web site hit counter Ghost in the Shell 2: Man-machine Interface - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Ghost in the Shell 2: Man-machine Interface

Availability: Ready to download

March 6, 2035. Motoko Aramaki is a hyper-advanced cyborg, a counter-terrorist net security expert heading the investigative department of the giant multi-national, Poseidon Industrial. Partly transcending the physical world and existing in a virtual world of networks, Motoko is a fusion of multiple entities and identities, deploying remotely controlled prosthetic humanoid March 6, 2035. Motoko Aramaki is a hyper-advanced cyborg, a counter-terrorist net security expert heading the investigative department of the giant multi-national, Poseidon Industrial. Partly transcending the physical world and existing in a virtual world of networks, Motoko is a fusion of multiple entities and identities, deploying remotely controlled prosthetic humanoid surrogates around the globe to solve a series of bizarre crimes. Meanwhile, Tamaki Tamai, a psychic investigator from the Channeling Agency, has been commissioned to investigate strange changes in the temporal universe, brought about by two forces, one represented by the teachings of a professor named Rahampol, and the other by the complex, evolving Motoko entity. What unfolds will be all in a day's work...a day that will change everything, forever.


Compare

March 6, 2035. Motoko Aramaki is a hyper-advanced cyborg, a counter-terrorist net security expert heading the investigative department of the giant multi-national, Poseidon Industrial. Partly transcending the physical world and existing in a virtual world of networks, Motoko is a fusion of multiple entities and identities, deploying remotely controlled prosthetic humanoid March 6, 2035. Motoko Aramaki is a hyper-advanced cyborg, a counter-terrorist net security expert heading the investigative department of the giant multi-national, Poseidon Industrial. Partly transcending the physical world and existing in a virtual world of networks, Motoko is a fusion of multiple entities and identities, deploying remotely controlled prosthetic humanoid surrogates around the globe to solve a series of bizarre crimes. Meanwhile, Tamaki Tamai, a psychic investigator from the Channeling Agency, has been commissioned to investigate strange changes in the temporal universe, brought about by two forces, one represented by the teachings of a professor named Rahampol, and the other by the complex, evolving Motoko entity. What unfolds will be all in a day's work...a day that will change everything, forever.

30 review for Ghost in the Shell 2: Man-machine Interface

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    I really hate to give such a low rating to anything Ghost in the Shell, but this really deserved it. The majority of this manga is, to put it bluntly, complete and utter crap. I love Ghost in the Shell and I usually love Shirow's art, but this book was pretty terrible. We'll start off with the story. Most of it gets lost completely in all the technobabble (complete with rambling footnotes) and most of the time I had no idea what was going on. Motoko (not the same as the original) spends most of t I really hate to give such a low rating to anything Ghost in the Shell, but this really deserved it. The majority of this manga is, to put it bluntly, complete and utter crap. I love Ghost in the Shell and I usually love Shirow's art, but this book was pretty terrible. We'll start off with the story. Most of it gets lost completely in all the technobabble (complete with rambling footnotes) and most of the time I had no idea what was going on. Motoko (not the same as the original) spends most of the story floating around nude in cyperspace while ordering her ridiculous looking AI assistants to put out decoys and toy bombs and other techno jargon nonsense. Most of this could have been cut and the story might have seemed a bit more cohesive. Then there's the art. It's pretty terrible too. Shirow seems to be using some weird combination of more 3-d realistic looking art and flat anime art and it just doesn't work well. It's jarring and most of the 3-d looks bad. He also randomly switches between color and black & white, sometimes right in the middle of the page. Plus there was a ridiculous amount of fanservice everywhere. I'm used to some from Shirow, but the majority of the book was Motoko floating around nude or running around in various bodies flashing her underwear in awkward action shots. Overall I don't think I'd recommend this to anybody. Really the only merit I saw in it was in elements of it that were drawn on for the anime.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Technobabble/fan service levels are just off-scalecin this final volume of GITS manga, sometimes it seems the author is the only one understanding what is going on and the absence of fan favourite Section 9 characters like Batou is almost too much, but Masamume Shirow's artworks are so good here that left breathless this reader. A beautiful Shell but the Ghost inside was absolutely as not as good. Technobabble/fan service levels are just off-scalecin this final volume of GITS manga, sometimes it seems the author is the only one understanding what is going on and the absence of fan favourite Section 9 characters like Batou is almost too much, but Masamume Shirow's artworks are so good here that left breathless this reader. A beautiful Shell but the Ghost inside was absolutely as not as good.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    There are some great ideas explored in this book, and the writing is great. What i found disappointing about the book was its reliance on fan service as a selling point. As far as i can tell from my own perspective, this book would be bought and read by anyone familiar with the series who read the first book, watched the movie, or watched the television show. The amount of aforementioned fan service (a term that refers in general, to mostly unneccessary additions of titillating visuals to a stor There are some great ideas explored in this book, and the writing is great. What i found disappointing about the book was its reliance on fan service as a selling point. As far as i can tell from my own perspective, this book would be bought and read by anyone familiar with the series who read the first book, watched the movie, or watched the television show. The amount of aforementioned fan service (a term that refers in general, to mostly unneccessary additions of titillating visuals to a story) in every other installment in the franchise is at a tolerable level, but in this manga series there's just a bit too much to make the story readable. It's kind of embarassing, in fact. I mean, as far as manga and anime goes, Ghost In The Shell is about as successful as they get. So why sink to such base tactics to sell books? And if you're going to sink to those tactics for selling the book, why bother with the philosophical acrobatics posited by the story? The art and the story appeal to two different demographics, and there's probably not very much crossover. I could go on and on. I mean, if authors would just talk to me before they publish, I could totally help them make their books like, ten times better. Maybe even fifty times better. Sheesh! Don't they know that? :^}

