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Sonnets (Unabridged Edition): 63 Sonnets from one of the most beloved English Romantic poets, influenced by John Milton and Edmund Spenser, and one of ... Literature, alongside William Shakespeare

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This carefully crafted ebook: “Sonnets (Unabridged Edition)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. John Keats (1795–1821) was an English Romantic poet. Content: Introduction: Life of John Keats by Sidney Colvin Sonnets: Bright Star! Would I Were Steadfast As Thou Art On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer Sonnet: When I Have Fears T This carefully crafted ebook: “Sonnets (Unabridged Edition)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. John Keats (1795–1821) was an English Romantic poet. Content: Introduction: Life of John Keats by Sidney Colvin Sonnets: Bright Star! Would I Were Steadfast As Thou Art On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer Sonnet: When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be Sonnet on the Sonnet Sonnet to Chatterton Sonnet Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition Sonnet: Why Did I Laugh Tonight? No Voice Will Tell Sonnet to a Cat Sonnet Written Upon the Top of Ben Nevis Sonnet: This Pleasant Tale is Like a Little Copse Sonnet - The Human Seasons Sonnet to Homer Sonnet to A Lady Seen for a Few Moments at Vauxhall Sonnet on Visiting the Tomb of Burns Sonnet on Leigh Hunt’s Poem 'the Story of Rimini’ Sonnet: A Dream, After Reading Dante’s Episode of Paulo and Francesco Sonnet to Sleep Sonnet Written in Answer to a Sonnet Ending Thus: Sonnet: After Dark Vapours Have Oppress’d Our Plains Sonnet to John Hamilton Reynolds Sonnet on Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again Sonnet: Before He Went to Feed with Owls and Bats Sonnet Written in the Cottage Where Burns Was Born Sonnet to The Nile Sonnet on Peace Sonnet on Hearing the Bagpipe and Sonnet: Oh! How I Love, on a Fair Summer’s Eve Sonnet to Byron Sonnet to Spenser Sonnet: As from the Darkening Gloom A Silver Dove Sonnet on the Sea Sonnet to Fanny Sonnet to Ailsa Rock Sonnet on a Picture of Leander Sonnets Two Sonnets on Fame To My Brothers Addressed to Haydon To G. A. W.


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This carefully crafted ebook: “Sonnets (Unabridged Edition)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. John Keats (1795–1821) was an English Romantic poet. Content: Introduction: Life of John Keats by Sidney Colvin Sonnets: Bright Star! Would I Were Steadfast As Thou Art On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer Sonnet: When I Have Fears T This carefully crafted ebook: “Sonnets (Unabridged Edition)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. John Keats (1795–1821) was an English Romantic poet. Content: Introduction: Life of John Keats by Sidney Colvin Sonnets: Bright Star! Would I Were Steadfast As Thou Art On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer Sonnet: When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be Sonnet on the Sonnet Sonnet to Chatterton Sonnet Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition Sonnet: Why Did I Laugh Tonight? No Voice Will Tell Sonnet to a Cat Sonnet Written Upon the Top of Ben Nevis Sonnet: This Pleasant Tale is Like a Little Copse Sonnet - The Human Seasons Sonnet to Homer Sonnet to A Lady Seen for a Few Moments at Vauxhall Sonnet on Visiting the Tomb of Burns Sonnet on Leigh Hunt’s Poem 'the Story of Rimini’ Sonnet: A Dream, After Reading Dante’s Episode of Paulo and Francesco Sonnet to Sleep Sonnet Written in Answer to a Sonnet Ending Thus: Sonnet: After Dark Vapours Have Oppress’d Our Plains Sonnet to John Hamilton Reynolds Sonnet on Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again Sonnet: Before He Went to Feed with Owls and Bats Sonnet Written in the Cottage Where Burns Was Born Sonnet to The Nile Sonnet on Peace Sonnet on Hearing the Bagpipe and Sonnet: Oh! How I Love, on a Fair Summer’s Eve Sonnet to Byron Sonnet to Spenser Sonnet: As from the Darkening Gloom A Silver Dove Sonnet on the Sea Sonnet to Fanny Sonnet to Ailsa Rock Sonnet on a Picture of Leander Sonnets Two Sonnets on Fame To My Brothers Addressed to Haydon To G. A. W.

