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Juliette merge cu metroul din Paris în fiecare zi, la aceeaşi oră. Cea mai mare plăcere a ei este să vadă ce citesc cei din jur: doamna în vârstă, colecţionarul de ediţii rare, studenta la matematică sau fata care plânge la pagina 247. Îi priveşte pe toţi cu tandreţe şi curiozitate, de parcă ceea ce citesc, pasiunile şi diversitatea existenţei lor i-ar putea colora şi ei v Juliette merge cu metroul din Paris în fiecare zi, la aceeaşi oră. Cea mai mare plăcere a ei este să vadă ce citesc cei din jur: doamna în vârstă, colecţionarul de ediţii rare, studenta la matematică sau fata care plânge la pagina 247. Îi priveşte pe toţi cu tandreţe şi curiozitate, de parcă ceea ce citesc, pasiunile şi diversitatea existenţei lor i-ar putea colora şi ei viaţa monotonă. Dar într-o zi Juliette hotărăşte să coboare cu 2 staţii mai devreme şi să o ia pe un drum ocolitor spre serviciu, decizie care îi va schimba viaţa


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Juliette merge cu metroul din Paris în fiecare zi, la aceeaşi oră. Cea mai mare plăcere a ei este să vadă ce citesc cei din jur: doamna în vârstă, colecţionarul de ediţii rare, studenta la matematică sau fata care plânge la pagina 247. Îi priveşte pe toţi cu tandreţe şi curiozitate, de parcă ceea ce citesc, pasiunile şi diversitatea existenţei lor i-ar putea colora şi ei v Juliette merge cu metroul din Paris în fiecare zi, la aceeaşi oră. Cea mai mare plăcere a ei este să vadă ce citesc cei din jur: doamna în vârstă, colecţionarul de ediţii rare, studenta la matematică sau fata care plânge la pagina 247. Îi priveşte pe toţi cu tandreţe şi curiozitate, de parcă ceea ce citesc, pasiunile şi diversitatea existenţei lor i-ar putea colora şi ei viaţa monotonă. Dar într-o zi Juliette hotărăşte să coboare cu 2 staţii mai devreme şi să o ia pe un drum ocolitor spre serviciu, decizie care îi va schimba viaţa

