web site hit counter The Ties That Bind - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Ties That Bind

Availability: Ready to download

Six years ago, Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl helped the people of the planet Apsolon choose their first free leader. It seemed that peace had arrived at last. Now the leader has been killed. His daughters have been kidnapped. And Qui-Gon and Tahl have returned to Apsolon with Qui-Gon's apprentice Obi-Wan--against the wishes of the Jedi Council. The ties that bind Qui-Gon and Tahl ar Six years ago, Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl helped the people of the planet Apsolon choose their first free leader. It seemed that peace had arrived at last. Now the leader has been killed. His daughters have been kidnapped. And Qui-Gon and Tahl have returned to Apsolon with Qui-Gon's apprentice Obi-Wan--against the wishes of the Jedi Council. The ties that bind Qui-Gon and Tahl are about to experience their most powerful test yet.


Compare

Six years ago, Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl helped the people of the planet Apsolon choose their first free leader. It seemed that peace had arrived at last. Now the leader has been killed. His daughters have been kidnapped. And Qui-Gon and Tahl have returned to Apsolon with Qui-Gon's apprentice Obi-Wan--against the wishes of the Jedi Council. The ties that bind Qui-Gon and Tahl ar Six years ago, Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl helped the people of the planet Apsolon choose their first free leader. It seemed that peace had arrived at last. Now the leader has been killed. His daughters have been kidnapped. And Qui-Gon and Tahl have returned to Apsolon with Qui-Gon's apprentice Obi-Wan--against the wishes of the Jedi Council. The ties that bind Qui-Gon and Tahl are about to experience their most powerful test yet.

30 review for The Ties That Bind

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    This entry in the Jedi Apprentice series wasn't just more of the same; the knock-your-socks-off ending ensured that I will be reading the next installment first chance I get. This entry in the Jedi Apprentice series wasn't just more of the same; the knock-your-socks-off ending ensured that I will be reading the next installment first chance I get.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    Actual rating is 2.5 stars. This is part of a series that is aimed towards the younger audience. This book can be used as a starting point as this begins a new story arc for Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan. In this one, we get a little bit of a time jump as Qui-Gon receives a vision that his good Jedi friend, Tahl, will be in serious danger. Does he act on his vision or wait and see as visions are not the most reliable? These are quick reads and a nice supplement to the overall arc. These detail individual mi Actual rating is 2.5 stars. This is part of a series that is aimed towards the younger audience. This book can be used as a starting point as this begins a new story arc for Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan. In this one, we get a little bit of a time jump as Qui-Gon receives a vision that his good Jedi friend, Tahl, will be in serious danger. Does he act on his vision or wait and see as visions are not the most reliable? These are quick reads and a nice supplement to the overall arc. These detail individual missions of Jedi master and padawan. I do think that this series is losing its steam or maybe I have just read too many of these. I really did not care about the mission at all in this book. The reason I rated this as high as I did was the inclusion of Tahl in the overall story. I like her character and for the last several books she has been on the outside looking in. The highlight of this book is an interesting turn for Qui-Gon and his beliefs. I look forward to exploring that story. I really don't expect much from these books and I did enjoy the beginning of this series. My interest is starting to wane on this series and maybe I have read too many in a row. Many this series is better off not being binged. I do look forward to the next one because if the author follows thru with a particular story, things will definitely pick up.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Branwen Sedai *of the Brown Ajah*