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ross

    Not as good as the first one, but a pretty good addition to the overall story. Did Japanese William Gibson write this? It comes off as VERY pretentious regarding technology. I really wish it didn't have so much techno-babble and fan service. Oh well. Not as good as the first one, but a pretty good addition to the overall story. Did Japanese William Gibson write this? It comes off as VERY pretentious regarding technology. I really wish it didn't have so much techno-babble and fan service. Oh well.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. This was probably one of the biggest disappointments I’ve ever known in a long time. With a franchise like The Ghost in the Shell, you’d think that everything related to it would be inevitably flawless and indisputable as a cyberpunk classic. Limited to three deluxe editions, the manga is anything but what the franchise’s reputation acknowledges it to be. Learning it the hard way was not something I planned on doing, but now that I’ve been throu You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. This was probably one of the biggest disappointments I’ve ever known in a long time. With a franchise like The Ghost in the Shell, you’d think that everything related to it would be inevitably flawless and indisputable as a cyberpunk classic. Limited to three deluxe editions, the manga is anything but what the franchise’s reputation acknowledges it to be. Learning it the hard way was not something I planned on doing, but now that I’ve been through all three volumes, I won’t deny the overwhelming sense of disenchantment I felt for this series. With that being said, I still see the light at the end of this tunnel with the chance to finally check out the anime adaptations that have clearly been the source of all the praise garnered for The Ghost in the Shell name. What is the final volume of The Ghost in the Shell about? I couldn’t even tell you even if you gave me all the time in the world to spell it out for you. The story doesn’t exactly follow the iconic protagonist known as Major (Motoko Kusanagi), but instead follows Motoko Aramaki, known as Motoko 11. While not technically the same, they share a lot of elements in common, as the story hints that she might be an offspring of Motoko Aramaki and another key character in the franchise. Nevertheless, Motoko 11 still has Major’s fashion sense and destructive combat skills to help fans fall in love with her. While technically set after the events of the first volume, most of this story arc shows no continuity at all to any of the past events. And so you must be wondering what is Motoko 11 doing throughout this story. Well, most of the story, if not all, has her floating around naked—without nipples—sort of like a doll with a human face, within a neural-mapped electronic brain as she attempts to hunt down an unknown villain. To do so, she attempts complex and incomprehensible hacking techniques to access hidden pathways, bypass complex protocols and inject viruses, and all that with the help of strange little tech assistant creatures, creatures that visually made no sense and only made me want to ignore most of the time. Coherence and structure were clearly not Masamune Shirow’s strong suit. This volume, while it was just one huge story arc, never tried being coherent even if its publication would have depended on it. As the author attempts to deliver once again an ambitious and complex story, he completely fails to hit his target and gives us what is probably the most unnecessary story ever. If I could sum up what I faced against throughout this reading experience, it would come down to two things: technobabble and pornography. You read that right. Flipping through this volume, I found myself not understanding a single word thrown at me more often than not. I honestly couldn’t see what the purpose of throwing random technological instructions left and right could serve to the experience when the story itself was impossible to follow. I simply felt like I was a living fish dropped in the middle of a cat fight: I didn’t know what was going on, but I knew something was going to kill me soon. And then there’s the pornography. I’m going to call it just that because that’s all it really was. Every single female character in this volume had watermelons on their chest, a stomach slimmer than a tree branch and a buttocks bigger than my pillows. And that obviously includes the protagonist who doesn’t hesitant a moment to find herself in a strange position to showcase her assets and her panties. Not only were the designs so unrealistic and were inappropriately showcased every flip of a page, you could easily tell that the purpose of it all was nothing more than to sexually arouse readers. Trust me when I say this happens a lot. Who needs a Playboy magazine when you got this volume of The Ghost in the Shell to do the trick. It really was about raising your libido levels, while trying to convey some sort of original idea or philosophy around artificial life. As if pumping all that blood out of your brain to other parts of your body would help a reader reflect on complex ideas. Funny thing is, as I slowly—actually pretty quickly—approached the epilogue, I wondered how the volume didn’t feature actual hentai—if you have no clue what that is, I invite you to look it up at your own risk—instead of flirting with softcore pornography. Surprise, surprise. Right towards the end, there’s actually a panel that was straight out of hentai. While the source material might have scarred me momentarily, I still remain optimistic regarding its anime adaptations. After all, after having delved into the manga, it’s safe to say that its fame did not arise from there. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/ ____________________________ I'll never understand this. It should never have existed... P.S. Full review to come. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  6. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    So...many...words. I jut can't get into the Ghost in the Shell series. I've never been into comics that are too wordy as I've always thought the purpose of a comic is to let the art tell at least half the story. This just has too much technical jargon and too many words in general. I don't care too much for the subject matter either. I will say the art is very nice, especially the full color portions. If you're into cyberpunk you'll probably love this, but it's just not for me. So...many...words. I jut can't get into the Ghost in the Shell series. I've never been into comics that are too wordy as I've always thought the purpose of a comic is to let the art tell at least half the story. This just has too much technical jargon and too many words in general. I don't care too much for the subject matter either. I will say the art is very nice, especially the full color portions. If you're into cyberpunk you'll probably love this, but it's just not for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    The Final Song ❀

    That is a lot of shiny girls and technobabble.