30 review for Fata care citea în metrou

  1. 4 out of 5

    Caro the Helmet Lady

    So finally here comes my review... First of all I want to congratulate our greedy Lithuanian publishers for such seemingly innocent and fun idea coming out villainous as changing the title of the book to a completely different one to lure the unaware native Francophiles to purchase their product. As I noticed here on GR in every other language the title is a direct translation of the original one, that is "The Girl Who Read on the Metro". Marketing masterminds decided to call it "The Extraordina So finally here comes my review... First of all I want to congratulate our greedy Lithuanian publishers for such seemingly innocent and fun idea coming out villainous as changing the title of the book to a completely different one to lure the unaware native Francophiles to purchase their product. As I noticed here on GR in every other language the title is a direct translation of the original one, that is "The Girl Who Read on the Metro". Marketing masterminds decided to call it "The Extraordinary/Unusual/Amazing/Strange Bookshop of the Parisian alley" or something - feel free to correct me and pick the right words, since I'm not the translator here, but you definitely get my point - they put an accent on Paris, maybe on a bookshop too, but definitely not the girl. But especially on Paris, since it sells very well nowadays and reading girls, especially those in metros probably not, as we can assume from such decision. Why the hell a young successful woman would read in metro, right? She should be googling her instagram or something or is she homeless? I am not the mentioned Francophile and I don'g give a f** for where they spend their money, the bookshop lured me though, but that's a different story. - Note to my future self - girl, you continue avoiding books with words "paris, parisians, french, montmartre, bonjour, amour etc" on their covers as you always did before, especially if it has also a picture of Eiffel's tower on top. One Amelia doesn't make the culture as you already know it. -Also, drink more water. Secondly I want to apologize to people who bought huge amounts of popcorn and cola expecting me to spill out my rage and disappointment in this book in my review. I'm sorry guys, because I'm sort of not that pissed anymore (just a little bit, hehe) but rather sad and I will tell you why. I think the author really tried, but she didn't try enough or she didn't have the clear idea of what she's getting into. Because the presentation might make you think you're getting a happy optimistic "girl with a book in the world" kind of book, meeting new friends over her books or in the bookshop and having adventures and making you feel good when you finish it. Instead you get a melancholic one, with bland protagonists, many unnecessary descriptions, many things "as seen in movies" and very little in fact about the books themselves. The idea had a potential which was completely lost somewhere among words, words, words, empty words. Spoilers ahead, consider yourself warned. In short - Juliette goes to work by metro every day and she observes people reading books - seems like she travels with all same people all the time and they read all same books all the time. Must be a french phenomenon, BUT OK. I don't clearly get if this was happening for years or just recent period of time, but I could have missed it while yawning, my bad. Her life is a dull routine - at work (in the real estate), at home, in her free time. Books seem to be the only thing that saves her from this routine and boredom. I'm not very convinced why she hates her life that much since she actually has her books tucked everywhere and has an actual time to read them off work, which probably some working mothers with 3 kids and real life problems can't do, BUT OK. One day she jumps off the train on a random (aha!) station and goes on a walk and gets to unexpected place in city - you guessed - where the (lithuanian) titular bookshop is. There she meets the owner - the mysterious Iranian refugee Suleyman and his mysterious sweet very special cute daughter Zaida (she couldn't be just a regular kid with snot all over her face, could she?) with a huge vault of books of all kinds. Of course he makes her a cup of very special coffee and tells her about his Life Mission. And of course our heroine is hooked immediately, and what happens pretty soon - she quits her super boring job and everything and, after short time of reflection, moves to the bookshop to look after owner's daughter, because he has to go on some super mysterious trip. And of course he will pay her and of course she won't have to do much, just paint her room in yellow, keep it all clean a bit, don't burn the bookstore, and feed the kid sometimes, and of course she can read all she wants all the time, even while peeling potatoes. Although I don't really get what stopped her from doing it before? All right, I will have mercy on you and resume - so far you've probably noticed how everything is cliche on cliche and a pile of stereotypes - and further it won't change much - Juliette will face sort of a challenge (surprised emoji), some people will die (sad emoji), some will reunite with their mysterious mother (happy emoji), Juliette will get a yellow bus full of books and go for her adventures, The End!!!! However, there was no stupid sappy love story in it. Thanks at least for for this, C.F.F.! So what in heavens got my interest in this "generic product" book? It was this thing - Suleyman's Mission, which is sort of "traveling book" idea, I'm sure you my dear book maniacs know all about it - read a book and leave it somewhere on the park bench for someone else to read who will maybe pass it on for the next reader and so on. Maybe someday it will come back to you. Personally I'm in love with this idea and I'm sure the Author was too, hence this book I'm sharpening my tongue on now... So what went wrong? It's too many things. The characters are too weak, the story is cliche, the descriptions try to be somewhat Proust-ish but, eh, come on. Bare with my free translation: "...His dark skinned hand (Suleyman's)moved nervously and it reminded her of a little monkey"... Seriously, wtf? Hey, Author, did you read what you've just written? There's more stuff like this which maybe was supposed to be funny and special, but isn't. Also, characters often speak in phrases that are normally reserved for movies, you know, Big Words Casablanca style. This got annoying at some point. Maybe if the Author made her characters deeper, if she just let us see the bonds between this people building and growing, not just happening because "it's magic cuz I said so", and maybe if she actually let us see how books help Juliette to change and become this yellow bus driver - maybe then this book would work. Maybe then she wouldn't have to put this list of books as some kind of proof in the end of her book - if she'd woven them into the actual story. Maybe if Author had some patience to make this book bigger?... I could like this book, maybe even love, if it wasn't so painfully superficial and predictable and fastfood. It was OK, but I didn't enjoy it. P.S. Also... I have to get it out of my system, sorry, but... Juliette, or more like - C.F.F. - you don't paint walls with same paint as you paint your car, you just don't. Don't embarrass yourself.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    A sweet quick read about a woman who uncovers a mysterious bookstore and bookseller, a group of people who carry books around until they find the person they are meant for. And those other readers on the métro come back around in interesting ways. Most books similar to this are couched in romance and I liked that this one wasn't, although it still has other delights. I had a copy of this book from the publisher in Edelweiss, but read it before it came out... it comes out mid-October 2019. A sweet quick read about a woman who uncovers a mysterious bookstore and bookseller, a group of people who carry books around until they find the person they are meant for. And those other readers on the métro come back around in interesting ways. Most books similar to this are couched in romance and I liked that this one wasn't, although it still has other delights. I had a copy of this book from the publisher in Edelweiss, but read it before it came out... it comes out mid-October 2019.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amalia Gkavea

