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Global Frequency: The Deluxe Edition

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Created by Warren Ellis (The Authority, Transmetropolitan), Global Frequency: The Deluxe Edition collects the entire twelve-issue series in hardcover! Global Frequency is a worldwide rescue organization created to deal with any crisis too big, too strange or too dangerous to handle by more...conventional means. Founded and funded by the enigmatic Miranda Zero, this mysterio Created by Warren Ellis (The Authority, Transmetropolitan), Global Frequency: The Deluxe Edition collects the entire twelve-issue series in hardcover! Global Frequency is a worldwide rescue organization created to deal with any crisis too big, too strange or too dangerous to handle by more...conventional means. Founded and funded by the enigmatic Miranda Zero, this mysterious agency is made up of 1,001 agents, all experts in fields as diverse as bioweapons engineering and parkour running. Each member is equipped with a special mobile phone that keeps them in constant communication with Mirando Zero's cunning right-hand woman Aleph, the nexus of the worldwide operation. From a middle-aged linguist to a 16-year-old computer geek to a retired detective to an ace test pilot, Global Frequency agents are the best at what they do, and they are humanity's last, best chance for survival. Collects Global Frequency #1-12.


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Created by Warren Ellis (The Authority, Transmetropolitan), Global Frequency: The Deluxe Edition collects the entire twelve-issue series in hardcover! Global Frequency is a worldwide rescue organization created to deal with any crisis too big, too strange or too dangerous to handle by more...conventional means. Founded and funded by the enigmatic Miranda Zero, this mysterio Created by Warren Ellis (The Authority, Transmetropolitan), Global Frequency: The Deluxe Edition collects the entire twelve-issue series in hardcover! Global Frequency is a worldwide rescue organization created to deal with any crisis too big, too strange or too dangerous to handle by more...conventional means. Founded and funded by the enigmatic Miranda Zero, this mysterious agency is made up of 1,001 agents, all experts in fields as diverse as bioweapons engineering and parkour running. Each member is equipped with a special mobile phone that keeps them in constant communication with Mirando Zero's cunning right-hand woman Aleph, the nexus of the worldwide operation. From a middle-aged linguist to a 16-year-old computer geek to a retired detective to an ace test pilot, Global Frequency agents are the best at what they do, and they are humanity's last, best chance for survival. Collects Global Frequency #1-12.

