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A military machine with a soul, a thinking computer in the form of a man -- X-51 is the Machine Man! Abel Stack gave a government-created robot a human face, nurturing the man inside the machine and calling him son. But Stack's death left that son, Aaron, alone and running for his life. The military wants to strip him apart, and mankind doesn't understand him -- but in exp A military machine with a soul, a thinking computer in the form of a man -- X-51 is the Machine Man! Abel Stack gave a government-created robot a human face, nurturing the man inside the machine and calling him son. But Stack's death left that son, Aaron, alone and running for his life. The military wants to strip him apart, and mankind doesn't understand him -- but in exploits crafted by two of the medium's greatest talents, he'll still redefine humanity. Few comic books were lucky enough to be graced by the work of Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko. Machine Man never saw an issue that wasn't illustrated by one of these creative titans. Now, the complete Machine Man epic is collected for the first time, and in one complete volume! Collecting: Machine Man 1-19, Incredible Hulk 235-237, & Marvel Comics Presents 10


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A military machine with a soul, a thinking computer in the form of a man -- X-51 is the Machine Man! Abel Stack gave a government-created robot a human face, nurturing the man inside the machine and calling him son. But Stack's death left that son, Aaron, alone and running for his life. The military wants to strip him apart, and mankind doesn't understand him -- but in exp A military machine with a soul, a thinking computer in the form of a man -- X-51 is the Machine Man! Abel Stack gave a government-created robot a human face, nurturing the man inside the machine and calling him son. But Stack's death left that son, Aaron, alone and running for his life. The military wants to strip him apart, and mankind doesn't understand him -- but in exploits crafted by two of the medium's greatest talents, he'll still redefine humanity. Few comic books were lucky enough to be graced by the work of Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko. Machine Man never saw an issue that wasn't illustrated by one of these creative titans. Now, the complete Machine Man epic is collected for the first time, and in one complete volume! Collecting: Machine Man 1-19, Incredible Hulk 235-237, & Marvel Comics Presents 10

30 review for Hombre Máquina

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Jack Kirby did two different styles of work. He either did incredible, creative work that blows away all the comics art being done by his contemporaries or he did rushed, thoughtless work that reveals how busy he was at the time. Fortunately, what you see in this volume is some of his best stuff. I don't know what it is, but I love the aesthetic he put into creating this character. Machine Man just looks cool. The second half of this volume is all Steve Ditko. And most might disagree with me, bu Jack Kirby did two different styles of work. He either did incredible, creative work that blows away all the comics art being done by his contemporaries or he did rushed, thoughtless work that reveals how busy he was at the time. Fortunately, what you see in this volume is some of his best stuff. I don't know what it is, but I love the aesthetic he put into creating this character. Machine Man just looks cool. The second half of this volume is all Steve Ditko. And most might disagree with me, but Ditko's later Marvel work is just sad. Childish and awkward. It's too bad, because there is so much great Ditko artwork out there. Now for the story: it's practically unreadable. Stilted, awful dialogue and crappy, formulaic stories. Too bad the story can't mirror the talent seen in the art of those early issues.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    This may not be one of Kirby greatest creations, but it is still entertaining. I was disappointed in that it claims to be the "Complete Collection" by "Kirby & Ditko" yet it doesn't have the first three appearances of the character from the last three issues of Kirby's series 2001: A Space Odyssey. So I'm not sure I'd really call this volume "Complete." The Ditko issues are a bit weaker and they feel like the contributors were really trying to get a grasp of the character and what direction to t This may not be one of Kirby greatest creations, but it is still entertaining. I was disappointed in that it claims to be the "Complete Collection" by "Kirby & Ditko" yet it doesn't have the first three appearances of the character from the last three issues of Kirby's series 2001: A Space Odyssey. So I'm not sure I'd really call this volume "Complete." The Ditko issues are a bit weaker and they feel like the contributors were really trying to get a grasp of the character and what direction to take it in. Still, for all the weaknesses, it is entertaining.

  3. 4 out of 5

    I.D.