    "You must be sure of what you want and believe. Sometimes the way will be confused, but allow yourself the time to understand yourself." Jumping ahead a few years since the last book, Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon defy the wishes of the Jedi council and go on a mission to help an old friend who has requested their help. But they may be walking into a trap. And they will have to rely on their master and padawan bond more than ever to be able to survive. I have one thing to say about this book, HOLY HELL WHAT "You must be sure of what you want and believe. Sometimes the way will be confused, but allow yourself the time to understand yourself." Jumping ahead a few years since the last book, Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon defy the wishes of the Jedi council and go on a mission to help an old friend who has requested their help. But they may be walking into a trap. And they will have to rely on their master and padawan bond more than ever to be able to survive. I have one thing to say about this book, HOLY HELL WHAT A CLIFFHANGER!!?!? Seriously, it is very intense! This is probably my favorite book in this series thus far. Obi-Wan is a few years older, and more mature, and it is obvious how strong the bond between him and Qui-Gon is. Also, this book reveals some major insights into the mind and heart of Qui-Gon, which left me overjoyed. But yeah, the cliffhanger is epic. So make sure you have the next book ready to go when you finish this one!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Still good, but oof... these are hard to get through. Tahl has always been one of my favorite characters, and I know what's coming and why... Also calling bull on Tahl not being able to defend herself from blaster fire and probe droids because she can't see them. The books show padawans sparring while blindfolded. And the movies also show this. If Luke who is barely trained can fend off blaster fire from a floating droid as an early training exercise, then it should be easy for Tahl, a highly tr Still good, but oof... these are hard to get through. Tahl has always been one of my favorite characters, and I know what's coming and why... Also calling bull on Tahl not being able to defend herself from blaster fire and probe droids because she can't see them. The books show padawans sparring while blindfolded. And the movies also show this. If Luke who is barely trained can fend off blaster fire from a floating droid as an early training exercise, then it should be easy for Tahl, a highly trained Jedi Knight to do this. You'd think she'd have retrained in combat after going blind, especially since the council let's her go on missions by herself. I remember being really annoyed by this as a child and hating how this arc took Tahl, a capable character, and then constantly damsels her to emotionally crush Qui-gon in the next book. Like so much of this series has been Tahl not being defined by now being blind and relearning things, but now because it has to be a romance and not just good friends suddenly Qui-gon is super protective of her because feelings and she's blind. She's capable in this book till for some reason she forgets all her training so Qui-gon has to rescue her. I do love these books but this one and the next two were ones that angered, frustrated, and count as most traumatic character death in lit from childhood for me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    Story(Jude Watson): 5/10 Cover Art: 4/10 "the art is a quality drawing, but it doesn't help to visualize anything in the story. all it shows us is Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan standing in front of the council, not very informative. PARENTS GUIDE Age Level: 5+ Violence: A brief story is told about torture, that is moderately graphic. No Sex/Nudity, Profanity, or Drugs/Alcohol Story(Jude Watson): 5/10 Cover Art: 4/10 "the art is a quality drawing, but it doesn't help to visualize anything in the story. all it shows us is Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan standing in front of the council, not very informative. PARENTS GUIDE Age Level: 5+ Violence: A brief story is told about torture, that is moderately graphic. No Sex/Nudity, Profanity, or Drugs/Alcohol

  6. 4 out of 5

    Drew Ck

    Qui Gon's friend and fellow Knight Tahl, is sent on an easy mission. Yet Qui Gon is unsettled about her going alone. Is there merit to his feelings or has Qui Gon let his emotions get the better of him. Qui Gon's friend and fellow Knight Tahl, is sent on an easy mission. Yet Qui Gon is unsettled about her going alone. Is there merit to his feelings or has Qui Gon let his emotions get the better of him.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura Scribner

    I remember absolutely loving this book when I was younger (not a youngling, though), so when I saw it for sale at a library used books sale, I leapt at the chance to have it as my own. But man, am I overall disappointed. First, I enjoyed the low-key Jedi “romance” that I remembered, even if Qui-Gon did come off more douchey than I remember. Second, I was saddened by how little Obi there was in this book, considering they’re kind of his books. Lastly, and here’s the kicker, holy hell the writing is I remember absolutely loving this book when I was younger (not a youngling, though), so when I saw it for sale at a library used books sale, I leapt at the chance to have it as my own. But man, am I overall disappointed. First, I enjoyed the low-key Jedi “romance” that I remembered, even if Qui-Gon did come off more douchey than I remember. Second, I was saddened by how little Obi there was in this book, considering they’re kind of his books. Lastly, and here’s the kicker, holy hell the writing is terrible. Here’s why. Every sentence is the same. There’s no rise or fall of tome. No energy or emotion is shared. No scenery is given the time of day. There is only the plot. Even the spoken segments are the same. See how all those sentences were the same tempo and feel? That was THE WHOLE BOOK.

