easy 4 out of 5.

  8. 5 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    *Read in single issues I really like the universe that Jeff Lemire is creating with his Black Hammer books. Sherlock Frankenstein is no exception. This basically feels like a rogue gallery. Lucy Weber, Black Hammer's daughter, doesn't believe that her father and his teammates are dead. This is a story of her investigation into the matter and her search for one of Black Hammer's greatest foes...Sherlock Frankenstein. Maybe he will have the answers she seeks. Also, for once, this is a Lemire book that *Read in single issues I really like the universe that Jeff Lemire is creating with his Black Hammer books. Sherlock Frankenstein is no exception. This basically feels like a rogue gallery. Lucy Weber, Black Hammer's daughter, doesn't believe that her father and his teammates are dead. This is a story of her investigation into the matter and her search for one of Black Hammer's greatest foes...Sherlock Frankenstein. Maybe he will have the answers she seeks. Also, for once, this is a Lemire book that didn't rip my heart out and stomp on it. Which, for me, is an unusual experience when reading a Lemire story. I definitely recommend this one for fans of Black Hammer. The world and the mythos are expanded upon and it is a great set up for what Lemire has coming in this universe next!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    This miniseries spinoff of Black Hammer follows Hammer's daughter Lucy Weber, which I was excited to discover, especially after her exciting introduction in Black Hammer Vol. 2. As a younger Lucy investigates the disappearance of her father and the other Spiral City heroes after the Cataclysm and their fight with the Anti-God, she tries to track down the city's greatest supervillain, Sherlock Frankenstein, who may hold the answers. Through her detective work, we meet some of the city's colorful This miniseries spinoff of Black Hammer follows Hammer's daughter Lucy Weber, which I was excited to discover, especially after her exciting introduction in Black Hammer Vol. 2. As a younger Lucy investigates the disappearance of her father and the other Spiral City heroes after the Cataclysm and their fight with the Anti-God, she tries to track down the city's greatest supervillain, Sherlock Frankenstein, who may hold the answers. Through her detective work, we meet some of the city's colorful villains, such as the Metal Minotaur and the plumber-turned-cosmic emissary Cthu-Lou. I love how much fun Lemire seems to be having with exploring this world, a vintage superhero universe solely of his own creation that also still pays nostalgic homage to the classic comic book eras. Please don't make the mistake thinking this is some throw-away spin-off. It is integral to the main Black Hammer storyline as it not only expands on the universe even more with it's rich world-building but it ties in to the main story in cool ways, serving as a prequel of sorts told from a different point-of-view, and further enriching what we've read and know from the main series. It feels like the events here may prove to be important as the story progresses. If you've read Black Hammer, make sure not to skip this!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Diz

