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Lucifer, Vol. 6: Mansions of the Silence

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The sixth collection of the hit series from the world of THE SANDMAN, reprinting issues #36-41. The strange crew of Lucifer Morningstar voyages on a ship made of dead men's nails in search of the soul of Elaine Belloc, the daughter of the Archangel Michael and the girl who gave her life to save Lucifer's.


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The sixth collection of the hit series from the world of THE SANDMAN, reprinting issues #36-41. The strange crew of Lucifer Morningstar voyages on a ship made of dead men's nails in search of the soul of Elaine Belloc, the daughter of the Archangel Michael and the girl who gave her life to save Lucifer's.

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 6: Mansions of the Silence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Airiz

    I felt like this one is not on par with the previous volumes, but it’s definitely a fascinating read. It’s still chuck-full of interwoven mythologies—Norse, Japanese, Judeo-Christian—and it teems with life, with characters blown up to sheer fullness through good storytelling. The main backbone of The Mansions of Silence is the quest to find the soul of Elaine Belloc, God’s granddaughter (through Michael Demiurgos). In the previous volumes, we see how Elaine unwittingly sacrifices her own life ju I felt like this one is not on par with the previous volumes, but it’s definitely a fascinating read. It’s still chuck-full of interwoven mythologies—Norse, Japanese, Judeo-Christian—and it teems with life, with characters blown up to sheer fullness through good storytelling. The main backbone of The Mansions of Silence is the quest to find the soul of Elaine Belloc, God’s granddaughter (through Michael Demiurgos). In the previous volumes, we see how Elaine unwittingly sacrifices her own life just so Lucifer Morningstar will be able to live again, and the Lightbringer wants to return the favor now in the best possible way. Lucifer borrows the Naglfar, the trickster god Loki’s warship that was made from dead man’s nails, and assembles a crew that he trusts to return successfully. The Naglfar is to voyage to the Mansions of Silence, where apparently Elaine’s soul is in torment in the hands of a character keen on taking revenge on the Morningstar… Good premise and all, but the threads of the plot fell short of the mark I expected it to hit. Perhaps this is because it’s the beginning of a new storyline; after all, the stuff concerning Lucifer’s wings are already tied to a close in Inferno. The characters shine through though, especially Mazikeen. I like it when Maz and Lucifer are together—they complement each other, Maz being all brawn and brutality while Lucifer is all mind and manipulation. But I liked it more when Mazikeen is not standing as the Morningstar’s shadow, because she proves to be a butt-kicking soldier worthy of having storylines of her own. As for Loki’s half-brother Bergelmir, he is somewhat likable, which is a break for him because all this time he’s wearing this beware-of-me-I-may-betray-you veil. In fact he’s the only character onboard who has the guts to tell Lucifer how outraged he is to what the Lightbringer has done to the Mansions of Silence, making himself a subwoofer of conscience in a place where he is not likely to be heard. The fallen cherubim duo of Gaudium and Sera and the cuteness of their banters are reminiscent of Gaiman’s Matthew from The Sandman graphic novels. It’s always nice to have someone to stand as a comic relief to a story that’s all despair and fighting. The duo’s existence lies in stark juxtaposition with the nature of the whole story, and it’s magnificently successful in its balance. In this volume, Lucifer and his twin Michael are forced to act in concert because of Elaine. They trek to the place where Mazikeen’s ex-husband has built some kind of alchemical machinery containing God’s thoughts. I think it’s the epicenter of this tome’s letdown—the engine is deus ex machina in every sense of the word. If I were Carey, I would have saved these bits of storyline about the heart-to-heart talk between God and his twins, but I can feel that Carey has something more up his sleeve. That’s what I’m going to wait for. As I’ve said, this one’s an enchanting read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tsumi Tsunami

