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The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, MORNINGSTAR gathers together the forces of Heaven, Hell, and everyone in between for a final battle to determine the fate of both Yahweh and Lucifer's Creations — a fate no one, not even the Lightbringer, could fores The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, MORNINGSTAR gathers together the forces of Heaven, Hell, and everyone in between for a final battle to determine the fate of both Yahweh and Lucifer's Creations — a fate no one, not even the Lightbringer, could foresee.


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The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, MORNINGSTAR gathers together the forces of Heaven, Hell, and everyone in between for a final battle to determine the fate of both Yahweh and Lucifer's Creations — a fate no one, not even the Lightbringer, could fores The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, MORNINGSTAR gathers together the forces of Heaven, Hell, and everyone in between for a final battle to determine the fate of both Yahweh and Lucifer's Creations — a fate no one, not even the Lightbringer, could foresee.

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 10: Morningstar

  1. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    I really just love all the arcs for the side characters in this series. I mean I love Lucifer and his story line too but I appreciate that it's not just about him all the time and that we see several ordinary people going on extraordinary journeys and doing amazing things. I really love when Lilith and Elaine meet with God outside the universe and he says he was expecting Lucifer and Fenris to be there. But instead we get the first woman and the teenage girl who literally becomes God arguing for I really just love all the arcs for the side characters in this series. I mean I love Lucifer and his story line too but I appreciate that it's not just about him all the time and that we see several ordinary people going on extraordinary journeys and doing amazing things. I really love when Lilith and Elaine meet with God outside the universe and he says he was expecting Lucifer and Fenris to be there. But instead we get the first woman and the teenage girl who literally becomes God arguing for the fate of the universe. It's absolutely amazing to me. Also while I find Christopher to be kind of boring in general, his story of a mortal man in hell who rises up to destroy the whole system is very inspiring as well. Really the only thing has ever bothered me in this whole thing is Jill Presto. I mean she has gone through some horrible things. She's been raped and forced to carry a child against her will and when she thinks she's finally gotten rid of it oh here's another one but through all of that we've been focused on HER reactions to these things and her feelings and what she wants ...and then Elaine just erases her memory and the baby's memories and puts it back inside of her, not even asking her if that's what she would want. I know her memories don't stay erased in the new series and she seems happy being a mother later on but it's still pretty awful for someone who's already had so much of their agency taken away and has been fighting it every step of the way. Also the random interlude issue with the guy who has that wishing doll and wants to rule hell is probably literally the only single issue in this entire series that I actively dislike and feel contributes nothing to the plot. I actually skipped it this time around lol. But despite that this volume still gets 5 stars because the rest of it really is just phenomenal in bringing together all the story lines that have been building up over this whole thing. Some highlights: Like ...Noema, I honestly don't know what you expected. This part always just makes me laugh. I love how Beatrice is like 'aren't you worried about Mazikeen' is Lucifer is just like 'lmao no but I'd love to watch her kill these dumbasses'. OTP ❤ Snark FTW I just really love this page. #TheDreamTeam lol And again #owned Even when he's helping he's still using you. Love these panels. Also obligatory mention of will. Obligatory mention of will part 2 Surprisingly good advice considering who it's coming from lol Like I said before ...ugh. #ouch

