web site hit counter What the Future Looks Like: Leading Science Experts Reveal the Surprising Discoveries and Ingenious Solutions That Are Shaping Our World - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

What the Future Looks Like: Leading Science Experts Reveal the Surprising Discoveries and Ingenious Solutions That Are Shaping Our World

Availability: Ready to download

Science fact, not science fiction, features in this wide-ranging update from leading experts on the cutting-edge developments that are already defining our future lives and world Every day, scientists alight on pioneering solutions that will define the future of life on this planet, yet it isn’t every day you hear about these discoveries straight from the scientists themsel Science fact, not science fiction, features in this wide-ranging update from leading experts on the cutting-edge developments that are already defining our future lives and world Every day, scientists alight on pioneering solutions that will define the future of life on this planet, yet it isn’t every day you hear about these discoveries straight from the scientists themselves. Now, award-winning science writer Jim Al-Khalili and his top-notch team of experts draw on their mastery of groundbreaking scientific research to predict what advancements will shape the future just around the corner and beyond. Taking in genomics, robotics, AI, the “Internet of Things,” synthetic biology, interstellar travel, colonization of the solar system, and much more, What the Future Looks Like explores big-picture questions like: Will we find a cure to all diseases? The answer to climate change? And will bionics one day turn us into superheroes? Neither celebratory nor alarmist, here is entirely reality-based insight on the science-fueled future that is helping to solve intractable problems—and that’s already unfolding all around us.


Compare

Science fact, not science fiction, features in this wide-ranging update from leading experts on the cutting-edge developments that are already defining our future lives and world Every day, scientists alight on pioneering solutions that will define the future of life on this planet, yet it isn’t every day you hear about these discoveries straight from the scientists themsel Science fact, not science fiction, features in this wide-ranging update from leading experts on the cutting-edge developments that are already defining our future lives and world Every day, scientists alight on pioneering solutions that will define the future of life on this planet, yet it isn’t every day you hear about these discoveries straight from the scientists themselves. Now, award-winning science writer Jim Al-Khalili and his top-notch team of experts draw on their mastery of groundbreaking scientific research to predict what advancements will shape the future just around the corner and beyond. Taking in genomics, robotics, AI, the “Internet of Things,” synthetic biology, interstellar travel, colonization of the solar system, and much more, What the Future Looks Like explores big-picture questions like: Will we find a cure to all diseases? The answer to climate change? And will bionics one day turn us into superheroes? Neither celebratory nor alarmist, here is entirely reality-based insight on the science-fueled future that is helping to solve intractable problems—and that’s already unfolding all around us.

30 review for What the Future Looks Like: Leading Science Experts Reveal the Surprising Discoveries and Ingenious Solutions That Are Shaping Our World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Constantine

    Rating: 3.5/5.0 The book is a collection of different essays written by several authors. It focuses on how the future of humanity might look like in terms of technological advances. The future here is not only the near future but also the not so near one. I liked that the book has not only focused on the bright sides of each advancement but on its drawbacks as well. I found it also interesting to read about what will happen (Apocalypse) if things go wrong and not as planned. The book is divided in Rating: 3.5/5.0 The book is a collection of different essays written by several authors. It focuses on how the future of humanity might look like in terms of technological advances. The future here is not only the near future but also the not so near one. I liked that the book has not only focused on the bright sides of each advancement but on its drawbacks as well. I found it also interesting to read about what will happen (Apocalypse) if things go wrong and not as planned. The book is divided into sections like the future of our planet in terms of climate changes, demographics, and biosphere. Then there is the future of humanity and our survival in terms of genetic engineering, medicines, and transhumanism. Then it focuses on the future of the internet and how it will affect us and our world when there will be more use of cloud services and artificial intelligence. I found the part about the future of transportation, advanced teleporting and time travel to be fascinating a lot but personally, I don't see that happening even in the long run, but who knows what will happen? There are lots of new information I gained from reading this book but as a tech-savvy, I also found many things discussed here I already knew. So how might this book benefit you in looking into the future will depend on your current knowledge. Nevertheless, this was an interesting read overall. I have read an advanced copy of this book from NetGalley. The book is set to release in April 2018.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Correen

    This was a fun read. I sat back and let the author and contributors took me through possible changes in our lives. Some of the experimental work had already brought us beyond the imagination of most of us -- self driving cars, etc. Some of the topics were beyond my comprehension, e.g., being in two places at the same time. This is not your usual future prediction book. It is written by scientists whose work in theoretical physics is changing the way we live.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lauren James