    This graphic novel set in the Black Hammer universe explores the complexity of super villains. Why do they do what they do? What sets them down that path? Are perceptions of villains different from how they really are? The exploration of these questions makes you think about how superhero stories are told from a biased perspective. On the other hand, I am not a fan of the art style of this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Really love this series. Its what hooked me on Lemire and I became a fanboy. Great characters and writing, the worldbuilding is amazing. More a prequel slash story occuring at the same time. Artwork is awesome. Cant wait for Vol 3.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    I am so surprised that I enjoyed this. My reaction to other works by Jeff Lemire has been pretty lukewarm. But there’s something about this story about Lucy Weber looking for her father, superhero Black Hammer, who disappeared years before fighting the Anti-god, that captured my attention. I’m sure the colourful and kinetic artwork by Dave Rubín has something to do with it. I kept getting a goofy 1950s sensibility from Rubín’s work. I’m not familiar with any of Black Hammer’s and his band of supe I am so surprised that I enjoyed this. My reaction to other works by Jeff Lemire has been pretty lukewarm. But there’s something about this story about Lucy Weber looking for her father, superhero Black Hammer, who disappeared years before fighting the Anti-god, that captured my attention. I’m sure the colourful and kinetic artwork by Dave Rubín has something to do with it. I kept getting a goofy 1950s sensibility from Rubín’s work. I’m not familiar with any of Black Hammer’s and his band of superheroes’ stories, but that wasn’t a detriment to enjoying this story. Two small complaints though; there are six women in total in this story, and only one has any presence here. Also, both of the mothers were portrayed to varying degrees negatively, with one being emotionally abusive.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Writer Jeff Lemire and artist Dean Ormston have created a fantastic universe where superheroes and supervillains are honoured through an hommage to their existence. By creating a world where every little detail is a reminder of the greatness of comic book writers, artists, and stories, their franchise grows with countless potential avenues to expand and explore at every corner of their creative process. Serving as the first spin-off story of the You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Writer Jeff Lemire and artist Dean Ormston have created a fantastic universe where superheroes and supervillains are honoured through an hommage to their existence. By creating a world where every little detail is a reminder of the greatness of comic book writers, artists, and stories, their franchise grows with countless potential avenues to expand and explore at every corner of their creative process. Serving as the first spin-off story of the Black Hammer universe, the story rewinds back to the young Lucy Weber as she attempts to understand the events following up to the Cataclysm that ultimately struck her father, the greatest heroes she’s ever known, and her city, leaving her dumbfounded with their civilization’s loss. What is Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil about? Lucy Weber has never been the same ever since her father Black Hammer sacrificed himself for Spiral City in hopes of giving it the chance to live on. Without a hint of what happened to him during the tragic event that stole him away from her, she now channels her investigative reporting skills to figure it all out. What she doesn’t know is that the answers she seeks are within the stories of her father’s greatest foes. Collecting Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evils issues #1-4 and Black Hammer #12, the story offers a look at the villain’s perspective that made them who they are while unveiling Lucy’s journey for the truth. Without being as ground-breaking or refreshing as other story arcs within the Black Hammer universe, this spin-off serves as an interesting albeit unremarkable exploration of Lucy Weber’s story while also looking into some of the villains that have not had the chance to truly be developed in the canonical comic book run. With characters like Cthu-Lou, Metal Minotaur, and Dr. Sherlock Frankenstein, this volume offers fans the chance to discover their origin stories and how they fit into the tragedy that befell the well-beloved hero Black Hammer. Unfortunately, the mystery that plagues his end, explored through the young and inquisitive Lucy Weber, is disenchanting, to say the least, but still relevant to the original story to make this somewhat of a justified read. What this volume excels at is its character designs for the villains and artist David Rubín does a phenomenal job in illustrating them in their depressed or villainous forms. That is, however, all the credit I can honestly muster out for him as his artwork didn’t grow on me by the end of the story. The facial expressions of several characters are too expressive—if that even makes sense—with giant bubbly eyes and exaggerated emotional states. Otherwise, the fantasy elements in the story are much more consistent with the tonality desired for the sequences in which they are. The colouring is also fantastic, drawing upon darker shades and explosive colours to illustrate the grimmer or hectic moments. How he assures coherence in the artwork through colour schemes that fit certain characters is also uplifting. Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil is an interesting spin-off unveiling lore-essential character development amongst quirky villains. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I'm still a bit lukewarm to the nostalgia wallow that is Lemire's Black Hammer universe, but I'm glad to see that this spin-off series features Black Hammer's daughter. She has some grit and gumption, unlike that morose bunch stuck in limbo in the mother title. Heck, the villainous Sherlock Frankenstein has more going for him than they do right now, even though his story runs second on the entertainment scale to the origin and present-day family life of supernatural schlub Cthu-Lou. Anyhow, this I'm still a bit lukewarm to the nostalgia wallow that is Lemire's Black Hammer universe, but I'm glad to see that this spin-off series features Black Hammer's daughter. She has some grit and gumption, unlike that morose bunch stuck in limbo in the mother title. Heck, the villainous Sherlock Frankenstein has more going for him than they do right now, even though his story runs second on the entertainment scale to the origin and present-day family life of supernatural schlub Cthu-Lou. Anyhow, this story is way too predictable and doesn't really provide back-story that couldn't have been shoe-horned into an issue or two of a faster paced version of the main series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Benji Glaab

