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The Logic of Miracles: Making Sense of Rare, Really Rare, and Impossibly Rare Events

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We live in a much more turbulent world than we like to think, but the science we use to analyze economic, financial, and statistical events mostly disregards the world’s essentially chaotic nature. We need to get used to the idea that wildly improbable events are actually part of the natural order. The renowned Hungarian mathematician and psychologist László Mérő explains We live in a much more turbulent world than we like to think, but the science we use to analyze economic, financial, and statistical events mostly disregards the world’s essentially chaotic nature. We need to get used to the idea that wildly improbable events are actually part of the natural order. The renowned Hungarian mathematician and psychologist László Mérő explains how the wild and mild worlds (which he names Wildovia and Mildovia) coexist, and that different laws apply to each. Even if we live in an ultimately wild universe, he argues, we’re better off pretending that it obeys Mildovian laws. Doing so may amount to a self‑fulfilling prophecy and create an island of predictability in a very rough sea. Perched on the ragged border between economics and complexity theory, Mérő proposes to extend the reach of science to subjects previously considered outside its grasp: the unpredictable, unrepeatable, highly improbable events we commonly call “miracles.”


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We live in a much more turbulent world than we like to think, but the science we use to analyze economic, financial, and statistical events mostly disregards the world’s essentially chaotic nature. We need to get used to the idea that wildly improbable events are actually part of the natural order. The renowned Hungarian mathematician and psychologist László Mérő explains We live in a much more turbulent world than we like to think, but the science we use to analyze economic, financial, and statistical events mostly disregards the world’s essentially chaotic nature. We need to get used to the idea that wildly improbable events are actually part of the natural order. The renowned Hungarian mathematician and psychologist László Mérő explains how the wild and mild worlds (which he names Wildovia and Mildovia) coexist, and that different laws apply to each. Even if we live in an ultimately wild universe, he argues, we’re better off pretending that it obeys Mildovian laws. Doing so may amount to a self‑fulfilling prophecy and create an island of predictability in a very rough sea. Perched on the ragged border between economics and complexity theory, Mérő proposes to extend the reach of science to subjects previously considered outside its grasp: the unpredictable, unrepeatable, highly improbable events we commonly call “miracles.”

38 review for The Logic of Miracles: Making Sense of Rare, Really Rare, and Impossibly Rare Events

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aron

    Over 20 years ago I picked up Méro’s Moral Calculations after reading a review. It turned out to be one of those books that changed how I view the world In profound way. I often think about the ideas in the book but recently I started obsessing about the author and title which I couldn’t remember. A frantic search finally helped me find both and then I began to wonder if he had written anything else. Which led me to this book which I immediately bought on iBooks. I was not disappointed. Here is y Over 20 years ago I picked up Méro’s Moral Calculations after reading a review. It turned out to be one of those books that changed how I view the world In profound way. I often think about the ideas in the book but recently I started obsessing about the author and title which I couldn’t remember. A frantic search finally helped me find both and then I began to wonder if he had written anything else. Which led me to this book which I immediately bought on iBooks. I was not disappointed. Here is yet another book that changed how I view the world profoundly. While written two years ago, it’s the perfect book for pandemic times, because it is also about unexpected events and how we should deal with them. It surprised me some people gave this book two stars and I’m the first five stars. Perhaps they picked up this book thinking it was some religious text. Quite the contrary. Méro brings to life ideas from the frontiers of math and science and makes them relevant to our daily lives. He excels at making these very complicated ideas clearly understandable and at forcing you to think carefully about your assumptions regarding how the world works. If you have an European enlightenment mindset and enjoy thinking hard about the world, your life, and your place in it, then this book will be a deeply pleasurable and rewarding read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Corey

  3. 5 out of 5

    Simon Rubinstein-Salzedo

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richard Thomas

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kat

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    Catherine

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    Chun Ngai Au

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    Alexander Gildenberg

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    Ryan Sawyer

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    Victor Goryachev

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    Katalin Wright

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    Joseph Maloney

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    YHC

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    Antonina Kosikova

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    Joel Haack

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    Awesome Daruis

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    Rob

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    Agisilaos Tsaraboulidis

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    Nitin Rughoonauth

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    Leon

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    Craig Wood

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    Swmak

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    Gerald

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    Eva

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    Jack

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    Mohannad Elhamod

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    Casey

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    Louie

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    Roger B

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jan

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    Ivan

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    Kristy Jones

  33. 4 out of 5

    Manzoor Elahi

  34. 5 out of 5

    Esti Nurjadin

  35. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  36. 4 out of 5

    Shabaig Chatha

  37. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Bartsch

  38. 5 out of 5

    Sark

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