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In the Company of Educated Women: A History of Women and Higher Education in America

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A leading authority in the field here provides the first synthetic and comprehensive history of women in American higher education in over fifty years.


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A leading authority in the field here provides the first synthetic and comprehensive history of women in American higher education in over fifty years.

30 review for In the Company of Educated Women: A History of Women and Higher Education in America

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Jones

    I assigned this book for a History of Higher Education (MA) class and will keep it. I think the author does a good job of maintaining a level of depth that instructs without overwhelming. The source base is rooted in a variety of primary sources from university documents to personal accounts. The strength of the book is in the balance between what happened on campuses with the larger culture's response to the role of women. It's especially important that Solomon did not portray some inexorable pr I assigned this book for a History of Higher Education (MA) class and will keep it. I think the author does a good job of maintaining a level of depth that instructs without overwhelming. The source base is rooted in a variety of primary sources from university documents to personal accounts. The strength of the book is in the balance between what happened on campuses with the larger culture's response to the role of women. It's especially important that Solomon did not portray some inexorable progress forward narrative. It shows, particularly at the turn of the century, how sometimes society regressed on the question of educated women. I would recommend the book for history of higher ed courses, certainly. I also think it's important for an overall women's history course. Understanding the role of educated women in movements like suffrage is helpful in grasping the overall national narrative as well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    The title of this book should be “In the Company of Educated White Women”. It tends to gloss over the experiences of black women quite a lot. Sometimes the author just writes “women” when she means “white women” and it’s surprising when after that the explanation of black women’s experiences are given. I should mention that white and black women are the only ones discussed with no really talk of native women or other ethnicities. This was a companion book that my professor required in order to c The title of this book should be “In the Company of Educated White Women”. It tends to gloss over the experiences of black women quite a lot. Sometimes the author just writes “women” when she means “white women” and it’s surprising when after that the explanation of black women’s experiences are given. I should mention that white and black women are the only ones discussed with no really talk of native women or other ethnicities. This was a companion book that my professor required in order to cover the story of women in HE but it sadly didn’t live up to its expectations.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Curtis Seven

    An able historical narrative and while it is specifically speaking to the role of women in higher education it is by default also about the history of American higher education. Many young people have no idea today how limited a woman's choice in education was and how important the land grant college system proved to be in getting to where we are today. The purpose of these and other colleges who accepted women was to turn out teachers for the school systems in various regions but they also turn An able historical narrative and while it is specifically speaking to the role of women in higher education it is by default also about the history of American higher education. Many young people have no idea today how limited a woman's choice in education was and how important the land grant college system proved to be in getting to where we are today. The purpose of these and other colleges who accepted women was to turn out teachers for the school systems in various regions but they also turned out women with a sense of history who were the backbone of the Progressive Era. The notion that the glass ceiling does not exist should be dispelled here it is not as overt today as it was say one hundred years ago but we are products of the society as well as the times we grow up in. Societal values change more slowly than individuals and in this sense our collective perception of a thing such as this in fact is a reflection of history. The same prejudices can persist over generations but will shift in the language used the glass ceiling is still there even if things are much improved women are in no sense in full parity with their male counter parts. The conflicting interests just extends further into the economic realm days than it did then so it is not purely a question of educational rights or voting rights now as it is a more fundamental question of the value of work done.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Bateman

    A clear, thorough overview of female participation in higher education. Most of her material is derived from secondary sources and easy-to-find primary sources, but it's a good enough narrative and has loomed large over this particular subject for many years. A clear, thorough overview of female participation in higher education. Most of her material is derived from secondary sources and easy-to-find primary sources, but it's a good enough narrative and has loomed large over this particular subject for many years.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Selena

    Eye-opening journey into the education of women. I might have not chosen this book if it was not assigned for class. I'm glad I did. Eye-opening journey into the education of women. I might have not chosen this book if it was not assigned for class. I'm glad I did.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    So boring.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Noles Maven

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  9. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Cohn

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

  12. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Mathena

  13. 5 out of 5

    Meg Dillon

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tanika

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Krainfo

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Knox

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Nguyen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Backus

  22. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

  23. 5 out of 5

    April Vlaanderen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sugar

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kensington Speer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Hudson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

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