    sALE lOKI

  3. 5 out of 5

    sally ✿

    “For you are the king of contrivance and manipulation, my Samuel. But in that, as in all things—you learned from your father.” more mazikeen pls.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sonja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. At first, it seemed that this was a fairly plot centric volume: find Elaine. Talk to God the Father. And then wham. Surprise visit of Holy-Shit-They-Actually-Went-There. Yes. That is a literary term. Meet Jill Presto: mother to be of a magical baby because the tarot people raped her and impregnated her with it. Throughout the course of the story, the boy has become corporeal and is trying to cozy up to mother dearest, declaring his love for her and trying to convince her that she must love him too. At first, it seemed that this was a fairly plot centric volume: find Elaine. Talk to God the Father. And then wham. Surprise visit of Holy-Shit-They-Actually-Went-There. Yes. That is a literary term. Meet Jill Presto: mother to be of a magical baby because the tarot people raped her and impregnated her with it. Throughout the course of the story, the boy has become corporeal and is trying to cozy up to mother dearest, declaring his love for her and trying to convince her that she must love him too. But she doesn't react in the way he expects her to. She tells him, in no uncertain terms, to stop mind controlling her to love him and that if he does it again there will be pain. Lots of pain. And then topped with death. Then he becomes injured in the course of the story as he steps in to protect his vessel/mother. Lucifer says he'll save him if Jill wants him too -- but then she decides to leave him to die, concluding with these final words: "I got what I wanted, I'm not complaining. But it was a hell of a long way to come for an abortion." Excuse me while I have a holy-shit moment. Perhaps this doesn't seem so significant if viewed in a bubble -- but consider: Take Fringe for example. Where "abortion" is never even mentioned as an option (even when it's later revealed that the pregnancy would probably kill both mother and child). Then there's another show called Invasion -- it's about aliens, but what's the first symptom that aliens have been fiddling with the humans? When women stop acting like mothers. So -- you have a mother abandoning her kid (side character played by the chick that plays Peggy on Mad Men, btw). Then you have another primary character who's a doctor. She doesn't seem to be Off because she stops being such a good job. Oh no. Something's wrong because she stops being a good mom. She doesn't call her kids and tell them that she's going to be late after a big ass hurricane. It's the Monstrous Mothers trope -- women so far perverted that they reject the very fiber of their being -- their motherhood -- and thus become irredeemable monsters. And here this is being subverted in a glorious fashion. Jill doesn't want to be a mother. She wants to have a career and have good sex. She is furious when someone tries to tell/force her that she needs to love this child. I really appreciate how they position love as a choice, as an action springing forth from someone's agency, instead of something natural. It's self-validating. Individuality first, role second. But the volume wasn't just about motherhood -- it was about fatherhood too. Because God the Father is abandoning the Silver City and randomness/chaos is about to ensue. Gabriel feels betrayed, Lucifer is hardly surprised. Though perhaps my favorite line so far in regards to Lucifer and God the Father is this: FOR YOU ARE THE KING OF CONTRIVANCE AND MANIPULATION, MY SAMAEL, BUT IN THAT, AS IN ALL THINGS -- YOU LEARNED FROM YOUR FATHER. Slytherins! The lot of them. And I fucking love it. I'm hoping the fatherhood theme will play out more in further episodes, but I just find the juxtaposition of a masculine character and a feminine character abandoning certain roles society has thrust upon them to be fascinating. And, of course, I like the subversion of the typical concept of God so prevalent in Judeo-Christian societies. I mean, I don't think that "contrivance" and "manipulations" would be the first adjectives the average person would use to describe "god."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    This volume might not have as much going on as previous volumes, but I still think it's a really good time. There's really only one plot going on with the whole Mansions of the Silence thing, and even though Michael and Lucifer are doing their own thing for awhile, it's still all more tightly tied together than the different lines in previous volumes. Despite the relative shortness and overall simplicity, it's still definitely a 5 star read for me though. I love all the characters on the Naglfar This volume might not have as much going on as previous volumes, but I still think it's a really good time. There's really only one plot going on with the whole Mansions of the Silence thing, and even though Michael and Lucifer are doing their own thing for awhile, it's still all more tightly tied together than the different lines in previous volumes. Despite the relative shortness and overall simplicity, it's still definitely a 5 star read for me though. I love all the characters on the Naglfar and it's great to see them all interacting together. The last issue is really great too both because I love Elaine and also because I'm so excited for what is about to happen next! Some highlights: true lol I just like Lucifer blowing up things / setting things on fire SMACK! Also Michael joining Death in pointing how Lucifer and Yahweh are similar mmhmmm I like bitter!Michael [snort] #ass I think this was the only mention of will in this volume :)))