  2. 4 out of 5

    Airiz

    Lucifer is called the Morningstar for a reason. Metaphorically speaking, it is the dark evening when the war on Heaven commences, and the enemies of the Devil think they finally get the upper hand. What they forget is the obvious fact that lamplighters shine brightest in the dark… Morningstar, the tenth volume of the Lightbringer’s chronicles, is for me one of the best installments of this series. The tome zeroes in on “The Day of Reckoning”. The Lilim and a new breed of angel host join forces wi Lucifer is called the Morningstar for a reason. Metaphorically speaking, it is the dark evening when the war on Heaven commences, and the enemies of the Devil think they finally get the upper hand. What they forget is the obvious fact that lamplighters shine brightest in the dark… Morningstar, the tenth volume of the Lightbringer’s chronicles, is for me one of the best installments of this series. The tome zeroes in on “The Day of Reckoning”. The Lilim and a new breed of angel host join forces with the Norse wolf Fenris, their scheme centering on the annihilation of the Primum Mobile or God’s throne. Christopher Rudd launches an assault both on Heaven and Lilith’s army, in hopes of seeking a system of justice that uses no man’s soul for currency; Lucifer Morningstar, with his powers seemingly leeched because of the departure of the Divine Word, makes his haste move to protect Heaven. Meanwhile, God arranges a talk with Michael and Fenris about the destiny of the Creation, but Elaine Belloc and Lilith arrive in their stead. I love this volume immensely. What makes it so exceptional and heartrending is that it has lots of philosophical and emotional apexes juxtaposed with the peaks of brutal action scenes. The compelling imagery—both in words and art—make it so that it reminds me of the mental images I had when I first read John Milton’s Paradise Lost for the first time. There are so many scenes that tug hard at the heartstrings, one of them being an epiphany concerning the fate of Elaine Belloc. She finally learns what she will be, and she feels a little betrayed by the Morningstar because he knows it all along; in fact this is what he is preparing her for. I feel for her, and I can almost see the looming bunch of responsibilities descending on her shoulders. At first I think three Creations make this series a tad too crowded, but clearly Carey doesn’t like waste. That’s a clue in itself already and I will tell no more than that. :P There are a couple of stand-alone stories here as well. The first is “The Wheels of God”, featuring the hardboiled private investigator Solomon as he formulates an equation for justice. This story brings us back the characters of Jayesh, the homosexual kid bashed in The Devil in the Gateway; and Karl, one of the guys who bashed Jayesh as induced by peer pressure and his mixed feelings of love and hate for the latter. Here, they are depicted as living together. The main point is to prove that justice can be cruel almost to a fault, but the tale also has the strong undercurrent of true love. I find this story poignant. Solomon gives Karl a mission in exchange for a truth that Jayesh has no memory of: that Karl is one of the bashers, even if in the end he calls the ambulance just in time to save Jayesh’s life. He agrees with Solomon but due to some miscalculations, the mission goes awry. When he goes home, he finds a note that says Jayesh remembers every single detail of the bashing from day one…that the boy just doesn’t see the need to hold grudges because Karl loves him anyway. The last panel of their story is heartbreaking in a quiet way. The second short, "The Beast Can't Take Your Call Right Now,” lies in the opposite side of the spectrum as it features the fallen cherubim Gaudium and Spera in a funny, be-careful-what-you-wish-for tale. An old man tries to strike a bargain with Lucifer and summons “the most powerful demon in hell”. But because of the fight taking place in Heaven at that time, Hell is almost empty—except for Gaudium, so he's the one who lands in the old man's way. He agrees to deal with the old man with the help of the goddess Eriti. It seems that everything is going well for the old man, until his wishes go out of hand and completely brings him his doomed fate. Overall, this is an astonishingly good volume. I’d hate to say goodbye to this series because I’ve just learned to love it, but we all come to that stage. I just wish the last installment—or the epilogue, rather—is as good as this one! Five stars!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    I have no words. Perfection.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    Incredible....still....

  5. 5 out of 5

    sally ✿

    "Try wrath. Try mercy. Try to find yourself somewhere in between." Remembering where Elaine started and seeing where she ends up makes me feel very proud. We love that character development. Also, the part where Beatrice was telling Lucifer how Mazikeen was in trouble and could be dying and he was basically like "lol I'd love to see those fuckers try to kill her" made me cackle. I love them. But at the end of the day, Jill Presto was really done dirty and I feel so bad for her.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Raj

