web site hit counter The Things Our Fathers Saw—The Untold Stories of the World War II Generation-Volume III: War in the Air—Combat, Captivity, and Reunion - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Things Our Fathers Saw—The Untold Stories of the World War II Generation-Volume III: War in the Air—Combat, Captivity, and Reunion

Availability: Ready to download

Dying for freedom isn’t the worst that could happen. Being forgotten is. (The War in the Air Book Two)~VOLUME 3 IN THE BEST SELLING 'The Things Our Fathers Saw' SERIES~ —"After the first mission Colonel Davis told us, ‘From now on you are going to go with the bombers all the way through the mission to the target.’ It didn’t always work, but that was our mission—we Dying for freedom isn’t the worst that could happen. Being forgotten is. (The War in the Air Book Two)~VOLUME 3 IN THE BEST SELLING 'The Things Our Fathers Saw' SERIES~ —"After the first mission Colonel Davis told us, ‘From now on you are going to go with the bombers all the way through the mission to the target.’ It didn’t always work, but that was our mission—we kept the Germans off the bombers. At first they didn’t want us, but toward the end, they started asking for us as an escort, because we protected them to and from the missions."-Clarence Dart, Tuskegee Airman, WWII ~ANOTHER BOOK IN THE BEST SELLING ‘The Things Our Fathers Saw’ SERIES~ How soon we forget. Or perhaps, we were never told. That is understandable, given what they saw. — [Someone in the PoW camp] said, ‘Look down there at the main gate!’, and the American flag was flying! We went berserk, we just went berserk! We were looking at the goon tower and there’s no goons there, there are Americans up there! And we saw the American flag, I mean—to this day I start to well up when I see the flag." -Sam Lisica, former prisoner of war, WWII By the end of 2018, fewer than 400,000 WW II veterans will still be with us, out of the over 16 million who put on a uniform. But why is it that today, nobody seems to know these stories? Maybe our veterans did not volunteer to tell us; maybe we were too busy with our own lives to ask. But they opened up to the younger generation, when a history teacher told their grandchildren to ask. This book brings you the previously untold firsthand accounts of combat and brotherhood, of captivity and redemption, and the aftermath of a war that left no American community unscathed. As we forge ahead as a nation, we owe it to ourselves to become reacquainted with a generation that is fast leaving us, who asked for nothing but gave everything, to attune ourselves as Americans to a broader appreciation of what we stand for. ~This book should be a must-read in every high school in America. It is a very poignant look back at our greatest generation; maybe it will inspire the next one.~ Reviewer, Vol. I This book picks up where the previous ‘War in the Air’ volume left off, in the air war over Europe. This collection includes portions previously published as ‘A Tuskegee Airman Over Europe’ and ‘B-17 Crew Prisoner of War Reunion’.


Compare

Dying for freedom isn’t the worst that could happen. Being forgotten is. (The War in the Air Book Two)~VOLUME 3 IN THE BEST SELLING 'The Things Our Fathers Saw' SERIES~ —"After the first mission Colonel Davis told us, ‘From now on you are going to go with the bombers all the way through the mission to the target.’ It didn’t always work, but that was our mission—we Dying for freedom isn’t the worst that could happen. Being forgotten is. (The War in the Air Book Two)~VOLUME 3 IN THE BEST SELLING 'The Things Our Fathers Saw' SERIES~ —"After the first mission Colonel Davis told us, ‘From now on you are going to go with the bombers all the way through the mission to the target.’ It didn’t always work, but that was our mission—we kept the Germans off the bombers. At first they didn’t want us, but toward the end, they started asking for us as an escort, because we protected them to and from the missions."-Clarence Dart, Tuskegee Airman, WWII ~ANOTHER BOOK IN THE BEST SELLING ‘The Things Our Fathers Saw’ SERIES~ How soon we forget. Or perhaps, we were never told. That is understandable, given what they saw. — [Someone in the PoW camp] said, ‘Look down there at the main gate!’, and the American flag was flying! We went berserk, we just went berserk! We were looking at the goon tower and there’s no goons there, there are Americans up there! And we saw the American flag, I mean—to this day I start to well up when I see the flag." -Sam Lisica, former prisoner of war, WWII By the end of 2018, fewer than 400,000 WW II veterans will still be with us, out of the over 16 million who put on a uniform. But why is it that today, nobody seems to know these stories? Maybe our veterans did not volunteer to tell us; maybe we were too busy with our own lives to ask. But they opened up to the younger generation, when a history teacher told their grandchildren to ask. This book brings you the previously untold firsthand accounts of combat and brotherhood, of captivity and redemption, and the aftermath of a war that left no American community unscathed. As we forge ahead as a nation, we owe it to ourselves to become reacquainted with a generation that is fast leaving us, who asked for nothing but gave everything, to attune ourselves as Americans to a broader appreciation of what we stand for. ~This book should be a must-read in every high school in America. It is a very poignant look back at our greatest generation; maybe it will inspire the next one.~ Reviewer, Vol. I This book picks up where the previous ‘War in the Air’ volume left off, in the air war over Europe. This collection includes portions previously published as ‘A Tuskegee Airman Over Europe’ and ‘B-17 Crew Prisoner of War Reunion’.

