web site hit counter Lucifer, Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Lucifer, Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway

Availability: Ready to download

From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, is unexpectedly called back into action when he receives a mission from Heaven. Given free reign to use any means necessary, Lucifer is promised a prize of his own choosing if he fulfills this holy request. But once he completes his mission, the Prince of Darkness' demand shakes the foundation of From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, is unexpectedly called back into action when he receives a mission from Heaven. Given free reign to use any means necessary, Lucifer is promised a prize of his own choosing if he fulfills this holy request. But once he completes his mission, the Prince of Darkness' demand shakes the foundation of Heaven and Hell. Now as his enemies unite to stop his reemergence, Lucifer gathers his forces as he prepares to launch his new revolution. This volume contains: The Sandman Presents: Lucifer #1–3 Lucifer #1–4


Compare

From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, is unexpectedly called back into action when he receives a mission from Heaven. Given free reign to use any means necessary, Lucifer is promised a prize of his own choosing if he fulfills this holy request. But once he completes his mission, the Prince of Darkness' demand shakes the foundation of From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, is unexpectedly called back into action when he receives a mission from Heaven. Given free reign to use any means necessary, Lucifer is promised a prize of his own choosing if he fulfills this holy request. But once he completes his mission, the Prince of Darkness' demand shakes the foundation of Heaven and Hell. Now as his enemies unite to stop his reemergence, Lucifer gathers his forces as he prepares to launch his new revolution. This volume contains: The Sandman Presents: Lucifer #1–3 Lucifer #1–4

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    One of my favorite comic series, and I've read it at least 2-3 times before this, so I'm rather surprised that I haven't made some comment about it here on Goodreads yet. I think this is probably my favorite comic work by Mike Carey, which is saying quite a bit, as he's also done Crossing Midnight and unwritten. The tone of the series is very similar to Sandman. I don't mean that in any derogatory or derivative way. (Though I have a hard time imagining how a comparison to Sandman could be deroga One of my favorite comic series, and I've read it at least 2-3 times before this, so I'm rather surprised that I haven't made some comment about it here on Goodreads yet. I think this is probably my favorite comic work by Mike Carey, which is saying quite a bit, as he's also done Crossing Midnight and unwritten. The tone of the series is very similar to Sandman. I don't mean that in any derogatory or derivative way. (Though I have a hard time imagining how a comparison to Sandman could be derogatory, now that I think of it.) Not only does the series use some of the characters created in Sandman (Lucifer, most notably.) and exist in the same cosmology, but the shape of the story is the same. It's a loose narrative that follows Lucifer around and indulges in many small tangents and vignettes along the way, introducing new characters and broadening the reader's knowledge of the world. That said, trying to emulate Sandman isn't particularly notable, (who wouldn't want steal some of the tricks there?) What *is* impressive, is how well Mike Carey makes this story structure work. I was never lost, confused, or bored. And that's hard to do using this loose style. What's more, the fundamental differences in the two lead characters make these stories profoundly different. Lucifer is arrogant and brash in a way that Sandman never was. Is it worth your time? Absolutely. Especially if you enjoyed Sandman, and/or character-centered stories that tend toward the mythic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    If you've read Sandman and are looking for more, this is a good place to start. It picks up with Lucifer running a nightclub in L.A. when he's asked to do a favor for heaven. I like that even though this spins out of Sandman, Carey quickly establishes his own mythology and characters. His Lucifer is cutthroat and conniving and yet, it's easy to think he's looking out for you. Like Sandman, Lucifer isn't always the star of each story, sometimes only playing a minor character. Scott Hampton's art i If you've read Sandman and are looking for more, this is a good place to start. It picks up with Lucifer running a nightclub in L.A. when he's asked to do a favor for heaven. I like that even though this spins out of Sandman, Carey quickly establishes his own mythology and characters. His Lucifer is cutthroat and conniving and yet, it's easy to think he's looking out for you. Like Sandman, Lucifer isn't always the star of each story, sometimes only playing a minor character. Scott Hampton's art in the initial miniseries is fantastic. I love how he switches back and forth between sparse colored pencils and full paints. Todd Klein is known as the best letterer in the business. It's clear why in this volume. Every character has his or her own font and way of speaking. Lettering is one of those things you typically only notice when it's bad. Here with the numerous nonhuman characters in the story, it really stands out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cheese