30 review for Global Frequency: The Deluxe Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    What? I don't get it. I mean, normally when something opens up in the middle of the action with little to no explanation as to what's happening or why, it's a good idea to sit back and wait. Because eventually the backstories and reasons behind the story will be explained. But if you think that's what will happen here, you'll be sorely disappointed. <--I know I was. Everything you're going to find out about the mysterious Global Frequency is in the blurb. Everything. The stories themselves are jus What? I don't get it. I mean, normally when something opens up in the middle of the action with little to no explanation as to what's happening or why, it's a good idea to sit back and wait. Because eventually the backstories and reasons behind the story will be explained. But if you think that's what will happen here, you'll be sorely disappointed. <--I know I was. Everything you're going to find out about the mysterious Global Frequency is in the blurb. Everything. The stories themselves are just sort of weird little one-shots about random agents across the world who each have different abilities. And by abilities I mean...well, one chick has the power of parkour. This was (to me) pretty dull and hard to get through. Especially considering you get absolutely no payoff for slogging through 12 issues. I'm sure this appeals to a lot of people out there, but this was definitely not my cuppa.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This volume collects all 12 issues of Global Frequency. As such, it tells 12 different stories that come to life through the art of 12 different artists. I will not pretend to know the different artists. I must also admit that some of the art was not too good in my opinion (3 stars max) while other artists blew it out of the water. I will not go into details of all the 12 standalone stories. Suffice it to say that they offer a glimpse into what the Global Frequency is. Miranda Zero started the re This volume collects all 12 issues of Global Frequency. As such, it tells 12 different stories that come to life through the art of 12 different artists. I will not pretend to know the different artists. I must also admit that some of the art was not too good in my opinion (3 stars max) while other artists blew it out of the water. I will not go into details of all the 12 standalone stories. Suffice it to say that they offer a glimpse into what the Global Frequency is. Miranda Zero started the rescue organisation and is recruiting all kinds of people for it, from engineers to physicists and hackers and so on (even some parcour artist), based on their expertise but also on where in the US they are situated in order to ensure there is always at least one operative that can be called in at any time with the smallest response time. GF has 1001 members (1000 at the beginning of issue #1). They respond to threats that are ... unusual if you will. One case was a man that had been turned into a killer machine via incredible feats of technology / bio-engineering until there was nothing left of the man himself (think Terminator) for example. It usually is some form of technology used by one government or another that then gets out of hand and threatens all of mankind. Since GF consists of so many individuals, some of which even have extensive combat training, their response time is, of course, faster than that of authorities and they operate in a sort of grey area (not to mention that they only take care of "special" problems). There are some people in the government that don't want to acknowledge them at all, but they seem to be humanity's last chance in every case presented here. I was a bit apprehensive at first since the common concept always was "kill the problem". It wasn't bad and I saw the need for it, but I would have wished for more diversity like finding another way (or at least trying). As it was, it was all nails and a hammer. However, considering that the GF is the last resort, I guess that wish was obsolete from the beginning. Nevertheless, the stories were often full of blood and gore and violence and I like that each author/artist was not afraid to show "the ugly side". They are certainly weird stories, not at all the usual thing or what I had expected when I started reading this, but the science-violence combination worked very well and the short, standalone stories are great and fast to read. Equally, I like that the 12 issues have different artists as well as it gives them all different feels, like their own personality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Global Frequency was surprisingly good. This volume collects all the single issues into one. The Global Frequency is a group of thousands of individuals who are all connected to this private frequency. They are all sorts of people- from intel agents to computer hackers, artists to parkour athletes...in the event of an emergency (generally a rescue operation of some sort) the Global Frequency jumps into action. Due to the huge disparity in the jobs and roles of the members they can sometimes respo Global Frequency was surprisingly good. This volume collects all the single issues into one. The Global Frequency is a group of thousands of individuals who are all connected to this private frequency. They are all sorts of people- from intel agents to computer hackers, artists to parkour athletes...in the event of an emergency (generally a rescue operation of some sort) the Global Frequency jumps into action. Due to the huge disparity in the jobs and roles of the members they can sometimes respond quicker than the authorities. As weird as this sounds-it actually works. Each is a self contained story about different members of the Global Frequency handling missions. The variety of the missions, the villains and the GF members are all over the place. That is what makes this an interesting read. Want to see a elite military unit being sent in to kill a hybrid cyborg? or a an Aussie Police officer and a British Intel agent take down a suicidal terrorist cult? Or even a parapsychologist and a mage (not sure what he is) try to figure out why people in a small village all claim to have seen an angel? This is just a smattering of the various ideas that populate this rather interesting volume. The artwork varies as each story is done by a different artist. Some are great and some are meh. The stories are pretty interesting all the way through. I liked the strange mix of humor, violence and death (what a cool mixture). The Global Frequency is a lot of fun to read and is somewhat different than the norm. I think people who like a fun and interesting story with a lot of violence and oddball members will enjoy the Global Frequency.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I'm not sure how this hasn't got past the development stage of a TV series. The first 12 episodes have already been written even. They could be lifted as is from the graphic novel. That's how good this series is. This is Warren Ellis at his best. The premise of the series is simple. 1,001 experts in their fields have committed to be on-call when disaster strikes. They fight alien technology, terrorists, government experiments gone wrong, etc. I'm not sure how this hasn't got past the development stage of a TV series. The first 12 episodes have already been written even. They could be lifted as is from the graphic novel. That's how good this series is. This is Warren Ellis at his best. The premise of the series is simple. 1,001 experts in their fields have committed to be on-call when disaster strikes. They fight alien technology, terrorists, government experiments gone wrong, etc.

  5. 5 out of 5

    A G

    Man, I wish I could say I loved this book. It’s got action, sharp writing, cool technology, and resplendent artwork. And yet it’s fundamentally unsatisfying because of what it is: a series of twelve well-crafted, self-contained, consequence-free action scenes. For me, the episodic nature of this series is its undoing. You know going in that the Global Frequency agents are going to get the bad guys, so the book is devoid of any genuine sense of danger. Drama flies out the damn window, and you’re l Man, I wish I could say I loved this book. It’s got action, sharp writing, cool technology, and resplendent artwork. And yet it’s fundamentally unsatisfying because of what it is: a series of twelve well-crafted, self-contained, consequence-free action scenes. For me, the episodic nature of this series is its undoing. You know going in that the Global Frequency agents are going to get the bad guys, so the book is devoid of any genuine sense of danger. Drama flies out the damn window, and you’re left with the feeling of passively watching an interesting scenario (and the scenarios, with a couple of exceptions, are quite interesting) play itself out. You might as well be playing a video game. The stories move way too quickly — the set-up is usually about two or three pages, and the resolution is only one or two panels. The truly frustrating thing about Global Frequency is that are some fascinating ideas and themes and mythologies lurking in the subtext — none of which ever get a chance to breathe because of the lack of continuity. Walking black holes, bionic monsters, kinetic harpoons, evil medical research, the ethical and logistical questions of running an organization like the Frequency…these are all things I was interested in and wanted to know more about. But no: it’s all just a backdrop to beating the bad guys in 20-odd pages. This shallowness is keenly felt in the final story, where some of the complex questions surrounding the Global Frequency are very briefly considered. Too little, too late. So it’s possible to enjoy Global Frequency for what it is, if you don’t expect too much out of it. This is a smart book, and I would have greatly preferred a longer, serialized, slower-paced version, rich in world-building and drama, that leaves you with much to ponder. As it is, this feels like an appetizer without a main course.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael Benavidez