    I really enjoyed ALIENS, Jim Al-Khalili's last edited essay collection. This wasn't as enticing for me, as I think a lot of the ideas were already discussed in the last collection - it was about the likelihood of meeting aliens, but covered a lot of futurism topics at the same time. I do love the references in these books though, and always find lots of interesting things to read that I might not have stumbled across. A great general science non-fiction guide that will be a brilliant christmas p I really enjoyed ALIENS, Jim Al-Khalili's last edited essay collection. This wasn't as enticing for me, as I think a lot of the ideas were already discussed in the last collection - it was about the likelihood of meeting aliens, but covered a lot of futurism topics at the same time. I do love the references in these books though, and always find lots of interesting things to read that I might not have stumbled across. A great general science non-fiction guide that will be a brilliant christmas present to any budding scientists or science fans.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert Narojek

    Excellent book ☺ If you like since based future speculation it will be interesting. All of the authors are humble in making predictions, and at the same time show the inevitable change coming sooner or later. Definitely it is worth reading. It is worth to know what to expect within next few years and decades.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lily Jones

    As a non-science person, I thought the book was very interesting and fun to read! Although, I was not very interested in the chapters about computers and AI, I liked everything else.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I really enjoyed this book of essays on a variety of topics- smart materials, AI, cyber security, genomics, climate change, etc. It gave me so much to think about and made me quite optimistic about the innovations that we could see in the future! As a middle school engineering teacher, it gave me so many great ideas for projects this year!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ailith Twinning

    This is betterthan the Aliens collection by just being more interesting. Anyway, collection of short essays on future stuff -- mostly a highly restrained version. Not bad, but not really book ready. Honestly, I'm generally not a fan of essay collections because they just don't get very deep into their territory. It's hard to even engage with most of it because you have to make too many inferences about missing information, unless you already have it and don't care to argue directly with the auth This is betterthan the Aliens collection by just being more interesting. Anyway, collection of short essays on future stuff -- mostly a highly restrained version. Not bad, but not really book ready. Honestly, I'm generally not a fan of essay collections because they just don't get very deep into their territory. It's hard to even engage with most of it because you have to make too many inferences about missing information, unless you already have it and don't care to argue directly with the author themself. MEh. One of my biggest problems is that, for many arguments, the format goes "Given: A highly contentious and totally overconfident moral absolute we're not going to talk about" HEY! WAit! Stop! We need to talk about that "Given" dude! So I tend to just get annoyed or combative with a lot of what comes after because it's based on a premise that might be faulty, or a subjective moral judgement I find abhorrent. But, to be honest, I find techno-libertarianism to be disturbing, reductionist, inhuman, inhumane, and evil. And almost all of Silicon Valley seem to be techno-libertarians. Seriously, how didn't Star Trek make geeks less. . . cruel? You know what AI I want? A Picard bot that reviews books as Picard man.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ilena

    Greatly compiled and easily digestible essays ranging from the scary to the hopeful as human beings continue to use technology to improve the way we live and the world around us. It’s really an interesting think piece because it’s the idea between giving up privacy and a more natural way of living at the expense of what is in the interest of “the greater good.” And that alone brings up some interesting questions. If we genetically engineer food, drugs, and humans, what’s really left? If we’re ab Greatly compiled and easily digestible essays ranging from the scary to the hopeful as human beings continue to use technology to improve the way we live and the world around us. It’s really an interesting think piece because it’s the idea between giving up privacy and a more natural way of living at the expense of what is in the interest of “the greater good.” And that alone brings up some interesting questions. If we genetically engineer food, drugs, and humans, what’s really left? If we’re able to recreate someone’s brain, is it still the same person? Do we even tackle the idea of a soul? The book ends with the ”Apocalypse” chapter: even in our fight for life, does it really matter when Mother Nature is crumbling faster than we can handle? Definitely an interesting read and provided me with further topics/organizations to research to gain an even deeper understanding of the moving parts in the scientific world.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ed Bernard

