web site hit counter The Phantom Flotilla: The most exciting true story from the Royal Navy's history - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Phantom Flotilla: The most exciting true story from the Royal Navy's history

Availability: Ready to download

In 1915 Germany dominated Central Africa with its naval control of Lake Tanganyika. The Lake formed the boundary between German East Africa (now Tanzania) and the Belgian Congo, and no Allied vessel could be brought against the gunboat because the only completed railway to the Lake was in German territory. No British or Belgian forces could advance into German territory b In 1915 Germany dominated Central Africa with its naval control of Lake Tanganyika. The Lake formed the boundary between German East Africa (now Tanzania) and the Belgian Congo, and no Allied vessel could be brought against the gunboat because the only completed railway to the Lake was in German territory. No British or Belgian forces could advance into German territory because the Germans could always land troops behind them to cut their lines of communication. Breaking that hold was a military necessity and an incredibly difficult and dangerous task. Not only did the crew have to outwit the Germans but also navigate 3,000 miles of the world’s most hazardous and disease-ridden country. For Lieutenant-Commander Spicer-Simson the dilemma facing the Allied High Command was simply the chance for an incredible adventure. So the sailor turned explorer. Thus began the most astounding voyage in naval history, as ‘Spicer’ led an expedition of two motor-boats through hundreds of miles of bush and mountains to reach the Lake, through a wilderness laid waste by sleeping-sickness and uncharted by roads or communications of any kind. Here is one of the strangest, most exciting passages in the history of the Royal Navy – the true-life adventure which inspired C. S. Forester’s The African Queen. Praise for Phantom Flotilla… ‘A wonderful adventure yarn made all the more absorbing because it really did happen’ - The Evening News Peter Shankland was a military historian whose books include Byron of the Wager, The Phantom Flotilla and Dardanelles Patrol, a story of the submarine operation against Turkey in World War I.


Compare

In 1915 Germany dominated Central Africa with its naval control of Lake Tanganyika. The Lake formed the boundary between German East Africa (now Tanzania) and the Belgian Congo, and no Allied vessel could be brought against the gunboat because the only completed railway to the Lake was in German territory. No British or Belgian forces could advance into German territory b In 1915 Germany dominated Central Africa with its naval control of Lake Tanganyika. The Lake formed the boundary between German East Africa (now Tanzania) and the Belgian Congo, and no Allied vessel could be brought against the gunboat because the only completed railway to the Lake was in German territory. No British or Belgian forces could advance into German territory because the Germans could always land troops behind them to cut their lines of communication. Breaking that hold was a military necessity and an incredibly difficult and dangerous task. Not only did the crew have to outwit the Germans but also navigate 3,000 miles of the world’s most hazardous and disease-ridden country. For Lieutenant-Commander Spicer-Simson the dilemma facing the Allied High Command was simply the chance for an incredible adventure. So the sailor turned explorer. Thus began the most astounding voyage in naval history, as ‘Spicer’ led an expedition of two motor-boats through hundreds of miles of bush and mountains to reach the Lake, through a wilderness laid waste by sleeping-sickness and uncharted by roads or communications of any kind. Here is one of the strangest, most exciting passages in the history of the Royal Navy – the true-life adventure which inspired C. S. Forester’s The African Queen. Praise for Phantom Flotilla… ‘A wonderful adventure yarn made all the more absorbing because it really did happen’ - The Evening News Peter Shankland was a military historian whose books include Byron of the Wager, The Phantom Flotilla and Dardanelles Patrol, a story of the submarine operation against Turkey in World War I.