    Hits the ground running. A good start and getting stronger and more intriguing every time I turn the page. Lucifer is far more devilish than I could have imagined.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Airiz

    LUCIFER MORNINGSTAR. Most of us know him as the Prince of Hell, formerly the angel Samael, proud Lightbringer of the Heavens. But you might as well include the first title as a thing of the past, because apparently Lucifer has resigned. Yes, folks, you heard that right: he’s quit. That's at least according to the canon of Gaiman’s phenomenal graphic novel series, The Sandman. Establishing a continuity with Gaiman’s modern interpretation of the Devil, Mike Carrey crafts this spin-off following Luc LUCIFER MORNINGSTAR. Most of us know him as the Prince of Hell, formerly the angel Samael, proud Lightbringer of the Heavens. But you might as well include the first title as a thing of the past, because apparently Lucifer has resigned. Yes, folks, you heard that right: he’s quit. That's at least according to the canon of Gaiman’s phenomenal graphic novel series, The Sandman. Establishing a continuity with Gaiman’s modern interpretation of the Devil, Mike Carrey crafts this spin-off following Lucifer’s unconventional reconnection with the Creator. As we have seen in The Sandman, Lucifer abdicates his throne in hopes of being free from responsibilities, and then becomes the owner and pianist of a nightclub in Los Angeles. Now he’s opted to be a neutral (or shall we say Machiavellian?) entity between the so-called ‘good guys’ and ‘bad guys’. Just as he thinks it’s all going smooth, a message from his old employer arrives: God wants him to become heaven’s cleanup man. There’s an ancient force planting the seed of Armageddon in the best soil possible—the human hearts—and it appears that heaven can’t get involved in the affairs of mortals. So they’ve only got one choice, and that is to convince the Fallen One to accept the holy quest with a price of his own choosing. Lucifer knows his status very well, so when heaven gives him the ‘payment’, he makes it a point to take a good look at the “gift horse’s guts”. What follows next is a string of events that will again disturb the balance of planes—earthly and otherwise. As a whole, I think this volume is a rather solid kick-off to a new series. The first three issues, which are originally part of the special stand-alone stories called Sandman Presents, has a premise that is vaguely Gaimanesque. But Carey’s distinctive execution makes the story his own, inflating characters with sheer weight using an air so different from Gaiman (though not necessarily better). I’ve once commended Gaiman for his exceptional interpretation of the biblical figure of the Fallen One. Carey didn’t let me down either, as he is doing a good job of keeping Lucifer an interesting antihero—a character that readers would actually care for. And I think that is magnificently ironic because in actuality, nobody wants to be fond of or to root for the Prince of Hell (except maybe if you’re a Satanist). But the point here is that the molding is good, making Lucifer worthy of being the title character of this series. I’m intrigued by the new characters and it’s forgivable that they need a little bit more of fleshing out since this is just the first volume. Here we meet a lot of angels, mostly ones that have taken carnal forms, but also those who are still up in the Silver City: Amenadiel, Sandalphon, Meleos, etc. I’m not very well-versed in angelology, but I knew enough to recognize them here and how different Carey’s interpretation of them is in comparison with that of other mythologies (or religious sources). I’m impressed, and I’m looking forward to see more of them in the next tomes. The artwork is okay, I think, although I'm sort of expecting more impressive ones. I mean, the cover arts are gorgeous.... I would say this volume is more character-driven that plot-driven, but I have a feeling that the storyline will thicken in the next issues. Very engrossing read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    Very promising start Gaiman's work have tons of his weirdness and charm and it's hard to write spin-off to his series and not look pale in comparison but so far it seems that Lucifer has potential to be as good if not better than Sandman. Illustrator manages to maintain similar style to Sandman but with more detailed illustrations.I think that this is how Sandman series should have looked. This doesn't apply to last issue in this volume who's illustrations are just as bad as Sandman at it's worst.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Forrest

