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The Alpine Path is an autobiography of Lucy Maud Montgomery. Originally published as a series of autobiographical essays in the Toronto magazine Everywoman's World from June to November in 1917, it was later separately published in 1975. The Alpine Path is an autobiography of Lucy Maud Montgomery. Originally published as a series of autobiographical essays in the Toronto magazine Everywoman's World from June to November in 1917, it was later separately published in 1975.


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The Alpine Path is an autobiography of Lucy Maud Montgomery. Originally published as a series of autobiographical essays in the Toronto magazine Everywoman's World from June to November in 1917, it was later separately published in 1975. The Alpine Path is an autobiography of Lucy Maud Montgomery. Originally published as a series of autobiographical essays in the Toronto magazine Everywoman's World from June to November in 1917, it was later separately published in 1975.

30 review for The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    I kept hearing about Anne of Green Gables for years without showing the least interest in reading it. A chance viewing of Anne with an E on Netflix delighted me enough for me to pick up the book, and I was instantly hooked. I don’t necessarily think that all the Anne books were great but I really enjoyed the old-world charm of the books and the easy-going life of the characters. I tried to read the Emily of New Moon series but the first book left me cold. All this to say that I don’t think of L. I kept hearing about Anne of Green Gables for years without showing the least interest in reading it. A chance viewing of Anne with an E on Netflix delighted me enough for me to pick up the book, and I was instantly hooked. I don’t necessarily think that all the Anne books were great but I really enjoyed the old-world charm of the books and the easy-going life of the characters. I tried to read the Emily of New Moon series but the first book left me cold. All this to say that I don’t think of L.M. Montgomery as a great writer but I was sufficiently intrigued to pick up The Alpine Path, in which she describes her rise to stardom. The first half of the book describes her childhood, which is interesting. I caught snippets of Anne’s and Emily’s lives and that was delightful in a way. As if I knew Montgomery herself through her characters. Some of the anecdotes were funny while others were heart-warming. The tone changes in the second half as Montgomery marries and goes on a honeymoon. This portion is a description of her time in Scotland and England and makes a delightful, if short, travelogue. This was a great read and the author comes across as humble and humorous. I began to like Montgomery as a person as I read this memoir, which is rather rare for me! I might now try to read some other stories, which are not as depressing as Emily. If you love Anne Shirley Cuthbert, this is a not-to-be-missed memoir.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eva-Joy