  8. 4 out of 5

    E.S.

    This was by far the best Ghost in the Shell volume I've read and I'm bummed that it's the last volume. From what I understand, there are only 3 volumes of Ghost in the Shell, no? Volumes 1, 1.5, and 2. In this book, the main character is not Motoko Kusanagi, but Motoko Aramaki...otherwise known as Motoko 11, which from my understanding is sort of like....I don't want to say a child of Kusanagi, but rather she has elements of Kusanagi in her as well as the Puppeteer (remember, Kusanagi fused with This was by far the best Ghost in the Shell volume I've read and I'm bummed that it's the last volume. From what I understand, there are only 3 volumes of Ghost in the Shell, no? Volumes 1, 1.5, and 2. In this book, the main character is not Motoko Kusanagi, but Motoko Aramaki...otherwise known as Motoko 11, which from my understanding is sort of like....I don't want to say a child of Kusanagi, but rather she has elements of Kusanagi in her as well as the Puppeteer (remember, Kusanagi fused with the Puppeteer...also known as Project 2501?). In this volume Motoko 11 (more than one Motoko prototype then...?) tackles Millennium, the "enemy" of this book who controls a group called Stabat Meter. Millennium is looking into something called Brain Expansion (or rather it's a experiment or project they are working on). Brain Expansion is called off though once Motoko 11 infiltrates them. However, it is also revealed that *spoilers* Millennium is also known as number 20...so number 20 of the Motoko hybrids? This volume was as fucking mind-bending as Legion. The artwork was beautiful and the transitions from black-and-white to color were perfect. My only complaints are a) the action was sometimes hard to follow and b) sometimes the vocabulary was so complex, I felt like I needed a dictionary of words for this universe. Shirow's notes were helpful, but I felt like every page something new was introduced and I'm thinking "wait...okay...now what does THIS mean?" Despite some of the confusion, I couldn't stop turning the pages and wanted to find out what happened. IT ENDED IN SUCH A CLIFFHANGER AND THERE ISN'T EVEN ANOTHER DAMN VOLUME. If I'm not mistaken, Kusanagi/The Puppeteer were behind the whole Millennium thing in general, they WEREN'T Millennium necessarily, but I think they were wondering whether or not the brain expansion was worth doing and in the epilogue, I think we see this brain expansion of Kusanagi in some crazy psychedelic combination of science, space, and mythology. But...the end we see (oh shit, I've forgotten her name now, but the woman who was observing all of this happening to Kusanagi) her eyes light up like she's found out some crazy truth, like the meaning of life itself or something, or like HER brain has expanded. Has Kusanagi fused with her? Is she a part of her? I didn't understand it. In fact, sometimes it feels like there isn't a storyline at all, but rather a bunch of technical language that makes perfect sense to the author, but not to the reader. I know...this is a very conflicting review. My bad.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hamza

    This is a good read, but I truly didn't understand a great deal of it. Unlike the first Ghost in the Shell volume, this book is full of too much technobabble that only Shirow himself seems to understand. There were so many technological references I didn't understand that I had to constantly google them. Fun fact: about half of them are real, the other half were merely invented for this series. The confusion I experienced with that and the jumbled storyline(s) are what caused me to lop off a sta This is a good read, but I truly didn't understand a great deal of it. Unlike the first Ghost in the Shell volume, this book is full of too much technobabble that only Shirow himself seems to understand. There were so many technological references I didn't understand that I had to constantly google them. Fun fact: about half of them are real, the other half were merely invented for this series. The confusion I experienced with that and the jumbled storyline(s) are what caused me to lop off a star rating, as well as take so long to finish the book. I only gave it four stars because I enjoyed trying to follow along, and because I love Motoko and her wacky tech adventures. But those expecting the same thing as the original volume are in for a disappointment.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nick Tramdack

    A disappointment, especially for a fan of the original manga. I thought this one lacked heart, stakes, and perspective. But I guess it has something to recommend it if you like absurdly curvy babes shouting out antivirus commands amidst a garishly realized, but nevertheless totally bullshit depiction of cyberspace. I gather there's some secret twist in the chronology, like the stuff is presented out of order but you only realize that later. However, I couldn't be bothered to figure it out in deta A disappointment, especially for a fan of the original manga. I thought this one lacked heart, stakes, and perspective. But I guess it has something to recommend it if you like absurdly curvy babes shouting out antivirus commands amidst a garishly realized, but nevertheless totally bullshit depiction of cyberspace. I gather there's some secret twist in the chronology, like the stuff is presented out of order but you only realize that later. However, I couldn't be bothered to figure it out in detail... What happened to Shirow?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Youngblood