    Lucifer, Vol. 1 is not the best graphic novel I've read in the last year or so and not the worst. The artwork and production are, as one would expect from Vertigo, top notch. The stories included are good, but nothing like the other stuff I've been lucky enough to encounter in the last few months. Lucifer as a character - well, it's complicated, but not complicated enough to compel me to read the whole series. Still, there's a lot of potential for the retired prince of Hell. At times, I found hi Lucifer, Vol. 1 is not the best graphic novel I've read in the last year or so and not the worst. The artwork and production are, as one would expect from Vertigo, top notch. The stories included are good, but nothing like the other stuff I've been lucky enough to encounter in the last few months. Lucifer as a character - well, it's complicated, but not complicated enough to compel me to read the whole series. Still, there's a lot of potential for the retired prince of Hell. At times, I found him arbitrarily nasty, then not nearly nasty enough. I suppose that Carey is trying to add complexity to Lucifer's character, but the lightbringer becomes, in the process . . . well, muddled. Dark, even, but not in an interesting way. More foggy, I suppose. Maybe I'll pick up a copy of the later volumes and give Carey a chance to grow the character. But maybe not. I can't recommend this nearly as strongly as I can other graphic novels I've recently read, but I can't firmly say "you shouldn't read this," either. From me, it gets an underwhelming: "Meh. It's okay. Better than reading cheap romance novels, I suppose." Prepare to not be blown away.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Wordy and info dumpy in a not good way. World: The art is solid, it’s not the best type of the era and the framing is fairly standard but it does it’s job. The world building is solid too as it continues the story that we saw in Sandman and we get to see the little piece of the world that Gaiman has created for Lucifer. The magic stuff is done well and pretty representative of the era of comics that this book is from. Story: There are two stories here and a single issue and for the most part they Wordy and info dumpy in a not good way. World: The art is solid, it’s not the best type of the era and the framing is fairly standard but it does it’s job. The world building is solid too as it continues the story that we saw in Sandman and we get to see the little piece of the world that Gaiman has created for Lucifer. The magic stuff is done well and pretty representative of the era of comics that this book is from. Story: There are two stories here and a single issue and for the most part they are interesting stories. They move along slowly and are soil boil stories that are tied to character and lore. I liked the idea of the cards and I also liked the ideas of the darkness (I liked they darkness story more). I liked how deep and wide the world felt with the tales and the sense of weight it had. That being said there is a log of info dumping, like super wordy info dumping. I am a fan of world building and I don’t mind info dumps most of the time but this book took it to a whole new level. It was also in places slowed the story down to a complete stop an dumped and dumped and dumped (issue 2 of the main series comes to mind). The pacing therefore was problematic and it made the story more burdened than it needed to be. The third story a single issue tale with Elaine was good as it didn’t have this problem and was pretty great. Overall the writing needs a bit of work. Characters: A lot of character and a lot of information about them was given to readers. I don’t know how much of the depth we got was needed for these stories, they may help in future stories but their arcs and their journeys were really bogged down by the long info dumps and monologues and text bombs all over the book. I wanted more quiet moments to build Lucifer and his relationships with the character but we get exposition and description after exposition and description and wow I did not care by the end. I see a lot of potential but the book needs to stop yammering on and on and on. Onward to the next book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    I recently reread Sandman, and while I do love it for its own sake, I must confess that my real reason for trekking through Gaiman's epic was to get to Carey's equally majestic, albeit much-less praised, story. Frankly, I'm not sure why that is, as in many ways, I think Lucifer surpasses its origin story. Both boast rich, and mostly independent cosmologies, but whereas for a significant part of its run, Sandman exists as a framework for Gaiman to write any kind of story he wants, Lucifer is surp I recently reread Sandman, and while I do love it for its own sake, I must confess that my real reason for trekking through Gaiman's epic was to get to Carey's equally majestic, albeit much-less praised, story. Frankly, I'm not sure why that is, as in many ways, I think Lucifer surpasses its origin story. Both boast rich, and mostly independent cosmologies, but whereas for a significant part of its run, Sandman exists as a framework for Gaiman to write any kind of story he wants, Lucifer is surprisingly single-minded in telling the tale of the title character's most recent war against his creator. And frankly, I'd rather read about cunning, crafy, cold, cruel Lucifer than mopey Morpheus. Volume one does little more than establish the setup for the rest of the series. Lucifer gets his Macguffin, and we meet the Basanos and Elaine. Sadly, Mazikeen gets short-shrift, but it's hard to do much with a character who can only barely be understood. But mostly, this book exists so that we can see what a brilliant bastard Lucifer can be.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Damon