    More of a 4.5🌟 but time to show black hammer some deserved love. Ten years ago Luce Webbers father disappeared. The citizens of Spiral city believe Black Hammer to be dead. Luce has always had a feeling he is still out there. With little to go on she has vowed to find her dad and his friends. Now if for some reason you haven't read Black Hammer yet go do that first. This volume is a tie in, and really adds some depth to the overall story. However I do feel you can read this without spoiling the ma More of a 4.5🌟 but time to show black hammer some deserved love. Ten years ago Luce Webbers father disappeared. The citizens of Spiral city believe Black Hammer to be dead. Luce has always had a feeling he is still out there. With little to go on she has vowed to find her dad and his friends. Now if for some reason you haven't read Black Hammer yet go do that first. This volume is a tie in, and really adds some depth to the overall story. However I do feel you can read this without spoiling the main Story arc. After defeating Anti God it's believed Black Hammer and all his peeps were enveloped and destroyed in a massive detonation. Luce Webber with no remaining friendlies to contact decides to seek out the Super villain Sherlock Frankenstein. Lemire continues the theme of paying his respects to the masters of the comic industry through the ages this whole series really embodies the different era's very well, and I like seeing all the Easter eggs, and guessing where the inspiration came for various characters and settings. Most noticible are the Spiral Asylum which is totally the Arkham complete with Killer Croc, and various other baddies that appear straight off the streets of Gotham. Some of the villain designs were super creative Cthu-Lu was an easy favourite. The backend of the book showed some behind the scenes creation process, which was an enjoyable insight since the art was so unique. Really made all these crazy ass villains pop right off the pages. Lemire delivers a pulpy addictive read while further expanding our Black Hammer lore. Still waiting on Quantum Age which is the next BH tie in I have lined up.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    [Read as single issues] Set prior to Lucy Weber's adventure into the town of Black Hammer, this four issue series (plus lead-in issue from Black Hammer proper) explores the origins of some of Black Hammer's (the character) villains while reaffirming Lucy's resolve to go and find out the truth about her father's disappearance. Lemire proves here that he can turn his magnifying glass on the villains of the DC universe as much as he can the heroes, with fun takes on familiar faces reimagined for the [Read as single issues] Set prior to Lucy Weber's adventure into the town of Black Hammer, this four issue series (plus lead-in issue from Black Hammer proper) explores the origins of some of Black Hammer's (the character) villains while reaffirming Lucy's resolve to go and find out the truth about her father's disappearance. Lemire proves here that he can turn his magnifying glass on the villains of the DC universe as much as he can the heroes, with fun takes on familiar faces reimagined for the universe of Black Hammer. Lucy ties it all together with a good connecting thread of investigation, although the concluding issue misses the mark just a tad for taking us full circle right back where we started with a bit of a leap of logic. Artwise, Lemire pairs with David Rubin for a similar visual aesthetic to the main book but just different enough to differentiate it, which works very well with the real-world setting compared to Dean Ormston's take on the town of Black Hammer. If you're reading the main Black Hammer book, this (and the barrage of other minis that Lemire seems to be doing) expands on the world of Black Hammer extremely well, and makes it feel a lot more cohesive. It does stand well on its own though, and deserves to be judged on its own merits, which are just as high as the main book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    I like Dave Rubin's art a lot. The story is.. well, alright. The mystery isn't much of a mystery, because it can't change anything about Black Hammer's main story. Now it all feels a bit.. pointless? In a way, I'd rather have seen an actual Sherlock Frankenstein story - but everything has to tie back to the main series. I like Dave Rubin's art a lot. The story is.. well, alright. The mystery isn't much of a mystery, because it can't change anything about Black Hammer's main story. Now it all feels a bit.. pointless? In a way, I'd rather have seen an actual Sherlock Frankenstein story - but everything has to tie back to the main series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Despite the name, this is really the story of Lucy Moran and her quest for her father, the Black Hammer. It starts off with an excellent issue of Black Hammer itself, which gives a lot of background on who she is, but from there it turns into a snipe hunt that gets less interesting issue by issue. There's some good material on the villains of the Black Hammerverse, which feels positively Astro City-esque. But the actual hunt for Sherlock Frankenstein, in the hope that he might give information on Despite the name, this is really the story of Lucy Moran and her quest for her father, the Black Hammer. It starts off with an excellent issue of Black Hammer itself, which gives a lot of background on who she is, but from there it turns into a snipe hunt that gets less interesting issue by issue. There's some good material on the villains of the Black Hammerverse, which feels positively Astro City-esque. But the actual hunt for Sherlock Frankenstein, in the hope that he might give information on Black Hammer, really doesn't have any tension, and pretty much anticlimaxes at the end, apparently because nothing real can happen in this spinoff story. So, nice details, poor plotting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Greensmith

    "Global Planet reporter Lucy Weber is determined to find our what happened to her father: The Black Hammer! All answers seem to lie in Spiral City's infamous asylum, where its most dangerous super-villains reside. As she searches for the truth, Lucy uncovers the dark origins of Black Hammer's greatest foes...Could they be connected to the mysterious disappearance of Spiral City's greatest heroes? This was good, gave a little insight into some of the villains. The art wasn't to my liking, was "Global Planet reporter Lucy Weber is determined to find our what happened to her father: The Black Hammer! All answers seem to lie in Spiral City's infamous asylum, where its most dangerous super-villains reside. As she searches for the truth, Lucy uncovers the dark origins of Black Hammer's greatest foes...Could they be connected to the mysterious disappearance of Spiral City's greatest heroes? This was good, gave a little insight into some of the villains. The art wasn't to my liking, was a bit too cartoony (I know its a comic) but I liked the story, I would have liked to have read it chronologically with the rest of the Black Hammer comics, but not a bad mini-series...3 🌟

  20. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    I wish I liked this more than I do. It's just lacking a certain...something. I can see what Lemire is trying to do here (and in Black Hammer), but it just isn't working for me. Much prefer his work on titles like Descender and Sweet Tooth. I wish I liked this more than I do. It's just lacking a certain...something. I can see what Lemire is trying to do here (and in Black Hammer), but it just isn't working for me. Much prefer his work on titles like Descender and Sweet Tooth.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Valéria.