30 review for The Phantom Flotilla: The most exciting true story from the Royal Navy's history

  1. 4 out of 5

    NRVOUTDOORSMAN

    Great stuff about a little known Royal Navy exploit In 1915 a harebrained expedition to Lake Tanganyika CARRIED two motor launches hundreds of miles overland through jungle, desert, and African wilderness to deny the Germans control of the lake, permitting an assault on German East Africa. It was done by hard work, determination, adaptability, and valor; it succeeded completely and without the loss of a man. Africa was a sideshow in The Great War but no less demanding of courage and effort. This Great stuff about a little known Royal Navy exploit In 1915 a harebrained expedition to Lake Tanganyika CARRIED two motor launches hundreds of miles overland through jungle, desert, and African wilderness to deny the Germans control of the lake, permitting an assault on German East Africa. It was done by hard work, determination, adaptability, and valor; it succeeded completely and without the loss of a man. Africa was a sideshow in The Great War but no less demanding of courage and effort. This book chronicles the expedition and us based on first hand accounts by survivors. An amazing tale, and well told.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vivienne

    A Truly Remarkable Story That this is actually a true story makes it all the more remarkable. As the blurb says, one German gunboat controls Central Africa and neither the British nor the Belgians can do anything about it, until an experienced African explorer comes up with a ludicrous plan. The Admiralty agrees and Commander Spicer-Simson is tasked with pulling this off and he wants his good friend Dr Hanschell to join the expedition as Medical Officer. To his own surprise, Hanschell agrees, but A Truly Remarkable Story That this is actually a true story makes it all the more remarkable. As the blurb says, one German gunboat controls Central Africa and neither the British nor the Belgians can do anything about it, until an experienced African explorer comes up with a ludicrous plan. The Admiralty agrees and Commander Spicer-Simson is tasked with pulling this off and he wants his good friend Dr Hanschell to join the expedition as Medical Officer. To his own surprise, Hanschell agrees, but discovers on the ship to Cape Town that Spicer has a big ego, and that his own consequence is more important than anything else. On such an expedition, of course, there are many obstacles, most unforeseen, that are overcome by ingenuity, team work, and lateral thinking. There are some very amusing incidents described on the way to the Lake and I especially enjoyed the one where the Belgians sent a Lieutenant with eight askaris (highly-trained African soldiers). I will leave it for future readers to read the rest of that little tale for themselves. Spicer has a Jekyll and Hyde personality, with some very peculiar quirks. His self-consequence leads to all kinds of problems both with the men under him, and more importantly, with the Belgian authorities, although he is a hit with the Africans. I followed their journey as best I could with the aid of several maps found on Google, and while it looks relatively easy, even using several small relief maps, the description of the expedition’s journey paints a picture with words that show it was anything but easy. This story is written in the third person, from the Medical Officer’s POV and I thought it very well-written and edited, with one or two minor digitisation errors. The author does an excellent job of capturing the mood and emotions of the characters and his descriptive passages of the route they travelled, the scenery, and the African flora and fauna are outstanding. There are a number of amusing anecdotes and some that are amusing but also have a poignancy to them. The ending of this particular piece of British World War I history shows exactly the type of man Spicer is/was and will be no surprise to all who read this book. I really enjoyed this true story, and although the style may not be to everyone’s taste, I found it a very satisfying read. It is meticulously researched, including interviews with survivors and significant help from Dr Hanschell.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris Payne

    I don't do book reviews like you keep seeing, as I find that some give too much of the plot away and I personally hate that, as it makes the book not worth reading. I much prefer to take the authors back cover write up as a review as it can either intrigue you enough to read the book of provide you enough information to make you decide that the book is not for you. My review rules are: The more stars, the more I liked it. If there are too many typos or errors the less stars I give If the storyline I don't do book reviews like you keep seeing, as I find that some give too much of the plot away and I personally hate that, as it makes the book not worth reading. I much prefer to take the authors back cover write up as a review as it can either intrigue you enough to read the book of provide you enough information to make you decide that the book is not for you. My review rules are: The more stars, the more I liked it. If there are too many typos or errors the less stars I give If the storyline or plot is poor or contains too many errors, the characters are too weak, the ending lacking something, then the less stars I give. Simple, uncomplicated and to the point without giving anything away. Some of the books I read have been given to me by the author as a pre-release copy and this does not bias my reviews in any way.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Koit

