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The Bible And Racism: What the Bible REALLY Says about Racism

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Racial discord seems to be at a fever pitch currently, and people are nervous. With a polarizing U.S. president, an explosive white supremacy rally taking place in Charlottesville, constant terror attacks all across Europe, and a new racial controversy every week, most countries seem to remain constantly on a heightened state of racial anxiety and alert. Is there a solutio Racial discord seems to be at a fever pitch currently, and people are nervous. With a polarizing U.S. president, an explosive white supremacy rally taking place in Charlottesville, constant terror attacks all across Europe, and a new racial controversy every week, most countries seem to remain constantly on a heightened state of racial anxiety and alert. Is there a solution, or is violence and more painful strife inevitable? The Bible and Racism examines what the Bible really has to say about racism. Does the Bible actually justify racism? (No!) Does the Bible justify race-based slavery? (Not at all!) Does the Bible advocate for the segregation of races on Sunday mornings (Quite the opposite!) Does the Bible justify servanthood and bond-servants? (Yes, it does - read inside to see how that is a good thing.) This book covers comprehensively every major issue of race and gives a plain-sense answer from the Word of God. You will learn how Confederate pastors twisted Scripture to justify their abhorrent and unbiblical theology. You will see how pastors and government leaders during the 1950s-1970s sought to explain their segregationist policies by abusing the clear teachings of Scripture. Ultimately, you will see that God created all humans (no matter their ethnicity, skin color, nor nationality) in His Image. You will see that Jesus prayed for His followers (Red, Yellow, Black and White) to all be unified and together in the deepest way possible. Finally, you will see that the church in Heaven is made up of every ethnicity, skin color and nationality all worshiping on level ground together, shoulder to shoulder, and you will come to understand that Jesus has called His church on earth to reflect the reality of the unified church in Heaven! My name is Chase, and I am a white, Southern-Baptist pastor from Birmingham, Alabama, USA - the epicenter of the Civil Rights Movement. Just a few years ago, I realized that maintaining a quietly neutral attitude about race and racism wasn't going to cut it anymore. As a pastor, I thought that I could help out with racial issues by being nice to everybody, cultivating friendships with people of other races, and decrying racism from time to time on social media. That was a naive strategy, and it is not nearly enough. Jesus, in His Word, calls believers to PURSUE peace and oneness, and that pursuit is what this book is about. Racial harmony is possible and racial unity is possible, but there are many false, but old and dearly held beliefs, that will have to be crushed under the hammer of God's Word in order to get to a place of real peace. Please join me and let's see What the Bible REALLY Says about Racism!


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Racial discord seems to be at a fever pitch currently, and people are nervous. With a polarizing U.S. president, an explosive white supremacy rally taking place in Charlottesville, constant terror attacks all across Europe, and a new racial controversy every week, most countries seem to remain constantly on a heightened state of racial anxiety and alert. Is there a solutio Racial discord seems to be at a fever pitch currently, and people are nervous. With a polarizing U.S. president, an explosive white supremacy rally taking place in Charlottesville, constant terror attacks all across Europe, and a new racial controversy every week, most countries seem to remain constantly on a heightened state of racial anxiety and alert. Is there a solution, or is violence and more painful strife inevitable? The Bible and Racism examines what the Bible really has to say about racism. Does the Bible actually justify racism? (No!) Does the Bible justify race-based slavery? (Not at all!) Does the Bible advocate for the segregation of races on Sunday mornings (Quite the opposite!) Does the Bible justify servanthood and bond-servants? (Yes, it does - read inside to see how that is a good thing.) This book covers comprehensively every major issue of race and gives a plain-sense answer from the Word of God. You will learn how Confederate pastors twisted Scripture to justify their abhorrent and unbiblical theology. You will see how pastors and government leaders during the 1950s-1970s sought to explain their segregationist policies by abusing the clear teachings of Scripture. Ultimately, you will see that God created all humans (no matter their ethnicity, skin color, nor nationality) in His Image. You will see that Jesus prayed for His followers (Red, Yellow, Black and White) to all be unified and together in the deepest way possible. Finally, you will see that the church in Heaven is made up of every ethnicity, skin color and nationality all worshiping on level ground together, shoulder to shoulder, and you will come to understand that Jesus has called His church on earth to reflect the reality of the unified church in Heaven! My name is Chase, and I am a white, Southern-Baptist pastor from Birmingham, Alabama, USA - the epicenter of the Civil Rights Movement. Just a few years ago, I realized that maintaining a quietly neutral attitude about race and racism wasn't going to cut it anymore. As a pastor, I thought that I could help out with racial issues by being nice to everybody, cultivating friendships with people of other races, and decrying racism from time to time on social media. That was a naive strategy, and it is not nearly enough. Jesus, in His Word, calls believers to PURSUE peace and oneness, and that pursuit is what this book is about. Racial harmony is possible and racial unity is possible, but there are many false, but old and dearly held beliefs, that will have to be crushed under the hammer of God's Word in order to get to a place of real peace. Please join me and let's see What the Bible REALLY Says about Racism!