    I keep picking this up and reading it again because I forgot that I had already read it. Now it is on my read list.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    Mike Carey’s Lucifer is even more manipulative, charming, and dangerous than I could have hoped. The supporting cast are real people, living and dead, in a real world. - Neil Gaiman Well, here I am reading this series for the fourth time, and this time I went ahead and bought myself some hard copies and some little post-it bookmark things because if you couldn't tell I AM WAY TOO INTO THIS SERIES. Once upon a time [about ten years ago] I was slowly making my way through the Sandman series. Then I Mike Carey’s Lucifer is even more manipulative, charming, and dangerous than I could have hoped. The supporting cast are real people, living and dead, in a real world. - Neil Gaiman Well, here I am reading this series for the fourth time, and this time I went ahead and bought myself some hard copies and some little post-it bookmark things because if you couldn't tell I AM WAY TOO INTO THIS SERIES. Once upon a time [about ten years ago] I was slowly making my way through the Sandman series. Then I learned about the Lucifer spin-off and promptly put Sandman down to run off to read Lucifer instead. Fast forward to last year and I FINALLY read all of Sandman [although it is still my personal opinion that this series is way better]. This is absolutely my favorite graphic novel, probably my favorite 'book' in general [if I'm allowed to count a graphic novel series as a single book lol], and definitely the standard to which I hold up any other stories I read about Lucifer [spoiler alert: they all fall woefully short, with the exception of Glen Duncan's I, Lucifer]. So strap in for the long haul of me just absolutely gushing over every single part of this. I love that it delves into other mythologies besides just Christianity and weaves them all together so seamlessly. I love all the side characters and especially the women and girls. We just barely meet Elaine in this volume but she turns out to be one of the most important characters in the entire series. Mazikeen doesn't do much early in the series but she really comes into her own later. And you've got others like Jill, Mona, Beatrice, and many more. And they're all just so unique and incredibly realistic. This isn't just a story about Lucifer, but also about everyone around him and they all get their own storylines at some point. But most of all I just love the way that Lucifer is written. Most of the time I feel like the devil is either written as this like bumbling trickster caricature or more recently as some kind of like ~moody sexy troubled~ whatever that has me rolling my eyes out of my head. But this Lucifer isn't like that. He's not a nice guy by any means and he will manipulate people to his own ends, but he is also not overly malicious and doesn't go out of his way to cause destruction just for destruction's sake. I just feel like he is very believable as an immortal character, incredibly patient and focused as opposed to how several writers have immortal characters who are thousands of years old running around acting like teenagers. Also for this reread I'm trying to mark every time 'will' is brought up in the series because an ongoing theme is how Lucifer pretty much just gets shit done through sheer force of will [in addition to all the 'free will' references you would expect for anything featuring Lucifer as a character] and I find that to be both incredibly fascinating and also one of my favorite character traits of his. For the first volume we have: [I figure references to other people's lack of will count as well] [and the obligatory free will reference] Also just a few other random things that I like, either because of the quotes or because of the art:

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    The art in the first half has a very painterly look to it - as if it's all been coloured in watercolour paint - which adds an airy, breezy quality to the pages. Which is a fascinating counterpoint to the menace that lies just beneath the surface of the interactions between characters. The actual questing and action are almost beside the point in this book - or at least for me, they're not terribly compelling, compared with the mythology of heaven, hell, the world and humanity that Carey teases ou The art in the first half has a very painterly look to it - as if it's all been coloured in watercolour paint - which adds an airy, breezy quality to the pages. Which is a fascinating counterpoint to the menace that lies just beneath the surface of the interactions between characters. The actual questing and action are almost beside the point in this book - or at least for me, they're not terribly compelling, compared with the mythology of heaven, hell, the world and humanity that Carey teases out over occasional pages. I have no idea how much of it derives from pre-existing mythologies (religions) and how much Carey imagined himself - but the way he weaves it into the story, and makes it so accessibly interesting, is good enough for me. However the first storyline ends more with a whimper - not a strong punch line. And for a writer who's known for his character development, these are some pretty dull, one-dimensional cutouts. I'd be much happier with the menace, twists and/or real emotional reactions found in most of the good issues of Hellblazer. And the second storyline seems more moralistic, but it much more meaningful. I don't know what's missing - a sense of dread? Any actual threat or chance that Lucifer might not get everything he wants? The final one-off story was the most enjoyable, but also the least meandering and philosophical of the book. I don't know how much of that is causation or correlation. This is pretty unsatisfying reading for me, and I wish I could articulate why, because many people I respect are big fans of these Lucifer books, and I'd sure like to share the enjoyment they got out of these. I still think Carey's pretty talented, and that he pulled off something worth doing with this book, but something's still missing for me. This book took me an awful number of tries to get through. Not really a page-turner for me, but I may give the next volume a try in case the writing style picks up.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    I really truly enjoy Mike Carey's works... I just found this so boring! Which is guess is consistent, since I found Preludes & Nocturnes boring too... I don't know what I'm missing here, but everything read flat for me. And I know Mike Cary can plot out excitement and write complex characters from having loved The Unwritten, Vol. 1: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity and The Girl With All The Gifts, but this just didn't do it for me. Oh well. I really truly enjoy Mike Carey's works... I just found this so boring! Which is guess is consistent, since I found Preludes & Nocturnes boring too... I don't know what I'm missing here, but everything read flat for me. And I know Mike Cary can plot out excitement and write complex characters from having loved The Unwritten, Vol. 1: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity and The Girl With All The Gifts, but this just didn't do it for me. Oh well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    sally ✿