    What a lovely, fascinating, charming book! I loved reading about LMM's life (except for all the journal entries from when she was traveling in Scotland). Greatly enjoyed this one and now I want to check out LMM's journals. What a lovely, fascinating, charming book! I loved reading about LMM's life (except for all the journal entries from when she was traveling in Scotland). Greatly enjoyed this one and now I want to check out LMM's journals.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I finished this sweet little biography this morning and absolutely adored it! Each paragraph was such a treat. I truly find a "kindred spirit" in L. M. Montgomery--I sensed through her stories and characters that our souls were made of similar stuff--and so it was a great pleasure and delight to read through these tidbits of her own life (though it's easy to see how much of it was already reflected in her fictional literary creations.) It was charming to read about her girlhood and all her dream I finished this sweet little biography this morning and absolutely adored it! Each paragraph was such a treat. I truly find a "kindred spirit" in L. M. Montgomery--I sensed through her stories and characters that our souls were made of similar stuff--and so it was a great pleasure and delight to read through these tidbits of her own life (though it's easy to see how much of it was already reflected in her fictional literary creations.) It was charming to read about her girlhood and all her dreams and fancies; so interesting and inspiring to learn of her toils and trial and triumphs on the "Alpine Path" to literary success. A few fun little insights illustrate the "real life" spots from whence she gleaned the inspiration for places in her stories, like Lovers' Lane and The Lake of Shining Waters--though she says that only one of her characters was drawn specifically and unadulterated from real-life. Interesting, too, the little confessions with her thoughts on her own books, such as "The Story Girl" being her very favorite (at the time the biography was written--gosh, I really ought to read that novel again, then!) and the fact that she later regretted the fate of Matthew in "Anne of Green Gables." I also found it intriguing and fun to read excerpts from her journal from her honeymoon to the UK (she, like me, always dreamed of seeing that land!) and to hear of her opinions on some of the places I visited, like Abbottsford and Roslin Chapel--and that one journal entry was penned at their hotel on Prince's Street in Edinburgh--so near to the one where Annie and I stayed in June!!! Most heartily recommended to anyone who loves L. M. Montgomery's books! [It arrived! Hooray! The first "fun" package I received in my new mailbox. My edition doesn't have the pretty photo on the cover, but it's cool in that it was actually published in Canada. Also, tucked inside was a brochure from the L.M. Montgomery birthplace! So, I got a surprise bonus with my purchase--the house is very cute, white with green trim ("green gables???") and some inset photos show her wedding dress and the room where she was born.:]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    So yes, The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career is, I believe, the only L.M. Montgomery piece of writing which I had not yet read and reviewed (except for her journals). And really, should The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career not more appropriately be titled that it is the story of L.M. Montgomery's life until 1917 (when she published this as a series of autobiographical essays in a Toronto, Ontario magazine), as while describing her development as a (published) writer is of course a very lar So yes, The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career is, I believe, the only L.M. Montgomery piece of writing which I had not yet read and reviewed (except for her journals). And really, should The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career not more appropriately be titled that it is the story of L.M. Montgomery's life until 1917 (when she published this as a series of autobiographical essays in a Toronto, Ontario magazine), as while describing her development as a (published) writer is of course a very large and important part of Montgomery's presented text, the development and flourishing of her career as an author is also and nevertheless not the only aspect of L.M. Montgomery's existence in Prince Edward Island and her first years of married life in Ontario being touched upon in The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career. Generally though and happily, The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career is and shows potential readers a sweetly expressive autobiographical portrait (and often delightfully poetic when L.M. Montgomery describes her intense love and appreciation of nature, of trees and especially of the ocean, of how Prince Edward Island is basically a lovely and glowing jewel resting in the Gulf of St. Lawrence), with my favourite parts most definitely being those snippets where L.M. Montgomery lists and describes episodes and scenarios from her childhood that she then ended up incorporating into in particular the Anne of Green Gables and The Story Girl novels (but of course, because The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career was published in 1917 one will naturally not find any references to novels later than this date, such as for example to the Emily of New Moon series). Warmly recommended as a short and basic autobiographical and personal introduction to L.M. Montgomery's life and career as a writer, but indeed a presented narrative that is also (at least in my humble opinion) rather lacking in both introspection and L.M. Montgomery daring to be critical of her family. For since having read many biographies on L.M. Montgomery over the years and how both her childhood and her married life were often intensely unhappy and emotionally starved, I guess I had kind of expected, or rather I had kind of wanted her to wield her pen a bit more critically with regard to in particular her maternal grandparents and her father (even though if truth be told, I am also not really all that surprised that this has not been the case in The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career, that L.M. Montgomery's descriptions of her grandparents and of her father are for the most part generally uncritical and positive, but yes indeed, often much too much so for my reading tastes, as, well, having read biographies on Lucy Maud Montgomery, I also do now know that she was abandoned by her father and that her maternal grandparents raised her in a physically adequate but emotionally and spiritually quite majorly lacking and inadequate manner).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lekeshua

    Simple and beautiful. I already love LMM as an author but now my heart has opened to her more. Her simple and humble conveyance of her history/life brought forth so much fresh air and beauty, I have a new appreciation for her. She has a true gift and talent. Love how her inspiration came from nature!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laurence R.