39 review for The Bible And Racism: What the Bible REALLY Says about Racism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Janet Thompson

    The Bible and Racism doesn't pull any punches in attacking white supremacy and any sort of thought or theology that underlies racism. It examines the racist preaching of the Civil War and Segregation eras and contrasts that with the actual teachings of the Bible, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that those preachers twisted Scripture to fit their own agenda. There is a ton of Scripture in this book, and also a lot of material from some excellent writers like john Piper, Tony Evans, Thabiti Any The Bible and Racism doesn't pull any punches in attacking white supremacy and any sort of thought or theology that underlies racism. It examines the racist preaching of the Civil War and Segregation eras and contrasts that with the actual teachings of the Bible, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that those preachers twisted Scripture to fit their own agenda. There is a ton of Scripture in this book, and also a lot of material from some excellent writers like john Piper, Tony Evans, Thabiti Anyabwile, Charles Spurgeon, Dwight McKissic, Tim Keller, and many others. The quotes from other pastors and authors alone are worth the book purchase. This book convincingly shows that the Bible is not only an anti-racist book, but it is far more than that: A crystal clear declaration that all people are equal and a strong cry for a church on earth as it is in Heaven - all nations, tribes, colors, ethnicities, etc. worshiping together. I think this is a great book that will stir you to better understand the current racial upheaval in American, and what the Christian and biblical response should be. Highly recommended!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tabitha Ormiston-Smith

    With engaging honesty and humility, and a chatty, friendly style that strikes a lovely balance between the formality of acadaemia and the choppy language of the street, Thompson walks us through the Bible, examining its actual content with regard to both racism and the notion of chattel slavery. I should point out here that I am not a biblical scholar myself. I have taken Thompson's many biblical references on faith, although it would be an easy enough matter to check them as he gives full refere With engaging honesty and humility, and a chatty, friendly style that strikes a lovely balance between the formality of acadaemia and the choppy language of the street, Thompson walks us through the Bible, examining its actual content with regard to both racism and the notion of chattel slavery. I should point out here that I am not a biblical scholar myself. I have taken Thompson's many biblical references on faith, although it would be an easy enough matter to check them as he gives full references for everything cited, both Bible and other. Of particular note to me was Thompson's willingness to turn his criticisms upon himself. Over and over he remarks upon his belief that he himself contains pockets of racism. It is this even-handedness, so different from the preachy, talking-down tone one all too often encounters, that made me willing to take his Bible references on faith, instead of scuttling off to look them all up; this kind of grass-roots-level honesty is, in my experience, sufficient to warrant taking a certain amount on faith. I'm not going to go through and sum up the whole book. The title says it all, and one also knows, really, which side the book is on, because people who are in favour of racism never, ever CALL it racism. So it's unnecessary to say more about the general content, but there are several things that for me were of particular note: Although the author is American and writes in the context of America, his discussion of the notion of 'corporate responsibility' gave me a deeper and clearer understanding of my own country's 'Sorry Day', and my own appropriate role in it as a European-descended person. I'd always felt I should be counted among our First Peoples with regard to this, and now I understand why I can't be. That was important for me; I may not like it, but the truth is always best. A sobering note was provided with regard to social media and outrage, etc. I found this deeply disturbing, yet ultimately hopeful in the way it carries within itself the possibility of positive action on an individual level. I'll be re-examining my own social media habits because of this book. A very perceptive analysis of the terrible harm that is done by inappropriate, or bad faith, accusations of racism. I'll be re-examining some of my own knee-jerk reactions in the light of this, too. Finally, for Christians (and I'd assume most people who read this book would be Christians, because of its nature) I found a surprising refreshment and renewal of my own faith as I read it. I'm not going to go into personal details here, because this review is of Thompson's book, but I will say that in my experience, this happens only with the best of Christian writing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Molly Neely