    Will I like this more than the Sandman? That remains to be seen as Neil Gaiman sort of has my heart, but it was a solid and interesting start. I'm excited to continue, though, I will admit, my knowledge of religion is very minimal so my dumbass self is probably missing a lot. Shoutout to my high school English teacher for gifting me the entire series. Sorry that I'm only just reading them now. You're the best!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Miss Susan

    man i am so glad i read this now and not ten years ago ten years ago i would've known that this series is well liked and highly acclaimed and i would've picked up the next volume because it's supposed to be good right? and the library has it! i cannot waste this comics opportunity happily i am now old and curmedgeonly enough to know that life is too short to read things i don't like. unless the rest of the series features an abrupt tonal shift -- and feel free to tell me if it does! -- i care far man i am so glad i read this now and not ten years ago ten years ago i would've known that this series is well liked and highly acclaimed and i would've picked up the next volume because it's supposed to be good right? and the library has it! i cannot waste this comics opportunity happily i am now old and curmedgeonly enough to know that life is too short to read things i don't like. unless the rest of the series features an abrupt tonal shift -- and feel free to tell me if it does! -- i care far too much about character to suffer through a ugly story that offers me no one to be really invested in 2 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I think my major gripe was the inconsistency. I wish writers would not throw in some new rule right when a character needs the change. You create a world, stick to your own rules. Creativity is great but attempt some type of reasoning or smoothness. Otherwise, I liked this, holds a lot of promise. Lucifer is an extremely interesting character.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    Easily the best part of the Extended Sandman Universe, the Lucifer story is coherent, paced really well, and a delight to watch unfold. Many writers of this era have a giant plot idea and set everything up as a set of quests to reach that plot. Carey has several different stories to tell that end up creating a large tapestry. By the end, the full run feels more like focused than Neil Gaiman's Sandman, but it's actually just very effective at pulling off the same tricks. If you loved Gaiman's Sandm Easily the best part of the Extended Sandman Universe, the Lucifer story is coherent, paced really well, and a delight to watch unfold. Many writers of this era have a giant plot idea and set everything up as a set of quests to reach that plot. Carey has several different stories to tell that end up creating a large tapestry. By the end, the full run feels more like focused than Neil Gaiman's Sandman, but it's actually just very effective at pulling off the same tricks. If you loved Gaiman's Sandman, you really should check this out. It's excellent.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lucas Chance

    This a very bold thing to say, but I adore this volume more than any of the Sandman volumes. That isn’t a bash against Gaian, that’s a testament to what Carey does here.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ivana

    I did not really get into it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    irene

    It wasn't the beginning I was expecting (but it's by Mike Carey and I hope it gets better and better).

