web site hit counter Forgotten Women: The Scientists - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Forgotten Women: The Scientists

Availability: Ready to download

'For most of history, anonymous was a woman.' Virginia Woolf Everyone knows a forgotten woman. The ones we hold close to our hearts, the rebels we raise in conversation over a drink, the pioneering early feminists who have been overlooked for too long. Forgotten Women redresses the balance. Forgotten Women: The Scientists recognizes and celebrates the work of 48 (the number 'For most of history, anonymous was a woman.' Virginia Woolf Everyone knows a forgotten woman. The ones we hold close to our hearts, the rebels we raise in conversation over a drink, the pioneering early feminists who have been overlooked for too long. Forgotten Women redresses the balance. Forgotten Women: The Scientists recognizes and celebrates the work of 48 (the number of Nobel-prize-winning women) female scientists from across history and from all scientific disciplines, including mathematics, genetics, technology, chemistry, astronomy, physics and medicine. From Rosalind Franklin, who uncovered the structure of DNA but whose work was attributed to her male colleagues, to Ruby Hirose, whose pioneering research led to the polio vaccine, Forgotten Women: The Scientists shines a light on the unsung scientific heroes whose hugely important yet broadly unacknowledged discoveries and research have transformed the face of science. With evocative illustrations from the first open international directory of female professional illustrators, womenwhodraw.com, and in collaboration with the New Historia, an academic initiative designed to document and promote the achievements of women in history, Broadly editor-in-chief Zing Tsjeng brings together the stories of the most remarkable women in science from across the ages.


Compare

'For most of history, anonymous was a woman.' Virginia Woolf Everyone knows a forgotten woman. The ones we hold close to our hearts, the rebels we raise in conversation over a drink, the pioneering early feminists who have been overlooked for too long. Forgotten Women redresses the balance. Forgotten Women: The Scientists recognizes and celebrates the work of 48 (the number 'For most of history, anonymous was a woman.' Virginia Woolf Everyone knows a forgotten woman. The ones we hold close to our hearts, the rebels we raise in conversation over a drink, the pioneering early feminists who have been overlooked for too long. Forgotten Women redresses the balance. Forgotten Women: The Scientists recognizes and celebrates the work of 48 (the number of Nobel-prize-winning women) female scientists from across history and from all scientific disciplines, including mathematics, genetics, technology, chemistry, astronomy, physics and medicine. From Rosalind Franklin, who uncovered the structure of DNA but whose work was attributed to her male colleagues, to Ruby Hirose, whose pioneering research led to the polio vaccine, Forgotten Women: The Scientists shines a light on the unsung scientific heroes whose hugely important yet broadly unacknowledged discoveries and research have transformed the face of science. With evocative illustrations from the first open international directory of female professional illustrators, womenwhodraw.com, and in collaboration with the New Historia, an academic initiative designed to document and promote the achievements of women in history, Broadly editor-in-chief Zing Tsjeng brings together the stories of the most remarkable women in science from across the ages.

30 review for Forgotten Women: The Scientists

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lumsden

    This is such a great look into the history of women's role in science, from ancient times to the present day, taking 48 influential women and telling their stories, their discoveries, and the difficulties they faced. A really powerful, engaging and moving read, with a lot of information to learn - I would highly recommend! This is such a great look into the history of women's role in science, from ancient times to the present day, taking 48 influential women and telling their stories, their discoveries, and the difficulties they faced. A really powerful, engaging and moving read, with a lot of information to learn - I would highly recommend!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Reyes

    What an excellent collection of short biographies! I knew some of these women, but more importantly I knew about most of these accomplishments without knowing they had been achieved by women. Reading about all these exceptional scientists who were refused an education "by reason of sex" and how many of them were forced to give up their careers after getting married "because it was not appropriate" made me see red, but what really breaks my heart is thinking about how many brilliant things have y What an excellent collection of short biographies! I knew some of these women, but more importantly I knew about most of these accomplishments without knowing they had been achieved by women. Reading about all these exceptional scientists who were refused an education "by reason of sex" and how many of them were forced to give up their careers after getting married "because it was not appropriate" made me see red, but what really breaks my heart is thinking about how many brilliant things have yet to be discovered because the patriarchy still doesn't realise that half this world's population are more than moms and wives. Very recommendable, and I will for sure be reading the rest of the Forgotten Women series!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Flapper72