30 review for Sonnets (Unabridged Edition): 63 Sonnets from one of the most beloved English Romantic poets, influenced by John Milton and Edmund Spenser, and one of ... Literature, alongside William Shakespeare

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    "Nothing so cleanses the dross out of a man as the creation of beauty or the pursuit of truth." —Will Durant Listening to an essay in The Greatest Minds and Ideas of All Time, Will Durant convinced me to do the unthinkable: purchase a book of poetry. The touching story of the sonnets and letters John Keats wrote to the love of his life- prior to his premature death at twenty-five years old- drew me to him. I was determined to read Keats before any other poet. The 64 Sonnets by John Keats was pu "Nothing so cleanses the dross out of a man as the creation of beauty or the pursuit of truth." —Will Durant Listening to an essay in The Greatest Minds and Ideas of All Time, Will Durant convinced me to do the unthinkable: purchase a book of poetry. The touching story of the sonnets and letters John Keats wrote to the love of his life- prior to his premature death at twenty-five years old- drew me to him. I was determined to read Keats before any other poet. The 64 Sonnets by John Keats was published in 2004. Edward Hirsch, who is an accomplished poet, best-selling author, and current president of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, wrote a brief- albeit instructive- introduction to the sonnets. Hirsch traces Keats' forays into sonnets and his experimentations with rhyme structure. Hirsch also grants the reader a glimpse into Keats' motivation and drive that compelled him to strive for greatness. After visiting the British Museum to view a Parthenon exhibit, Hirsch states Keats was so moved by the Elgin Marbles that he "took the greatness of the statues personally, almost competitively." Apparently terrified by failure, he "responded by rededicating himself to the creative task with a deeper candor, a more furious resolve." Three interrelated pieces contained in this book irrevocably and positively transformed my feelings about poetry: a brief introduction to each sonnet, learning some basics about rhyme scheme, and the sonnets themselves. Each sonnet is prefaced by brief remarks giving the reader context of the poem's origin and a sense of Keats' personality traits. He playfully competes in sonnet challenges winning accolades from his friends. It's simple, humanizing stories like these that, for me, makes Keats eminently likable. Edward Hirsch discusses rhyme structure in the introduction and an appendix of Keats' rhyme schemes is included. It wasn't until around the fiftieth sonnet the rhyming structure really sunk in and I became fascinated by it. The final third of Keats' sonnets are written using a Shakespearean- rather than a Petrarchan- rhyme scheme. Keats wasn't ideologically wedded to an exclusive pattern and he freely experimented with mixed patterns. Although it's beyond the scope of a review to discuss the difference, his Shakespearean sonnets were far and away my favorite (thus earning these sonnets a place on my favorites shelf). The Petrarchan sonnets simply didn't have the same appeal once the distinction dawned on me. Favoring one rhyme scheme over another, however, is a matter of personal taste for each individual. Finally, Keats' sonnets themselves are engaging as much for their words as the stories they tell. His sonnets are littered with references to the Greek Pantheon and many include nature references. A portion of one of my favorite Shakespearean sonnets- Blue!—'Tis the life of heaven—the domain- is included below: Blue!—gentle cousin to the forest green, Married to green in all the sweetest flowers— Forget-me-not—the blue-bell—and, that queen Of secrecy, the violet:–What strange powers Hast thou, as a mere shadow?—But how great, When in an eye thou art, alive with fate! It's difficult to identify the cause of my hesitation to poetry. Maybe I had to read some poetry in a high school literature class I didn't like or maybe I simply had convinced myself it's just a genre I simply didn't like. But a comment by Will Durant piqued my interest in John Keats who, in these sonnets, has fostered in me a new- or dormant- appreciation for poetry that has brightened my life.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robin Helweg-Larsen