  20. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    "Lucifer" is a graphic novel that's a spin-off from Gaiman's incredibly popular "Sandman" series. As such, it shares a lot in common with Gaiman's re-envisioning of mythology. In "The Sandman: Seasons of Mist", Lucifer resigned from his post in Hell, had his wings cut off by Dream, and "retired" to host a nightclub called Lux where Lucifer plays his own piano. This book and series picks up where that left off--in a story arc called "The Morningstar Option", opening with a visit from Amenadiel, a "Lucifer" is a graphic novel that's a spin-off from Gaiman's incredibly popular "Sandman" series. As such, it shares a lot in common with Gaiman's re-envisioning of mythology. In "The Sandman: Seasons of Mist", Lucifer resigned from his post in Hell, had his wings cut off by Dream, and "retired" to host a nightclub called Lux where Lucifer plays his own piano. This book and series picks up where that left off--in a story arc called "The Morningstar Option", opening with a visit from Amenadiel, an angel of the host to Lucifer to offer him a job for whatever price Lucifer will name. Thus begins the wheels-within-wheels that is the hallmark of this series. In his foreword to this tpb, Gaiman states that whenever another comic writer would ask him what he thought should spin-off from "Sandman", he always explicitly replied "Lucifer," which is likely not what any of them wanted to hear, instead hoping that Gaiman would give free rein to one of the Endless. But Gaiman had already covered the possibilities with the Endless--with the exception of the enrichment brought about by "The Dreaming" spin-off, while Lucifer was the perfect protagonist: extremely flawed yet ultimately intriguing, charming and deadly, and full of pride for who else would he be other than that? Lucifer is the character you don't want to like, but you can't help yourself from doing so because, unlike the throne of Heaven, Lucifer is much more like us. The Bible may say that man was created in God's image, but our personalities were grafted from Lucifer. This collection has three main story arcs (collected from "The Sandman Presents: Lucifer #1–3" and "Lucifer #1–4"): "The Morningstar Option" where Lucifer fulfills a job for Heaven, and shows that he's a right bastard to any who doubted; "A Six Card Spread" in which Lucifer attempts to discover if his payment (a Letter of Passage) from Heaven has any strings attached that he wasn't aware of; and "Born with the DEAD" which seems ancilliary to the ongoing story--as it's about a young girl who tries to figure out how and why her best friend died with Lucifer showing up near the denounement to provide a favor which will put the girl in debt to him. The stories seem unconnected somehow but I'm guessing another couple of story arcs would show how Carey would tie it all together. This first volume hasn't impressed me but it shows a lot of potential to grow into the rich, multi-layered story within a story that I'm sure it's aiming to become. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  21. 4 out of 5