    This book was OK. A long list about lots of women who had achieved something in the world of science but HIStory decided to ignore. There were a couple of pages written about each individual. Nice, easy read, enlightening I guess but nothing in too much depth. HIStory has been recorded by white, middle class and privileged men. Not surprisingly really that the authors report on people like themselves. There were plenty of amazing women out there (and continue to be might I say), it's refreshing This book was OK. A long list about lots of women who had achieved something in the world of science but HIStory decided to ignore. There were a couple of pages written about each individual. Nice, easy read, enlightening I guess but nothing in too much depth. HIStory has been recorded by white, middle class and privileged men. Not surprisingly really that the authors report on people like themselves. There were plenty of amazing women out there (and continue to be might I say), it's refreshing that people actually go out searching for the alternative/real/more balanced story of our forebears.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Liene Millere

    Very beautiful book about powerful, smart and amazing women thoughout the centuries . Inspiring book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    You can't help but feel angry when thinking about the discoveries and inventions that might have happened, or might have happened earlier, if our society didn't constantly put down people based on their sex, race, and a bunch of other stupid categories. Apart from anger though I also, naturally, feel very inspired and I'm looking forward to picking up the other books in this series! I also really, really appreciate the effort that went into choosing who to write about and the fact that at the very You can't help but feel angry when thinking about the discoveries and inventions that might have happened, or might have happened earlier, if our society didn't constantly put down people based on their sex, race, and a bunch of other stupid categories. Apart from anger though I also, naturally, feel very inspired and I'm looking forward to picking up the other books in this series! I also really, really appreciate the effort that went into choosing who to write about and the fact that at the very beginning the author points out that white women and women not born into poverty would have had more opportunity than other women.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bobrusha

    Every woman from this book had invented or discovered something which heavily impacted the scientific fields they worked on. They faced a lot of stupid obstacles created by society for women in science, but despite that, they worked really hard and contributed to science: Nettie Stevens, geneticist, who had discovered sex chromosomes. Rosalind Franklin, who had discovered the double-helix shape of DNA. Admiral Grace Hopper, programmer and the inventor of the concept of human-understandable progr Every woman from this book had invented or discovered something which heavily impacted the scientific fields they worked on. They faced a lot of stupid obstacles created by society for women in science, but despite that, they worked really hard and contributed to science: Nettie Stevens, geneticist, who had discovered sex chromosomes. Rosalind Franklin, who had discovered the double-helix shape of DNA. Admiral Grace Hopper, programmer and the inventor of the concept of human-understandable programming languages. So on, and so on. Although I’ve heard a few names from this book before, I didn’t know about their achievements and or understand the importance of their work.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Suradha

    Thank you NetGalley for providing me with a snippet of the eARC of Forgotten Women:The Scientists in exchange for an honest review. I love reading biographies of women in STEM and especially those who worked on groundbreaking science. The book makes it clear that even if it's some women who get featured, it's groundbreaking that they were able to do science at their level given their circumstances, a sobering thought indeed. Do I agree with the nature of many of their origin stories? No. Did I r Thank you NetGalley for providing me with a snippet of the eARC of Forgotten Women:The Scientists in exchange for an honest review. I love reading biographies of women in STEM and especially those who worked on groundbreaking science. The book makes it clear that even if it's some women who get featured, it's groundbreaking that they were able to do science at their level given their circumstances, a sobering thought indeed. Do I agree with the nature of many of their origin stories? No. Did I roll my eyes at the slightly inappropriate nature of relationships between senior academics and these women? So much. Despite the lack of adequate context, are the stories of science and discovery fascinating? Big time. Looking earnestly to buy the full copy of the book for myself.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Devan Wiser

    This book was well written and well researched, along with great illustrations. I enjoyed it as a science teacher because it has given me great info to integrate into lessons. But someone without a science background could still enjoy it; it isn’t overly technical.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alina Lucia

    Found myself absorbed in the life stories of these wonderful women and scientists. Was deeply inspired and encouraged by stories of discovery, courage, achievement and overcoming social barriers. Although not my usual read, the simplistic concept of the book was balanced by the enourmous character of these scientists.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Jones

    4/5 really enjoyed. So many times I put it down to turn to my partner and say ‘did you know...’