    ‘’He was talking about books as if they were alive - old friends, powerful adversaries at times, insolent teenagers and elderly ladies sitting by the fire. In our bookcases? Grumpy wise men and mistresses, uncontrollable passions, future killers, thin paper boys offering their hands to fragile damsels whose beauty grew thin with every description. Some books were wild horses that took you with them in a mad galloping while you were hanging, breathless. Others were like boats sailing softly on ‘’He was talking about books as if they were alive - old friends, powerful adversaries at times, insolent teenagers and elderly ladies sitting by the fire. In our bookcases? Grumpy wise men and mistresses, uncontrollable passions, future killers, thin paper boys offering their hands to fragile damsels whose beauty grew thin with every description. Some books were wild horses that took you with them in a mad galloping while you were hanging, breathless. Others were like boats sailing softly on a lake lit by the moonlight. And some were prisons.’’ Juliette commutes daily to her mundane work in a real estate agency. Her employer is a vacant man. Her colleague an even more vacant woman. Juliette’s way out is to observe the people in the metro and their reading choices. You are what you read, some say. Or are you? One day, she decides to break her daily routine and chooses to get off at a different station. Her meeting with a brilliant young girl and her mysterious father will lead her to a life that only books can offer. This is a novel for those of us who travel -literally - daily with a book to keep us company amidst the noise of the train tracks and the shuddering ignorance of the commuters who don’t even know how the word ‘’book’’ is written. It is a tender journey, full of Parisian flair and elegance, for the ones who inhale the smell of old and new books, those of us who know how to listen to the whispers of the pages, those of us who fell in love with Russia, Norway, Britain, France, Spain, Italy, Colombia, Mexico, Japan, Korea, and so many countries before we actually visit them. Words are the finest guides. For those of us who feel at ease when we are alone with a book in our hands because people have become too loud, too ignorant, too annoying. It is a novel for those who READ. *No, Goodreads isn’t the place for such a book. Not anymore…* My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.word...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    I spent most of this book being confused about what was happening, but it was still cute. Plus it's about books so no complaints there! So we have Juliette - who is quite an odd duck, to be perfectly honest - who lives a dull life and spends her daily commute reading people who are reading instead of her book. Then one day she happens upon a door held open by a book and it leads her to meeting Soliman, who is a recluse living in an apartment full of books. Soliman has people who deliver random bo I spent most of this book being confused about what was happening, but it was still cute. Plus it's about books so no complaints there! So we have Juliette - who is quite an odd duck, to be perfectly honest - who lives a dull life and spends her daily commute reading people who are reading instead of her book. Then one day she happens upon a door held open by a book and it leads her to meeting Soliman, who is a recluse living in an apartment full of books. Soliman has people who deliver random books to people after stalking them to discover their interests. What happens after that is mostly a mystery to me. I found it really hard to follow what was going on, and I think that's because Juliette is always off in her own little world. She goes off on tangents and the story telling skips around and suddenly you're reading thinking, 'wait a sec ... how did we get here?' It's almost like the editor was too heavy-handed and took out half the narrative. It was also a bit disappointing for me as a Francophile that this was a bit light on the descriptions. Plenty of place names but they're going to be more familiar to locals than tourists - I imagine Parisians reading this will get a kick out of recognising places and descriptions but I found it hard to connect. This is a book about books so if you're widely read, prepare for the little thrills when you recognise titles and quotes. Some are quite obscure but there's a handy list at the back as well, which will also give book lovers plenty of inspiration. I recognised a few references here and there, and it was fun to understand them. There's also a heavy emphasis on how much books can change lives and I'm 100% on board with that. It was a bit of a strange story overall but it was never dull and I wasn't entirely bothered that I only half understood it. I liked the message it was sending and I do feel that Juliette's transformation was there and quite sweet. I loved the emphasis on books and I think there is something here that will really capture hearts for those who can relate. With thanks to Macmillan for an ARC

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    This book sounded SO cute. And it started in a very interesting way, but quickly fell off. Juliette makes up stories about the people she sees regularly riding the Métro, especially about the books they read. But they the reader is supposed to believe her book obsession without her actually doing much reading herself. She was more interested in people watching and daydreaming while even mentioning the lack of reading she had done for a very long time. I just didn't buy it. But the book quickly f This book sounded SO cute. And it started in a very interesting way, but quickly fell off. Juliette makes up stories about the people she sees regularly riding the Métro, especially about the books they read. But they the reader is supposed to believe her book obsession without her actually doing much reading herself. She was more interested in people watching and daydreaming while even mentioning the lack of reading she had done for a very long time. I just didn't buy it. But the book quickly fell off for me in its disjointed feel of jumping around to her job and then takin gon the weird bookstore arrangement. When someone she doesn't know is going to leave for an adventure and just leave her in charge. I guess this is where the magical realism writes it off as workable, but it didn't FEEL like it worked for me as the reader. In the end, I can't tell how much was lost in translation and how much of this just felt like a brainstorming idea that was never fully formed. It was just ok for me, 2 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marjolein