    This is the volume where Lucifer's story reaches its climax. Lilith leads her children in a bitter war against Heaven which, without God, can no longer stand against them. Lucifer finds himself fighting at the gate of the Silver City once again, this time on the side of the Angels. Noema, the daughter of the Basanos' is born and immediately comes into conflict with Lucifer before taking him and Elaine to see the new state of affairs in Hell and possibly to get Rudd's help in the war. There's also This is the volume where Lucifer's story reaches its climax. Lilith leads her children in a bitter war against Heaven which, without God, can no longer stand against them. Lucifer finds himself fighting at the gate of the Silver City once again, this time on the side of the Angels. Noema, the daughter of the Basanos' is born and immediately comes into conflict with Lucifer before taking him and Elaine to see the new state of affairs in Hell and possibly to get Rudd's help in the war. There's also a comic interlude in the middle with Gaudium and Spera, the fallen Cherubim. This shouldn't work in the middle of such a big story, but it really does. It both breaks and holds the tension, letting you wind down a bit between large-scale stories. From his early appearance as (not very good) guardian to Elaine, I've really enjoyed wise-cracking Gaudium and his smarter sister. This is a suitably epic conclusion for such a large-scale story, and the art doesn't let it down. It finishes with Lilith and Elaine stepping outside Creation to argue for its preservation or destruction in front of God himself. And even without being there, Lucifer has to stick his oar into things and his influence is felt. Oh, and this book also confirms what I always knew: God is an English gentleman :).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Minimal surprises and no spectcular writing but I was thoroughly entertained. Everyone needs complete gratification occasionally.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zardoz

    I found the story and art to be a not as good as the previous ones leading up to the conflict. The ending was a little dull, though I liked the army of the damned bit with Rudd.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zec

    Story: Wheels of God, Morningstar, The Beast Can’t Take Your Call Right Now. Really interesting. For the past few arcs, Elaine has been the main character: she’s the one who makes mistakes, learns and grows. This volume is the culmination of everything Lucifer is about freewill, the helplessness of the created and the creator, the multiple paths that might or might not ever exist. Even the child of the Basanos makes miscalculations. Can anyone ever justify existence? What is the will of God? What Story: Wheels of God, Morningstar, The Beast Can’t Take Your Call Right Now. Really interesting. For the past few arcs, Elaine has been the main character: she’s the one who makes mistakes, learns and grows. This volume is the culmination of everything Lucifer is about freewill, the helplessness of the created and the creator, the multiple paths that might or might not ever exist. Even the child of the Basanos makes miscalculations. Can anyone ever justify existence? What is the will of God? What if even the angels have difficulty deciphering God’s will? So many fascinating questions and themes explored in this series. Wow. Many characters meet their end in fitting manner. The one-shot stories: Wheels of God and The Beast Can’t Take Your Call Right Now showcase the very best of the series - emotional poignancy with darkness in the former and humour with absolute wackiness in the latter. I will miss this series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    SaraKat

    This was definitely the climax of the series. All of the characters meet for one final winner-take-all battle for existence. I appreciate how it was an ensemble effort and there is no superhero that solves everything. Lucifer stayed true to himself as well even though he could have been wiped from existence.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    There's an internal logic to this series that one could almost believe applied to the whole of creation. I understand that's meant to be the point, but it's impressive how well it works. I wonder how these events might play out in our owns heavens.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zia

    Metafyzika a spol.

  13. 5 out of 5

    William

    A solid conclusion to the events surrounding Lucifer, with no loose ends. I'm looking forward to Volume 11, where the ultimate question needs answering: What does Lucifer do with freedom?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    A fantastic series well executed with grand scope and plots. Great characters with plenty of thought provoking ideas to keep a theologian busy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Wow! Just..wow. And yes, I read this in one sitting. And yes, I have stayed up way too late reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    James

    Elaine comes into her power and three become one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matej Mika

    Finally something interesting, something you may call a finale of previous 60 numbers. And it is quite satisfying.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Beautiful. Didn't expect that.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hennie