    With a few more days' thought behind it, I am not sure I can really support the 4/5 rating. Maybe 3.5, however, would be accurate. The book was a good overview of the Lake Tanganyika Expedition, but at the same time it was devoid of any commentary on what was going on. The memoirs of a few of the members of the expedition have been used, but even their thoughts are not expanded on. Furthermore, there was no attempt to describe the German or even Belgian points of view, and for the history to work With a few more days' thought behind it, I am not sure I can really support the 4/5 rating. Maybe 3.5, however, would be accurate. The book was a good overview of the Lake Tanganyika Expedition, but at the same time it was devoid of any commentary on what was going on. The memoirs of a few of the members of the expedition have been used, but even their thoughts are not expanded on. Furthermore, there was no attempt to describe the German or even Belgian points of view, and for the history to work objectively that should have been done. Admittedly, the author only claims to write on the British expedition and I suppose that's fair enough -- it's just that this work, therefore, only acts as a very small cog in understanding the East African theatre.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ray Savarda

    Interesting story of a little-known WW1 action in the heart of Africa. A British expedition overcame steep odds to surprise the Germans in Central Africa. Most telling to me, Trump seems to be a clone of the general leading this expedition - egotistic, lying to bolster his reputation, ignorant of how much of his success was luck, but plowed on ahead anyway and actually accomplished a great victory over long odds. It doesn't hurt that he actually had good people to pull his butt out of the fire ma Interesting story of a little-known WW1 action in the heart of Africa. A British expedition overcame steep odds to surprise the Germans in Central Africa. Most telling to me, Trump seems to be a clone of the general leading this expedition - egotistic, lying to bolster his reputation, ignorant of how much of his success was luck, but plowed on ahead anyway and actually accomplished a great victory over long odds. It doesn't hurt that he actually had good people to pull his butt out of the fire many times. Anyway, a good read - went thru it pretty quick.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Richard F. Underwood

    Naval action in Central Africa! A detailed and interesting record of an amazing ( one might well say fantastic) portage of two small combat vessels over land through jungles and over mountain ranges to successfully seek out and sink German warships on Lake Tanganyika. Wresting command of this huge lake from the Germans was a crucial need by the allies and those involved were all awarded promotions and/or awards.Quite a feat and quite a read. T

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom Watson

    Enjoyable read about a little known British expedition in Africa If you have read a lot of history about the world wars you probably aren't aware of the actions that took place far from the center of the action in Belgium and France. This is an entertaining book about the British plan to expel Germans from East Africa in WW1. Very interesting read, not very long. Recommended Enjoyable read about a little known British expedition in Africa If you have read a lot of history about the world wars you probably aren't aware of the actions that took place far from the center of the action in Belgium and France. This is an entertaining book about the British plan to expel Germans from East Africa in WW1. Very interesting read, not very long. Recommended

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Ambruso

    Really wanted to like this I love books about historic accounts, biographies, etc. However, over the years, I have discovered that I can't read histories written by the British. They have a way of turning the most interesting tale into something as dull as dish water. I was attracted to this book because I saw its connection to The African Queen story. But... Really wanted to like this I love books about historic accounts, biographies, etc. However, over the years, I have discovered that I can't read histories written by the British. They have a way of turning the most interesting tale into something as dull as dish water. I was attracted to this book because I saw its connection to The African Queen story. But...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Byron Miller

    Interesting what can be accomplished with poor leadership. Would have liked a few pictures seeing as there was an official photographer.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Tubbs

    I did have to check Wikipedia to authenticate this rattling good yarn.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Hausladen

    Interesting and Too Detailed Perhaps it's just me but too much detail on a wide variety of characters and not much on the key military activities. A very strange piece of history. Interesting and Too Detailed Perhaps it's just me but too much detail on a wide variety of characters and not much on the key military activities. A very strange piece of history.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dan Flick

    I had some trouble keeping names straight.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Don Hutton

  14. 5 out of 5

    Peter Priem

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brian Newton

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Easterbrook

  17. 5 out of 5

    danny jones

  18. 4 out of 5

    dale e roberts

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  20. 4 out of 5

    peter aitchison

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig Hodgkiss

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bogdana

  23. 4 out of 5

    James Spagnoli

  24. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Whitfield

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jools

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Grace

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth John Gathard

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

  29. 5 out of 5

    not john

  30. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.