    3.5 I'm torn with this series. The action is awesome, it runs all the way through with minimal stops for explanation. The situations are fantastic because the writing creates a whole world with such a limited experience. It's just 12 issues, all centered around action pieces and out of this world scenarios. That's great and all, but there isn't any character development. Each issue is a new cast (save for two). Whenever shit hits the fan (because there are instances where things go smoothly) ther 3.5 I'm torn with this series. The action is awesome, it runs all the way through with minimal stops for explanation. The situations are fantastic because the writing creates a whole world with such a limited experience. It's just 12 issues, all centered around action pieces and out of this world scenarios. That's great and all, but there isn't any character development. Each issue is a new cast (save for two). Whenever shit hits the fan (because there are instances where things go smoothly) there is just no tension. We don't care for the character beyond what we are given from the beginning of the issue. In a way this series seems like a bunch of random outlandish ideas that Warren Ellis had, but no way to fit them in a bigger story. So yes it's an awesome book, but it feels like it's lacking major storing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I read this book a couple of years ago and commented that I wish there was more of a thread to tie this book together. Rereading it now, I realize that this was a monthly comic that has been collected in trade, and not a graphic novel/ one story. And for a year of comic books, it’s pretty great. Yes, there is not much of a thread from issue to issue, but if I was reading this month to month I would have dug it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nick Kives

    Warren Ellis mentioned in an interview that he wrote this book in response to 9/11. Not that attack of 9/11 but the response of people to it, and how some would say "I wish Superman(or whoever) were real to stop things like this." His response in this book is that it can be everyday people like us to stop these things. Each issue is a single issue about a single event, and a group of people (brought together by the Global Frequency) to stop a bombing, a virus release, etc. Each issue has a diffe Warren Ellis mentioned in an interview that he wrote this book in response to 9/11. Not that attack of 9/11 but the response of people to it, and how some would say "I wish Superman(or whoever) were real to stop things like this." His response in this book is that it can be everyday people like us to stop these things. Each issue is a single issue about a single event, and a group of people (brought together by the Global Frequency) to stop a bombing, a virus release, etc. Each issue has a different artist, but Warren Ellis is the writer throughout. So the art tends to vary issue to issue, but all of it is great. The end was a bit lacking, but only in that fact that there is no real end. It is just the end of a singular story, and nothing overarching. I probably can't recommend a Warren Ellis book enough.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Special Ops team that operates on a global scale to save the world from threats. Not a believable story. I couldn't get into it. Special Ops team that operates on a global scale to save the world from threats. Not a believable story. I couldn't get into it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Every second count. Isn’t that what they always say? Whether you’re drowning in the middle of a river or being held at gunpoint by a psychopathic serial killer, it’s within those precious seconds that everything can change and that means you either suffer a terrible death or live to see another day. But what if state-issued protection (police, army, etc.) wasn’t enough? What if the answer lied in a whole different system that didn’t abide by the You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Every second count. Isn’t that what they always say? Whether you’re drowning in the middle of a river or being held at gunpoint by a psychopathic serial killer, it’s within those precious seconds that everything can change and that means you either suffer a terrible death or live to see another day. But what if state-issued protection (police, army, etc.) wasn’t enough? What if the answer lied in a whole different system that didn’t abide by the same rules as everyone else? Created and written by Warren Ellis (Transmetropolitan, Planetary, The Authority), this graphic novel collects 12 issues consisting of 12 stand-alone stories drawn by different artists and all looking into the heroic feats of an independent international rescue organization. What is Global Frequency about? The world in which this story is set resembles that of the 21st century with a science-fiction twist that comes in a myriad of forms, whether it’s mutated human-weapons or sinister cults. Founded by the mysterious Miranda Zero, this graphic novel looks into an agency made up of a 1001 agents scattered across the globe with singular expertise perfect for unexpected crises too big or too strange to handle by governmental means. All connected via a special mobile phone, these hidden heroes are only solicited by Aleph, their tactical and strategic operator with unlimited technical support, when danger is in their proximity. While the idea in principle merits some notice, the result leaves a lot to be desired. By having stand-alone stories set in the same world but following a different cast of characters each time—besides Miranda and Aleph who remain recurring figures—allows no room for character development. Then again, it can be argued that the graphic novel didn’t have that purpose in the first place but it doesn’t help when the newly-introduced agents in each story vary greatly in their skill sets—and, inevitably, in their response time and problem-solving strategies—and their personalities. From a young computer-tech prodigy to a retired detective, very few stand out much more than others but all remain relatively average when it comes to their charisma and appeal. With a distinctive and effortless blend of gore, violence, and dry humour, creator Warren Ellis thus looks to tease readers a radical take on our response to terror. As part of creator Warren Ellis’s pitch for this twelve-issues comic book series—which never got renewed for more afterward—is the solicitation of a different artist for each issue. While it is a refreshing idea that allows the graphic novel to withhold a certain element of surprise, it, unfortunately, led to some rather unimpressive artwork that hardly contributed to the volume’s identity. Rough, unpolished, unconvincing. The visual design for most of the stories struggled to form a cohesive whole and invites skepticism rather than admiration for the work before us. Despite efforts by colourists David Baron and Art Lyon to unify the issues through shades and tone, the artistic vision for this graphic novel remained ordinary. If it weren’t for the episodic nature of this graphic novel, where the structure of each story looked to skim over world-building and character development and have recourse to quick resolutions, the artwork could’ve played a much bigger role in helping this title dig itself out of its hole. Global Frequency is a cursory look at an alarming world filled with danger that only a covert intelligence organization could hastily handle. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  11. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I loved this one. It reminded me a lot of Planetary, just with less superheroics. Global Frequency is a global team of 1,001 agents all with specialized skills. Each issue features a new cast (some show up every issue, but the core team changes) dealing with some new weirdness in places all over the world. Think X-Files or Fringe type happenings. Each issue is also drawn by a different top notch artist, which plays right into the different agents being used for each mission. I think some people fou I loved this one. It reminded me a lot of Planetary, just with less superheroics. Global Frequency is a global team of 1,001 agents all with specialized skills. Each issue features a new cast (some show up every issue, but the core team changes) dealing with some new weirdness in places all over the world. Think X-Files or Fringe type happenings. Each issue is also drawn by a different top notch artist, which plays right into the different agents being used for each mission. I think some people found the different characters and the mash-up of plots confusing, but that's just how Ellis sometime likes to tell a story. Overall I found this to be top notch work from Ellis and his all star cast of artists.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sherif