    I read this book in one sitting and it was a wonderful experience. I read it on the grass on the top of a cliff in Prince Edward Island, with the warmth of the sun and the sounds of the waves, the wind and the seagulls. Reading about Prince Edward Island while being there felt incredibly special and all I had to do to see the beauty that LMM was talking about was to look up. To me, this afternoon felt like a religious experience, even though it had nothing to do with religion. I will always reme I read this book in one sitting and it was a wonderful experience. I read it on the grass on the top of a cliff in Prince Edward Island, with the warmth of the sun and the sounds of the waves, the wind and the seagulls. Reading about Prince Edward Island while being there felt incredibly special and all I had to do to see the beauty that LMM was talking about was to look up. To me, this afternoon felt like a religious experience, even though it had nothing to do with religion. I will always remember the time I spent reading this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Beccie

    This didn't have as much information as I would have liked, but it was still fun to read it. Through a lot of the book she would mention things from real life that she had put in Anne of Green Gables and The Story Girl , but I would recognize stories from her own life that were in the Emily of New Moon books. Even the name of the book is a big part of the Emily books, so I wondered why she never said anything about Emily. Then I realized she hadn't written the Emily books at the time this w This didn't have as much information as I would have liked, but it was still fun to read it. Through a lot of the book she would mention things from real life that she had put in Anne of Green Gables and The Story Girl , but I would recognize stories from her own life that were in the Emily of New Moon books. Even the name of the book is a big part of the Emily books, so I wondered why she never said anything about Emily. Then I realized she hadn't written the Emily books at the time this was written. I'm very glad she kept on writing after this so I could have my beloved Emily.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Mead

    This was a lovely little book that gives insight into the history of LMM - my favourite author. I loved learning about her early life and how she began writing. There were some absolute gems in there about writing and how it takes time and effort. (if I remember I might find some to share on here) All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed it! The only thing I wish is that it would've been longer. But seeing as LMM wrote it, it's not exactly possible to request that nearly 100 years after the fact... xD This was a lovely little book that gives insight into the history of LMM - my favourite author. I loved learning about her early life and how she began writing. There were some absolute gems in there about writing and how it takes time and effort. (if I remember I might find some to share on here) All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed it! The only thing I wish is that it would've been longer. But seeing as LMM wrote it, it's not exactly possible to request that nearly 100 years after the fact... xD

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I thoroughly enjoyed this autobiography of LMM!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rikke

    So apparently a magazine editor asked Montgomery for a short article about her career and its resulting success. And apparently Montgomery responded by sending what amounted to a small book. The Alpine Path is Montgomery's autobiography. Published in small installments during 1917 it is only partly finished in the modern reader's eyes and do not take Montgomery's later works into account; instead Montgomery focuses mainly on her beloved Anne series and the nostalgic memories of her childhood tha So apparently a magazine editor asked Montgomery for a short article about her career and its resulting success. And apparently Montgomery responded by sending what amounted to a small book. The Alpine Path is Montgomery's autobiography. Published in small installments during 1917 it is only partly finished in the modern reader's eyes and do not take Montgomery's later works into account; instead Montgomery focuses mainly on her beloved Anne series and the nostalgic memories of her childhood that inspired it. Montgomery's success was not the work of an instant – and in these pages she tells the story of her early writing triumphs, her countless rejections and the small wonders of her world and her home that made her able to climb the steep Alpine path of her dreams. Best of all, Montgomery does not offer apologies or hides behind false modesty; she is proud of her work and her words. Rightly so. As you read, it is easy to be led astray by her picturesque descriptions of her childhood home; of the beloved trees and constant view of the glistening sea surrounding Prince Edward Island. And while Montgomery's childhood surroundings certainly was the inspiration for many of her novels, it was by no means as idyllic as this text suggests. Montgomery was perhaps editing herself, creating her own myth. Reading Montgomery's autobiography was an odd and beautiful experience in so many ways. I found small pieces of Montgomery's heroines hiding in every line – and some lines even seemed oddly familiar, an echo of something I'd read before. While Montgomery wrote The Alpine Path years before Emily of New Moon she re-used direct passages, making Emily speak words from Montgomery's own lived experiences. I've never encountered this in such a clear format before; in Montgomery's world fiction and reality always blends together so beautifully. There's no doubt in my mind that the way up Montgomery's alpine path was a hard climb; much harder than Montgomery even allows her reader to suspect.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Montgomery begins the book by staying that she was asked to write it for her fans, generally meaning Anne's fans. It serves its purpose: Montgomery shares what details of her life she feels are relative to her career, providing several anecdotes and sources for her inspiration. She paints a pleasant picture for her audience, rarely mentioning any emotion other than happiness or wonder. It is measured and careful but straight from the author's pen. It was written to be shared and to maintain her i Montgomery begins the book by staying that she was asked to write it for her fans, generally meaning Anne's fans. It serves its purpose: Montgomery shares what details of her life she feels are relative to her career, providing several anecdotes and sources for her inspiration. She paints a pleasant picture for her audience, rarely mentioning any emotion other than happiness or wonder. It is measured and careful but straight from the author's pen. It was written to be shared and to maintain her image. It is a very pleasant read with some lovely insights, but it isn't as invasively informative as her journals, or the biographies they later spawned.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Francie