  6. 4 out of 5

    James Kibirige

    Another epic installment of Mike Careys Lucifer series. Again the book showcases Mike Careys sheer imagination & creativity with a mixture of themes spanning Christianity, Norse and Japanese mythology. Peter Gross art is also iconic and excellent... Another epic installment of Mike Careys Lucifer series. Again the book showcases Mike Careys sheer imagination & creativity with a mixture of themes spanning Christianity, Norse and Japanese mythology. Peter Gross art is also iconic and excellent...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Štěpán

    i liked it but not really liked it

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Lucifer Morningstar traffics in debts and favors, but until now he's always been the owed and not the owing. That changed when Elaine Belloc, God's granddaughter, sacrificed her life to save his, and now the Devil's out to settle that score (and maybe further his own machinations) by bringing Elaine back from the half-world where he soul is trapped. And so Lucifer gathers a rag-tag band of what he refers to as loose-ends, packs them off on a ship borrowed from Loki, and sends them on their quest Lucifer Morningstar traffics in debts and favors, but until now he's always been the owed and not the owing. That changed when Elaine Belloc, God's granddaughter, sacrificed her life to save his, and now the Devil's out to settle that score (and maybe further his own machinations) by bringing Elaine back from the half-world where he soul is trapped. And so Lucifer gathers a rag-tag band of what he refers to as loose-ends, packs them off on a ship borrowed from Loki, and sends them on their questing way while he deals with other matters. With almost the entirety of this book taken up with the quest narrative, Mansions of the Silence is a much more straight-forward tale than most of the other volumes in Carey's series. I found that refreshing, though I can see how others might feel like there's not a whole lot going on here (and, comparatively, there's not). But how can you be disappointed in a story wherein a Japanese god makes paper lanterns out of the souls of small children? Or where you find out that, in service to his goals, Lucifer is just as willing to destroy worlds as build them? Mansions offers both a breather and a reset for the coming conflict with the Almighty, who does indeed seem to have a plan for his fallen son - maybe even one the Master Artificer himself won't see coming.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    I'm trying to pace myself. It's not really working. Loving the Naglfar trip, although Bergelmir now seems sleazier than I remembered. Gaudium and Spera win at everything. Yahwe is a pompous prick and his "everything you do, you do because it is part of My Plan" bullshit needs a hard smackdown. Aaaand it's about time Michael got angry. I love Elaine and Mona's friendship, and I love this - temporary - solution for them. "You're in charge of hedgehogs. You're in charge of everything else."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Zec

    Contains the arcs: Naglfar and Sisters of Mercy. Most of this volume is spent following the various cast of characters on a journey without Lucifer accompanying them. Jill Presto has some pretty good character development in this arc, finally taking charge and making decisions, no longer the puppet of a pack of cards. Mazikeen is as awesome and badass as always. The fallen-cherubim add some humour. It is nice to meet A villain from a previous arc in his place of power. The real gem here is Lucif Contains the arcs: Naglfar and Sisters of Mercy. Most of this volume is spent following the various cast of characters on a journey without Lucifer accompanying them. Jill Presto has some pretty good character development in this arc, finally taking charge and making decisions, no longer the puppet of a pack of cards. Mazikeen is as awesome and badass as always. The fallen-cherubim add some humour. It is nice to meet A villain from a previous arc in his place of power. The real gem here is Lucifer and Michael having an extremely one-sided conversation with God. The implications are stunning. I liked this arc but in the same vein as the previous volume, it feels as though it is building up to something bigger.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kyle12

    JOIN ILLUMINATI THE SECRET SOCIETY, CALL +19136084584 .We welcome every one to this society where by,are you a musician,footballer,firm star,politician etc, every one can [THE MORE PEOPLE THE MORE STRENGTH $ POWERS WE GAIN],Join now. For more information  call on +19136084584 Email [email protected]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    A viking ship made of fingernails with a crew of angels, ghosts and demons on a quest through the afterlife and beyond to save the spirit of a dead girl, whose father is angel from a dead god, what's not to like.

  13. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    Another great installment of the series. I can see why many reviewers count this one as one of the best of the series. It was rather epic and I like to see Lucifer and Michael working together. And the inclusion of their father was interesting!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Keeloca

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. But WHY is destroying the mansions of silence a bad thing? Isn't non-existence better than eternal suffering, which a lot of them seem to have, what with being sewn into lamps and what-not? Also, go Jill. You have that abortion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    I love this series but the same stories seem to be repeating over and over....

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    I keep reading these volumes despite most of it going right over my head. This one was a bit slower paced and easier to follow but, as usual, I found myself lost a few times.