    This has got to be literally the single longest book that I have read wherein nothing happens for the majority of the book. I have been through Man-Machine Interface several times cover to cover, and I have to say that the entire 'plot' of the book - so called - could have easily fit into one half the number of editions. I don't know how many pages I skipped during the useless and pointless cyberspace e-"battles" wherein the main character does absolutely nothing except float there on a page pack This has got to be literally the single longest book that I have read wherein nothing happens for the majority of the book. I have been through Man-Machine Interface several times cover to cover, and I have to say that the entire 'plot' of the book - so called - could have easily fit into one half the number of editions. I don't know how many pages I skipped during the useless and pointless cyberspace e-"battles" wherein the main character does absolutely nothing except float there on a page packed with pretty CG images and tell her little drones to release "toy bomb combo B!" or somesuch nonsense, while they blather at her that "barrier maze QQQ has fallen, and the enemy has begun action 'X'!!!". It's almost as if the honorable Mr. Shirow realized that the story he had plotted out had a minimal page count, so he had to pad the story out with gratuitous illustrations of the heroine in skimpy panties and low-cut dresses talking to simplistically designed helpers while floating in a non-specific representation of computer land. Now, about those gratuitous upskirt shots. I'm beginning to think that Masamune Shirow is a dirty old man with a pen and a panty fetish, because of the number of pages wherein our heroine is depicted either in skimpy clothing, performing martial arts in a skirt (with the point of view conveniently placed to greasily ogle the heroine's unmentionables), or stylistically rendered as completely nude, such as when the characters are floating in cyberspace. There are simply too many of these pages scattered throughout the book for it to be little more than pandering to perverse shut-ins with a hentai fetish. I suppose that it could be argued (if one wished to delve so far into a make-believe world) that those people who have opted to become total cyborgs no longer suffer from the shamefulness of being naked that most people seem to suffer from. If this were true, then where are the naked male cyborgs? I counted only one half-naked male cybernetic organism in the entire book, and the character was actually a 'suit' for yet another scantily-clad female cyborg to crawl into and hide within. Any female cyborg that has a position in the healthcare field is dressed like some ultra-distilled male pervert's version of a pornographic nurse, where all the men are in casual clothes, three-piece suits, or heavy concealing armor. Even a female cop cyborg that is taken over by the 'heroine' of the book gets into a fistfight with several robots while wearing a micro-miniskirt, giving the reader several free looks at her gonch. Of course, there was also the gratuitous, pointless lesbian scene in the first Ghost in the Shell, so I think it's safe to say that Mr. Shirow just enjoys drawing nekkid women. That's fine, if the book is erotica, porn, or even an artistic representation of the female form (as another Shirow book has done). Ghost in the Shell: Man-Machine Interface is none of these, however, so the technique seems almost desperate, as if the author were trying to say: "Look! Boobies! Don't look over here at the lack of story! Just look at the tits on this chick! Hey, check it out, I'm giving you panty-shots galore, too!" Don't get me wrong; for the most part, I think all of Masamune Shirow's work is entertaining, complex, well-developed, and a thousand times better than the dreck that passes for anime nowadays (Naruto, anyone?). I just feel that this one could have done with either a little more developing and proper scripting, or a lot less page count...and far more of a point to having so many naked women in the book (or fewer naked women to begin with), rather than for some kind of base gratification. GitS:M-MI has been touted as a "philosophical romp into the meaning of personality and identity", but I suspect that's just an overenthusiastic PR man trying to get the books to sell.

  12. 5 out of 5

    João

    Very interesting ideas all around, and nice ending. But the execution is really bad. Breaking it down: 1 - Narrative: Overly complicated. Sometimes it even seems on purpose. Meaningless phrases and words, technological jargon invented/misused/not explained. 2 - Explanations: Or better, the rants. Most of these are extremely annoying and fail to explain anything. 3 - Beginning: Worst first chapters in of all Shirow's works I've read. Very hard to get into this GITS2 and start to enjoy it. GITS 1 and Very interesting ideas all around, and nice ending. But the execution is really bad. Breaking it down: 1 - Narrative: Overly complicated. Sometimes it even seems on purpose. Meaningless phrases and words, technological jargon invented/misused/not explained. 2 - Explanations: Or better, the rants. Most of these are extremely annoying and fail to explain anything. 3 - Beginning: Worst first chapters in of all Shirow's works I've read. Very hard to get into this GITS2 and start to enjoy it. GITS 1 and 1.5 didn't have this problem. 4 - Art: While, having many moments of brilliance, most of the times it's just a mess. Many styles mixed that just don't work. Some pages made me cringe. 4.5 - 3D: That overused - horrible - 3D rendering... Why? It just sucks. My eyes are bleeding. And Shirow is extremely talented at drawing. Again: Why? 5 - Fan service: Irritating to say the least, the narrative sometimes is lead by it... Awful! It destroyed what could be otherwise a great manga. This killed it for me. Can't take seriously the philosophical aspects being thrown at the same time as no-nipple-boobs. Hundreds... No. Thousands of times. It's all there. It can almost be grasped: a great manga. You just need to unveil the overflow of awful authorial and editorial decisions. That's it: many layers of awfulness. I love Ghost in the Shell. But really, many fundamental aspects of this particular volume make it impossible to truly enjoy it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul Spence