  8. 5 out of 5

    zachary

    "I am speaking of everything a being can give another." Honestly, the plot is nothing extra-ordinary, it feels a lot like a repeat of the same old but I guess that's because it is the fourteenth book in a series that follow the same plot structure in every book. But what I'm truly here for is the characters, and Watson captures them well. It is not just interesting to read more about Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan's relation; we see too little of it in the primary work. There's also young Obi-Wan that is ex "I am speaking of everything a being can give another." Honestly, the plot is nothing extra-ordinary, it feels a lot like a repeat of the same old but I guess that's because it is the fourteenth book in a series that follow the same plot structure in every book. But what I'm truly here for is the characters, and Watson captures them well. It is not just interesting to read more about Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan's relation; we see too little of it in the primary work. There's also young Obi-Wan that is exciting to read about, but Qui-Gon stands out for me; especially in this one. I might be a little in love.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    [ high pitched screaming ] Obi-Wan barely does anything this entire book, as he is busy being an extreme third wheel. The whole thing is about Qui-Gon grappling with his feelings for Tahl and their place within the Jedi philosophy and oh my gosh I am going to die this is SO TENSE. I'M SO WORRIED. Not just about what's going to happen to Tahl, but about the effect it's going to have on Qui-Gon! I know that both are going to be bad. I can't wait for Qui-Gon to have to finally explain all this to Ext [ high pitched screaming ] Obi-Wan barely does anything this entire book, as he is busy being an extreme third wheel. The whole thing is about Qui-Gon grappling with his feelings for Tahl and their place within the Jedi philosophy and oh my gosh I am going to die this is SO TENSE. I'M SO WORRIED. Not just about what's going to happen to Tahl, but about the effect it's going to have on Qui-Gon! I know that both are going to be bad. I can't wait for Qui-Gon to have to finally explain all this to Extremely Curious And Orthodox Teenager Obi-Wan.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David

    Leaves you hanging for the next book. "Six years ago, Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl helped the people of the planet Apsolon choose their first free leader. It seemed that peace had arrived at last. Now the leader has been killed. His daughters have been kidnapped. And Qui-Gon and Tahl have returned to Apsolon with Qui-Gon's apprentice Obi-Wan--against the wishes of the Jedi Council. The ties that bind Qui-Gon and Tahl are about to experience their most powerful test yet." Leaves you hanging for the next book. "Six years ago, Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl helped the people of the planet Apsolon choose their first free leader. It seemed that peace had arrived at last. Now the leader has been killed. His daughters have been kidnapped. And Qui-Gon and Tahl have returned to Apsolon with Qui-Gon's apprentice Obi-Wan--against the wishes of the Jedi Council. The ties that bind Qui-Gon and Tahl are about to experience their most powerful test yet."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I enjoyed this, but I feel like it was a weird direction to take Qui-Gon. Also, because I read a bunch of the Jedi Quest books first, I actually already know what is going to happen. *shrug* It really doesn't seem to fit with Jedi rules, but Qui-Gon is pretty good at ignoring rules when it's necessary, so I guess it's not that surprising. I enjoyed this, but I feel like it was a weird direction to take Qui-Gon. Also, because I read a bunch of the Jedi Quest books first, I actually already know what is going to happen. *shrug* It really doesn't seem to fit with Jedi rules, but Qui-Gon is pretty good at ignoring rules when it's necessary, so I guess it's not that surprising.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anime Mage

    Brimming with a surprisingly compelling story, solid writing, and a surprisingly well done character arc for Qui Gon Jinn, and making Tahl a surprisingly compelling supporting character, this book ends up being another solid entry in this really compelling series. I look forward to the next part for sure. I give this book 3.93/5.00 stars - an exciting read

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    These kids' books are getting darker now. Qui Gon is in a bad place, defying the order, making decisions based on emotion. He is traveling a dark path in his desire and worry to protect Tahl at all costs. These kids' books are getting darker now. Qui Gon is in a bad place, defying the order, making decisions based on emotion. He is traveling a dark path in his desire and worry to protect Tahl at all costs.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan head to a planet in upheaval. (Blind)Jedi Knight Tahl has gone undercover to find out who is leading the revolution. Qui-Gon realises he is falling in love with Tahl. Having just read "Secrets of the Jedi", this book also deals with the Jedi's rule of not falling in love... Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan head to a planet in upheaval. (Blind)Jedi Knight Tahl has gone undercover to find out who is leading the revolution. Qui-Gon realises he is falling in love with Tahl. Having just read "Secrets of the Jedi", this book also deals with the Jedi's rule of not falling in love...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Man. This one’s very twisty and makes you unsure who to trust and what’s really going on. Plus this is very clearly the story arc where Tahl, well, you know. That admission towards the end sealed [a character’s] doom. And then it ends.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Lil' Chip