  17. 5 out of 5

    James

    The small party goes on a quest where Lucifer cannot.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Miles McCoy

    This is basically John Milton fanfiction at this point and I love it

  19. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Oof it feels like they've done Elaine and Mona wrong. Are we ever gonna see them again? I sure hope so. Goddess of the hedgehogs. It's a choice.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hennie

    2.5/3 stars. This was so far the weakest volume for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ganesh Sree

    Really picking up pace and the plot gets more interesting

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    This was one of my favorite volumes of the 10 trade paperbacks in the initial Lucifer run. The voyage through the Mansions of Silence is just a great, classic adventure story. I also loved that they brought Elaine back into the plot and that things ended up so well for her and her friend Mona by the end of this volume. I also really liked that Heaven's good boy, Michael, finally stopped drinking God's Kool-aid. I enjoyed the art of the last issue, by guest artist David Hahn. His style is pretty r This was one of my favorite volumes of the 10 trade paperbacks in the initial Lucifer run. The voyage through the Mansions of Silence is just a great, classic adventure story. I also loved that they brought Elaine back into the plot and that things ended up so well for her and her friend Mona by the end of this volume. I also really liked that Heaven's good boy, Michael, finally stopped drinking God's Kool-aid. I enjoyed the art of the last issue, by guest artist David Hahn. His style is pretty realistic-looking, which makes it clear--but he also has an interesting signature quirk with how he draws the inside of ears. They kinda look like Greek keys.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    The Mansions of Silence isn’t one of my favorite arcs, but it is one of the series’ strongest. It is a collection largely devoid of its title character, yet full of some of Carey’s strongest storytelling and some consistently beautiful art. After striking a deal with Loki of Norse myth, Lucifer assembles an unlikely crew and sets them off on a quest, sailing a ship made of dead men’s fingernails. The crew, (made up of Mazikeen, Jill Presto, the half-angel Cal, fallen cherubs Gaudium and Serpa, th The Mansions of Silence isn’t one of my favorite arcs, but it is one of the series’ strongest. It is a collection largely devoid of its title character, yet full of some of Carey’s strongest storytelling and some consistently beautiful art. After striking a deal with Loki of Norse myth, Lucifer assembles an unlikely crew and sets them off on a quest, sailing a ship made of dead men’s fingernails. The crew, (made up of Mazikeen, Jill Presto, the half-angel Cal, fallen cherubs Gaudium and Serpa, the ghost of David Easterman—the man who thought he was Elaine’s biological father—and Loki’s frost giant half brother) are tasked with retrieving Elaine from the titular Mansions of Silence, a place where angels (fallen or not) are forbidden to tread. Despite not being one of my favorite overall collections, many of my favorite moments can be found in these pages, particularly in Issue 36 (the first one included). The panels where Lucifer declares “this is what I was named for. In case you wondered,” are probably my favorite from the entire run. Though this is a small volume, only six issues long, Carey accomplishes much. The unlikely crew of the Nagalfar endure several trials and tribulations which affect them on personal levels, and Jill Presto comes face-to-face with a very unexpected face. And Lucifer and Michael, drawn to the pool of God’s collected thoughts, finally see the Creator’s master plan. These issues were my introduction to Lucifer, back when the series was still being published as a monthly comic. After just finishing Gaiman’s spectacular The Sandman, I was thrilled to learn that one of its most dynamic characters had his own spinoff. I remember being disappointed by these issues as they arrived in my pull box every month. Because I didn’t know the back-story, beyond what had happened in The Sandman. But, most importantly, because I didn’t understand how much groundwork for the future is contained in what could easily be misinterpreted as a side story. It wasn’t until the second or third re-read of the series that the full importance of The Mansions of Silence was made evident to me. It’s a sneaky little story that way. Especially that cutesy little one-shot at the end, where David Hahn’s almost cartoonish art serves as a distraction for what’s really going on behind the scenes.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