  11. 5 out of 5

    Billpalmer

    Review of ‘Forgotten women: The scientists’ by Zing Tsjeng Tsjeng, Z. (2018). Forgotten women: The scientists. London: Cassell Illustrated. Reviewer: Dr William P. Palmer This is a review of ‘Forgotten women: the scientists’ by Zing Tsjeng. However, it should be noted that the book is one in a series by the same author. Other titles in the series are ‘Forgotten women: the leaders’, ‘Forgotten women: the artists’ and ‘Forgotten women: the writers’: it may be that school librarians will be interested Review of ‘Forgotten women: The scientists’ by Zing Tsjeng Tsjeng, Z. (2018). Forgotten women: The scientists. London: Cassell Illustrated. Reviewer: Dr William P. Palmer This is a review of ‘Forgotten women: the scientists’ by Zing Tsjeng. However, it should be noted that the book is one in a series by the same author. Other titles in the series are ‘Forgotten women: the leaders’, ‘Forgotten women: the artists’ and ‘Forgotten women: the writers’: it may be that school librarians will be interested in the whole series. The most curious aspect of this book is its printing style; the size of typeface changes in what appears to be a random fashion, which is a feature which I personally do not like, but it is said to help students retain interest. Forty-eight women scientists are chosen and each scientist has three to four pages that describe their life and work and include a portrait of the scientist. The illustrations by thirteen different artists are a major and very welcome feature of the book. Zing Tsjeng chose to describe the lives and work of the forty-eight women scientists because forty eight women have won a Nobel Prize for science. The forty-eight scientists are divided into seven groups based upon the subject areas in which they worked. The areas were: The earth and the universe, Biology and natural sciences, Medicine and psychology, Elements and genetics, Physics and chemistry, Mathematics and Technology and inventions. This is an unusual categorisation as women chemists can be found in two different groups. The subject areas with most female scientists mentioned were Medicine and psychology and Biology and natural sciences. The key to the author’s choice of scientists is provided by one sentence in the introduction (p. 12) ‘The women who battled the interlocking foes of sexism, racism and class-based prejudice are those that I most admire...’ This is shown in the choices made where several of the women mentioned are not found in other books on women scientists. This is a factor in making the book a unique contribution to the study of women scientists. The title of the book implies that it will be those women who Zing Tsjeng believes to be forgotten scientists who feature in the book. It is a tribute to Zing Tsjeng’s scholarship that she has found more information about some of these women than is usually available. For example, Tapputi, (or Tapputi-Belatekallim) (p.140) who may have been the world’s first chemist, a perfume-maker mentioned in a cuneiform tablet dated around 1200 BC in Babylon in Mesopotamia, was one of Zing Tsjeng’s 48 scientists. She has obtained an impressive amount of information about Tapputi and her work. The information about the female scientists is remarkably accurate, though I did notice that Zing Tsjeng incorrectly stated that Dmitri Mendeleev published the periodic table in 1896 (p.116), rather than the correct date of 1869. This is an unfortunate error as chemists celebrate the 150th anniversary of the periodic table in 2019. This book combines scholarship and general interest brilliantly and certainly deserves a place in the school library or amongst the favourites of any science student. BILL PALMER Review published: Palmer, W. P. (2019). A review of Forgotten women: the scientists by Zing Tjeng, in Teaching Science (The Journal of the Australian Science Teachers Association) 65(3)46 (September).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica M

    http://jessjustreads.com Forgotten Women by Zing Tsjeng is a really wonderful new series, allowing readers to discover 96 women who I can guarantee you’ve never heard of before. Each of these books features 48 incredible women of history, styled with beautiful artwork and colourful layouts. The Leaders is all about women who were true pioneers. They may not have lived long, or they may have been overlooked, but their contributions were important. Grace O’Malley was a 16th century Irish pirate quee http://jessjustreads.com Forgotten Women by Zing Tsjeng is a really wonderful new series, allowing readers to discover 96 women who I can guarantee you’ve never heard of before. Each of these books features 48 incredible women of history, styled with beautiful artwork and colourful layouts. The Leaders is all about women who were true pioneers. They may not have lived long, or they may have been overlooked, but their contributions were important. Grace O’Malley was a 16th century Irish pirate queen, Sylvia Rivera spearheaded the modern transgender rights movement, and Agent 355 was an unknown rebel spy who played a pivotal role in the American Revolution. The series is both informative and interesting. I thought I would’ve gotten sick of these types of books, but I’ve found myself just as enthralled and intrigued as ever. In The Leaders, chapters are broken down into different categories, from rebels to warriors, rulers to activists. In The Scientists, the chapters range from Biology & Natural Sciences to Physics & Chemistry. Each woman is given around three pages of information, so the books are pretty quick to read and the information not too heavy. In The Scientists, we meet women whose scientific achievements or whose inventions have paved the way for the future, but unfortunately their successes weren’t as acknowledged or praised as highly or as often as they should’ve been. Ruby Hirose developed a vaccine for polio, Mary Beatrice Davidson Kenner was a brilliant inventor who found ways to improve everyday struggles, and Ynes Mexia was a botanist who discovered 500 new plant species. Both of these books are packaged beautifully. They’re hardback, with thick, high quality paper and bright colours. They look wonderful together on the shelf, and I hope the series will have more books coming out. I’m sure there are plenty more women out there whose achievements have been sadly forgotten. Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy of both books in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Yolanda Sfetsos