    I am a Warren Ellis fan, or at least I thought I was until I started reading that book. I mean Trees was frustrating with its slow pace but this!!!! I even joined goodreads specially to write this review. I have never been so frustrated with a graphic novel as much as I have with Global Frequency. The story lines and the dialogues are so cheesy! They might appeal to a middle school kid. Stories are fast-paced, dumb, unconvincing, and have no substance. I am giving it a (very generous) two-star re I am a Warren Ellis fan, or at least I thought I was until I started reading that book. I mean Trees was frustrating with its slow pace but this!!!! I even joined goodreads specially to write this review. I have never been so frustrated with a graphic novel as much as I have with Global Frequency. The story lines and the dialogues are so cheesy! They might appeal to a middle school kid. Stories are fast-paced, dumb, unconvincing, and have no substance. I am giving it a (very generous) two-star review for the art which is the only upside. I loved Transmetropolitan and I think is one of the greatest graphic novel series ever made, but this is just pure disappointment.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Phoenix Scholz-Krishna

    Too superficial plotlines; way too much violence. I'm beginning to suspect that all those simultaneous projects are wearing the author thin. If he could focus on fewer, I bet they'd be really good (again). (Awesome art by Lee Bermejo again in one episode. I really like his style.) Too superficial plotlines; way too much violence. I'm beginning to suspect that all those simultaneous projects are wearing the author thin. If he could focus on fewer, I bet they'd be really good (again). (Awesome art by Lee Bermejo again in one episode. I really like his style.)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Raja

    Some of these punchy serials were pretty interesting, others were just blah. Almost all of them felt just a little too short, probably due to the same format constraints that keep me from reading any comic series issue by issue.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nuno R.