    The two parts of this reflect the two creators. Kirby's half is whiz bang Machine Man turns into a car fighting space aliens, the second half, Ditko's is all about alienation and Machine Man feeling like humanity is persecuting him. Both interesting. The two parts of this reflect the two creators. Kirby's half is whiz bang Machine Man turns into a car fighting space aliens, the second half, Ditko's is all about alienation and Machine Man feeling like humanity is persecuting him. Both interesting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    The first thing to say is that this ‘complete collection’ isn’t. ‘Machine Man’ originally featured in Jack Kirby’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ stories which may never be reprinted because of copyright issues, alas. He’s also reappeared in a mini-series illustrated by Barry Windsor-Smith in 1984 and another one in 1999 where he was turned into a mutant hunter. Never mind. Let’s go with what we have here. As part of a US government project, a Doctor Broadhurst invented the X-Models, robots that were su The first thing to say is that this ‘complete collection’ isn’t. ‘Machine Man’ originally featured in Jack Kirby’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ stories which may never be reprinted because of copyright issues, alas. He’s also reappeared in a mini-series illustrated by Barry Windsor-Smith in 1984 and another one in 1999 where he was turned into a mutant hunter. Never mind. Let’s go with what we have here. As part of a US government project, a Doctor Broadhurst invented the X-Models, robots that were superior duplicate men. They all went mad except X-51, our hero, who was taken into the home of brilliant psychiatrist Abel Stack and treated like a son. He took the human name of Aaron Stack. The government ordered all the robots destroyed and General Kragg is on the case. He lost several men and his left eye fighting Machine Man’s kin and has a fervour for the job equal to that of General Ross for chasing the Hulk. In issue #1, Machine Man befriends a psychiatrist named Peter Spaulding, one of whose patients is used to allow an Autocron to come to Earth. The Autocrons are a whole race of sentient robots who like conquering fleshy people. Later, a US Senator decides he can further his career by campaigning against the Machine Man menace. The art is good Kirby. There is some variation in the layouts. In issue # 1 pages 2 -3, he does long panels to show Machine Man descending a cliff space. In issue # 2, a shot of Machine Man looking round a door cuts to a shot of a nurse looking round a door in the exact same pose. Neat. In issue # 9 on page 153 of this edition, there’s a nine-panel sequence in which Machine Man shows someone how he escaped an atom bomb blast. None of this is particularly mind-boggling but it does show that Kirby was focused on the job and doing good work. Plotting is pretty tight. At his worst, Kirby would spread out a thin plot over several issues by doing plenty of big panels accompanied by splash pages or double-page panels and ‘chapters’ as filler. The Autocron yarn is a bit dragged out but, if you removed the rose-tinted nostalgia spectacles, you can see that it’s no more so than some Fantastic Four stories yarns in the later 1960s. In general, you get a fair bit of story per issue. I didn’t feel cheated. Which brings me to the script. I don’t know where Kirby got his idea of which words to emphasise in speech and captions but it isn’t the standard practice. You get used to it. There were a couple of glitches in the dialogue though. Spalding says of a patient: ‘This kind of case is unique but not rare.’ Later Machine Man says: ‘I’m picking up inter-stellar transmissions!’ Spalding replies, ‘You’re talking about signals from beyond our own galaxy!’ Er, no. Interstellar is in the same galaxy. Jack turned it out pretty fast and errors are inevitable but consulting editor Artie Simek should have picked these up. Kirby’s run of ‘Machine Man’ finished with issue # 9 from December 1978. He began again in his own title with issue # 10 in August 1979 which was preceded by him co-starring in The Incredible Hulk # 234-237 from April to July 1979. With scripting by Roger Stern and art by ’Our pal’ Sal Buscema, these are okay. At the end of Kirby’s run, he introduced a well-funded, high-tech gangster group called Inter-Gang – no, it was the Corporation, sorry – and they feature in these Hulk stories. Happily, the contents page gives all these dates and one doesn’t have to check them on the Internet. So to Steve Ditko. I bought the book as a Kirby completist thing because anything by Jack always doubles in price when it goes second-hand, so it’s best to grab the fresh printings quickly. Ditko was a bonus and it was a pleasant surprise that he wasn’t slacking either and turned in an art job worthy of the good old days. Largely, I think, because he was inking his own pencils. Scripter Marv Wolfman gave our hero a better human mask and a job in an insurance company so he became more like a conventional super-hero with a cast of colleagues and a secret identity to hide. Senator Brickman is still out to get him and there are some low-grade villains to contend with as well. All in all, it’s like a decent superhero comic from the 1960s with no gory violence or misery but enough drama to go round. I thought the stories went downhill somewhat when Tom DeFalco took over with issue # 15 but that was mostly because of the awful alliteration he resorted to in both dialogue and captions. The plots were okay. The artists are headlined in the title because they’re the reason to buy the book. Kirby and Ditko have now achieved almost legendary status because of the terrific stuff they produced at Marvel in the 1960s. This book has Kirby doing five to six panels per page and Ditko doing six to nine panels. The art is not at all far from the quality they produced back in 1965 and, if you squint a bit or take a small drink or anything to give them a bit of leeway, it’s easy to imagine that this is a reprint from those halcyon days of yore. Eamonn Murphy This review first appeared at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/