    The 64 extant sonnets of John Keats make for a very interesting read for anyone interested in formal verse. Not only do we have the poet developing his skills and expression in the last five years of his short life (he was 18 when he wrote his first sonnet, and died at 23), but he consciously experimented with the form, outlining in his letters the shortcomings that he saw in the Petrarchan and Shakespearean versions while he looked for a better structure. This collection has a useful but insuff The 64 extant sonnets of John Keats make for a very interesting read for anyone interested in formal verse. Not only do we have the poet developing his skills and expression in the last five years of his short life (he was 18 when he wrote his first sonnet, and died at 23), but he consciously experimented with the form, outlining in his letters the shortcomings that he saw in the Petrarchan and Shakespearean versions while he looked for a better structure. This collection has a useful but insufficient introduction by Edward Hirsch and incompetent notes by Gary Hawkins. Hirsch writes of the development of Keats' themes, but fails to tie the poems into the details of his life. I suggest reading at least the Wikipedia entry on Keats to get a fuller sense of what was going on in his mind, his life, his environment. The notes by Hawkins appear to have been thrown together without either care or insight. There is a facing page of three or four comments for each poem, and there is a further note on the rhyme scheme in an appendix at the back. The appendix catches four of the lengthened lines (6 or even 7 feet in a line) but misses three of them; and notes one of the shortened lines but misses another. Worse, the analysis of the rhyme scheme for the technically most interesting sonnet ("If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd") fails to understand the structure Keats was creating, despite quoting his comments in the letter containing the poem. Hawkins gives the structure as abc ad (d) c abc dede (tercets, quatrain) This is wrong on so many levels... First, the fifth line's rhyme is b, not d. Second, there is no quatrain at all. Third, Keats has shown how to analyze the sonnet - which is a single sentence - by breaking it into tercets with the use of semicolons to clarify the structure of his thought. Its structure is abc; abd; cab; cde; de. That this doesn't fit into Hawkins categories of Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnets is precisely the point Keats makes in his letter ("I have been endeavouring to discover a better sonnet stanza than we have") as well as in the sonnet itself ("Let us find out, if we must be constrain'd, / Sandals more interwoven and complete / To fit the naked foot of Poesy;") Hawkins also makes errors of fact and interpretation in the notes facing the sonnets themselves. The very first sonnet, written in 1814, references "the triple kingdom" which Hawkins explains as "Great Britain, composed of England, Scotland and Wales." Wrong. With the Act of Union of 1801 the three kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland were united, as represented by the simultaneous creation of the Union Jack with its combination of the crosses of the three flags. Wales was not a kingdom but a principality, and its flag never figured in the larger national flags. In the sonnet "How many bards gild the lapses of time!", Keats writes "A few of them have ever been the food / Of my delighted fancy." Hawkins annotates this as "namely, the epic poets Milton and Spenser." Oh really? How about Shakespeare, whom Keats addresses directly as "Chief Poet!" in another sonnet. And this is quite apart from sonnets addressed to Byron, Chatterton, Hunt, and Burns. I have to smile at Hawkins' interpretation of "artless daughters": Happy is England, sweet her artless daughters; Enough their simple loveliness for me, Enough their whitest arms in silence clinging: Yet do I often warmly burn to see Beauties of deeper glance, and hear their singing, And float with them about the summer waters. Hawkins interprets the "artless daughters" as "Scotland and Wales". Oh come on! Keats could fall in love at a girl's glance, at a stranger pulling off a glove. I don't think he meant Scotland and Wales - he meant girls, classic "English rose" girls, and contrasted them with what he might find in the Mediterranean. Where he went, and died. Few of the sonnets are near as memorable as "On first looking into Chapman's Homer" or "When I have fears that I may cease to be", but they are all readable and rereadable, and to have them as this collection is a treat.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nate Hansen

    Keats was a poetic genius. Unfortunately, he spent the greater part of that genius in talking about himself -- the art in this book is a mirror. When it's held up to the world, it's unbeatably beautiful. When it's turned on Keats, we find a young man overwhelmingly taken with the beauty of his own spirit, which does not make for edifying reading. Keats was a poetic genius. Unfortunately, he spent the greater part of that genius in talking about himself -- the art in this book is a mirror. When it's held up to the world, it's unbeatably beautiful. When it's turned on Keats, we find a young man overwhelmingly taken with the beauty of his own spirit, which does not make for edifying reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Javiilicitano

    It was really inspirational reading about this English poet, how he overcame every setback that occur to him in his short life. It´s a shame he died so young, he could have been so much better with a little bit more of time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I'm reading Keats to study the form. I'm reading Keats to study the form.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  8. 5 out of 5

    Grayce Owens

  9. 5 out of 5

    jackie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katarina

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  12. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

  13. 4 out of 5

    Talyn Draconmore

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Wesley

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ivarbjoe

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  20. 4 out of 5

    Federico Colombo

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul Dry Books

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Y

  25. 4 out of 5

    christina

  26. 4 out of 5

    Synthia

  27. 5 out of 5

    Danny Hunt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Walborn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen

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