    The other day I posted my review for FORGOTTEN WOMEN: The Leaders, and on that same day I actually received this very awesome book! Just like LEADERS, this edition is absolutely stunning. It's hardback and the pages inside are colourful in both illustrations and knowledge. The way everything is set out kept me turning the page, wanting to consume all the information until I reached the end. Although there are a bunch of women I do recognise listed here, there are too many I didn't. So I'm really g The other day I posted my review for FORGOTTEN WOMEN: The Leaders, and on that same day I actually received this very awesome book! Just like LEADERS, this edition is absolutely stunning. It's hardback and the pages inside are colourful in both illustrations and knowledge. The way everything is set out kept me turning the page, wanting to consume all the information until I reached the end. Although there are a bunch of women I do recognise listed here, there are too many I didn't. So I'm really grateful to this book for introducing me to these intelligent and innovative women in history. I hate that these amazing ladies were considered forgotten at any time, because they deserve to be out there in the public eye. Every single one deserves their place in the history books! Forgotten Women: The Scientists is another outstanding addition to my feminist reference books. I love learning about these very talented women and hope this series of books expands into every field so we can discover all of the pioneers left out for no other reason than their gender. Love this book!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Snorki

    Prompted by a survey of asking children to draw a scientist, and only 20% draw women - with the women all being drawn by girls. It’s a tour of a variety of women who have made great contributions to science through the ages, from Ancient Egypt to the 20th century. The book has examples from different cultures and ages, although the majority are western sciences in the last 100 years. Impressive achievements, but most stories include a great deal about prejudice, about fighting for recognition an Prompted by a survey of asking children to draw a scientist, and only 20% draw women - with the women all being drawn by girls. It’s a tour of a variety of women who have made great contributions to science through the ages, from Ancient Egypt to the 20th century. The book has examples from different cultures and ages, although the majority are western sciences in the last 100 years. Impressive achievements, but most stories include a great deal about prejudice, about fighting for recognition and in many cases, about a man getting more credit for the work. Good that someone is taking the time to collate and promote these stories.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicola

    Every #film #producer on the planet - read this book! There are a hundred stories of great lives to turn into quality films - #docos and #dramas. I learned so much reading Tsjeng's book and I intend to read it again (possibly even purchasing it first, rather than borrowing from the library), noting this time the names of the women about whom she's written. Many more paths to explore from that list, I can tell you! Don't be put off by the simple presentation or the seemingly simple writing; this Every #film #producer on the planet - read this book! There are a hundred stories of great lives to turn into quality films - #docos and #dramas. I learned so much reading Tsjeng's book and I intend to read it again (possibly even purchasing it first, rather than borrowing from the library), noting this time the names of the women about whom she's written. Many more paths to explore from that list, I can tell you! Don't be put off by the simple presentation or the seemingly simple writing; this is not a children's book (especially the story of Hypatia) but would suit young adults and older adults because of the plain, clear English. Just a winner, all round.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    As a woman who got her Chemistry degree whilst working and being a mother, I was very drawn to this book already knowing of women who are overlooked in the sciences. Each scientist has a brief biography and her work explained, credited, and what we know now because of these developments given to us, without being heavy reading. It's a beautifully written tribute to those women, a fantastic starting point to make you want to learn more about these pioneers, and a great inspiration for our daughte As a woman who got her Chemistry degree whilst working and being a mother, I was very drawn to this book already knowing of women who are overlooked in the sciences. Each scientist has a brief biography and her work explained, credited, and what we know now because of these developments given to us, without being heavy reading. It's a beautifully written tribute to those women, a fantastic starting point to make you want to learn more about these pioneers, and a great inspiration for our daughters

  17. 4 out of 5

    teleri llinos

    “It’s made to believe Women are the same as Men; Are you not convinced Daughters can also be heroic?” – Wang Zhenyi. Was this the most detailed account of these women’s lives? No. Yet I still learnt things, and felt inspired by the women I was reading about. It’s a cute, short account on these talented women and I enjoyed it for that. I did expect it to be longer, and have more than five scientists mentioned, but I’m not annoyed by it’s lack of material. It was a quick read, and I liked it. Enough sai “It’s made to believe Women are the same as Men; Are you not convinced Daughters can also be heroic?” – Wang Zhenyi. Was this the most detailed account of these women’s lives? No. Yet I still learnt things, and felt inspired by the women I was reading about. It’s a cute, short account on these talented women and I enjoyed it for that. I did expect it to be longer, and have more than five scientists mentioned, but I’m not annoyed by it’s lack of material. It was a quick read, and I liked it. Enough said.