    This is a good test for comics that rely so much on technology: read them 10, 12 years later. Global Frequency was published from 2002 to 2004 and it's fresh in 2015. It serves as a counterpoint to Transmetropolitan. And it actually began when Transmetropolitan ended, in 2002. That other series was an anti-system delirium, centered around a single character, distilling heavy doses of hatred, scepticism, lucidity, humanism, sometimes all those at once. The leading character, a journalist, incarnat This is a good test for comics that rely so much on technology: read them 10, 12 years later. Global Frequency was published from 2002 to 2004 and it's fresh in 2015. It serves as a counterpoint to Transmetropolitan. And it actually began when Transmetropolitan ended, in 2002. That other series was an anti-system delirium, centered around a single character, distilling heavy doses of hatred, scepticism, lucidity, humanism, sometimes all those at once. The leading character, a journalist, incarnated the distrust of political leaders and the whole political system and, most of the time, society and humanity at large, and carried the burden of being a voice of reason, even if it meant destroying himself, in the process. Global Frequency is, in a way, the system. It is sort of a governmental agency. But not something like NSA. There are 1001 agents, and every single one of them seems like an outcast of society. The axis of them all, Aleph, looks (and acts) like a cyberpunk. This series anticipated a lot of what is happening today with the anarcho-capitalists, for instance, that see Bitcoin as an utopic thing. Or the hackers that are going deep in the high frequency trading business in Wall Street. These days, it's not easy to separate people. Hackers can be leftists. Or right wing libertarian nuts. You can be hired because you are a computer genius. You can be a Snowden, and take a long time to wake up. There is a brilliant, quite brutal episode, called Hundred, where Aleph shows she knows how terrorist hackers think, when she defuses, by talking, a dangerous situation. (view spoiler)["The demands that you only put on your website because you're all geeks who live on the web and think that everyone reads it, just like you. / I ran a denial of service attack on your website thirty minutes ago. / No one can read your demands. / No one knows you're there. / No one knows what's happening./ You won't even get to be martyrs./ You'll be like the heaven's gate cult; a bunch of mental web designers who killed themselves for nothing." (hide spoiler)] Warren Ellis does not write about a black and white world. His journalist, in Transmetropolitan, was not my hero, even if he voiced plenty of important issues. And his Global Frequency agents are very uncomfortable. They are, most of them, cruel and ruthless. But Ellis puts them in the obvious position of heros. They are the ones who rescue people - the Global Frequency is called upon when no one else has the skills to do the rescue. So we have to compare them to "heros" like the ones that have been forced upon us, like the word police, that have been invading country after country or changing governments when they dislike them, or to soldiers, in general, glorified in their violence.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Malin

    Global Frequency is an international, independent organisation founded by the mysterious and secretive Miranda Zero. It's made up from 1001 agents all over the world and deals with occurrences and situations too big, strange or dangerous to be handled by conventional means, such as eco-terrorism, mass hysteria, or secret government cyborgs out of control. The agents range from law enforcement representatives, both active and retired, professors, scientists, tech savvy teenagers, intelligence ope Global Frequency is an international, independent organisation founded by the mysterious and secretive Miranda Zero. It's made up from 1001 agents all over the world and deals with occurrences and situations too big, strange or dangerous to be handled by conventional means, such as eco-terrorism, mass hysteria, or secret government cyborgs out of control. The agents range from law enforcement representatives, both active and retired, professors, scientists, tech savvy teenagers, intelligence operatives and just generally experts in some field or other. Every single member can be called on in a crisis, connected in a world wide nexus, controlled by the enigmatic Aleph, who sits at the centre of the organisation and co-ordinates everything. This series was originally published from 2002-2004, and I was sorry to discover that there are only the ten issues collected in this one volume. Each issue is a stand-alone story, featuring a few of the various agents of Global Frequency. The only recurring characters in each story are Miranda Zero and Aleph, and I'm assuming Zero must do constant recruiting, as being an agent for the organisation frequently seems to be very dangerous, and quite a few of the agents don't survive their various missions. Each issue is illustrated by a different artist, which adds to the separateness of the stories. Not all the stories were as entertaining, and in certain cases, I didn't really like the art much (the more I read of graphic media, the more it's becoming clear that it doesn't matter how good the writing is, if I don't like the art). Global Frequency is an action packed and exciting mini series. Ennis can be an extremely capable writer when he sets his mind to it. I liked the episodic feel of the various issues, but was sorry to see that we don't find out more about Aleph, Miranda Zero and the bigger purposes for the organisation. I would really have liked to keep reading the series, with a "new crisis each issue", and the occasional development on the founding and background of the group. Sadly, that is not to be, so I guess I should be grateful that I liked more of the ten issues in the collection than not.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    Warren Ellis is a master of the single issue comic. He consistently crafts 22-page stories that are compelling, succinct, and powerful, short stories you can pick up and enjoy without knowing anything. Whenever I read an Ellis comic, his reverence for the single issue comic as an art form shines through. Global Frequency, then, is a perfect showcase for Ellis’ single issue prowess. The series consists of 12 stories – each drawn by a different artist – about an intelligence organization that thwa Warren Ellis is a master of the single issue comic. He consistently crafts 22-page stories that are compelling, succinct, and powerful, short stories you can pick up and enjoy without knowing anything. Whenever I read an Ellis comic, his reverence for the single issue comic as an art form shines through. Global Frequency, then, is a perfect showcase for Ellis’ single issue prowess. The series consists of 12 stories – each drawn by a different artist – about an intelligence organization that thwarts crises around the world (“cleaning up the 20th century” as Ellis calls it). Every story presents a different case that Global Frequency works to solve, featuring rotating members with two main characters repeating. You can pick up any issue and understand completely what’s going on; every issue is essentially a quick injection of espionage, tightly plotted and quickly paced while providing exactly what you need for the story. The whole series is a fascinating experiment and very well done. All the artists bring their A-game, with nary a bad-looking page in the book. If I had to choose, the issues by Lee Bremejo and Gene Ha are my favorites. While I enjoyed all the stories, they get repetitive reading them back-to-back. I suggest spacing out your reading for maximum effect.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Loved this, sad to see it had such a short run, excellent pace and the various artists on the issues where all top notch. This could and should have ran for longer so more background on the operatives could have been established. The mission impossible/man from uncle vibe i enjoyed and the fact that it was a rescue organisation was also very cool. Its a shame the proposed t.v. series never got past the pilot episode stage. I think toady this series would have gone further. Mr Ellis rocks again.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Max