  5. 5 out of 5

    Devero

    Ristampa delle prime storie di uno dei miei personaggi preferiti. Machine Man, insieme a gli Eterni, è il miglior personaggio, con le migliori storie, della seconda venuta di Kirby alla Marvel. La sua serie personale, alla fine degli anni '70, è durata solo 9 numeri, tutti pubblicati in Italia su "Gli Eterni" della Corno. Ma su questo personaggio ci sarebbe stato molto ancora da scrivere. Così la serie ripartì dal numero 10, con i testi di Marv Wolfman prima e di Tom De Falco poi. Ma il vero scr Ristampa delle prime storie di uno dei miei personaggi preferiti. Machine Man, insieme a gli Eterni, è il miglior personaggio, con le migliori storie, della seconda venuta di Kirby alla Marvel. La sua serie personale, alla fine degli anni '70, è durata solo 9 numeri, tutti pubblicati in Italia su "Gli Eterni" della Corno. Ma su questo personaggio ci sarebbe stato molto ancora da scrivere. Così la serie ripartì dal numero 10, con i testi di Marv Wolfman prima e di Tom De Falco poi. Ma il vero scrittore fu Steve Ditko, che realizzò sia le matite che le chine. Un Ditko alquanto minimale, in calando come stile. A oltre 15 anni dai suoi esordi sulla Marvel, il suo stile di disegno è veramente ai limiti del guardabile, caricaturale spesso senza volerlo essere, con donne che dovrebbero essere belle e invece sono inguardabili e visi tutti troppo simili. Insomma, è molto peggiorato dai tempi del suo Spider-Man e soprattutto del suo Dr. Strange. Quantomeno un inchiostratore potevano e dovevano affiancarglielo, sostengo io. Certo, con un caratteraccio come il suo probabilmente non avrebbe accettato. Tra i cicli dei due autori trascorsero diversi mesi, nei quali Machine Man visse un avventura di tre albi su Incredible Hulk, qui pubblicate. Essendo una storia di Hulk, Machine Man è solo un comprimario, ma è ben scritto e decisamente rispettoso della modo di Kirby di caratterizzare il personaggio. Cosa che non farà Ditko, specie nelle prime storie. Inoltre i disegni di quelle storie di Hulk sono di Sal Buscema, una garanzia. Erano gli anni nei quali era influenzato dal fratello maggiore John e dal Re, Jack Kirby. Immagino sia per motivi di diritti che questa collezione manchi delle origini di Mr. Macchina, per riutilizzare il nome con cui l'Editoriale Corno tradusse il personaggio sulla sua mitica testata "Gli Eterni". La testata originale, "2001: A Space Odissey" era una di quelle pubblicate su licenza. Ad ogni buon conto ci metto 4 stelle e mezzo per le prime nove storie di Kirby, 3 stelle e mezzo per quelle a fianco di Hulk e 2 stelle, perché sono buono, ai dieci albi di Ditko. La media farebbe 3 stelle e mezza.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Christmas gift! Recapturing my lost youth! Loved, loved, LOVED the Kirby half of this book. His art explodes off the page, action sequences are amazing, story-line is solid. And all of that still holds up, 40-45 years after being written/drawn. As for Ditko's half... well... sorry true Ditko fans! He was visionary in the 60's but these newer stories just don't hold up. His art (to me) seems simplistic and out of touch here. As does the storyline (OK.. it's Marv Wolfman writing/editing, but surel Christmas gift! Recapturing my lost youth! Loved, loved, LOVED the Kirby half of this book. His art explodes off the page, action sequences are amazing, story-line is solid. And all of that still holds up, 40-45 years after being written/drawn. As for Ditko's half... well... sorry true Ditko fans! He was visionary in the 60's but these newer stories just don't hold up. His art (to me) seems simplistic and out of touch here. As does the storyline (OK.. it's Marv Wolfman writing/editing, but surely with Ditko input) ex: Machine Man takes a job in the insurance industry and puts up with office politics, romance triangles.... WHAT!? That's quite a contrast to Kirby's story-line of Machine Man saving the earth from a galactic invasion force. In the Ditko stories, such an abundance of allegorical alliteration! Not to mention the (most often unneeded) expository dialog with exclamations, "I've got to use my hydraulic legs to push on these rocks!" All that said, it was terrific seeing the opposing takes of two comic book titans (Kirby and Ditko) with same title character in the same volume.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    The sophisticated robot that yearns to be human is a common theme in science fiction, and a decent premise for a comic book. Jack Kirby frequently explored similar big issues in his work with entertaining results. However, the 1970's Machine Man series collected here left me disappointed. I liked the Kirby art in the early issues but the stories were mundane, standard superhero fare of the era. Machine Man occasionally makes reference to his struggle to understand humanity and control his emotio The sophisticated robot that yearns to be human is a common theme in science fiction, and a decent premise for a comic book. Jack Kirby frequently explored similar big issues in his work with entertaining results. However, the 1970's Machine Man series collected here left me disappointed. I liked the Kirby art in the early issues but the stories were mundane, standard superhero fare of the era. Machine Man occasionally makes reference to his struggle to understand humanity and control his emotional impulses, but mostly he just flies around, punches bad guys and engages in typical superhero hijinks. The usual seventies comic writing style also tends to slow down the stories. Characters are unnecessarily wordy, constantly narrating every action even though the reader can clearly look at the illustrations and see what is happening. It could be enjoyable in small doses, but as the series progressed, I found my attention flagging. I’d hoped for more from big names like Kirby and Ditko, but to me, this has the feel of a very conventional monthly series churned out without much attention paid to the characters or story quality. Maybe I expect too much from a 1970's comic, but this was a letdown.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The first nine issues, the Kirby issues, are okay. They're lackluster by Kirby standards, but there's still a little of the old vigor and imagination there. It's okay to miss it, but you won't regret it if you take some time to read it. That's followed by three issues of Incredible Hulk by Stern and Buscema, which look nice (Sal's great), but are shallow and inane. Marv Wolfman and Ditko take over the Machine Man book next, and an issue and a half later, I'd had enough. Tedium could learn someth The first nine issues, the Kirby issues, are okay. They're lackluster by Kirby standards, but there's still a little of the old vigor and imagination there. It's okay to miss it, but you won't regret it if you take some time to read it. That's followed by three issues of Incredible Hulk by Stern and Buscema, which look nice (Sal's great), but are shallow and inane. Marv Wolfman and Ditko take over the Machine Man book next, and an issue and a half later, I'd had enough. Tedium could learn something from these issues. There're 8.5 issues left in the book that I'll never read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elfbiter