    Ghost in the Shell 2: Man-Machine Interface is the second volume collection in Masamune Shiro's Ghost in the Shell series, based on eleven chapters of manga first serialised in Kodansha, Japan. The review is based on the Dark Horse Comics trade paperback edition A5 size, originally published in January 2005. Like the previous Ghost in the Shell manga adaptation, the localisation is wonderful, but suffers from the art being flipped/mirrored. Shame on the publisher for not doing what Tokyopop and Ghost in the Shell 2: Man-Machine Interface is the second volume collection in Masamune Shiro's Ghost in the Shell series, based on eleven chapters of manga first serialised in Kodansha, Japan. The review is based on the Dark Horse Comics trade paperback edition A5 size, originally published in January 2005. Like the previous Ghost in the Shell manga adaptation, the localisation is wonderful, but suffers from the art being flipped/mirrored. Shame on the publisher for not doing what Tokyopop and Viz Media has been doing for years. As with Ghost in the Shell and other Masamune's cyber-punk mangas such as Appleseed, GITS2: Man-Machine Interface is filled with a quasi-humanity plot and pseudo-intellectual narrative in a typical futuristic setting. Despite Masamune's warning/apologies that Man-Machine Interface isn't a direct sequel to Ghost in the Shell, I can't help but comparing this 'sequel' to the original classic. Truthfully, despite sharing the same protagonist and the same title, Man-Machine Interface is a far departure from GITS, both in terms of art style as well as story line. Perhaps Masamune or his publisher(s) felt that having it associated with a highly regarded graphic novel would help sell the book better. Who knows? For those who are fans of the original GITS's excessive and graphic violent action scenes (like I am) would be very disappointed. Man-Machine Interface's plot centres around information warfare. This is in contrast to the episodic feel of cop vs baddies narrative of the original. In GITS2, one of Motoko's children from her fusion with the Puppeteer, from the first manga, continues the fight against the baddies - just not with brawn this time, but with geeky computer commands instead. In between these Cyberbrain warfares are more techno-babble talk and fan service in the form of Barbie style virtual nude ladies with plenty of crotch shots (even surpassing that of Ikkitousen). Yep, those infamous crotch shots from the first book has returned ten-fold, with a far far higher frequency this time round. The sequel also lacks the variety of fully developed characters from the first book, instead presenting only a couple of two-dimensional plot advancers (with the occasionally funny characters). Even within GITS2, the quality of the artistic direction differs wildly. Masamune has decided that the coloured pages of GITS2 would consist of plenty of computer generated backgrounds. Some support characters are also computer rendered. While main characters are beutifully drawn, the 3D CG backgrounds are just hideous. Regardless, with the help of CG, there are more coloured pages in Man-Machine Interface than the first volume, which some may see as a bonus. To me this allowed me to appreciate the B&W pages even more. Masamune's talent for drawing in B&W is more pronounced here than ever especially in contrast to the fugly coloured pages.

  14. 5 out of 5

    J.M. Giovine

    It’s rather intriguing and odd to analyze this sequel, since it feels everything but an actual sequel of the previous Ghost in the Shell. Yeah, Shirow Masamune clarifies at the beginning that this takes place four years after the original, and even so, the story goes all over the place, so much, it doesn’t seem to fit in this continuity, with the exception of a couple of references, the prologue and the epilogue, aside of that, this could easily be seen as a crossover. This time, the story focus It’s rather intriguing and odd to analyze this sequel, since it feels everything but an actual sequel of the previous Ghost in the Shell. Yeah, Shirow Masamune clarifies at the beginning that this takes place four years after the original, and even so, the story goes all over the place, so much, it doesn’t seem to fit in this continuity, with the exception of a couple of references, the prologue and the epilogue, aside of that, this could easily be seen as a crossover. This time, the story focuses on a so-called Motoko Aramaki, a somehow successor (mostly spiritual) to the previous main character, being she a kind of head of a super agency affiliated to the government, who’s also a full body cyborg. The thing I noticed with this volume was how random it feels. While the focus and tone are practically the same, as well for some of its art, there’s a certain feeling of insecurity, in regards of the story and its characters, specially the main one, since it is not actually clarified what or who she is, for the most part. The main issue is Masamune wants us to dig her as the new main character, but the thing is, the attachment for Motoko Kusanagi was that much in the previous volumes, now she seems just like one more character, and that only works against her. Now for the art, well, it is impressive, as always, but it was the random addition of 3D art. It works at first, when the visuals are too complicated just to be shown in black and white format, but they feel forced; just something Masamune thought would look cool at the time. And, while in regards of plot, the book still acknowledges some of the existentialistic and humanistic aspects of cybernetics, IA and technology for sci-fi purposes, it’s approached in such randomly confusing ways, its everything but enjoyable, at moments. In the end, I guess this “continuation” serves a certain purpose, and at times I did enjoy it, but I only wished this could’ve been more reminiscent of the first volume, and more concentrated in regards of the storytelling, which I believe it was its weakest aspect. Fans of the first volumes might like it, but casual manga readers could find it a little bit tricky and raw.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Boethia