    Fantastic. People have been after me to read this for ages, and I'm so glad I finally took their advice. Warren Ellis writes some of the best single issues in comics—I came to Global Frequency expecting a long, slow build, like in Planetary, but found instead these chiseled, expansive issues, closer to his run on Moon Knight, but with Planetary's political edge. I'll be returning to this one in the near future. Fantastic. People have been after me to read this for ages, and I'm so glad I finally took their advice. Warren Ellis writes some of the best single issues in comics—I came to Global Frequency expecting a long, slow build, like in Planetary, but found instead these chiseled, expansive issues, closer to his run on Moon Knight, but with Planetary's political edge. I'll be returning to this one in the near future.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robert Davis

    AWESOME!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Are you on the Global Frequency? If not, I suggest you tune in as soon as possible.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt Stephens

    Global Frequency was a 12 issue, episodic miniseries written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by a roster of artists whom each drew a single issue for the Wildstorm imprint. This edition was released by Vertigo around a decade after the original release. The book centers around a group of 1,001 skilled operatives known as Global Frequency and only has two major characters, the leader Miranda Zero and the dispatcher Aleph, the rest of the characters change from issue to issue except for issue 12 wh Global Frequency was a 12 issue, episodic miniseries written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by a roster of artists whom each drew a single issue for the Wildstorm imprint. This edition was released by Vertigo around a decade after the original release. The book centers around a group of 1,001 skilled operatives known as Global Frequency and only has two major characters, the leader Miranda Zero and the dispatcher Aleph, the rest of the characters change from issue to issue except for issue 12 which has some characters return for the finale. Global Frequency is a somewhat shadowy organization devoted to saving humanity from different threats like an augmented man turned into a killing machine that has gone insane to an alien invasion that takes the form of a memetic virus. The art is somewhat of a mixed bag. Some artists are really great like Gene Ha and Garry Leach, others not so much. The lack of a unifying style helps with the episodic nature of the book while denying the possibility of a more coherent and cohesive feel. This makes the book feel more like a sci-fi anthology show than anything else. This is a very good book, but certain elements hold it back from achieving the greatness of something like Transmetropolitan or Planetary. For example, when Alice April says "this mission is teh suck" in issue 12 or when Aleph says "we are so fux0r3d" in the same issue. That's just obnoxiously bad dialogue. Also not every issue has the same level of quality. This could be caused by sloppy art or just because the central premise of the issue isn't as interesting as the rest. Very muchso worth reading for fans of Warren Ellis or sci-fi comics in general. The technology presented in the book is outdated but that's kind of expected. Who could've forseen smart phones in 2002? I certainly didn't expect that. So the bulky remote shaped Global Frequency phones with a tiny screen kind of stand out. Not major though, you have to expect that older sci-fi will have outdated elements in it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul Spence