    5 STARS. WISH I COULD GIVE IT MORE.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    In the first issue of this trade paperback we see Jayesh again--ugh, how sad, but an important message about internalized homophobia and hate crimes. The art of this issue is by Colleen Doran, and I don't care for it. She draws a lot of lines on people's faces and makes everyone look ancient and recently pulled out of a messy suitcase. Most of this trade deals with the continued siege on the Silver City, which I wasn't very interested in. I did really like how it ended though, with Elaine steppin In the first issue of this trade paperback we see Jayesh again--ugh, how sad, but an important message about internalized homophobia and hate crimes. The art of this issue is by Colleen Doran, and I don't care for it. She draws a lot of lines on people's faces and makes everyone look ancient and recently pulled out of a messy suitcase. Most of this trade deals with the continued siege on the Silver City, which I wasn't very interested in. I did really like how it ended though, with Elaine stepping up in power. There is a pretty funny issue where Gaudium and Spera (seriously can they get their own spin-off series already!?) trick a greedy warlock.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    The penultimate volume in the Lucifer collection brings us the grand climax we’ve all been waiting for, as the angelic host, the Lilim, and the army of Hell war for the Silver City in an attempt to (depending on whose side you’re on) destroy or save the whole of two creations. Fenris, Lilith and Christopher Rudd have their reasons for wanting to see Heaven fall, an event that now seems inevitable since God’s abdication from his realm began the slow unraveling of the cosmos atom by atom. Michael’ The penultimate volume in the Lucifer collection brings us the grand climax we’ve all been waiting for, as the angelic host, the Lilim, and the army of Hell war for the Silver City in an attempt to (depending on whose side you’re on) destroy or save the whole of two creations. Fenris, Lilith and Christopher Rudd have their reasons for wanting to see Heaven fall, an event that now seems inevitable since God’s abdication from his realm began the slow unraveling of the cosmos atom by atom. Michael’s death at the base of the World Tree has hastened this destruction. Lilith seeks the annihilation of the Silver City, which she and her children helped build back when our world was still young. Christopher Rudd seeks war on Heaven in effort to redeem the sufferings of the damned, and change the way things are done in both Heaven and Hell. The Host is just trying to survive and make sense of their rapidly changing world, now devoid of both their creator and his two most favored angels. Amid all this chaos, Lucifer and Elaine seek a way to survive and, if possible, to flourish. But Lucifer has a very specific plan in mind to save three separate creations, and it’s one he’s kept very carefully hidden from Elaine—who is the lynchpin in his design. This is the biggest of the moments Carey and company have been building up to, and it does not disappoint. This is a battle that spans across multiple issues without ever feeling like it’s dragging, and which brings all the major plotlines together in a way that ensures out world—all our worlds—will never be the same again. I like this book not for its climactic battle scenes, but for its theology. When your title character is Lucifer and you’re plotting with and illustrating the major players of Heaven and Hell, there’s always going to be theology involved. But bringing Yahweh back to render a final judgment on his creation was a step Carey didn’t have to take in order to further the plot—events would have reached the same conclusion regardless of his reappearance. Still, the conversation with Elaine and the mock trial which follows makes for some of the most interesting dialogue in the series, without ever sounding preachy. Combined with Rudd’s earlier views on why the status quo in Heaven and Hell must change, it makes for fascinating reading. My only real complaint with this issue is a rare timing misstep which seems to have been overlooked. In the one-shot featuring Gaudium, Serpa and the summoner, they arrive at Hell to find it empty, and promptly take up residence in the angelic tower. However, in the final issue, Elaine plucks Jill out of the same tower—where she had presumably been left since her arrival with Lucifer. Why didn’t Gaudium, Serpa and the summoner encounter her during their stay? Perhaps I’m missing something here, but it’s always irked me. On to the final volume…