    Well. I guess this book is supposed to be romantic and poetic and lyrical. The main character is probably supposed to be a passionate dreamer and the setting is supposed to be idyllic. In my opinion, this book is none of these things. It's pretentious and shallow and just kind of weird. The way it's written feels like something that shouldn't be allowed but is considered literature. There are way too many relative clauses (idk, is that what it's called in English?) and way too many comparative d Well. I guess this book is supposed to be romantic and poetic and lyrical. The main character is probably supposed to be a passionate dreamer and the setting is supposed to be idyllic. In my opinion, this book is none of these things. It's pretentious and shallow and just kind of weird. The way it's written feels like something that shouldn't be allowed but is considered literature. There are way too many relative clauses (idk, is that what it's called in English?) and way too many comparative descriptions. However it's called in English grammar: the author has pulled the sentences apart which makes it VERY difficult to read and to stay focused on the story. Maybe the translation is to blame, but I know for a fact that these kind of things are pretty much frowned upon in Dutch grammar. So I don't know why the hell the publishers thought this was a great idea. It's really not. Storywise - the concept was promising, I guess. Juliette isn't really happy with her life and after meeting an eccentric man and his daughter, she decides to become a bookcrosser. Someone who hands out books to strangers after basically following them around for a while. Which kind of sounds creepy, come to think of it now... anyhow. What really bothered me is the fact that after meeting Soliman and Zaide only ONCE she immediately moves in with them and takes care of Zaide when Soliman has to go away for a while. This isn't romantic and poetic and lyrical at all. It's weird and definitely not normal. She also quits her job to dedicate her time to being a bookcrosser but we never actually get to see her in action? She hands out books to her former boss and colleague but she only tells Soliman about it. And she hands ONE guy on the subway a book but that's it. Pretty much a let down. Some of the conversations were so vague and pretentious that I rolled my eyes on more than one occassion. I guess these type of books are really not my cup of tea. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely adore books - I basically hoard books. I sell them, I buy them, I love them and I share them... but treating them the way they did in this book was way too much, even for me. This entire book was WAY too pretentious for my taste and ugh. Kind of a let down. I was hoping for a cute read about a girl finding the perfect homes for books and instead I got this. Even the books the author referenced made me feel very inferior and stupid. I still finished it because I wanted to know how it would end, but I feel like I kind of wasted precious time I could have spend reading a different book. And that's the tea on my 39th book of 2018.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    Small jewel. A book about books. Who can resist that? :D I know it doesnt have much of a story, much of an action, but it talks about books in a new way. From an interesting perspective. Perfect for a rainy day and you are caught somewhere for an hour or two. Keep it in your bag. You will never know when you finish it and somebody else needs it. ;)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Burnett

    4.5 stars THE GIRL WHO READS ON THE METRO is a joy to read from start to finish. An ode to booklovers everywhere, this gem of a book follows Juliette as she rides the Paris metro to and from work and muses about her fellow passengers and their reading choices. One day she stumbles upon an old bookstore and is recruited by the owner Soliman as a passeur, the name he uses for the individuals who take used books from the store and match them with just the right owner. Meeting Soliman and his daughte 4.5 stars THE GIRL WHO READS ON THE METRO is a joy to read from start to finish. An ode to booklovers everywhere, this gem of a book follows Juliette as she rides the Paris metro to and from work and muses about her fellow passengers and their reading choices. One day she stumbles upon an old bookstore and is recruited by the owner Soliman as a passeur, the name he uses for the individuals who take used books from the store and match them with just the right owner. Meeting Soliman and his daughter Zaide shakes up Juliette’s life for the better, but Juliette has to decide whether she can trust fate and take her life in a new direction. Focusing on the importance of community and the ability of books to connect people, THE GIRL WHO READS ON THE METRO will warm your heart and having you cheering for Juliette. Bibliophiles will also revel in the the numerous literary references. I highly recommend this one. For more reviews, check out my Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/thoughtsfro... and my newsletter: https://www.cfapage.net/subscribe.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dana Al-Basha دانة الباشا

    It seems like such a good book! Kind of reminds me of This Beautiful Fantastic (a movie I love!). It's not! I was seriously disappointed with this one, the cover and title and synopsis seemed so good, adding that it was so short but I didn't like it. I find all the books that "booklovers" write to be horrible. You'll get amazing quotes, but no substance or story. I felt like the writer had an idea but didn't write it well. It seems like such a good book! Kind of reminds me of This Beautiful Fantastic (a movie I love!). It's not! I was seriously disappointed with this one, the cover and title and synopsis seemed so good, adding that it was so short but I didn't like it. I find all the books that "booklovers" write to be horrible. You'll get amazing quotes, but no substance or story. I felt like the writer had an idea but didn't write it well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Izabella (Pages Full of Stars)

    "The Girl Who Reads on the Metro" is a little charming book, and I truly wish it could be translated into English so that more people get to read it. It's a story of Juliette who leads a quite ordinary life working at the real estate agency, until one day she stumbles upon a mysterious bookshop. There she meets an even more mysterious man, who gives her a stack of books. Now Juliette is supposed to find them new owners but they can't be just any people. She needs to observe and really feel who ne "The Girl Who Reads on the Metro" is a little charming book, and I truly wish it could be translated into English so that more people get to read it. It's a story of Juliette who leads a quite ordinary life working at the real estate agency, until one day she stumbles upon a mysterious bookshop. There she meets an even more mysterious man, who gives her a stack of books. Now Juliette is supposed to find them new owners but they can't be just any people. She needs to observe and really feel who needs those exact books, before she gives them away. I dived right into it, because I have a soft spot for books about books, and I wasn't disappointed. It is a little weird and odd at times, but overall it's really a feel-good story that carries love for reading and written word at its heart. I loved the setting in Paris and the overall atmosphere of the book, that felt very vintage to me. The story was engaging and the characters were quirky but interesting, and I grew to care for them quickly. It's a very fast read at just under 200 pages, but I honestly wish it was longer. I didn't love everything about it but it left me with a feeling of happiness, so that alone is worth 5 stars from me :) Find me at my Instagram | Tumblr | Pinterest. ----------- Edit: Re-read in February 2019 for the Pop Sugar 2019 Reading Challenge - prompt: A Reread of a Favourite Book ★