    Classic if somewhat out-of-date stuff

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Great collection. I read bits and pieces of Machine Man when reprinted in "Forces in Combat" from Marvel UK in the 80s. Loved being able to read them all in sequence here. Great collection. I read bits and pieces of Machine Man when reprinted in "Forces in Combat" from Marvel UK in the 80s. Loved being able to read them all in sequence here.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Martin Maenza

    This was a character I knew from guest appearances in other Marvel titles in the 70’s. Here - I struggled with the Kirby and later Ditko art.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Acton Northrop

    It's a bit jarring to go from Kirby to John Buscema to Ditko in the same book but it's unquestionably a steal to have this much great art in one package. Kirby creates Marvel's most pointedly dickish robot hero in this proto-Inspector Gadget, who just wants to be left alone to listen to Billy Joel. The Ditko half plunges Aaron Stack/X-51 deeper into the Marvel U while doubling down on MM's unlikeability by making him the biggest jerk at an insurance company, and sustaining repeated, embarrassing It's a bit jarring to go from Kirby to John Buscema to Ditko in the same book but it's unquestionably a steal to have this much great art in one package. Kirby creates Marvel's most pointedly dickish robot hero in this proto-Inspector Gadget, who just wants to be left alone to listen to Billy Joel. The Ditko half plunges Aaron Stack/X-51 deeper into the Marvel U while doubling down on MM's unlikeability by making him the biggest jerk at an insurance company, and sustaining repeated, embarrassing facial injuries. If you loved how MM was portrayed in Nextwave (and who didn't?) this is surprisingly close to that characterization. Too bad the 2001: a space odyssey comics by Kirby that gave us MM aren't here, though, and likely won't be anytime soon due to licensing, but this is essential 70s Kirby on its own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    Tomo integral del Hombre Máquina de Kirby editado en la colección Marvel Limited Edition.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Waylon

  15. 4 out of 5

    James Tolson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kellen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Armani

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rob Rooney

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pat

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matthew J. Costello

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nickviola

  25. 4 out of 5

    Trey Conrad

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andreas Mars

  27. 4 out of 5

    Evan Schmalz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ta0paipai

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fer

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bob

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