    3.5 stars It was very interesting to see how the stories in Montgomery's books related to real-life incidents and I liked her childhood memories. However, I found some of the included diary entries too lenghty and out of place, especially those of her honeymoon. 3.5 stars It was very interesting to see how the stories in Montgomery's books related to real-life incidents and I liked her childhood memories. However, I found some of the included diary entries too lenghty and out of place, especially those of her honeymoon.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Deb in UT

    I enjoyed this book. I read somewhere that someone loved it so I put it on hold. I don't think I am the intended audience. Maybe I am. I didn't even know L.M. Montgomery wrote Anne of Green Gables. I may or may not have read an Anne book or two when I was young. I don't remember. I have a vague memory of watching one of the movies. I remember I liked it. This book is probably enjoyed a lot more by fans of her books. She refers to different places and people in her real life that had influence on I enjoyed this book. I read somewhere that someone loved it so I put it on hold. I don't think I am the intended audience. Maybe I am. I didn't even know L.M. Montgomery wrote Anne of Green Gables. I may or may not have read an Anne book or two when I was young. I don't remember. I have a vague memory of watching one of the movies. I remember I liked it. This book is probably enjoyed a lot more by fans of her books. She refers to different places and people in her real life that had influence on her writings. I think I'll read the books. It makes sense that part of her motivation for writing this was to encourage other writers. So I guess I am part of the intended audience; I've attempted to write from time to time. Montgomery didn't give up despite numerous rejections. She worked very hard and continually submitted her work. Also, it's interesting what she used from her real life. She generally changed names of places and people, but not always. I like the autobiographical aspects of this book. Clearly she was a sensitive and extremely imaginative child. She acknowledges that helped shape her career. Her descriptions of Prince Edward Island is what will stick with me. I'd love to see the red sand, green vegetation, and the trees surrounded by the turquoise sea. I looked up images of the island and now I want to visit! I've long wanted to go to Nova Scotia. My husband put the destination on our wish list. I like how she shares her visit to Britain and how, compared to the descriptions of certain places she'd read about in books, the actual places weren't as grand. She preferred her imagined version. Ha! I relate. It shows that we as readers really are co-creators of what we read. I live near the mountains, so I appreciate this quote written about part of her journey to Scotland: "If I were to live near mountains for any length of time I should learn to love them almost as much as I love the sea."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emilia

    This autobiography includes memories from Montgomery's childhood and also brief explanations about her writing rituals. There are many descriptions of P.E.I and they are all delightful and beautiful, as you would expect from her. Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy the excerpts from her journals, as they were not related to her writing. The most surprising fact was discovering that her favorite book was The story girl. I wish she had given us information about Emily of New Moon, but The Alpine Path This autobiography includes memories from Montgomery's childhood and also brief explanations about her writing rituals. There are many descriptions of P.E.I and they are all delightful and beautiful, as you would expect from her. Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy the excerpts from her journals, as they were not related to her writing. The most surprising fact was discovering that her favorite book was The story girl. I wish she had given us information about Emily of New Moon, but The Alpine Path was written before Emily existed.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ren (A Bookish Balance)