30 review for The Things Our Fathers Saw—The Untold Stories of the World War II Generation-Volume III: War in the Air—Combat, Captivity, and Reunion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Went into this book not expecting much and loved it. The stories of each individual and their job/speciality in aircraft was informative especially to a former airman who sat at a typewriter all day. I will read each of Matthew Rozell''s books. Went into this book not expecting much and loved it. The stories of each individual and their job/speciality in aircraft was informative especially to a former airman who sat at a typewriter all day. I will read each of Matthew Rozell''s books.

  2. 4 out of 5

    D. E.

    A MR. Military Aviation Action Review of Air Combat Stories of WW II (TTOFS) (TUSOT WWII- V3) MR. has penned the third volume if World War II Air Combat stories and the pilots who flew them. MR. has interviewed manu WW II air combat veterans. The first fighter pilots, bomber pilots, crew members, POW's, and he Tuskegee Airmen. Their stories of air combat cannot be matched by any other events in history. I have read many WW II book's of history, but one is quite close. The Tuskegee Airmen. When th A MR. Military Aviation Action Review of Air Combat Stories of WW II (TTOFS) (TUSOT WWII- V3) MR. has penned the third volume if World War II Air Combat stories and the pilots who flew them. MR. has interviewed manu WW II air combat veterans. The first fighter pilots, bomber pilots, crew members, POW's, and he Tuskegee Airmen. Their stories of air combat cannot be matched by any other events in history. I have read many WW II book's of history, but one is quite close. The Tuskegee Airmen. When the Air Combat and History "Walk of Fame" dedicated the plaque to the Tuskegee Airmen I met those still alive. I was in awe standing in their presence as was my father, himself a WW II Naval Air Combat veteran, a flying Chief. He had come to visit and had completed two tours of EDW Air Force Base and Museum. At the dining in that evening the officers and some enlisted that were combat veterans themselves celebrated the deaths and lives of those living. One of my personal friends, an SR - 71 pilot was a keynote speaker as was General Yeager. It was a night reserved for those who had done so much for our country and lived to tell about it. This is an excellent read for the genre.....DEHS

  3. 4 out of 5

    Terry Pray

    Stories told by those who lived it I have read many, many books on world war II and prefer the earliest printings I can find because subsequent printings often include edits can, and often do, change the original perspective of the author. Then I stumbled on the first book in this series and found exactly what I've been looking for: stories from the fighting men themselves. Preserving the oral history from those who are leaving us at a rapid pace for future generations it's a wonderful endeavor! Stories told by those who lived it I have read many, many books on world war II and prefer the earliest printings I can find because subsequent printings often include edits can, and often do, change the original perspective of the author. Then I stumbled on the first book in this series and found exactly what I've been looking for: stories from the fighting men themselves. Preserving the oral history from those who are leaving us at a rapid pace for future generations it's a wonderful endeavor! I am very thankful for Mr. Rozell's project, and thank all his students that participated in gathering the interviews with the WWII veterans. I've read all three volumes that are out now and am looking forward to the next release in a few months. These are a must read, and I hope someone else will pick up on the concept and start interviewing veterans in their own area.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David