    With Heaven and Hell being heads and tails, the Mansions of the Silence are described as the edge of the coin, the place where misfits go after they die. I believe this same metaphor was used in Hellblazer to describe a different post-death destination, but I don’t think the metaphor works since we’ve already seen there are numerous destinations for people after death, such as the Shinto version of Hell. Maybe instead of the edge of the coin, the Mansions of the Silence should be called the edge With Heaven and Hell being heads and tails, the Mansions of the Silence are described as the edge of the coin, the place where misfits go after they die. I believe this same metaphor was used in Hellblazer to describe a different post-death destination, but I don’t think the metaphor works since we’ve already seen there are numerous destinations for people after death, such as the Shinto version of Hell. Maybe instead of the edge of the coin, the Mansions of the Silence should be called the edge of the hundred sided dice? Shinto mythology played a large role in previous volumes (and Tsuki-Yomi shows up in this one), but now Norse mythology is the focus. Lucifer sends the Naglfar, a ship made from dead men’s fingernails, on a mission to resurrect Elaine and his crew features several familiar faces. We’re told fingernails continue to grow after death, which actually isn’t true, but maybe these particular fingernails are supernatural. The Naglfar takes its crew on a psychedelic voyage past gigantic mirrors that contain alternate universes, a place where the sea is in the sky, and a place where large pink bubbles float around. The Mansions are guarded by hordes of dead angels, which Erishad’s child feasts upon yet again (that old trick). Meanwhile, Lucifer and Michael access the thoughts of God. God is indeed leaving which means predestination is finally at an end. This doesn’t necessarily mean free will exists, though, since randomness has taken predestination’s place. This volume is filled with deaths, rebirths, and transformations. I believe this is the first volume that doesn’t feature a cameo from a Sandman character (with the exception of Lucifer and Mazikeen of course). A possible plot hole is starting to emerge. Lucifer promised Mazikeen he would restore her face as soon as he could a couple volumes ago, but he hasn’t tried yet. Maybe he’ll get around to it in the next volume?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    An added bonus to the reread of this series I am currently undertaking is realizing how many characters I have seen before. I am fairly sure I missed how the dead god in this arc was the Japanese poetry god Lucifer was spending time with back in Volume 2. That guy seemed rather polite and friendly. The dead version of him was sadistic and cruel. This volume answers a few questions, such as where angels (and presumably demons) go when they die, by presenting the weird limbo that, if Heaven and Hel An added bonus to the reread of this series I am currently undertaking is realizing how many characters I have seen before. I am fairly sure I missed how the dead god in this arc was the Japanese poetry god Lucifer was spending time with back in Volume 2. That guy seemed rather polite and friendly. The dead version of him was sadistic and cruel. This volume answers a few questions, such as where angels (and presumably demons) go when they die, by presenting the weird limbo that, if Heaven and Hell are flip sides of the same coin, is the edge of the coin that comes up on neither side. The Mansions of the Silence are a fragile place that can't support the power of a being like Michael or Lucifer, but that doesn't mean Elaine (and by extension her friend Mona) can't be rescued from there. Lucifer will do that, if for no other reason than to prevent himself from owing someone else a debt. He has his crew of Norse gods, women impregnated by tarot cards, half-angels, fallen cherubs, ghosts, and Mazikeen, and off they go in a ship made of dead men's fingernails. Lucifer also spends time with his brother Michael, and for the first time, the Voice of God speaks. God Himself will eventually appear in the series, but for now, the very idea of knowing everything and all that entails is coming into view. God knew Lucifer's rebellion was coming. It was part of His plan. Michael had never considered that...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I think I have to go out on a limb and say this is the best volume of this series yet (I like to live on the edge). Some of the coolest ideas coupled with high adventure and some of the must cunning trickery so far, fully displaying once and for all that Lucifer is 100% in this for himself and no one else. I Googled it just to be sure, but the idea of the Mansions of the Silence is so spot-on that I figured it had to be a mythological term that Carey was just using in his own way. Wrong. He coin I think I have to go out on a limb and say this is the best volume of this series yet (I like to live on the edge). Some of the coolest ideas coupled with high adventure and some of the must cunning trickery so far, fully displaying once and for all that Lucifer is 100% in this for himself and no one else. I Googled it just to be sure, but the idea of the Mansions of the Silence is so spot-on that I figured it had to be a mythological term that Carey was just using in his own way. Wrong. He coined the term and the function: the Mansions of the Silence are the places gods, angels and demons go when they die. We've known from this series they don't go to hell, and it wouldn't make sense if they went to heaven because, well, they were already there. So instead they go to this kind of nothing place to exist in turmoil for eternity. It's a cool idea, and the exploration of it is great. We get a great cast of characters, which has been collecting since issue one, and an odyssey into the unknown that left me uneasy from beginning to end. Really a great read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Reynolds