    Man, I wish I could say I loved this book. It’s got action, sharp writing, cool technology, and resplendent artwork. And yet it’s fundamentally unsatisfying because of what it is: a series of twelve well-crafted, self-contained, consequence-free action scenes. For me, the episodic nature of this series is its undoing. You know going in that the Global Frequency agents are going to get the bad guys, so the book is devoid of any genuine sense of danger. Drama flies out the damn window, and you’re l Man, I wish I could say I loved this book. It’s got action, sharp writing, cool technology, and resplendent artwork. And yet it’s fundamentally unsatisfying because of what it is: a series of twelve well-crafted, self-contained, consequence-free action scenes. For me, the episodic nature of this series is its undoing. You know going in that the Global Frequency agents are going to get the bad guys, so the book is devoid of any genuine sense of danger. Drama flies out the damn window, and you’re left with the feeling of passively watching an interesting scenario (and the scenarios, with a couple of exceptions, *are* quite interesting) play itself out. You might as well be playing a video game. The stories move way too quickly — the set-up is usually about two or three pages, and the resolution is only one or two panels. The truly frustrating thing about Global Frequency is that are some fascinating ideas and themes and mythologies lurking in the subtext — none of which ever get a chance to breathe because of the episodic nature of the series. Walking black holes, bionic monsters, kinetic harpoons, evil medical research, the ethical and logistical questions of running an organization like the Frequency…these are all things I was interested in and wanted to know more about. But no: it’s all just a backdrop to beating the bad guys in 20-odd pages. This shallowness is keenly felt in the final story, where some of the complex questions surrounding the Global Frequency are very briefly considered. Too little, too late. So it’s possible to enjoy Global Frequency for what it is, if you don’t expect too much out of it. This is a smart book, and I would have greatly preferred a longer, serialized, slower-paced version, rich in world-building and drama, that leaves you with much to ponder. As it is, this feels like an appetizer without a main course.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    When things go wrong -- bionic men turned psychopathic killers, doomsday cults hold hostages, a burned church releases an angel, an old Russian bioweapon gets activated -- 1001 special agents get the call. Literally, they get a call from the agent who runs the information network, and they pool their special skills into saving people's lives. (Occasionally by killing a lot of people.) If this sounds like a Warren Ellis pitch, that's because this is a very Warren Ellis comic: group of specialists When things go wrong -- bionic men turned psychopathic killers, doomsday cults hold hostages, a burned church releases an angel, an old Russian bioweapon gets activated -- 1001 special agents get the call. Literally, they get a call from the agent who runs the information network, and they pool their special skills into saving people's lives. (Occasionally by killing a lot of people.) If this sounds like a Warren Ellis pitch, that's because this is a very Warren Ellis comic: group of specialists with odd powers (all non-superhuman in this iteration) dealing with some weirdness of the week, often connected with something from the past coming to haunt the present. The gimmick here -- that everyone has smartphones -- might have seemed more revolutionary in 2002-2004 when this comic was written. Now it seems quaint. (Also, so many of the issues involves a bunch of distributed people on their computers going through data. Again, probably seemed interesting back in the day, when [email protected] was still pretty cool and new.) And since every episode has entirely different characters, there's no real arc to really help the reader engage. It ends up being pretty skippable in Ellis's oeuvre. Yet, there is something interesting here in that, ostensibly, this NGO is meant to save people. And what do they save people from? Rogue government experiments and cults (mostly). Which is to say, the Global Frequency saves people -- from people.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Philip Shade

    Remember back when you had to explain what a meme was to people? What about the first time you saw parkour? Did you know about military satellites dropping graphene rods on cities before GI Joe 2, in 2013? Published '02-'04 is a "Global Frequency" is a collection of stand-alone action stories based around Global Frequency, a world wide rescue organization headed up by Miranda Zero. In each story Warren Ellis features what was then a cutting edge idea, or underground practice and makes it the them Remember back when you had to explain what a meme was to people? What about the first time you saw parkour? Did you know about military satellites dropping graphene rods on cities before GI Joe 2, in 2013? Published '02-'04 is a "Global Frequency" is a collection of stand-alone action stories based around Global Frequency, a world wide rescue organization headed up by Miranda Zero. In each story Warren Ellis features what was then a cutting edge idea, or underground practice and makes it the theme on which either a crime, or rescue is centered. I read all the issues of the series when they came out and really enjoyed them. Revisiting Ellis is always interesting to see what parts became part of the cultural zeitgeist. Global Frequency hits the nail on the head in that respect. The stories caught on, and there was even a TV pilot made. I do take back one star on this review because of the story "Superviolence." As the title suggests it's just page after page of graphic violence. But, I guess, Ellis even got that correct. Later books like Kick-Ass, and contemporary shows like The Punisher are basically celebrations of people who can take (and inflict) extreme pain. Still, while not my thing, it's another prescient part of the collection.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Swanson

    12 issues, 12 stories, 12 artists. yOu'Re oN tHe gloBAl FReqUeNcy!!!11! Remember TV? When TV was a thing you thought was really cool? Here's a sci-fi/crime/action comic series of one-offs and each issue features a different artist.... seems pretty f'in fresh right about now. The stand-alone nature of each story meant I could set this book down without caring for weeks at a time and return to it for another slice. And the featured artist in each issue (generally) meant that slice was going to be rem 12 issues, 12 stories, 12 artists. yOu'Re oN tHe gloBAl FReqUeNcy!!!11! Remember TV? When TV was a thing you thought was really cool? Here's a sci-fi/crime/action comic series of one-offs and each issue features a different artist.... seems pretty f'in fresh right about now. The stand-alone nature of each story meant I could set this book down without caring for weeks at a time and return to it for another slice. And the featured artist in each issue (generally) meant that slice was going to be remarkably tasty. Frequently uber-violent. Sometimes confusing. Borges reference. Drool. I was very touched by the final entry: "Life goes fast. And we seem to spend most of it dancing around all these damn landmines left in the dirt. All this stuff left over from the last century that some bunch of bastards thought we didn't have the right to know about. Bert? You remember the crap we took from NASA just for wanting to go to space? Like they owned the gate to the world? Screw them all. We'll do what we like. We'll save our own lives and grow our own wings. You know? All of a sudden I can't think of anything funny to say."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rocky Sunico