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Lucifer Vol. 9 - Crux Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. & Lucifer Vol. 10 - Morningstar The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, MORNINGSTAR ga Lucifer Vol. 9 - Crux Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. & Lucifer Vol. 10 - Morningstar The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, MORNINGSTAR gathers together the forces of Heaven, Hell, and everyone in between for a final battle to determine the fate of both Yahweh and Lucifer's Creations — a fate no one, not even the Lightbringer, could foresee. Reviewed together as they were read back-to-back Things have gotten interesting. Interesting is that the story has little to do with its tittle character and more to do with the backup cast. Not that that's a bad thing, Carey does weave an interesting tale. But one does get the felling of "so what"... so what if the entirity of existence is on the verge of collapse, right? Although the story in these books might be a game changer for the book's cast, nothing that is actually potrayed has or will have an effect on the rest of the DC/Vertigo Universe, right? When everything is said and done... the entire story will have been about "nothing"... this graphic novel is the equivalent of a Seinfeld season. Sure it's entertaining as hell (heh, see what I did there?), but when everything is said and done... it'll have been a fun ride, but the destination 's pretty m'eh. Still, it does merit its 4-star if only for the entertainment factor.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Better is the end of a thing than its beginning, and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit. Well, in this case Ecclesiastes is half right, anyway. Mike Carey's sprawling tale of Heaven and Hell draws towards its close in Morningstar, the tenth volume in a series whose one constant is that its titular character refuses to take shit (or direction) from anybody. Having reached the finale, with Lilith's armies massed outside the gates of Heaven and the entirety of Creation hanging Better is the end of a thing than its beginning, and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit. Well, in this case Ecclesiastes is half right, anyway. Mike Carey's sprawling tale of Heaven and Hell draws towards its close in Morningstar, the tenth volume in a series whose one constant is that its titular character refuses to take shit (or direction) from anybody. Having reached the finale, with Lilith's armies massed outside the gates of Heaven and the entirety of Creation hanging in the balance, Lucifer battles and bleeds but never, ever bows to our expectations or to that of his Creator. Not surprisingly, this volume is full of familiar faces - Elaine Belloc, Jill Presto, Christopher Rudd, Solomon and Meleos all have roles to play. There's even time devoted to tying up smaller loose ends, like the story of Karl and Jayesh, which kicked off the series. (As it was in the beginning, right?) However, as charming as it was to see Gaudium again, I can't help feeling that the arc he features in (Interlude: The Beast Can't Take Your Call Right Now) is a bit of a waste. It must have been frustrating enough reading it as a single issue; appearing here as it does 3/4 of the way through the volume it sidetracks the narrative, derailing the steadily building tension of the story's climax for a mediocre gag and absolutely no payoff. Even with that glaring flaw - and my suspicion that Carey's ending may have been heavily influenced by Piers Anthony's Incarnations series - Morningstar is glorious to behold. Beautiful and brazen, it's everything you want in a fallen angel.