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amber J

    I try to express only my most honest opinion in a spoiler-free way. If you feel anything in my review is a spoiler and is not already hidden in spoiler brackets please let me know. Thank you. I didn't really like this book. It was boring. The only thing I really did like all the references and love given to books in the story. That's why it got a 2 star instead of just 1 star. I just couldn't connect with the characters or the story in any way really. Maybe it lost something in the translation? I I try to express only my most honest opinion in a spoiler-free way. If you feel anything in my review is a spoiler and is not already hidden in spoiler brackets please let me know. Thank you. I didn't really like this book. It was boring. The only thing I really did like all the references and love given to books in the story. That's why it got a 2 star instead of just 1 star. I just couldn't connect with the characters or the story in any way really. Maybe it lost something in the translation? I don't know, but I do know that this book was not for me. How I choose my rating: 1* Hated it. I had to force myself to finish it. 2** Didn't really like it. I didn't hate it but not sure why I finished it other than for some closure. 3*** I liked it. I had some issues with it, but as a whole it was good. I probably won't reread ever, but there is a chance I might finish the series. (If part of one) But if not it's not a huge loss. 4**** I really liked this book. Maybe not a work of genius, but highly entertaining. I might reread this, and I will finish the series. (If part of one) I would recommend to those I know hold interest in this book's content. 5***** I loved this book. I found little to no issues with it at all. I will definitely be rereading this and probably more than once. I will finish the series and reread it multiple times. (If part of one) I will recommend this book to EVERYONE!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    3.5 stars. I was in the mood to be swept away by a quick, light read and picked this one up. It had that The Shadow of the Wind vibe about it, but on the lighter side of the scale. I did enjoy it, and could've finished it in one sitting if I didn't need to eat, which is usually a great sign. But it fizzled for me at the end. I even reread the last couple of pages several times, thinking I had missed something, but if so, I missed it again lol. It could just be me, but looking at the GR rating, m 3.5 stars. I was in the mood to be swept away by a quick, light read and picked this one up. It had that The Shadow of the Wind vibe about it, but on the lighter side of the scale. I did enjoy it, and could've finished it in one sitting if I didn't need to eat, which is usually a great sign. But it fizzled for me at the end. I even reread the last couple of pages several times, thinking I had missed something, but if so, I missed it again lol. It could just be me, but looking at the GR rating, maybe not. If you are really into books about books, then you might pick this up, but hopefully you can get it from your local library, as I'm glad I didn't buy this. The library did not have the audio for this and since it was so short, I read the paper book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Iulia

    This was such a disappointing read, an awful start to the year.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (WhereTheReaderGrows)

    I think this is just a book/reader mismatch. The premise is cute but it reads almost like a historical novel/contemporary literature-ish type style that I'm just not very fond of. I couldn't connect to any of the characters, wasn't a huge fan of the dialogue or choices. However, the suggested reading list in the back give this book a little oomph. It makes sense though as the majority of those books are ones I wouldn't pick up. SO at the end of the day, just not a book for me in particular. I thi I think this is just a book/reader mismatch. The premise is cute but it reads almost like a historical novel/contemporary literature-ish type style that I'm just not very fond of. I couldn't connect to any of the characters, wasn't a huge fan of the dialogue or choices. However, the suggested reading list in the back give this book a little oomph. It makes sense though as the majority of those books are ones I wouldn't pick up. SO at the end of the day, just not a book for me in particular. I think those who like cultural contemporary books would enjoy this. The back says that fans of Amelie and The Little Paris Bookshop would like this one and I haven't read either so... *shrug*