    MissAnnThrope

    30 December 2012 Rating: * * 1/2 I really wanted to like Lucifer, Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway more than I did. Perhaps I'm too simpleminded to grasp its appeal because it has mostly glowing reviews. Alas, I'm a dumdum and did not enjoy it as I wish I had. It sounded so promising: A spinoff of the Lucifer created by the almighty Neil Gaiman in The Sandman. There were parts in the first and last story that were interesting, but the writing felt mostly contrived. It takes big cajones to take on the t 30 December 2012 Rating: * * 1/2 I really wanted to like Lucifer, Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway more than I did. Perhaps I'm too simpleminded to grasp its appeal because it has mostly glowing reviews. Alas, I'm a dumdum and did not enjoy it as I wish I had. It sounded so promising: A spinoff of the Lucifer created by the almighty Neil Gaiman in The Sandman. There were parts in the first and last story that were interesting, but the writing felt mostly contrived. It takes big cajones to take on the task of writing a graphic novel based on the Devil himself, but even bigger cajones to fill the shoes of Neil Gaiman. Mike Carey seems to be trying too hard to write like Neil Gaiman, and maybe that's where this story fails. I think if Carey writes with his own voice, he could have something really spectacular here. Unfortunately, I felt mostly bored reading this volume so I doubt I will continue on with this series to see if Carey does find his own groove. This book should have taken me not more than a couple of hours to read, but it took me all day to get through. Maybe, one day I'll give it another chance, but for now, I'm setting it aside. I do like the picture on the back cover with Lucifer giving the finger à la The Flight of the Conchords' style.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    It's been so long since I last read this that the only thing I remembered of the first volume was the Tarot arc - I'd completely forgotten about The Morningstar Option and Rachel, and that Elaine's story already starts here! Such an amazing set-up and - sorry to say - instantly several miles above Sandman's take on Lucifer. Scott Hampton's art is gorgeous and a great choice to start with. I personally don't like Chris Weston's art that much, it looks pretty basic by comparison, but the story's s It's been so long since I last read this that the only thing I remembered of the first volume was the Tarot arc - I'd completely forgotten about The Morningstar Option and Rachel, and that Elaine's story already starts here! Such an amazing set-up and - sorry to say - instantly several miles above Sandman's take on Lucifer. Scott Hampton's art is gorgeous and a great choice to start with. I personally don't like Chris Weston's art that much, it looks pretty basic by comparison, but the story's so good I just kind of roll with it. Karl and Jayesh's story remains one of the most fucked-up things ever. (view spoiler)[Still finding it hard to grasp how you could ever start a relationship with someone after that. (hide spoiler)] Also, one of my enduring nitpicks about the Hamburg arc is that I really wish they'd consulted a native speaker for the German. It's so wrong it's distracting. Surely they could've afforded something better than whatever the 1999 version of Google Translate was. Apart from that, Jill rocks. Every word out of Lucifer's mouth is like well-aged whiskey. And I absolutely cannot wait for Mazikeen to start owning her own story. Onwards!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Re-read this last evening (June 18, 2013) just for the hell of it (heh) Good stories with nice art. I especially liked the Bolton art from the first story. Although using characters from the pages of Sandman, Carrey manages to weave original tales that transcend its origins. He characterizes Lucifer very well, he's an arognat ex-angel which likes to order people around... but you still can't keep from liking him. I would lov to see how a meeting between him and Constantine would work out... two bada Re-read this last evening (June 18, 2013) just for the hell of it (heh) Good stories with nice art. I especially liked the Bolton art from the first story. Although using characters from the pages of Sandman, Carrey manages to weave original tales that transcend its origins. He characterizes Lucifer very well, he's an arognat ex-angel which likes to order people around... but you still can't keep from liking him. I would lov to see how a meeting between him and Constantine would work out... two badasses out-badassing each other with their bad-assessness, heh. A good series to re-read, and I'll probably be going thru the entire thing in the next few couple of weeks... again, just for the hell of it. My Original Review (still stands) : From the pages of Sandman comes the on-going saga of everybody favorite lil' devil, Lucifer. Yeah, I liked this book. I just wish this series had been given a better format, such as a Deluxe Hardcover, or, at the very least, better paper.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    This was a great start to this series. I don't know how I didn't know there was a spin-off series about Lucifer from Sandman, but am so glad it was introduced to me, and the first volume loaned to me. Lucifer was always a really interesting character in Sandman, and it was nice to get an introduction into a series about just him. The various issues in this volume were all unique and interesting. It reminded me of Sandman in the way the stories we're all very different and didn't quite allow me t This was a great start to this series. I don't know how I didn't know there was a spin-off series about Lucifer from Sandman, but am so glad it was introduced to me, and the first volume loaned to me. Lucifer was always a really interesting character in Sandman, and it was nice to get an introduction into a series about just him. The various issues in this volume were all unique and interesting. It reminded me of Sandman in the way the stories we're all very different and didn't quite allow me to get/keep my bearings, but that they kept me interested. I particularly liked "Born with the Dead" as a story of it's own. I hope to see more of Elaine, and loved that there was a shout out to Death from Sandman, who is one of my favorite graphic novel characters of all time. I'm definitely interested in continuing on with the series, because it started off pretty original and interesting, with that biting look at humanity that Sandman also had.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Soorya

    This review is for all 11 volumes of Mike Carey's Lucifer, a side-quel to Neil Gaiman's Sandman. Neil Gaiman gave Carey a very difficult task. Sandman: Season of Mists leaves Lucifer in a very strange place, and I really couldn't imagine what would happen from there on. Carey starts off aping Gaiman's style in the first arc, and that doesn't work well. But after that he breaks free of Gaiman's shadow and starts telling his own story, and it turns out to be a unique and compelling tale in its own This review is for all 11 volumes of Mike Carey's Lucifer, a side-quel to Neil Gaiman's Sandman. Neil Gaiman gave Carey a very difficult task. Sandman: Season of Mists leaves Lucifer in a very strange place, and I really couldn't imagine what would happen from there on. Carey starts off aping Gaiman's style in the first arc, and that doesn't work well. But after that he breaks free of Gaiman's shadow and starts telling his own story, and it turns out to be a unique and compelling tale in its own right. A confession - I've never particularly liked Christian mythology. The sudden introduction of angels and devils in Sandman Vol. 4 felt forced and a bit too off for me. But I must say that Carey's take on Angels, Demons & God was a really fascinating re-imagining of Christian myth; I never imagined he'd try to attempt half the things he did.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam Sobelman