  24. 5 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    As the book opens, Lilith, the first woman, and the architect of Heaven, is leading her children, the Lilim against the forces of The Silver City. God has disappeared and Lilith means to destroy his throne, the Primum Mobile, to prevent God from returning home. Meanwhile Lucifer gathers his own forces that include Lilith's daughter Mazikeen, and the human woman Elaine--herself now a divine power and maker of her own form of creation. Lucifer visits Hell's new ruler, Christopher Rudd, in the hope As the book opens, Lilith, the first woman, and the architect of Heaven, is leading her children, the Lilim against the forces of The Silver City. God has disappeared and Lilith means to destroy his throne, the Primum Mobile, to prevent God from returning home. Meanwhile Lucifer gathers his own forces that include Lilith's daughter Mazikeen, and the human woman Elaine--herself now a divine power and maker of her own form of creation. Lucifer visits Hell's new ruler, Christopher Rudd, in the hopes of convincing him to aid Heaven in their battle with Lilith. This puts Rudd in a sticky situation: his own goal is to eliminate the division between Hell and Heaven and do away with this class system. Rudd wants change but he also doesn't want to see Heaven and all creation destroyed as Lilith does. All sorts of characters try to pass final judgment on heaven, hell and generally all creation (one of them being the second child of the Basanos whose beef is only with Lucifer) but in the end it is Yahweh himself who needs to decide what to do with his creation. Lilith and Elaine Belloc serve as "advocatus diaboli" and "advocatus dei" but as always, Lucifer finds a way to bend the rules a little bit, even in this final climax. While the series does end the story doesn't. Many questions about the new order of Heaven, Hell, and the world itself are left unanswered for perhaps a later series. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 10: Morningstar Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Like the series Lucifer spun off of, The Sandman, the series reaches its climax in the next-to-last volume. Unlike The Sandman, where the story dealt more with the single powerful entity trying to learn to change, Lucifer deals with a threat to the entire creation of everything. Lucifer comes back to the Silver City to protect Yahweh's throne (the destruction of which would lead to the destruction of everything in both Yahweh's and Lucifer's creations thanks to Lucifer and Michael failing to sto Like the series Lucifer spun off of, The Sandman, the series reaches its climax in the next-to-last volume. Unlike The Sandman, where the story dealt more with the single powerful entity trying to learn to change, Lucifer deals with a threat to the entire creation of everything. Lucifer comes back to the Silver City to protect Yahweh's throne (the destruction of which would lead to the destruction of everything in both Yahweh's and Lucifer's creations thanks to Lucifer and Michael failing to stop Fenris at the roots of Yggradsil). The reader gets a follow-up to the former neo-Nazi who led a young gay man with decidedly brown skin into an ambush despite being smitten with him, as well as divine judge Solomon tying up loose ends, new ruler of Hell Christopher Rudd moves his forces and sacrifices everything, and Elaine Belloc is pushed into the destiny that was there for her all along, something Lucifer would have never allowed himself to do since he's against all prisons. Into this comes an actual appearance by God in the form of a middle-aged British banker, welding an umbrella like some sort of cross between Mary Poppins and the Penguin. Yahweh explains why He stepped aside, then asks Elaine and Lilith whether He should fix creation. Lucifer provides a third option, and as a result saves the day without God needing to get involved.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robb Bridson

    God left, leaving the world to unravel. The forces of Lilith and Fenris the Wolf, seeking to destroy the universe in order to vex Yahweh, siege Heaven to destroy the throne connecting Creator to universe. That leads to Lucifer joining Heaven's side in battle, as even his universe is in danger. He enlists the new order of Hell (demons and the damned together), led by Christopher Rudd-- a reformer who wants to dethrone God in order to end the injustice that is Hell-- and brings along Mazikeen the God left, leaving the world to unravel. The forces of Lilith and Fenris the Wolf, seeking to destroy the universe in order to vex Yahweh, siege Heaven to destroy the throne connecting Creator to universe. That leads to Lucifer joining Heaven's side in battle, as even his universe is in danger. He enlists the new order of Hell (demons and the damned together), led by Christopher Rudd-- a reformer who wants to dethrone God in order to end the injustice that is Hell-- and brings along Mazikeen the rebel lilim, Elaine the angel-spawn, Duma the silent angel, and the weird child of Jill Presto and a sentient Tarot deck. This story just gets weirder and even better, and it all builds up to Elaine finding her true destiny, manipulated into it by Lucifer-- who could do it himself, but there are some things the Morning Star won't do even to save the universe and himself. I think this series is even better than the Sandman, evoking the best parts of horror comics like House of Secrets and the fantasy comics of Heavy Metal magazine, with a story that is philosophical, irreverent, and still action-packed.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

    We see the final epic battle in Heaven between those who want to end creation and those who want to preserve it. There’s even a couple Shakespearean quotes thrown in. There’s also a comic interlude in which Gaudium is summoned by a man who wants to sell his soul. There’s a bit of a plot hole in this storyline since Jill is in the tower in Hell while this story takes place but we don’t ever see her. Must have been in a back room. As the series starts coming to a close, we go back to the beginning. We see the final epic battle in Heaven between those who want to end creation and those who want to preserve it. There’s even a couple Shakespearean quotes thrown in. There’s also a comic interlude in which Gaudium is summoned by a man who wants to sell his soul. There’s a bit of a plot hole in this storyline since Jill is in the tower in Hell while this story takes place but we don’t ever see her. Must have been in a back room. As the series starts coming to a close, we go back to the beginning. Characters we haven’t seen for a while such as Jayesh return. Meleos even narrates one of the sections, although he barely appears in the story itself. We see a bit more of the largely extraneous character Solomon. We also meet yet another character who can see the future named Noema, but as usual, seeing the future doesn’t help her predict what will actually happen. Fenris turned out to be a bigger part of the story than I’d remembered. I also didn’t remember the centaurs showing up quite so often. Also, God finally makes an appearance.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Reynolds