  15. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    This will probably end up being more of a rant than a review TBH, just figured y’all should know going in. So my main problem is this book is boring as shit. I didn’t give a fuck about the plot, characters or anything else in this predictable yet also confusing book. I also didn’t realize it until now but the idea of a book that’s entire appeal is how books are great is actually a bad idea. Don’t get me wrong, a plot involving books and/or a character who’s into reading can be great IF IT’S NOT TH This will probably end up being more of a rant than a review TBH, just figured y’all should know going in. So my main problem is this book is boring as shit. I didn’t give a fuck about the plot, characters or anything else in this predictable yet also confusing book. I also didn’t realize it until now but the idea of a book that’s entire appeal is how books are great is actually a bad idea. Don’t get me wrong, a plot involving books and/or a character who’s into reading can be great IF IT’S NOT THE ENTIRE GODDAMN STORY. Here, I’ll further illustrate what I mean. Good: An interesting story that has appeal to it’s target audience for any number of reasons. The story has characters who enjoy books a lot so many readers will relate or part of the plot may involve books. Examples include several works ranging from Fahrenheit 451 to Sunstone. Bad: An entire book about why books are wonderful, why the main character loves books, how books can be an emotional experience BLAH BLAH BLAH. That’s what this book is. I consider books a similar storytelling art form to film or TV. Could you imagine a show dedicated to how much someone loves TV and how you can find a lot of good shows? That would be boring as shit, so is this. I mean, seriously, most people read at least a little bit, it’s not like it makes you special. Maybe that’s my problem with this book. It acts like reading is so fucking unique and special when really IT’S NOT. I feel the same annoyance when someone calls themselves a “bookstagrammer” or talks about their “BookTube” channel, nobody calls themselves a “videogamestagrammer” or “filmtuber”. I’m legitimately annoyed about other stupid shit now which is why this is more of a rant than a review. So yeah. This book’s main character is determined to give people the exact book they need and the one that’s right for that person. If she handed me this book she done fucked up at that job. I don’t think I’d hand this book to anyone as the book they need (except maybe someone I don’t like because fuck you, person I don’t like) (Just an FYI, this will be a frequently used gif in my reviews now because it works so well) 1/5

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    DNF @ 25% This one sounded cutesy: a Parisian girl takes on a mission to find the perfect home for unwanted books. Alas, the execution was agonisingly poor. Perhaps something was lost in translation. The Girl Who Reads on the Métro appeared in English for the first time back in October; if it weren’t for the stunning proof copy I spotted on the shelf in our staff room, I doubt I would have come across it – and I certainly wouldn’t have sought it out. But some things are just objective. The prose i DNF @ 25% This one sounded cutesy: a Parisian girl takes on a mission to find the perfect home for unwanted books. Alas, the execution was agonisingly poor. Perhaps something was lost in translation. The Girl Who Reads on the Métro appeared in English for the first time back in October; if it weren’t for the stunning proof copy I spotted on the shelf in our staff room, I doubt I would have come across it – and I certainly wouldn’t have sought it out. But some things are just objective. The prose is uninspired and amateur. The characterization is flat and the dialogue shallow. Most importantly: Juliette does not find homes for books! Not unless you count desperately forcing a paperback on a random stranger sat near you on the Métro and coming across as a complete and utter nutcase. Not the elegant, stylish or sweet contemporary I was hoping for. Not even a whiff of the Parisian atmosphere, either.

  17. 5 out of 5

    JimZ

    This novel is light fare. It was OK…a quick read. 2.5 stars. It was too cutesy for me. I picked it up from the library on Saturday…what attracted me to it what the illustration on the dust wrapper, and the fact that it was a novel translated from French (2017) to English (2019). The book at one point reminded me of the delightful movie (well at least to me!) Amelie (2001, Audrey Tatou) – Amelie at times through her small acts of kindness touched people. In this novel, Juliette, a young woman, pic This novel is light fare. It was OK…a quick read. 2.5 stars. It was too cutesy for me. I picked it up from the library on Saturday…what attracted me to it what the illustration on the dust wrapper, and the fact that it was a novel translated from French (2017) to English (2019). The book at one point reminded me of the delightful movie (well at least to me!) Amelie (2001, Audrey Tatou) – Amelie at times through her small acts of kindness touched people. In this novel, Juliette, a young woman, picks out a book for a person that by some sixth sense of hers will supposedly touch them, and I’ll leave it at that. The term that is used in the book for her new vocation (she quits her job as an administrative assistance at a real estate firm) is ‘passeur’ – French for “courier”. Lots of different books and authors are mentioned in passing in the book, which I enjoyed…I am sure the discerning GR reader will identify many of the books/authors. Oh, I just saw this on the inner front cover of the dust wrapper which confirms what I said above about Amelie 😊 …”For fans of “The Little Paris Bookshop” and “Amelie”, a charming story about a young women who dares to change her life.” These are the books that the author has published (all French with La fille qui lisait dans le métro translated into English), and as far as I can tell only the reviewed novel is in English: • Les vagues sont douces comme des tigres, 1999, Arléa, prix Antigone. [The Waves Are Soft Like Tigers] • Dans le miroir, 2000, Frontières/Gallimard. [In the Mirror] • L’Évier, 2001, Arléa. [The Sink] • Sept Péchés, 2003, Arléa. [Seven Sins] • Pour nous tout a commencé en 1963, 2013, Prat [For Us It All Started In 1963] • La fille qui lisait dans le métro, 2017, Denoël [The Girl Who Reads on the Metro] • La Femme sans ombre, 2019, Denoël [The Shadowless Woman] About the author: After studying literature and a few years of research on text-music relationships in opera, Christine Féret-Fleury has long been an editor at Gallimard Jeunesse, notably animating the Page Blanche, Folio Junior special edition, Folio Junior in poetry and Themes. In 1996, she published her first children's book, Le Petit Tamour (Père Castor / Flammarion), followed in 1999 by an “adult” novel, Les Vagues sont douces comme des tigres, crowned with the Prix Antigone, then by more ninety other titles (JimZ: I took this from Wikipedia…not sure what is meant by “ninety other titles”. Since 2001, she has mainly devoted herself to writing and runs workshops where enthusiasts of all ages meet. She lives in Paris. Several titles have been written in collaboration with Genevière Lecourtier and some with her daughter Madeleine Féret-Fleury. Some blurbs about the book: A life-affirming novel for our times about the transformative power of literature and the bonds people forge through their mutual love of books. It appeals to both the reader’s heart and soul. (The Bookseller, UK) An enchanting story made of literary references that would convince anyone to become a reader (Avantages, FRANCE] A beautiful tale, wonderfully crazy, for anyone who likes to end a book with a smile on their face [Lire, France] A delightful novel [Madame Figaro [France]