    Holy moly, this was a great first volume to a series. Mike Carey piqued my interest with his work on current comic "Unwritten", so I thought I should give his old opus a go. Following in the "literary comic" style of Gaiman's Sandman, "Lucifer" is a good slow burn. Every bit of dialogue, every character detail, every relationship is important. The world lives and breathes, and Heaven and Hell have never been more believable to me. And yet, this volume couldn't be more exciting. The stakes are high Holy moly, this was a great first volume to a series. Mike Carey piqued my interest with his work on current comic "Unwritten", so I thought I should give his old opus a go. Following in the "literary comic" style of Gaiman's Sandman, "Lucifer" is a good slow burn. Every bit of dialogue, every character detail, every relationship is important. The world lives and breathes, and Heaven and Hell have never been more believable to me. And yet, this volume couldn't be more exciting. The stakes are high! The creator has a mission that only Lucifer can fulfil... but they're still not exactly on good terms. Lucifer is the ultimate anti-hero. He's smart, smarmy, and only he knows exactly what he wants. I can't wait to see where this leads next!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Mike Carey really knows how to write about magic. There are 2 storylines in this book. The first is kind of lackluster and slow-burning, without a huge payoff. But it's clear that we're just getting started. The second arc really takes off with a fantasy flare, showing just how sinister and deceitful Lucifer can be. Without Hell to manage, he's become a selfish, blonde, single-minded monster in a sharp suit. After all the fables that have been told about the devil, somehow this one still feels f Mike Carey really knows how to write about magic. There are 2 storylines in this book. The first is kind of lackluster and slow-burning, without a huge payoff. But it's clear that we're just getting started. The second arc really takes off with a fantasy flare, showing just how sinister and deceitful Lucifer can be. Without Hell to manage, he's become a selfish, blonde, single-minded monster in a sharp suit. After all the fables that have been told about the devil, somehow this one still feels fresh. Looking forward to the rest.

  28. 4 out of 5

    James Kibirige

    The first volume of probably one of my all time favourite Graphic novel series. This one is up there with the Sandman in terms of sheer originality, characterisation and story telling. I fell in love with Mike Carey as a writer when I read this series, the art work is beautiful too. The characterisation of Lucifer hit the nail on the head. A tour Dr force for the graphic novel medium I recommend this to anyone into, fantasy fiction with religious themes...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chad Jordahl

    This book was tough for me. My favorite story of the three was the last one, the one-shot called Born with the Dead. Enjoyable throwback to classic horror comics from shops like EC in the 40s. Engaging little story. I found the other two stories in the volume a lot less compelling. I'm just not very interested in heavy mythology and mysticism. The sections where that was laid on thick were a tough slog. At points my interest dipped almost to zero. The art in the middle section, A Six-Card Spread, This book was tough for me. My favorite story of the three was the last one, the one-shot called Born with the Dead. Enjoyable throwback to classic horror comics from shops like EC in the 40s. Engaging little story. I found the other two stories in the volume a lot less compelling. I'm just not very interested in heavy mythology and mysticism. The sections where that was laid on thick were a tough slog. At points my interest dipped almost to zero. The art in the middle section, A Six-Card Spread, was good, fine... technically sound and appealing in parts. But the first story's art was terribly off-putting to me. The color and line style changed panel-to-panel, not for any apparent purpose. Some panels were actually quite good, but some were... quite not. Amateurish even. Uninteresting characters in a confusing and boring mythology laden story. So... not for me? Probably I'm really missing something here - I know a lot of people gave this book a good rating. At first I thought I was disadvantaged for not having read The Sandman. Maybe I lack the necessary grounding, or interest in, mythology?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Heath Lowrance

    A spin-off of The Sandman, Lucifer often comes close-- closer than anyone else has, anyway-- to matching the epic grandeur of its parent comic. Lucifer makes for a terrific anti-hero, neither good nor evil, just a powerful force in the universe. Focusing on the Fallen Angel after he's given up being master of Hell, this initial collection finds Lucifer doing Heaven's dirty work, and then engaging in a quest to reclaim his wings (which he'd had Dream cut off for him back in Sandman's "Season of M A spin-off of The Sandman, Lucifer often comes close-- closer than anyone else has, anyway-- to matching the epic grandeur of its parent comic. Lucifer makes for a terrific anti-hero, neither good nor evil, just a powerful force in the universe. Focusing on the Fallen Angel after he's given up being master of Hell, this initial collection finds Lucifer doing Heaven's dirty work, and then engaging in a quest to reclaim his wings (which he'd had Dream cut off for him back in Sandman's "Season of Mists"). Through various places both real and mythological, Lucifer, through his brilliant and devious mind, manages to stay one step ahead of the vast forces that rally against him.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.