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I love Qui-gon and Tahl so much!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    Star Wars Legends Project #54 Background: The Ties That Bind came out in August 2001. It was written by Jude Watson. The Ties That Bind begins about 2 years after The Dangerous Rescue (my review), 41 years before the Battle of Yavin and 9 years before The Phantom Menace. A few Jedi characters pop up on Coruscant at the beginning (Yoda, Mace Windu, Bant), but the major player aside from Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan is Tahl, who moves from a regular supporting character to take center-stage this time aro Star Wars Legends Project #54 Background: The Ties That Bind came out in August 2001. It was written by Jude Watson. The Ties That Bind begins about 2 years after The Dangerous Rescue (my review), 41 years before the Battle of Yavin and 9 years before The Phantom Menace. A few Jedi characters pop up on Coruscant at the beginning (Yoda, Mace Windu, Bant), but the major player aside from Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan is Tahl, who moves from a regular supporting character to take center-stage this time around. Summary: Several years ago, Qui-Gon and Tahl brought peace to the planet of New Apsolon, but now that peace is threatened and Tahl's presence has been requested. Qui-Gon, haunted by dark visions of a possible future he dares tell no one about, is reluctant to let her go alone, but she and the Jedi Council insist. When her "brief" mission stretches from days to weeks with no contact, Qui-Gon defies the Council and goes looking for her, only to find a situation far more complicated and dangerous than even he had feared. Review: Wow. This book really feels like a giant leap forward in quality for this series, in almost every way. The time-jump from the last book gives us an Obi-Wan who is older, more skilled and secure, and fully comfortable in his partnership with Qui-Gon. The "tension" of Obi-Wan's insecurities about his master are all but gone. In their place is a new maturity and darkness, at least to this story. The whole book is suffused with a growing sense of dread that parallels Qui-Gon's mounting unease. Part of this comes from how off-balance the Jedi are at every turn. Nothing is what it seems or how they expect it to be, and they are caught off guard several times by some new development while they were still struggling to respond to something else. The rest comes from how high the stakes are here. In the previous 3-book arc, there was an attempt at some of this tension, but it wasn't nearly as successful. In The Deadly Hunter (my review), the main character who was in danger was Didi Oddo, a more-or-less likable character, but a new and not very important character (plus, since the Jedi didn't even seem concerned enough about him to give him sanctuary in the Jedi Temple, why would we be worried?). In The Evil Experiment (my review), Watson upped the ante by placing Qui-Gon in deadly danger, which works well enough . . . Except that we all know she can't kill him off. In The Dangerous Rescue, the Jedi raced to rescue an elderly Jedi master we'd never heard of, and who barely even appeared (let alone spoke) at any point in the story. I can't even recall the moment when they rescued him because by that time he was so beside the point of the rest of the plot that he didn't matter. He was a pure MacGuffin. Here, the endangered character is one who not only means a great deal to Qui-Gon, but one we've come to know and appreciate over the past several books as a sort of Oracle to Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan's Batman and Robin. And Watson does a great job of making the danger feel very real. There are no guarantees Tahl will make it through this alive, and Qui-Gon is almost crippled by his own fear for her, which isn't any great comfort. The situation on New Apsolon also feels (a little) more complex and developed than on many of the planets they've visited in the past. There are at least 3 distinct factions, and while is clearly evil, it's not at all clear whether the other 2 are good or not, or who may be behind any given act or to what end they're working. I like that this book asks a question that none of the other books so far have really pondered: What happens on these planets after the Jedi have concluded their mission and moved on? Apparently it's not always all sunshine and puppies, especially when the Jedi (perhaps) left a bit prematurely. There are some additional issues raised by this book that I want to discuss, but I'll refrain until the next to get into them, cuz spoilers. I wouldn't want to give any more away than the next 2 freaking titles already do. Ugh. B