    3.25/5 Probably the weakest of the L.M. Montgomery books I've picked up due to pacing and structure issues. Montgomery as expected for the most part glosses over the difficult parts of her life. The last few chapters are bogged down by her journal entries and honeymoon experiences, which I unfortunately was not interested in. I do really appreciate seeing where certain scenes from The Story Girl and Anne of Green Gables originated, and I probably would have enjoyed this a lot more had I read it b 3.25/5 Probably the weakest of the L.M. Montgomery books I've picked up due to pacing and structure issues. Montgomery as expected for the most part glosses over the difficult parts of her life. The last few chapters are bogged down by her journal entries and honeymoon experiences, which I unfortunately was not interested in. I do really appreciate seeing where certain scenes from The Story Girl and Anne of Green Gables originated, and I probably would have enjoyed this a lot more had I read it before reading House of Dreams.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I love her books, so I thought I would loving reading her autobiography. The descriptions of her girlhood were sweet and read very much like her novels. The book, however, lacked introspection. I don't feel as if I know her any better after reading this book than I already knew her. Perhaps I need a biography . . . ? I love her books, so I thought I would loving reading her autobiography. The descriptions of her girlhood were sweet and read very much like her novels. The book, however, lacked introspection. I don't feel as if I know her any better after reading this book than I already knew her. Perhaps I need a biography . . . ?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liz B

    I listened to all of the Anne books in 2010 (minus Windy Poplars and Anne of Ingleside, which are not available as recorded books), which made me more interested in Montgomery's life & career. This was a very quick and fascinating read. I listened to all of the Anne books in 2010 (minus Windy Poplars and Anne of Ingleside, which are not available as recorded books), which made me more interested in Montgomery's life & career. This was a very quick and fascinating read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shreya Ganguly