  18. 4 out of 5

    B.S. Casey

    Forgotten Women is a beautiful compilation of the women that History forgot - and a must-read for any woman who feels like there's nobody out there they can look up to. Delving deep into the worlds of medicine, technology, chemistry, maths, and the universe itself - this book says the name of women who changed the world in their own way and gives us a valuable insight into the contributions women really made to science. Beautifully illustrated, concise and easy to read, this book gives you a per Forgotten Women is a beautiful compilation of the women that History forgot - and a must-read for any woman who feels like there's nobody out there they can look up to. Delving deep into the worlds of medicine, technology, chemistry, maths, and the universe itself - this book says the name of women who changed the world in their own way and gives us a valuable insight into the contributions women really made to science. Beautifully illustrated, concise and easy to read, this book gives you a perfect starting point if you want to learn more about these amazing scientists.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cherith

    This is a fantastic celebration of the women who have contributed so much to the various fields of science. It's such a shame we need special books like this to remember the women who changed the world. There are quite a few instances where women's contributions were overlooked and their male counterparts were unfairly awarded Nobel Prizes. This is part of a collection of four books. The illustrations are lovely and each woman's achievements are wonderfully brought to light. This is a fantastic celebration of the women who have contributed so much to the various fields of science. It's such a shame we need special books like this to remember the women who changed the world. There are quite a few instances where women's contributions were overlooked and their male counterparts were unfairly awarded Nobel Prizes. This is part of a collection of four books. The illustrations are lovely and each woman's achievements are wonderfully brought to light.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    4.5 "We were scientists, we were scholars. Neither of these words has a gender." - Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin I feel a lot as I finish this book (finally). Women strive. Women fight. Some have more privilege than others. Some dressed in drag to learn as men did. Some died brutal deaths for what they believed in. Some are completely invisible... Oof. This book should be read by everyone, men and women and everyone in between. 4.5 "We were scientists, we were scholars. Neither of these words has a gender." - Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin I feel a lot as I finish this book (finally). Women strive. Women fight. Some have more privilege than others. Some dressed in drag to learn as men did. Some died brutal deaths for what they believed in. Some are completely invisible... Oof. This book should be read by everyone, men and women and everyone in between.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I always enjoy reading female empowering things. This one is full of short descriptions of the accomplishments of a bunch of female scientists. I liked that it was categorised by field of science and that it mentions women from different time periods and ethnicities. My only problem with such stories is that I forget about them all very quickly..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jenifer Lavery

    Joyous It is wonderful to see so many women scientists documented here but sad to see how many had to battle to be heard not simply because of their sex but also their race, religion or social status. I hope however that like the women in this book other women will be inspired and continue the fight. Courage calls to courage

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I really enjoyed the variety of the different stories captured in this book. It’s one to keep coming back to time and again. Women were so much more intelligent, curious and powerful than they were given credit for. This book goes some way to give credit where it’s due and to recognise the injustice women faced in time gone by. Definitely one for the classroom.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris Sharpe

    In dire need of a good subeditor, but an otherwise excellent reminder of women's vast contribution to our accumulated scientific knowledge. It does include a few women who are actually rather well known, though; perhaps that space could have been used for some more genuinely "forgotten" luminaries? In dire need of a good subeditor, but an otherwise excellent reminder of women's vast contribution to our accumulated scientific knowledge. It does include a few women who are actually rather well known, though; perhaps that space could have been used for some more genuinely "forgotten" luminaries?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Demi

    I found it really interesting to see how many men had basically stolen the glory for ideas that weren’t really theirs. I enjoyed reading about the accomplishments of many different women and feel like this book should be a definite for all school library’s.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Irina J.

    I enjoyed reading it and as a scientist myself it was very pleasant to remember why I love it so much. Not only once I turned to my partner to tell about some of the interesting details included in the book or unfair conclusions that men have drawn about women.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Cremen

    A stunning brief insight into many of the foreMOTHERS of science. Each womans' life story is told in a beautiful and honest way. The artwork is simply stunning. A joy of a book. A stunning brief insight into many of the foreMOTHERS of science. Each womans' life story is told in a beautiful and honest way. The artwork is simply stunning. A joy of a book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie McCash

    Very interesting read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Angela Kow

    Another great book for my coffee table.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I really loved this book. I am a lover of women's history. I wish it were longer. I did not know about any of the women in this book. It was great to read. I really loved this book. I am a lover of women's history. I wish it were longer. I did not know about any of the women in this book. It was great to read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.