  18. 5 out of 5

    pamsreading

    I don't give stars, I give them hearts ⎯ [❤︎❤︎❤︎❤︎❤︎] IRONICALLY this book is all I could ask from a well written romance book THIS IS WHAT A GOOD LOVE STORY AND A HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP ARE LIKE Guys, May I introduce you Tahl and Qui-Gon. Now he felt softness of her hair, her skin, the lightness of her bones. He felt how she could melt against him and become part of him. Tears sprang to his eyes at the way one of her hands curled weakly around his neck. Ahhhhh this causes butterflies i I don't give stars, I give them hearts ⎯ [❤︎❤︎❤︎❤︎❤︎] IRONICALLY this book is all I could ask from a well written romance book THIS IS WHAT A GOOD LOVE STORY AND A HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP ARE LIKE Guys, May I introduce you Tahl and Qui-Gon. Now he felt softness of her hair, her skin, the lightness of her bones. He felt how she could melt against him and become part of him. Tears sprang to his eyes at the way one of her hands curled weakly around his neck. Ahhhhh this causes butterflies in my stomach. So passionate hnggg (yet not lusty). "I cannot let you go, I cannot let another minute pass, without telling you this. I did not come to New Apsolon only because you are my friend. I did not remain because you are a fellow Jedi. I have come to see that you are not just a friend and a fellow Jedi, Tahl. You are necessary to my life. You are necessary to me. You are my heart." Their love is forbidden and difficult in a way of how they put their duty first, nonetheless it doesn't make it less passionate at all. The dynamic is equal and not cringe worthy at all. No women hating, so surprising and SO GOOD to read. Qui-Gon is firey (like Anakin) but not one of those generic asshole heroes abundant in contemporary, classics, YA, and genre romance. "If you do not feel the same, I will step back into place and be your friend again," Ah see? Not an asshole male protagonist. This is like a breath of fresh air in between the current trend of romanticisation of assholesery, douchebaggery, and sadomasochism. This is one of if not the healthiest relationship in literature, ever. Although Qui-Gon plans a rescue mission however Tahl isn't painted like a damsel in distress, neither is she painted like a generic faux-progressive heroine. She's calm and mature, even more than Qui-Gon, but still warm and as passionate. Their whole exchange is ALL I hope for for a romance, from any genre fiction. The language describing such a scene is beautiful and poetic also. "No," Tahl said with sudden warmth. "Do not step back. Let us forward together. I feel as you do, Qui-Gon" "(But) I must go to the meeting," Tahl said. "Yes," Qui-Gon agreed. "We are Jedi. Our life together will be full of separations" By the Force, stars and galaxies, I just can't uh there is too much feeling. Qui-Gon is a man Anakin could have been. Tahl is just, perfect, but different from Siri, Padmé, and Hera, she's bold but not bold in manner. She takes bold actions and decisions under a calm demeanor. Ugh they both are perfect can't even anymore. Obi-Wan waited outside the door. He couldn't imagine why Qui-Gon had asked for privacy. Kenobi, have you ever wondered why people around you or your friends & family never confine with you their love lives or things like this, counting from Qui-Gon to Anakin to Quinlan to Asajj. I, too, wonder why LOL. Then around the end... wow.. this is mind blown... new flash Kylo Ren's tantrum is not new, neither it's original, because Qui lost control and literally lashed out like: I know now where Anakin and Ben (or Jacen) got that from hahha