  18. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Fauchelle

    I would say books are the main character in this very lovely story

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tien

    I don't think this is a book that I would've picked up on my own initiative. The cover looks so very cute and it's set in France so really, I would have felt, yea, maybe... then gone on and forgot all about it. Thanks to the publicist at MacMillan Australia though for sending me a copy because I so loved reading this book. I was at the stage that I needed something light and this book was just perfect. It was written in such whimsical tones and yet, it wasn't chirpy in any way. In fact, when you I don't think this is a book that I would've picked up on my own initiative. The cover looks so very cute and it's set in France so really, I would have felt, yea, maybe... then gone on and forgot all about it. Thanks to the publicist at MacMillan Australia though for sending me a copy because I so loved reading this book. I was at the stage that I needed something light and this book was just perfect. It was written in such whimsical tones and yet, it wasn't chirpy in any way. In fact, when you stop and think about it, the story is actually rather sad. And yet again, the author somehow managed to write in such beautiful turn of phrases to uplift the readers' hearts. Of course, all those loving praises she lavished on books will not go astray but are rather direct hits to booklovers' hearts. Some of us may just understand Juliette, main protagonist, better than others. We may just be like her in our situation, ie. just happened to get a job, stuck it out even if you're not particularly enjoying it, everyday is just routine & nothing exciting ever happens. Until one day when she spontaneously got off the Metro a number of stops away from her destination and found herself wandering the streets. And hence she begins to discover parts of herself previously dormant, to opening her heart, and to find the life she's meant to live. It's a terrific ending for a stand alone (for which I believe this book is) but I find myself wishing for a lot more of Juliette and her adventures. The Girl Who Reads on the Métro is a lovely easy heart-warming read. When you have that rare spare moment that you just want to read a whole book, don't pass this one by. I'll bet you'll find yourself smiling to yourself :) Thanks to Pan MacMillan Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen Whittard

    This book is very much more than meets the eye. It isn’t just all lightness and happiness. This book tackles lots of important issues like the terrorist attacks in France and how sometimes it’s hard to trust people in this world, and how we all need to learn to trust each other and be kind to one another again. Also for book lovers. It’s very easy to like the main character as she really loves books to. It’s a very easy book to read and it’s quite short. Perfect for a holiday read or when you do This book is very much more than meets the eye. It isn’t just all lightness and happiness. This book tackles lots of important issues like the terrorist attacks in France and how sometimes it’s hard to trust people in this world, and how we all need to learn to trust each other and be kind to one another again. Also for book lovers. It’s very easy to like the main character as she really loves books to. It’s a very easy book to read and it’s quite short. Perfect for a holiday read or when you don’t want anything too heavy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    thewoollygeek (tea, cake, crochet & books)

    This sounded perfect to me, but sadly I was disappointed, it’s not to say I didn’t enjoy it, I did. I just found it could have been so much more and better, it wastes so much opportunity, it spends too much time being pretentious. It’s a quirky light read, but could have been so much more Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for an honest opinion

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    This book was a bit weird. The premise sounded quite promising, but in the end the actual book didn't really meet my taste. I think one of my main issues was the weird rhythm this novel has. I believe this book could have been longer in order to give the chance to the story to be better fleshed out. It would have helped the flow of the narrative in my opinion. Also, I wasn't okay with some remarks Juliette made towards Soliman, I found them deeply uncomfortable and problematic. I don't recommend t This book was a bit weird. The premise sounded quite promising, but in the end the actual book didn't really meet my taste. I think one of my main issues was the weird rhythm this novel has. I believe this book could have been longer in order to give the chance to the story to be better fleshed out. It would have helped the flow of the narrative in my opinion. Also, I wasn't okay with some remarks Juliette made towards Soliman, I found them deeply uncomfortable and problematic. I don't recommend this one folks.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Rayne