    Lucy Maud Montgomery is one of my favorite authors and she is the renowned author of Anne of Green Gables as well as several other novels, short stories, and poems. Her memoir, The Alpine Path was published as a series of articles in 1917. This book is seventy pages in length and can easily be read in one sitting. The Alpine Path delineates the story of Maud's career from her childhood and teenage years when she developed her insatiable love for literature and writing, her family traditions on P Lucy Maud Montgomery is one of my favorite authors and she is the renowned author of Anne of Green Gables as well as several other novels, short stories, and poems. Her memoir, The Alpine Path was published as a series of articles in 1917. This book is seventy pages in length and can easily be read in one sitting. The Alpine Path delineates the story of Maud's career from her childhood and teenage years when she developed her insatiable love for literature and writing, her family traditions on Prince Edward Island, furthering her education, her first publications, writing amid her hectic schedule as a teacher, writing her first novel, and her honeymoon in England and Scotland with her husband, Ewan Macdonald. This book is about climbing the alpine path, a long and treacherous path to journey with tenacity and endeavor along with great toil to ultimately lead to a divine state of happiness. Maud's autobiographical character, Emily Starr from the Emily trilogy also ascends the alpine path. This journey of The Alpine Path was inspired from a poem that Maud read in a magazine as a teenager. Maud particularly was stern about her reputation being affected, and therefore did not write about her long and arduous years of depression and mental illness, which began at a young age. This personal story really commences with the Presbyterian families of the Macneills and Montgomerys fleeing Scotland to settle on the hills and farms in rural communities of Prince Edward Island, an island once belonging to the British Isles and would soon be annexed as a Canadian province. There is the tale of Maud's paternal great-grandmother, a seasick woman exploring the island with her husband, and the horrifying account of the inscriptions on the graveyard and her maternal uncle, Hector Macneill, a Scottish poet, through whom Maud inherited her writing talent from. Maud was born to Hugh John Montgomery and Clara Macneill in 1874, being a namesake of her maternal grandmother, Lucy Woolner Macneill, and Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Alice Maud Mary. Maud always preferred being called by her middle name, Maud. Lucy was a name she never liked or used. Three months short of her second birthday, Maud's mother, Clara died of tuberculosis and she was left in care of her maternal grandparents in Cavendish. She vividly remembers her earliest memory of the cold touch where she lay her hand on her mother's coffin and she wondered why her mother was so still, cold, and grave and why her father was crying. She later learned what the world called death. At the Macneill Homestead in Cavendish, Maud had her place for dreaming. She came from a family of storytellers; her maternal grandfather, Alexander Macneill narrated the tale of Cape LeForce on Cavendish beach. Her great-aunt, Mary Lawson was a skilled storyteller who had a brilliant memory and was an eloquent conversationalist, having the capacity for amusing stories. Maud's novel, The Story Girl includes many of Mary Lawson's tales. At the age of five, Maud was infected with typhoid fever and confused Mrs. Murphy for being her grandmother. There is the incident of James and William Forbes, calling her Johnny and Maud learned the lesson to never tease a child. She drew upon this experience with Gilbert Blythe accidentally vexing Anne Shirley about her red hair in Anne of Green Gables. The Judgement Sunday in The Story Girl was an actual occurrence in Maud's life where she feared that the world would end on Sunday afternoon because she believed every word that was printed. Peg Bowen from The Story Girl was one of Maud's only characters taken directly from her own life because she was the local witch in town used to scare children. Nevertheless, she added flavors to this character and painted it as a free lily. At the age of seven, Maud's father moved to Saskatchewan and remarried and her Aunt Emily also left to get married. This certainly left our Maud to be lonely and desolate, but she found comfort in her visits to Park Corner where she would spend hours with her cousin, Frederica Campbell. Charlottetown was simply a lovely city. At this time, Maud invented imaginary worlds and had the comfort of her imagined friends that lived in the cupboard glass, Katie Maurice and Lucy Gray. She could also read fluently and understand poetry well compared to her schoolmates and found joy in occasional scribblings that would form the basis for her writing. She did not have a great many novels at home when she was young but she constantly reread The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, Rob Roy by Sir Walter Scott, and Zanoni by Edward Bulwer-Lytton and pored over these volumes until she knew them by heart. Novels were frowned upon as reading material for children, but poetry did not share this ban. Therefore, she extensively read poetry and it influenced her writing style for her life. Soon enough, Well and Dave Nelson, two orphaned boys came to live with her family for the four jolly years. Their golden days were whimsical and delightful and they had the habit of imagining haunted woods, which would again appear in Anne of Green Gables. At the age of nine, the events of the shipwreck of Marco Polo came and Maud wrote her first poem, Autumn. After her father's disappointment, she wrote The Monarch of the Forest to please him. At the age of eleven, she started a story club with her friends, Amanda Macneill and Alma Simpson, which happened to also be included in the Anne of Green Gables story. She focused her attention on the stories, My Graves and The History of Flossy Briteyes. Her first few stories were tragic where most of the characters would be killed. At the age of twelve, she wrote another poem, Evening Dreams and she spent most of her thirteenth year trying to publish it, but every literary magazine rejected it. The next years were spent on writing and polishing her composition style. At the age of fifteen, she was sent off to Saskatchewan for a year to live with her father and her stepmother, Mary Ann McRae. She was primarily used as a maid and was tormented by her stepmother. She began to experience chronic headaches and was dependent on writing for comfort and escape. Her poem, On Cape LeForce, was published in the Charlottetown Patriot during her sixteenth year. Her essay about her visit to the plains of Western Canada was published in The Prince Albert Times that spring. Upon her return to Prince Edward Island, Maud wrote children's stories for Sunday school magazines and began studying for the Prince of Wales College entrance exams. During her year at Prince of Wales College, Maud studied an arts and humanities degree with teacher's training to earn her teaching certificate by the end of the year. That spring, her poem, The Violet's Spell was published in the Toronto Ladies World Journal. She spent her first year teaching at Bideford. While teaching, she could easily find time to write stories and poems. The next year was spent studying literature at Dalhousie University. During this year, Maud earned her first five-dollar check from a literary magazine for a poem. She spent the next two years teaching at Belmont and Lower Bedeque. After the death of her maternal grandfather, Maud returned to Cavendish to care for her widowed grandmother and she took up writing as a full-time career. Periodicals and magazines began requesting new work from her. In 1901, she worked as an editor in Halifax for nine months. A few years later, she began writing Anne of Green Gables. She did not want to waste her endearing character on an ephemeral serial. Instead, she wrote it as her first novel. After five rejections, Anne of Green Gables was published and Maud wrote her next few novels. She wrote a sequel, Anne of Avonlea, a stand-alone novel, Kilmeny of the Orchard, and another novel, The Story Girl. After her marriage to Ewan Macdonald, she visited the many literary locations in Europe. The book ceases with hope and Maud expressing that she is now very near ultimate happiness. I could relate with this memoir because I am an author and I love weaving stories, writing up verses, and elucidating thoughts through words. Maud was so actuating and she desperately wanted to convey that writing must be out of love, not constant desire for fame and glory.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ❀ Susan G