    The first issue "The Wheels of God" returns to Solomon, Meleos, Karl and Jayesh, it ties up Karl and Jayesh's story nicely and is decent overall. Meleos is good here, actually getting to act like a traditional angel in a way that few of the angels in this series bar Michael actually do. Issues #63-65 feature the drawing up of the armies of heaven and hell in preparation for battle. #66 is a comedy side-story that isn't one of the best and has a rather irritating villain. Finally in #67-69, thing The first issue "The Wheels of God" returns to Solomon, Meleos, Karl and Jayesh, it ties up Karl and Jayesh's story nicely and is decent overall. Meleos is good here, actually getting to act like a traditional angel in a way that few of the angels in this series bar Michael actually do. Issues #63-65 feature the drawing up of the armies of heaven and hell in preparation for battle. #66 is a comedy side-story that isn't one of the best and has a rather irritating villain. Finally in #67-69, things come to a head, with a massive battle and God himself making an appearance. The dialogue between God and his creations is low-key in an effective contrast to an apocalyptic battle, Lucifer gets to stick his oar in in a pleasingly cunning way, and it resolves itself in a satisfactory and bittersweet way. The only thing that sat badly with me was the easy final defeat of Fenris, which seemed like a massive cheat. My rankings of the Lucifer volumes: 3 (best), 6, 8, 4, 11, 2, 10, 1, 7, 9, 5 (worst)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashish

    Morningstar is a finale story. Loose ends get wrapped up, old characters are disposed off, miscellaneous arcs from past stories are concluded - including for the nth time, the Elaine Belloc story - after this one, I'm really not sure what they can do that's not going to be anticlimactic. It was also a relatively simple story, as the Lucifer series go. I'm not entirely sure the villains this time round weren't right - especially Lilith - but they seem to have been shafted with questionable allian Morningstar is a finale story. Loose ends get wrapped up, old characters are disposed off, miscellaneous arcs from past stories are concluded - including for the nth time, the Elaine Belloc story - after this one, I'm really not sure what they can do that's not going to be anticlimactic. It was also a relatively simple story, as the Lucifer series go. I'm not entirely sure the villains this time round weren't right - especially Lilith - but they seem to have been shafted with questionable alliances, very loaded clothing choices (Sandalphon literally looks like a mix between Magneto, M. Bison and SS, and that's just heavy-handed button-pushing) while the good guys make some highly debatable choices, morally - but in the end it's all wrapped up and we're told for the best, so let's go with that.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    An extremely satisfying, hugely monumental climax to an amazing fantasy series. Carey has somehow aligned every force from every level of this world and pitted them against each other in surprising ways, solidifying the characters' motivations and revealing things about them you never even considered. Very few loose ends are left to tie up after this volume, and its all done with a flair for storytelling and suspense that many writers can only hope to one day achieve. This series has left me tho An extremely satisfying, hugely monumental climax to an amazing fantasy series. Carey has somehow aligned every force from every level of this world and pitted them against each other in surprising ways, solidifying the characters' motivations and revealing things about them you never even considered. Very few loose ends are left to tie up after this volume, and its all done with a flair for storytelling and suspense that many writers can only hope to one day achieve. This series has left me thoroughly in the Mike Carey fan camp. His propensity for keeping a series this expansive and thematic fresh all the way to the end is something to be admired. After this volume I see why there's so much hype about Lucifer, and I believe it's deserved.

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