    I have never liked Rubín's artwork, but in this it worked really great. I have never liked Rubín's artwork, but in this it worked really great.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nafiza

    An earth changing event known as the cataclysm, a daughter searching for the truth behind her father's disappearance, a world where superheros and villains are commonplace. It's a classic comic setup but told with a heart that I've rarely seen. A stubbornly strong black female lead jumping down the rabbit hole as she tracks down the last baddie that saw her father alive. What's not to love? The plot is simple but not boring or condescending. Art style in Sherlock Frankenstein is quality without An earth changing event known as the cataclysm, a daughter searching for the truth behind her father's disappearance, a world where superheros and villains are commonplace. It's a classic comic setup but told with a heart that I've rarely seen. A stubbornly strong black female lead jumping down the rabbit hole as she tracks down the last baddie that saw her father alive. What's not to love? The plot is simple but not boring or condescending. Art style in Sherlock Frankenstein is quality without the over polished look of the DC/Marvel tradition and features crisp coloring, wonderful shade complements. I''m not a big superhero person with my comics. I prefer darker themes, slice of life, drama....but Lemire really pulled me in with this one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    Great add-on to the Black Hammer series, kind of parallel to the main story, we get deeper into the villains story, some of them, and obviously focusing on Sherlock Frankenstein. I like it a lot and would recommend reading for the Black Hammer fans and readers because on its own, without the Black Hammer, it isn't really worth it, you would miss half of it at least. Great add-on to the Black Hammer series, kind of parallel to the main story, we get deeper into the villains story, some of them, and obviously focusing on Sherlock Frankenstein. I like it a lot and would recommend reading for the Black Hammer fans and readers because on its own, without the Black Hammer, it isn't really worth it, you would miss half of it at least.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brylliams

    So this works as both a sequel to the first Black Hammer volume and as a standalone, as I wait for volume 2 of BH. This follows Lucy, Black Hammer's daughter, and her investigation into her father's disappearance (and the other superheroes) many years ago. Her investigation leads to the group of villains that plagued Black Hammer's life, and truth be told, some surprising secrets are told. Definitely recommend to those who enjoyed Lemire's new world. So this works as both a sequel to the first Black Hammer volume and as a standalone, as I wait for volume 2 of BH. This follows Lucy, Black Hammer's daughter, and her investigation into her father's disappearance (and the other superheroes) many years ago. Her investigation leads to the group of villains that plagued Black Hammer's life, and truth be told, some surprising secrets are told. Definitely recommend to those who enjoyed Lemire's new world.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Petr

    A pulpy comic about super-heroes. Although the name is silly and the drawing looks frivolous, the comic has quite serious content with interesting super-hero and super-villain characters. The story unwinds quite slowly, but it seems to match the content. Nevertheless, for some reason I did not get that involved in the story. At moments it seemed to me to be too much world building at once as we see a lot of new characters and ideas at once.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gav451

    Being as wise as ever I decided to judge the next book by its title. Because of that I chose a book that was probably out of sequence with the history of its own universe. Sherlock Frankenstein is a great title for a book however and the cover is a delight. I dived into this collected edition without really considering whether it was a spin off from another comic I have never read. The question then is whether this ruined it for me? No it didn’t. Well written with a ready supply of characters who Being as wise as ever I decided to judge the next book by its title. Because of that I chose a book that was probably out of sequence with the history of its own universe. Sherlock Frankenstein is a great title for a book however and the cover is a delight. I dived into this collected edition without really considering whether it was a spin off from another comic I have never read. The question then is whether this ruined it for me? No it didn’t. Well written with a ready supply of characters who were more than 2d this is a book that, even without knowing ANY of the back story, stood on its own 2 feet and kept me gripped throughout. In fact the detective form of the novel made it a good introduction to the rest of the universe which I now quite want to look in to. The story was very strong. None of the characters were what you expected and the twists inside it were not telegraphed and not obvious. The art was good and it fitted the universe well. This is kind of how you can do superheroes without every fight being the ultimate fight. The small battles are just as impactive as the earth shattering ones and in a well drawn universe with believable and sympathetic characters you come to care for they can be even more so. I have to mention Cthu-Lou who is my favourite character in a while. A fantastic concept, a fantastic name and one that is deftly handled. When I was first introduced to him I couldn’t help but chuckle to myself. Pathos, horror, humour and villainy are a tough mix to get right and this is as good an effort as I have ever seen. I was always happy in his presence. To be fair I think this is the only time I have seen this mix but that's not the point. The point it I liked the character and never tired of his company. It's a good read. Give it a go.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Cobbett