    Balanced and Rich in Scripture I really enjoyed this book. Any time an author delves deep into scripture and pulls out something from ancient times that completely relates to the now, I get excited. This book will make you think, it will make you re-evaluate yourself and it will help you see another layer of God's love for us. I got the impression that this book is one of many more to come. I hope so. Balanced and Rich in Scripture I really enjoyed this book. Any time an author delves deep into scripture and pulls out something from ancient times that completely relates to the now, I get excited. This book will make you think, it will make you re-evaluate yourself and it will help you see another layer of God's love for us. I got the impression that this book is one of many more to come. I hope so.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    I couldn't get all the way though this book. I was hoping to learn more about racial reconciliation and how to work towards forgiveness and equality. It was more of a history lesson and digging into verses to parse for subtext. I don't think there's anything inaccurate or hurtful in this book, it just doesn't feel relevant right now. We are facing deep rooted racism in our hearts and in our churches. Debating whether or not race based slavery is right or wrong feels like (hopefully) a non-issue I couldn't get all the way though this book. I was hoping to learn more about racial reconciliation and how to work towards forgiveness and equality. It was more of a history lesson and digging into verses to parse for subtext. I don't think there's anything inaccurate or hurtful in this book, it just doesn't feel relevant right now. We are facing deep rooted racism in our hearts and in our churches. Debating whether or not race based slavery is right or wrong feels like (hopefully) a non-issue in our world today. Nitpicky things: There's also a ton of quotes and verses in this book. There's very little commentary from the author himself. Because of this, the book doesn't flow very well. The author likes to make words and phrases bold or underline them or put them in all caps; sometumes he does all three. It was distracting and showed a lack of writing skills. Great writers can emphasis phrases with their writing and can skip the embellished text.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David

  6. 5 out of 5

    Esther Hunte

  7. 5 out of 5

    McPhaul M.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  9. 5 out of 5

    Allycia

  10. 5 out of 5

    Monte Owen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Anderson

  12. 5 out of 5

    A. NASH

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chase Thompson

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tyrell

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elsa Fowler

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sharyl

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hillary roberts

  18. 4 out of 5

    John Gaynard

  19. 4 out of 5

    PunkRockLibrarian

  20. 4 out of 5

    Krystle Berry

  21. 4 out of 5

    jules

  22. 5 out of 5

    Edith McDonald

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Holmes

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Chatos

  25. 4 out of 5

    Céline Libéral

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Napoleon Morrell

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frances Lee

  31. 4 out of 5

    Devon Hall

  32. 4 out of 5

    Derek Talley

  33. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  34. 4 out of 5

    Keith and Rachael

  35. 5 out of 5

    David Turner jr.

  36. 4 out of 5

    Les

  37. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

  38. 5 out of 5

    Bill Bush

  39. 5 out of 5

    Angukah chakari

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