    Second book I've read in this series. He does a great job with his interviews. Some have been done by his high school students, and are also excellent. These aren't comprehensive histories, but snippets and memories. He has selected these to try and draw a picture of what it was like, and, by chance perhaps, was able to give a pretty broad picture, with men serving in different units and different times, including a "Red Tail" Tuskegee airman. I'll be moving on to his first book, and look forwar Second book I've read in this series. He does a great job with his interviews. Some have been done by his high school students, and are also excellent. These aren't comprehensive histories, but snippets and memories. He has selected these to try and draw a picture of what it was like, and, by chance perhaps, was able to give a pretty broad picture, with men serving in different units and different times, including a "Red Tail" Tuskegee airman. I'll be moving on to his first book, and look forward to future volumes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brian Hooten

    Awesome Read I've read three of the books and each have been awesome reads so far. They are stories if not taken time by the author and his students to share with us would be forgotten forever. The great Veterans who were interviewed have all passed in the past couple of years and with them their stories. Thanks for sharing them here Mr. Rozell Awesome Read I've read three of the books and each have been awesome reads so far. They are stories if not taken time by the author and his students to share with us would be forgotten forever. The great Veterans who were interviewed have all passed in the past couple of years and with them their stories. Thanks for sharing them here Mr. Rozell

  6. 4 out of 5

    Judy Marshall

    The voices of men who fought and faced death during WWII. I am sure it wasn't easy for these men to tell their story. Very thought-provoking personal accounts that told me what my father who served in the Pacific would not. The voices of men who fought and faced death during WWII. I am sure it wasn't easy for these men to tell their story. Very thought-provoking personal accounts that told me what my father who served in the Pacific would not.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jane Thompson

    World War II Story Interesting book, because it tells the story of the war in the words of the men who fought it. This book is about the air war--there are several books in the series. The men tell their stories and also reveal their feelings.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joyce A. Wendeln

    They Saw It But We didn't get much of a description of it. You would think that lose lips were still sinking ships at this late date. I have read much better books about the Tuskegee Airmen. They Saw It But We didn't get much of a description of it. You would think that lose lips were still sinking ships at this late date. I have read much better books about the Tuskegee Airmen.

  9. 5 out of 5

    mark cheesman

    I really enjoyed reading the series, its first hand accounts from the men that were there. I wish there were more stories from the GI's. Great read well done! I really enjoyed reading the series, its first hand accounts from the men that were there. I wish there were more stories from the GI's. Great read well done!

  10. 5 out of 5

    leonard r. verhulst

    Good read Love reading about our heroes in World War Two Could not imagine being in their shoes. Amazing men and women.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Byers

    Great read and stories in their words Mathew To sell does a great job keeping all of the stories divided into parts that bring these words together. These fine men do the rest!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary Kirby

    Very good I enjoy the books that are eye witnesses to events and retell their stories. Mr. Rowell does a good job of getting these men to tell their stories .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    Great read Five stars, very good information about the past that we need to keep alive for future generations least we forget

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth W Ortensie

    Old Airman never die I will soon start volume IV, and I cannot wait to read it. I love to read the stories of these brave men.

  15. 4 out of 5

    sally reid

    Americans who cared What these flight crews did for the love of their country is amazing to me!! If only current Americans felt the same now.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roy Mueller

  17. 5 out of 5

    joe hollingsworth

  18. 4 out of 5

    Denis Lessa

  19. 5 out of 5

    William B. Wright, DVM

  20. 5 out of 5

    Linda McCary

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris F. DeNamur

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mary Jocz

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan Wellington

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bill Seaborn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard D Holschen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chan Merrell

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim Brooks

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bence Teo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mai-Lan Hanley

  30. 5 out of 5

    Albert Randolph

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.