    This was...fine? A lot of the emotional beats just didn't quite land for me, whereas Doctor Star and the Kingdom of Lost Tomorrows (which I read prior to this) gave me many feels. I thought the plot line had good potential but never really delivered. Maybe if I had read them in reverse order I would have enjoyed this one more? However, I did feel a great deal of sympathy for (view spoiler)[Cthu-Lou and Cthu-Louise (hide spoiler)] and would have liked to have learned more about them, to be honest. This was...fine? A lot of the emotional beats just didn't quite land for me, whereas Doctor Star and the Kingdom of Lost Tomorrows (which I read prior to this) gave me many feels. I thought the plot line had good potential but never really delivered. Maybe if I had read them in reverse order I would have enjoyed this one more? However, I did feel a great deal of sympathy for (view spoiler)[Cthu-Lou and Cthu-Louise (hide spoiler)] and would have liked to have learned more about them, to be honest. (view spoiler)[By the time we actually got to Sherlock's story, I wasn't particularly invested and it felt like HIS history was quickly glossed over to get to the end. Was it too much to ask for some actual story time be spent on WHY he and Golden Gail fell for each other rather than only making a passing mention that it happened? (hide spoiler)] I just talked myself into changing the rating from 3 stars to 2. :|

  28. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    4.5 stars A great side story collection that colors in what Lucy was up to prior to showing up in the main Black Hammer series while also spending more time with several now-retired villains. I love the “reminiscing with old, seemingly reformed villains” trope that this is a great example of. I also love the idea that Sherlock Frankenstein draws heroes to Spiral City, in a villain-centric twist on the idea that Batman might be responsible for bringing his rogues gallery to Gotham. Rubin’s art, pr 4.5 stars A great side story collection that colors in what Lucy was up to prior to showing up in the main Black Hammer series while also spending more time with several now-retired villains. I love the “reminiscing with old, seemingly reformed villains” trope that this is a great example of. I also love the idea that Sherlock Frankenstein draws heroes to Spiral City, in a villain-centric twist on the idea that Batman might be responsible for bringing his rogues gallery to Gotham. Rubin’s art, previously seen in an issue or two in the main series, is really exciting here and reminds me of a more psychedelic Ren and Stimpy style.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    AHHHH MORE BLACK HAMMER!!!! YES!!!! I love this universe, I'm so happy that they are expanding it and developing all these killer characters...especially Lucy Weber, although I feel like some of her dialogue is a bit over-the-top melodrama (why all the yelling fellas?) But she's going to be great - I just have this feeling about it. I really especially love Cthu-Lou (and Cthu-Louise!!!! LE SIGH. I need to see more of her and to know she's going to be OK.) Black Hammer is the best superhero world AHHHH MORE BLACK HAMMER!!!! YES!!!! I love this universe, I'm so happy that they are expanding it and developing all these killer characters...especially Lucy Weber, although I feel like some of her dialogue is a bit over-the-top melodrama (why all the yelling fellas?) But she's going to be great - I just have this feeling about it. I really especially love Cthu-Lou (and Cthu-Louise!!!! LE SIGH. I need to see more of her and to know she's going to be OK.) Black Hammer is the best superhero world going.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Terry Mcginnis

    I am in love with the Black Hammer universe! This book fills in a lot of story about Lucy's quest to find Abe and the gang at the farm in the main Black Hammer title. We meet some interesting characters from the past, before Anti-God's attack on the city, and learn about Sherlock Frankenstein's life. If you're looking for an in-depth journey into the story of Lemire's universe, pick this book up; it is not an action title. It is meant as a companion to Black Hammer, but an amazing one. Highly re I am in love with the Black Hammer universe! This book fills in a lot of story about Lucy's quest to find Abe and the gang at the farm in the main Black Hammer title. We meet some interesting characters from the past, before Anti-God's attack on the city, and learn about Sherlock Frankenstein's life. If you're looking for an in-depth journey into the story of Lemire's universe, pick this book up; it is not an action title. It is meant as a companion to Black Hammer, but an amazing one. Highly recommended.

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