    My partner introduced me to this series and re-reading this in digital format just brought back all those good memories. This Ellis creation is a solid creation of the sort of science fiction espionage stories that most geeks could only dream of. Global Frequency is a very compelling concept-a global rescue operation that doesn't necessarily have magically amazing non-violent rescue machines like in the Thunderbirds, but they are still a global rescue operation. But they have guns. I'm not selli My partner introduced me to this series and re-reading this in digital format just brought back all those good memories. This Ellis creation is a solid creation of the sort of science fiction espionage stories that most geeks could only dream of. Global Frequency is a very compelling concept-a global rescue operation that doesn't necessarily have magically amazing non-violent rescue machines like in the Thunderbirds, but they are still a global rescue operation. But they have guns. I'm not selling the concept well but you have to trust me that this is such a unique concept that it makes shows like Fringe feel like the kiddie pool. It's a compelling concept and it's a shame that efforts to make a TV show out of it never got off the ground. It's probably because the stories are so wildly different from issue to issue and you don't even have a central cast of characters apart from their leader Miranda Zero and the central operator Aleph. Global Frequency is a brilliant mini-series. More people need to read it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    Really appealing premise - 1001 quirky, highly trained, and often lethal volunteers distributed around the world are linked with realtime communications and serve as a global ‘rescue’ organization, taking down terrorists, mad scientists, and runaway automated weapons systems. The graphics are stylish and the characters are well drawn, always easy to follow who is who. What’s not to like? The hyperviolence, mostly, but connected to that, missed opportunities to explore a wider variety of tropes t Really appealing premise - 1001 quirky, highly trained, and often lethal volunteers distributed around the world are linked with realtime communications and serve as a global ‘rescue’ organization, taking down terrorists, mad scientists, and runaway automated weapons systems. The graphics are stylish and the characters are well drawn, always easy to follow who is who. What’s not to like? The hyperviolence, mostly, but connected to that, missed opportunities to explore a wider variety of tropes that would fit the premise. So many of the stories just wallow in bullets exploding through characters’ torsos and heads. But the concept is still cool, and by a couple of stories in, it’s hard not to feel a thrill at the catchphrase: ‘this is Aleph; you’re on the global frequency’.

  29. 4 out of 5

    John Shaw

    This is an older book by Ellis Before he had risen to comic book super God. We see a lot of the common threads that are present throughout his work. Secret organization Fighting weird shit to save the world The old ultra violence. The Global Frequency is a semi covert group of operatives and specialists who protect the world from the shit that Old Bill can't. From out of control killer cyborgs to alien thought viruses. The Global Frequency with 1,000 members is there to stop the weird shit from killing us. Fu This is an older book by Ellis Before he had risen to comic book super God. We see a lot of the common threads that are present throughout his work. Secret organization Fighting weird shit to save the world The old ultra violence. The Global Frequency is a semi covert group of operatives and specialists who protect the world from the shit that Old Bill can't. From out of control killer cyborgs to alien thought viruses. The Global Frequency with 1,000 members is there to stop the weird shit from killing us. Fun and exciting this is Ellis beginning to really find his stride.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

    Ellis tells this story again and again, but I don’t get tired of it. It’s basically the same concept as Planetary and The Injection. A group of unique individuals investigate weird stuff on a global scale. The hook this time is the Global Frequency, a network of 1001 individuals who each have a specialization useful to the organization, dedicated to rescuing people and saving lives. The high points include Issue #2, “Big Wheel”, about a supersoldier driven mad by his enhancements, Issue #3, “Inva Ellis tells this story again and again, but I don’t get tired of it. It’s basically the same concept as Planetary and The Injection. A group of unique individuals investigate weird stuff on a global scale. The hook this time is the Global Frequency, a network of 1001 individuals who each have a specialization useful to the organization, dedicated to rescuing people and saving lives. The high points include Issue #2, “Big Wheel”, about a supersoldier driven mad by his enhancements, Issue #3, “Invasive”, about an alien meme that takes over the mind of people who read it, and issue #10, Cathedral Lung, about, well, just read that one.

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