    I feel like this instalment should have never happened. While I do think the series is a bit overrated overall, the first volume had an interesting premise, it did a nice job of posing complex questions and stretching the topics of technology further to identity, personal freedom, individuality etc. It was dynamic, modern and I could understand its 'cult' status and the impact it had on the cyberpunk genre. This second volume is, however, hopelessly flat. The only redeeming factor is the art, whi I feel like this instalment should have never happened. While I do think the series is a bit overrated overall, the first volume had an interesting premise, it did a nice job of posing complex questions and stretching the topics of technology further to identity, personal freedom, individuality etc. It was dynamic, modern and I could understand its 'cult' status and the impact it had on the cyberpunk genre. This second volume is, however, hopelessly flat. The only redeeming factor is the art, which is unorthodox and the 3D aspect might not be everyone's favourite, but I liked it quite a bit - it's something new and it works well with the series' overall tone. There are issues too, though - one of them being the fact that it switches between black and white pages and full colour, completely haphazardly (and if there was a symbolic meaning hidden somewhere, I missed it and in that case, enlighten me, please). The story is very difficult to grasp because it's buried under tons and tons of technical blabber and in the end you're smacked by a 'wtf' moment which was supposed to be a big revelation but it just seemed silly and random and lazy, since the author's notes literally say: ''There's no point in explaining what it all means... I know it's similar to Shinto but actually it's not.'' Well, thanks for fucking nothing, maybe explain it next time instead of 100 pages of neuromancer-like nonsense and Motoko's boobs. Which brings me to my last point - the fanservice. I couldn't care less about it if it's done tastefully and when it's not overdone (in a medium which is not marketed as hentai/ecchi), which is not the case of GiTS II, at all. It's. In. Every. Panel. It's very difficult to take the main character seriously. How am I supposed to believe Motoko is the badass all-knowing cyborg and mastermind when she's flashing her underwear every few seconds? She can literally hack people but can't get her sizing right. Not to mention the fact that it makes the action scenes look awkward, not cool. I might just forget this exists, and I recommend others to do the same. It really isn't worth it and adds nothing to the series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mister Pete

    I don't mind a complex plot but I felt it wasn't worth the payout in this case. It seemed unnecessarily obtuse. The hacking is also overdone with way too many lines of "L52 barrier has disintegrated! D set virus array will be neutralized in 40 seconds!" A bit of techno jargon here and there is fine but it felt at times that I was skimming pages upon pages of it and perhaps missing actual plot elements tucked away here and there along the way. Masamune provides some great artwork here and a greate I don't mind a complex plot but I felt it wasn't worth the payout in this case. It seemed unnecessarily obtuse. The hacking is also overdone with way too many lines of "L52 barrier has disintegrated! D set virus array will be neutralized in 40 seconds!" A bit of techno jargon here and there is fine but it felt at times that I was skimming pages upon pages of it and perhaps missing actual plot elements tucked away here and there along the way. Masamune provides some great artwork here and a greater proportion of color pages than the other two volumes. Unfortunately it's held back by over the top fan service and some CG that doesn't blend in very well. I could imagine giving this a second read to try to pick out Masamune's philosophical contemplation from the surrounding flashiness and technobabble. But unfortunately I'm not sure it's worth the effort. After watching the 1995 anime film (and maybe its sequel) you should move on to the Stand Alone Complex series. Sadly Man-Machine Interface is not the GitS you are looking for.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Braiding

    I wanted to love this, because I do love the way ghost in the shell explores issues of tech + people and where things might go in the future. And some of the art was spectacular. But the storytelling was more opaque than in other ghost in the shell stories, and the fact that Motoko's groin is at the centre of just about every image of her was super distracting. As an example, I'm still not sure if her helper bots were actual bots or just AIs in cyberspace helping out, which probably shouldn't ma I wanted to love this, because I do love the way ghost in the shell explores issues of tech + people and where things might go in the future. And some of the art was spectacular. But the storytelling was more opaque than in other ghost in the shell stories, and the fact that Motoko's groin is at the centre of just about every image of her was super distracting. As an example, I'm still not sure if her helper bots were actual bots or just AIs in cyberspace helping out, which probably shouldn't matter in a story like this, but it did. I feel like Shirow's work would be better with a stronger editor, which is absurd because I know how manga works. On the other hand, the story editors who worked on the movies and anime have done a great job of lifting the key ideas and issues from the manga and turning them into something that is more easily accessible. I'm a techy person who loves sci-fi, I shouldn't find this stuff hard to read. But maybe it's just cultural differences.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Greg Frederick

    This was a must-read for me, being a huge fan of the animes. I first read the first manga, which was great. This one is more of a head trip, but gets bogged down in e-battles that are hard to follow. Also, it feels like the story kicks off in the middle, hits the ground sprinting, and doesn't stop till the end. For this reason, it is the type of book that is meant to be read and re-read in order to fully grasp what is going on. So I'm sure I'll give it another go at some point, but not for a whi This was a must-read for me, being a huge fan of the animes. I first read the first manga, which was great. This one is more of a head trip, but gets bogged down in e-battles that are hard to follow. Also, it feels like the story kicks off in the middle, hits the ground sprinting, and doesn't stop till the end. For this reason, it is the type of book that is meant to be read and re-read in order to fully grasp what is going on. So I'm sure I'll give it another go at some point, but not for a while. I only recommend this book to hardcore GITS fans... or anyone that wants to ogle naked (yet oddly nipple-less) virtual Motoko smeared across as many pages as the author felt like he could get away with. All that said, I wish there were a third book, and a fourth, and another between the first and second. There's just so much to explore in this amazing mindbending world Masamune Shirow has created.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniyal

    The pacing for this volume is really, really fast. I found I needed to assume there were sub-actions done between panels on a page at several times. I found the art excellent and got lost in seeing depictions of submarines, mechs, and combat easily. I also really enjoyed how aggressive Motoko Aramaki is as a character. She draws from satellite constellations and near-omnipotent awareness of nearby tech to exercise her actions. There is a lot of nonsensical jargon used in the depictions of electro The pacing for this volume is really, really fast. I found I needed to assume there were sub-actions done between panels on a page at several times. I found the art excellent and got lost in seeing depictions of submarines, mechs, and combat easily. I also really enjoyed how aggressive Motoko Aramaki is as a character. She draws from satellite constellations and near-omnipotent awareness of nearby tech to exercise her actions. There is a lot of nonsensical jargon used in the depictions of electronic combat that I simplified as I read it to better determine what was happening. I think you could disregard half of what Motoko Aramaki and sub-AI describe when fighting without losing meaning. Just keep in mind Level 6 means you're touching their raw mind and are most vulnerable to attack. There's a great deal of exposition happening in the prologue and epilogue. Take care to read it a few times.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Goose

    Exchanges the virtuoso characterization and dialogue of the original for an even more complex and abstruse plot. Loses more than it gains by this trade, given that the original was already fairly heady. Also, Masamune really went completely bonkers with the fanservice in this one. It's gratuitous for pretty much the entire length of the work - definitely a step down from the comparatively measured fanservice of the original, which I thought was tasteful and pretty. Masamune reinvented the wheel Exchanges the virtuoso characterization and dialogue of the original for an even more complex and abstruse plot. Loses more than it gains by this trade, given that the original was already fairly heady. Also, Masamune really went completely bonkers with the fanservice in this one. It's gratuitous for pretty much the entire length of the work - definitely a step down from the comparatively measured fanservice of the original, which I thought was tasteful and pretty. Masamune reinvented the wheel for the second and last installment. It would be basically impossible to outdo the mindblowing original, but this still blows most everything else in the genre out of the water, assuming you have the patience to follow it. Once you go from these books back to normal graphic novels, its like stepping from the schoolhouse back into goo goo ga ga baby preschool playground.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    I feel like a traitor only giving this 3.5 stars. However while insightful at times (especially when one recalls this was published in 2001, Masume's tech predictions were scarily accurate in parts, particularly around civil liberties relating to entertainment over privacy), so much of it was heavy handed. Plus I quickly got over the unnecessary nude angles; I understand the ebrain space need/representation as nudes, but really some of the angles?!? I kept wondering if they would have been deeme I feel like a traitor only giving this 3.5 stars. However while insightful at times (especially when one recalls this was published in 2001, Masume's tech predictions were scarily accurate in parts, particularly around civil liberties relating to entertainment over privacy), so much of it was heavy handed. Plus I quickly got over the unnecessary nude angles; I understand the ebrain space need/representation as nudes, but really some of the angles?!? I kept wondering if they would have been deemed necessary if it was Batou in the scene, and not Motoko. Also what was with the author note about regret in not giving Millennium a more feminine name (p214) - seriously? For someone who wrote a kick-arse female character, it was disappointing. Starting to think this is one of the few times I should just stick to the anime, and avoid the manga.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Saif Rahman

    The final instalment in Ghost in the Shell: Man-Machine interface seems to be much different than its other iterations. I found some scenes in the manga completely mind-boggling and refreshing. There were subtle elements derived from the Japanese mythology, and there are some broad philosophical facets to Shirow Masamune's work. I notably found it hard to understand whenever I picked up from where I started reading. I feel the manga leaves more questions than answers and this is especially bad f The final instalment in Ghost in the Shell: Man-Machine interface seems to be much different than its other iterations. I found some scenes in the manga completely mind-boggling and refreshing. There were subtle elements derived from the Japanese mythology, and there are some broad philosophical facets to Shirow Masamune's work. I notably found it hard to understand whenever I picked up from where I started reading. I feel the manga leaves more questions than answers and this is especially bad for a person like me who loves fulfilment, climaxes and conclusions. I also felt confused between Motoko Aramaki and Motoko Kusanagi and later realised they are the same. Overall, thoroughly enjoyed the series, cheers!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vladimir

    Masamune Shirow is not not a good storyteller. And this last book in the Ghost in the Shell series is the most vivid example of that. About 80% of the time I had no idea what was actually happening in the story and why. GitS 2 is like some kind of a hacker or tech porn with all kinds of technical details upon details upon details. Despite the book losing my interest in the story very early on, I still liked some of the author's thoughts and ideas of the possible future technologies. Also, the co Masamune Shirow is not not a good storyteller. And this last book in the Ghost in the Shell series is the most vivid example of that. About 80% of the time I had no idea what was actually happening in the story and why. GitS 2 is like some kind of a hacker or tech porn with all kinds of technical details upon details upon details. Despite the book losing my interest in the story very early on, I still liked some of the author's thoughts and ideas of the possible future technologies. Also, the colorful mixture of hand-drawn and CG art was gorgeous. To enjoy Man-Machine Interface you've got to be a diehard fan of the series or cyberpunk in general. One more thing I'd like to mention is that the sequel anime movie Innocence is an original work and is not based upon this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Gullestad