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    The Ties That Bind starts another trilogy within the Jedi Apprentice series, which returns Qui-Gon and Tahl, and old friend of Qui-Gon's who has featured in a handful of books in the series so far, to Apsolon, a planet they helped free from tyranny six years before. The new leader has been killed, and his daughters have requested they return because they don't feel safe. The ties that bind Tahl to the planet force her to return, and Qui-Gon follows, based on a vision he has concerning Tahl. Watso The Ties That Bind starts another trilogy within the Jedi Apprentice series, which returns Qui-Gon and Tahl, and old friend of Qui-Gon's who has featured in a handful of books in the series so far, to Apsolon, a planet they helped free from tyranny six years before. The new leader has been killed, and his daughters have requested they return because they don't feel safe. The ties that bind Tahl to the planet force her to return, and Qui-Gon follows, based on a vision he has concerning Tahl. Watson has written some great books in this series so far, but as I come to the end of it, I feel she's losing focus. The characters start to act as they need to for the story instead of acting as they should, and she plays loose with the Jedi tenets in this book. (view spoiler)[At the end of the book, Qui-Gon and Tahl confess their love to one another (though, curiously, Watson never uses the word "love" in the scene) and effectively get married. This makes sense for their characters (seriously, was there anyone who read the series who didn't get that these two were going to reach this point?), but it doesn't make sense for Jedi never forming attachments. At least with the prequel trilogy, there's a lot of angst surrounding Anakin's love (or, you know, whatever it was he was feeling) for Padmé, but here, the two of them make their confessions and move on like it's no big deal. I get the feeling Watson is leading us to the point where we see why the Jedi eschew attachments, but if these two Masters are as well-trained as they seem to be, why would they further their relationship? In addition, I don't understand why Watson feels the need to further their relationship. They're already close, and the affection they feel for each other comes through the stories, so when she winds up being kidnapped at the end of the book, he would have gone after her anyway. There's no need for her to suddenly become his betrothed, unless she's setting her up to be the girlfriend in the refrigerator to further Qui-Gon's own character development. Considering that the next book in the series is titled The Death of Hope, and the one following The Call to Vengeance, I get the feeling she is, which is a shame. Tahl has been an independent, strong, layered character all on her own, and Watson is doing her a disservice by taking her down this road. I think it's inevitable, though, and to paraphrase just about ever Star Wars character ever, "I've got a bad feeling about this." (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    Iset

    There were lots of points to recommend this story, but it also had faults. The plot did feel rather rushed – almost immediately after the twins are captured, Roan is suddenly killed. The various locations were interesting, but could have had more description and depth. The scenes on the training planet and at the Jedi Temple provided a variety of locations. Qui-Gon’s vision set an ominous, grim tone to the story that in places overshadowed scenes and made it depressing. The emotional scene broug There were lots of points to recommend this story, but it also had faults. The plot did feel rather rushed – almost immediately after the twins are captured, Roan is suddenly killed. The various locations were interesting, but could have had more description and depth. The scenes on the training planet and at the Jedi Temple provided a variety of locations. Qui-Gon’s vision set an ominous, grim tone to the story that in places overshadowed scenes and made it depressing. The emotional scene brought some happiness towards the end, though immediately dashed. Qui-Gon takes a strange turn as he becomes wracked by his visions, and becomes obsessed, almost paranoid, which seemed slightly out of character, although his feelings for Tahl seemed realistic. Obi-Wan acts much older in accordance with his increase in age, although he was a little slow on the uptake in figuring out what Qui-Gon’s feelings for Tahl indicated. Pretty much all the new characters were in need of further development. 6 out of 10 (for a children's book).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    I love these books for highlighting just how terrible and useless Qui-Gon is as a master. Obi-Wan’s aged three years since the start of the series and how he’s 16. He’s still always hungry (let the kid eat, Qui-Gon!), but now he’s more confident, less clumsy, and generally shaping up into a fine young man. Rather than giving him any praise or attention or instruction or anything else Qui-Gon should be doing, he off and Jedi marries Tahl. For a celibate monastic order, there sure is a lot of hank I love these books for highlighting just how terrible and useless Qui-Gon is as a master. Obi-Wan’s aged three years since the start of the series and how he’s 16. He’s still always hungry (let the kid eat, Qui-Gon!), but now he’s more confident, less clumsy, and generally shaping up into a fine young man. Rather than giving him any praise or attention or instruction or anything else Qui-Gon should be doing, he off and Jedi marries Tahl. For a celibate monastic order, there sure is a lot of hanky panky happening with the Jedi. Prepare to be replaced, Obi-Wan, because Qui-Gon never really gave a damn about you in the first place. Sorry, kid!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    GRRR I almost hate giving this a 5 star rating because it always messes with my emotions! Next book'll be 4.... An issue arises on Absolon, where Qui-Gon & Tahl had been on a mission years ago. Tahl goes back, at the request of twin girls. Qui-Gon (and Obi-Wan) follow after 3 weeks of non-communication without the approval of the Council because of a vision Qui-Gon had that he doesn't even share with anyone because he's a moron. The two learn that Tahl isn't where they thought she'd be and the poli GRRR I almost hate giving this a 5 star rating because it always messes with my emotions! Next book'll be 4.... An issue arises on Absolon, where Qui-Gon & Tahl had been on a mission years ago. Tahl goes back, at the request of twin girls. Qui-Gon (and Obi-Wan) follow after 3 weeks of non-communication without the approval of the Council because of a vision Qui-Gon had that he doesn't even share with anyone because he's a moron. The two learn that Tahl isn't where they thought she'd be and the political situation is worse than they initially thought. When they find Tahl awesome happens and then it doesn't and again - it messes with emotions.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bernard