    I just love books like this, as long as they are written in a way that they are comprehensible to a non-scientist like me, but also able to convey the wonder in their visions. For the most part, this book gets it right. It’s written by 18 different scientists, with topics ranging from demography to medicine, cybersecurity, quantum computing, AI and so on. I found the chapter on smart materials particularly interesting, maybe because I didn’t know anything about it, but also because it simply loo I just love books like this, as long as they are written in a way that they are comprehensible to a non-scientist like me, but also able to convey the wonder in their visions. For the most part, this book gets it right. It’s written by 18 different scientists, with topics ranging from demography to medicine, cybersecurity, quantum computing, AI and so on. I found the chapter on smart materials particularly interesting, maybe because I didn’t know anything about it, but also because it simply looked at the possibilities with a sort of wide-eyed awe; it was part of the best section in the book, IMO, which was about “Making the Future.” The stuff about time-travel and teleportation are so far off as to be nothing more than musings, but at least open the possibility within modern scientific theory. So, a mixed bag, but never dull, nicely read by the editor, who also contributes an introduction and the teleportation/time travel chapter. Entertaining and thought-provoking. Grade: A-

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Altogether, a very fun read that touched on many technologies that will most likely become part of our lives in the near future. There was nothing too out there or kooky in this book, and I'm glad I read it because now I have a lot of new interests to delve into. Like many others, I enjoyed the chapter on smart materials, but I also really liked the chapters about the future of energy and personal medicine. I highlighted a lot of things, including information about Tipler cylinders, which I've n Altogether, a very fun read that touched on many technologies that will most likely become part of our lives in the near future. There was nothing too out there or kooky in this book, and I'm glad I read it because now I have a lot of new interests to delve into. Like many others, I enjoyed the chapter on smart materials, but I also really liked the chapters about the future of energy and personal medicine. I highlighted a lot of things, including information about Tipler cylinders, which I've never heard of before (they may not even exist). The book did start off slow, with global warming, which I probably would have put 3/4 of the way in, but it eventually ramped up about 1/3 of the way through. It obviously (given the length) doesn't go very deep into any of the topics, but I still think it's a worthwhile read because it does give you a good idea of what scientists are currently working on.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kurtis Mcdowell

    A great general science non-fiction guide for the general audience with words and sentences are easy to read and comprehend,covering upcoming technology, written by experts in their respective fields. "New technologies have a way of bettering our lives in ways we cannot anticipate. There is no convincing demonstrated reason to believe that our evolving future will be worse than our present" The book covers topics from climate change to Happy Pills and reminds us that "genes are not destiny". I ha A great general science non-fiction guide for the general audience with words and sentences are easy to read and comprehend,covering upcoming technology, written by experts in their respective fields. "New technologies have a way of bettering our lives in ways we cannot anticipate. There is no convincing demonstrated reason to believe that our evolving future will be worse than our present" The book covers topics from climate change to Happy Pills and reminds us that "genes are not destiny". I have been gifted this book and chose to leave a voluntary review. The review and ratings are solely my opinions. Thanks NetGalley for the arc in exchange for my honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    I found this somewhat interesting. The book covered a good number of topics, and included near-future as well as far-future possibilities. If you read a lot of science non-fiction books and magazines like Wired, you’ve heard this before, especially the near-future concepts. I most liked the sections where the authors “let it ride” and speculated on the far future. You usually get those kinds of ideas and discussion only from science fiction books, and the prognostications are used to push the pl I found this somewhat interesting. The book covered a good number of topics, and included near-future as well as far-future possibilities. If you read a lot of science non-fiction books and magazines like Wired, you’ve heard this before, especially the near-future concepts. I most liked the sections where the authors “let it ride” and speculated on the far future. You usually get those kinds of ideas and discussion only from science fiction books, and the prognostications are used to push the plot forward, usually without context. It is good to get a scientist’s take – not just of what may happen, but why. This book does a reasonable job of that.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    This was an interesting book. The views on the future were thought out, argued and presented in an beautiful manner. I especially loved the diversity in the presenters, it is not often one find an almost equal amount of male and female researchers in a book like this. If you have an interest in how the future might look like in different fields, take a look at this book. What "scares" and intrigues me the most is how near we are to the science fiction future. *Copy provided by NetGalley in exchang This was an interesting book. The views on the future were thought out, argued and presented in an beautiful manner. I especially loved the diversity in the presenters, it is not often one find an almost equal amount of male and female researchers in a book like this. If you have an interest in how the future might look like in different fields, take a look at this book. What "scares" and intrigues me the most is how near we are to the science fiction future. *Copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

  14. 5 out of 5

    Edward B.