    After reading 1 and 1,5 this book is a huge letdown and is nothing like the previous installments. The book is prop full of philosophical mumbo jumbo and technical jargon that is neither interesting nor conducive. Man-machine Interface tries to make up for its lack of substantiated plot with an exuberance of color pages, the impact of this is however lessened by the fact that the protagonist has 90% of the 'screentime'. If you have read book 1 and 1,5 and is looking for a conclusion you won't rea After reading 1 and 1,5 this book is a huge letdown and is nothing like the previous installments. The book is prop full of philosophical mumbo jumbo and technical jargon that is neither interesting nor conducive. Man-machine Interface tries to make up for its lack of substantiated plot with an exuberance of color pages, the impact of this is however lessened by the fact that the protagonist has 90% of the 'screentime'. If you have read book 1 and 1,5 and is looking for a conclusion you won't really find one here the only subject matter that relates to the previous installments is found in the Prologue and the Epilogue. The middle is basically filler and the protagonist is most of the time in virtual space which when done in excess as is the case here can be rather boring.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Travis Lindeman

    Visually stunning, but I found the plot rather hard to follow. It seemed like a lot of made up terms for cyber security shot from the hip. Exhilarating to get through but I didn't finish it with the awe with which I finished vol 1. I was using this for research about what consciousness might look like when uploaded into a digital ether. Perhaps a graphic novel is not the correct place to look because this is an inherently visual medium. The portrayal of bodies floating in binary code is interest Visually stunning, but I found the plot rather hard to follow. It seemed like a lot of made up terms for cyber security shot from the hip. Exhilarating to get through but I didn't finish it with the awe with which I finished vol 1. I was using this for research about what consciousness might look like when uploaded into a digital ether. Perhaps a graphic novel is not the correct place to look because this is an inherently visual medium. The portrayal of bodies floating in binary code is interesting but I think not very accurate to what this would really look like.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Colin Schindler

    Uh, really bad. I couldn't even follow the story line at all. The art went 3-d and kind of reminds me of early video game graphics, they look really bad. The assistant creatures are probably the most bizarre example of this and mixed with their awkward personalities are incredibly irritating. Lastly, the original sector 9 characters are not found here although a mix of some of the names, motoko aramaki, remain. All of this really just confused me and I couldn't get too far into it. Sad, as I rea Uh, really bad. I couldn't even follow the story line at all. The art went 3-d and kind of reminds me of early video game graphics, they look really bad. The assistant creatures are probably the most bizarre example of this and mixed with their awkward personalities are incredibly irritating. Lastly, the original sector 9 characters are not found here although a mix of some of the names, motoko aramaki, remain. All of this really just confused me and I couldn't get too far into it. Sad, as I really enjoyed the first, and waded through 1.5 thinking getting to 2 would pay off. Well it didn't.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Powerful visuals, haunting narrative Shirley follows the seminal Ghost in the Shell with a disorienting yet alluring cyberpunk narrative. The commentary on cloning, Internet of things security, and consciousness remain relevant and intriguing. Much like William Gibson's prose, Shirow throws the reader into a collage of chrome and silicon, only to bring all of the pieces together in a moment of wonder. Powerful visuals, haunting narrative Shirley follows the seminal Ghost in the Shell with a disorienting yet alluring cyberpunk narrative. The commentary on cloning, Internet of things security, and consciousness remain relevant and intriguing. Much like William Gibson's prose, Shirow throws the reader into a collage of chrome and silicon, only to bring all of the pieces together in a moment of wonder.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nick Jones

    As an artist, Masamune Shirow is a modern master; unfortunately, his writing is not remotely at the same level, and if this book is any indication it's gotten progressively worse as time has gone on. Man-Machine Interface might've made sense to Shirow, but when taking his ideas and putting them out into the world any coherence was utterly lost. I literally couldn't tell you what was going on at almost any time, nor what any single character's motivations were. As an artist, Masamune Shirow is a modern master; unfortunately, his writing is not remotely at the same level, and if this book is any indication it's gotten progressively worse as time has gone on. Man-Machine Interface might've made sense to Shirow, but when taking his ideas and putting them out into the world any coherence was utterly lost. I literally couldn't tell you what was going on at almost any time, nor what any single character's motivations were.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Not nearly as good as the first volume. Still interesting, but it takes Shirow's cyber-soaked themes and cranks them way up. The art is beautiful but you can tell Shirow was putting a lot more effort and emphasis on the sexuality of Motoko this time around, which can be distracting. Sometimes the flavor text got a bit hard to decypher and in the way of the story, but if you love GitS and Shirow's other works, it wont bother you too much. Not nearly as good as the first volume. Still interesting, but it takes Shirow's cyber-soaked themes and cranks them way up. The art is beautiful but you can tell Shirow was putting a lot more effort and emphasis on the sexuality of Motoko this time around, which can be distracting. Sometimes the flavor text got a bit hard to decypher and in the way of the story, but if you love GitS and Shirow's other works, it wont bother you too much.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Icaro Menezes

    I couldn't finish it cause I couldn't understand 90% of the text, since it's spoken in "techeese". Completely confuse, this waste of paper sees itself as very smart, but doesn't really makes any sense. Most of the time, the protagonist it's talking to the AI's (don't really know) on her head and telling them to do stuff. Stuff that you don't understand. Also worth mentioning the hypersexualization, what makes it totally different from the first one. I couldn't finish it cause I couldn't understand 90% of the text, since it's spoken in "techeese". Completely confuse, this waste of paper sees itself as very smart, but doesn't really makes any sense. Most of the time, the protagonist it's talking to the AI's (don't really know) on her head and telling them to do stuff. Stuff that you don't understand. Also worth mentioning the hypersexualization, what makes it totally different from the first one.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.