    A nice Star Wars mystery. Seems like more and more in this series that Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are detectives. I was surprised by the revelation near the end concerning Qui-Gon and yet another... non-traditional action he makes, or rather, the decision he makes. Something never even hinted at in the sole movie whose events he is a part of nevertheless makes sense given his stoic and privately mysterious ways. Brava to Watson for continuing to make Qui-Gon a real person through exploration of his inn A nice Star Wars mystery. Seems like more and more in this series that Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are detectives. I was surprised by the revelation near the end concerning Qui-Gon and yet another... non-traditional action he makes, or rather, the decision he makes. Something never even hinted at in the sole movie whose events he is a part of nevertheless makes sense given his stoic and privately mysterious ways. Brava to Watson for continuing to make Qui-Gon a real person through exploration of his inner thoughts and relationships. If only Lucas had made room for some of this in The Phantom Menace....

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Suitable for ages 8+ and those who have seen the films. Qui gon has a vision of his best friend, Tahl, dying andis determined to help her. Even if it means defying the jedi council. Things aren't what they seem in this book, and events that have been building up in previous books do come to a conclusion. More of a political story than an action one. A good read. Suitable for ages 8+ and those who have seen the films. Qui gon has a vision of his best friend, Tahl, dying andis determined to help her. Even if it means defying the jedi council. Things aren't what they seem in this book, and events that have been building up in previous books do come to a conclusion. More of a political story than an action one. A good read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Russell Reidelberger

    I am slowly making my way through the Jude Watson's Jedi Apprentice series. The obvious plot line is the development of Qui Quon and Obi Won's relationship, but on a more subtle level, each book/arch presents a civic lesson. Obviously for younger readers, this book presents the planetary conflict between the Workers and I am slowly making my way through the Jude Watson's Jedi Apprentice series. The obvious plot line is the development of Qui Quon and Obi Won's relationship, but on a more subtle level, each book/arch presents a civic lesson. Obviously for younger readers, this book presents the planetary conflict between the Workers and

  26. 4 out of 5

    Just A. Bean

    Oh dear. We've sort of gone off the rails into a romance. I like romance usually, but not so much when it's an excuse for a male character to be irrationally overprotective and bossy towards his love interest. Because He Cares. For Her Own Good. Yeah, no. I did like the planet on this one though, which is sort of post-Apartheid South Africa. Obi-Wan not given enough to do. Oh dear. We've sort of gone off the rails into a romance. I like romance usually, but not so much when it's an excuse for a male character to be irrationally overprotective and bossy towards his love interest. Because He Cares. For Her Own Good. Yeah, no. I did like the planet on this one though, which is sort of post-Apartheid South Africa. Obi-Wan not given enough to do.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zuzana

    It's quite astonishing that Obi-Wan turned out to be such an outstanding Jedi with the kind of teacher/mentor Qui-Gon is pictured to be in this series. I wonder what would have happened if (view spoiler)[Tahl wasn't abducted. Would she and Qui-Gon have left the Order? I cannot imagine them taking Anakin's route of lies and deception (hide spoiler)] It's quite astonishing that Obi-Wan turned out to be such an outstanding Jedi with the kind of teacher/mentor Qui-Gon is pictured to be in this series. I wonder what would have happened if (view spoiler)[Tahl wasn't abducted. Would she and Qui-Gon have left the Order? I cannot imagine them taking Anakin's route of lies and deception (hide spoiler)]

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    The Jedi falling in love theme is definitely getting repetitive.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Fairweather

    We now enter a new phase in the Qui Gon/Obi Wan saga were as the focus moves from Obi Wan and more towards Qui Gon. Interesting concept but still leaving me feel empty while reading it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    This book seemed to drag and I had a hard time caring.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.