    Probably the most straightforward narrative of all the Lucifer volumes and hugely enjoyable. Lucifer is mostly off by himself for the first half of the volume, and the narrative stays with a quest narrative where Lucy sends a crew on a boatride into the Mansions of the Silence. The trials of its dysfunctional crew are both entertaining and thrilling, and it's intercut with Lucifer and Michael arguing which is always a plus. The boat's final destination, and the reveal of Lucifer's plan is partic Probably the most straightforward narrative of all the Lucifer volumes and hugely enjoyable. Lucifer is mostly off by himself for the first half of the volume, and the narrative stays with a quest narrative where Lucy sends a crew on a boatride into the Mansions of the Silence. The trials of its dysfunctional crew are both entertaining and thrilling, and it's intercut with Lucifer and Michael arguing which is always a plus. The boat's final destination, and the reveal of Lucifer's plan is particularly good, highlighting his how his prideful nature causes him to always pay his debts, but not to care about the immense destruction he leaves in his wake as he goes about fulfilling his obligations. Tsuki-Yomi returns briefly and is actually a pretty good villain here. The final issue, "Sisters of Mercy" ties up the volume very well in a funny and clever way, with the artwork being simple but effective, and the final image one of my favourites from the run. My rankings of the Lucifer volumes: 3 (best), 6, 8, 4, 11, 2, 10, 1, 7, 9, 5 (worst)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Deidre

    I was recommended this series by a friend about a year ago, and for Christmas this year I was given the first volume by another friend who knows I always give anything a couple of episodes to hook me in. I definitely was hooked on this and eagerly sought out more, and will probably finish the series soon. Lucifer is a fascinating character in this; at times seeming like a petulant teenager, at other times showing his age and accumulated wisdom in unexpected ways. The other characters introduced a I was recommended this series by a friend about a year ago, and for Christmas this year I was given the first volume by another friend who knows I always give anything a couple of episodes to hook me in. I definitely was hooked on this and eagerly sought out more, and will probably finish the series soon. Lucifer is a fascinating character in this; at times seeming like a petulant teenager, at other times showing his age and accumulated wisdom in unexpected ways. The other characters introduced along the way are just as complex; existing in the gray areas, even if they live in Heaven or Hell. However, it's clear that the story doesn't really go as in depth into some of its theological questions as it would like to. Luckily, this doesn't detract from the story at all. I'm sure I'll have more to say once I've finished it all, but here's hoping the second half is just as good, if not better, than the first half!

  29. 5 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    Lucifer is on a mission to locate the soul of a girl called Elaine who bears the distinction of being God's granddaughter. Lucifer then sets a crew to Naglfar to journey to the Mansions of the Silence, where Elaine and Mona's spirits are in torment. No, it seems Elaine's storyline is not yet finished, though a good number of loose ends get tied up in this volume. One major theme in "Naglfar" is revenge: Lucifer took revenge on Izanami for what she tried in "The House of Windowless Rooms". He made Lucifer is on a mission to locate the soul of a girl called Elaine who bears the distinction of being God's granddaughter. Lucifer then sets a crew to Naglfar to journey to the Mansions of the Silence, where Elaine and Mona's spirits are in torment. No, it seems Elaine's storyline is not yet finished, though a good number of loose ends get tied up in this volume. One major theme in "Naglfar" is revenge: Lucifer took revenge on Izanami for what she tried in "The House of Windowless Rooms". He made sure that the souls of their sons he had killed were no longer within her reach. Tsuki-Yomi was just an innocent bystander who surely did not deserve his fate. That explains why he is devoting his whole afterlife to get even with Lucifer. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 6: Mansions of the Silence Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Raj

    The sixth volume of Lucifer's story sees him commissioning a vessel to sail to the Mansions of the Silence, with a hand-picked crew to retrieve the soul of Elaine Belloc, the girl who, unwittingly, gave up her life to retrieve him from the unlife where he was trapped. That story is interwoven with those of the crew, including the half-angel Cal, Jill Presto, unwilling mother-to-be of the child of sentient tarot deck, the Basanos, a giant, a ghost and two fallen Cherubim. At least as interesting a The sixth volume of Lucifer's story sees him commissioning a vessel to sail to the Mansions of the Silence, with a hand-picked crew to retrieve the soul of Elaine Belloc, the girl who, unwittingly, gave up her life to retrieve him from the unlife where he was trapped. That story is interwoven with those of the crew, including the half-angel Cal, Jill Presto, unwilling mother-to-be of the child of sentient tarot deck, the Basanos, a giant, a ghost and two fallen Cherubim. At least as interesting as that story is the one going on in parallel with Lucifer's discussions with his brother Michael and their view of the mind of God, along with the consequences of that. It's a compelling story and one that had me turning the pages rapidly. The mythology of the series is really starting to build up and the relationships between characters taking on new meanings. And at the centre, there's always Lucifer, standing ever apart, always one step ahead of everybody else. Roll on volume 7.

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