    Good stuff, if you like shortish essays by a variety of scientists on what they anticipate developing in their fields in the nearish- to vastly-distant-future and how those things might affect/transform society/humanity - everything from medical treatments to smart materials to teleportation. It just so happens that I do like this sort of thing. It's also kind of an interesting experience to be reading, in July 2020, a book published in 2017/18 that contains sentences such as "It is a near certain Good stuff, if you like shortish essays by a variety of scientists on what they anticipate developing in their fields in the nearish- to vastly-distant-future and how those things might affect/transform society/humanity - everything from medical treatments to smart materials to teleportation. It just so happens that I do like this sort of thing. It's also kind of an interesting experience to be reading, in July 2020, a book published in 2017/18 that contains sentences such as "It is a near certainty that we will see another major viral pandemic within our lifetime".

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hayden Trenholm

    While some chapters are better and more thought provoking than others, this is a great little primer for those interested in what the future of our planet might look like -- for good or ill. And, for writers, it offers a few story ideas or suggestions for further reading. By the way, in the chapter on the apocalypse, one of the most likely ways civilization might collapse is an unconstrained pandemic. Just saying.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    This book is more quantity over quality in that it covers a large array of topics. A good premise to other books that are more specialized. Overall pretty interesting, though some of the essays are better done than others as is expected with curated collections such as this. I especially liked the section on solar power, clean energy, and electric cars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Falbs

    This could have been awesome, but I can't really say I learned a whole lot that I didn't already know. There was one great section on materials science that got me thinking differently about various materials and I would absolutely love to sit down with each and every one of the authors and pick their brains, but most of the truly big ideas didn't really come across so well in the book itself. This could have been awesome, but I can't really say I learned a whole lot that I didn't already know. There was one great section on materials science that got me thinking differently about various materials and I would absolutely love to sit down with each and every one of the authors and pick their brains, but most of the truly big ideas didn't really come across so well in the book itself.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mysteryfan

    A collection of essays on near, far, and very-far futures. There are sections on human futures - genomics and transhumanism - and sections on technology futures - transportation - as well as a section on potential catastrophies. I liked the essay on potential apocalypses. All the writers are British, so it's a slightly different perspective. A collection of essays on near, far, and very-far futures. There are sections on human futures - genomics and transhumanism - and sections on technology futures - transportation - as well as a section on potential catastrophies. I liked the essay on potential apocalypses. All the writers are British, so it's a slightly different perspective.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Kroon

    An accessible glimpse into scientific ideas and discoveries that are either currently shaping our world, or have the potential to do so in the near future. It was a good, quick, thought-provoking read, but dry at times and presumptuous in others. 3.5 stars, rounded down to 3 for the minuscule font the book was written in.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shan

    “The problems do not lie in the future—they are here and now” Some snapshots of where science is taking us in the future...not really meaty enough for my taste but at least reader-friendly with a lot of the chapters written by science writers...and a thought-provoking selection of topics from quantum mechanics to genomics to transportation and time travel...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sean S

    An interesting, although a bit bare bones, perspective on the now and near future to come in the space of science, technology, AI, augmentation, etc. Adds a little self promotion (quantum computing lab) and a non-factual take on the future (last chapter). Good for a cliff notes perspective on the latest trends, and more laden with philosophy and questions than I expected.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Jones

    Big topics tackled quite nicely by different scientists. Some make the future seem like a shit show, other show that hope remains in this digital chaos and climate changing world we find ourselves in.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Great breadth of topics describing some of the most advanced techniques and discoveries summarized to a few pages,sometimes leaving the reader wanting a narration with more thoroughfare. But realistically, what else could they do. Great book

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fresno Bob

    short individual essays, could go a little deeper

  25. 5 out of 5

    RJ

    Some of the chapters in this gave me interesting ideas to ponder. Fun & inspiring read!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy

    A brilliant set of essays which give some comfort in a world that seems headed for disaster.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Simon Hohenadl

    An engaging and fun listen, but nothing new for me here.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lynn

    Not sure if this is getting such a low rating from me due to content, being read following some other of my recent readings, or the multiple short essay format. It was just meh.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Henok Kidane

    Disappointing - I was expecting something thought-provoking, but all the essays read like something out of a college newspaper.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Will Thorpe

    entertaining enough. If you follow this sort of stuff you've probably already heard it before. entertaining enough. If you follow this sort of stuff you've probably already heard it before.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.