    Unfortunately this book didn't have a flow that I could sink into. There was one chapter that really captured me and a few places that gave this book a redeemable reading experience. Unfortunately, this book had a problematic trope and unnecessary problematic language aimed at an Iranian character. Content warning for suicide and parent death. Unfortunately this book didn't have a flow that I could sink into. There was one chapter that really captured me and a few places that gave this book a redeemable reading experience. Unfortunately, this book had a problematic trope and unnecessary problematic language aimed at an Iranian character. Content warning for suicide and parent death.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alina Maria Cristea

    It's the title that made me curious to read this book, I myself being a fan of reading in the subway. :P I liked the premise -- finding the right book for people to read, but I wasn't captivated by the execution. It's the title that made me curious to read this book, I myself being a fan of reading in the subway. :P I liked the premise -- finding the right book for people to read, but I wasn't captivated by the execution.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    2.5/5? It started nicely enough but I didn't care for the direction the story went. Some nice quotes though! 2.5/5? It started nicely enough but I didn't care for the direction the story went. Some nice quotes though!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carlos

    3 stars for this book. The story felt interrupted at times and the plot suffered for it. The plot itself was good enough that it was still readable but at some points you lost the flow of the story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Thank god it's over. This was a mess. This book tries to be inspirational and poetic and wonderful and it's just not. The main character gets hired for a job she doesn't know how to do and things go from there but she absolutely never learned to do this job or grew in a way that felt earned because she basically just quits her job and decides to move in to the bookshop she got the job at like.... 3 days ago. Her misfortunes include not paying rent, eating delicious Parisian food every day, and re Thank god it's over. This was a mess. This book tries to be inspirational and poetic and wonderful and it's just not. The main character gets hired for a job she doesn't know how to do and things go from there but she absolutely never learned to do this job or grew in a way that felt earned because she basically just quits her job and decides to move in to the bookshop she got the job at like.... 3 days ago. Her misfortunes include not paying rent, eating delicious Parisian food every day, and reading books all day long. What a struggle! By the way, I'm convinced the main character has maybe never read before outside of a classroom setting and certainly not on the metro. She's just a performative reader because she'd just bring a book on the train and then spy on what everyone else was reading but she never seemed to actually open her own novel at any point. Like we've all done what she does where we hoard books we won't read, but this woman will buy "sad books no one wants" at garage sales and she also won't read them at all and will just cram them into random places in her home. Just because. At one point, she makes a point out of nowhere to read an inspirational quote from a Black woman (i forget the exact words, but something like "I'm a Black woman and I will overcome). She then makes a point of saying how inspirational that one line is to other Black women in history and immediately says she isn't Black but she also has to overcome. Overcome WHAT, bitch? The fact your life is perfect now and you don't work at all and live in Paris rent-free? The white exceptionalism and performative activism the author tried to do here....... Then she just starts naming books she's seen people read before. Like.... ok? Am I supposed to be impressed? What's your point? What do I get out of this? The main character doesn't even know! This felt like such a mess, I can't give it more than 1.5 stars. This is worse than Emily in Paris.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    This is my first five star rating in such a very long time. This book is so incredibly beautiful to read that I know I never will let it go and definitely will read it again when I need some peace in my life . A beautifully descriptive book , the language and words so poetic .

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kim McGee

    I have found my life's ambition - I want to be a passeur! In this slim masterpiece, we follow Juliette who has a dull job and a long commute so she studies the other commuters and what they read on the metro. One day she follows her heart and instead of going to work ends up at the doorway of a most unusual bookshop, as unorganized as the man who runs it. As soon as she smells the old page smell and sneezes from the dust we know she is there to stay and so she becomes a passeur who passes on boo I have found my life's ambition - I want to be a passeur! In this slim masterpiece, we follow Juliette who has a dull job and a long commute so she studies the other commuters and what they read on the metro. One day she follows her heart and instead of going to work ends up at the doorway of a most unusual bookshop, as unorganized as the man who runs it. As soon as she smells the old page smell and sneezes from the dust we know she is there to stay and so she becomes a passeur who passes on books that match the person who receives them. As she takes on more responsibility for the man, shop and his young daughter lives, Juliette will undoubtedly find her own. Charming, unassuming and magical - this clever little tale takes us on a book adventure. For anyone who strives to find their passion, no matter how late and strives to share it with others who believe in the power of the written word - this is your lifeline. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Milena Reinherz

    I give it a full 4 stars. Yes, it's slow paced, doesn't have much of a story, the characters barely touch the surface, but the true characters here are the books and it's written with the sensibility I have only found in french and japanese authors so far. It's a story of finding oneself guided by the magic of books. I give it a full 4 stars. Yes, it's slow paced, doesn't have much of a story, the characters barely touch the surface, but the true characters here are the books and it's written with the sensibility I have only found in french and japanese authors so far. It's a story of finding oneself guided by the magic of books.

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