    As a huge fan of the Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon collection, I was happy to find a kobo bargain and download her entire works... over 13000 pages of of her beautifully written tales, many set in Prince Edward Island. The last book of this collection was her own story (or at least that of her early life and up until she left PEI for Ontario after her marriage). It was interesting to learn of how many rejections she had received for the beloved Anne of Green Gables and to learn that As a huge fan of the Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon collection, I was happy to find a kobo bargain and download her entire works... over 13000 pages of of her beautifully written tales, many set in Prince Edward Island. The last book of this collection was her own story (or at least that of her early life and up until she left PEI for Ontario after her marriage). It was interesting to learn of how many rejections she had received for the beloved Anne of Green Gables and to learn that she had read a news story where an elderly couple had received an orphan of the wrong gender. I enjoyed learning a little bit more about LMM and will continue reading the tales that I have not yet enjoyed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    stephanie suh

    As one of millions of readers in the world who have loved Canada's most famous red-haired Anne of Green Gables both in books, films, and animation, I have always admired Anne's creator, Lucy Maud Montgomery's choice of words and illustrative descriptions of characters, things, and situations that make the story at once vivaciously realistic and fantastically romantic. Naturally, when I came across this book by the author herself, I knew I had to read it with heart to find out more about her ont As one of millions of readers in the world who have loved Canada's most famous red-haired Anne of Green Gables both in books, films, and animation, I have always admired Anne's creator, Lucy Maud Montgomery's choice of words and illustrative descriptions of characters, things, and situations that make the story at once vivaciously realistic and fantastically romantic. Naturally, when I came across this book by the author herself, I knew I had to read it with heart to find out more about her ont only on a professional but a personal levels. The Alpine Path is her autobiography, originally published as a series of her essays in the Toronto magazine Everywoman's World in 1917 at the request of its editor to write about her writing career. In fact, Montgomery did not think it as a "career" but something of a niche where she wouldalways find comfort, happiness, and life itself abounded with the memories of beautiful Prince Edward Island whose chaste and restive loveliness was unsurpassed. Added to her natural affinity for words was her incessant diligence in practicing writing on a daily basis. Her topics of wiring ranged from scribbling her thoughts and feelings to biographic accounts of her cats and critical book reviews. Of all her fortes that enabled her to arrive as a writer, it was her indefatigable will combined with, commendable perseverance and brilliant imaginativeness, all grouping around her indomitable aspiration to become a writer, as discerned in her narrative. Montgomery believed in herself and struggled in secrecy and silence by making writing activities strictly private because deep down, under all rejections, discouragement, and rebuff, she knew she would arrive as a writer someday. What makes Montgomery's books entertaining and approachable to readers of all ages are her ideas of a good story that consists of the following components: (1) absence of a moral undertone in a story lest it should be a didactic textbook or a fable strips of literary merits and entertainment because literature should be "art for art's sake and fun for fun's sake"; and (2) use of imagination, which is a powerful tool to create a world of make-believe, based upon studying people and observing scenery in life to render realistic feelings to the imaginary world of fiction. To Montgomery, making use of the real to perfect the ideal is what gives to art its true meaning. To illustrate, the famous liniment cake episode that happened when Anne made the selfsame cake by accident for the parson and his wife was based upon her own experience as a school teacher in Bideford boarding at the Methodist parsonage there; the parson's wife mistakenly put liniment in a cake, but only the parson himself did not recognize it. Also, while working as a reporter for The Daily Echo in Halifax, she was often asked to write up a society letter when it was not sent by the requested lady of high society. Montgomery used her wide scope of imagination by writing such letter as if she were the lady of high society, which gained popularity from readers. As Benjamin Franklin once said, "Heaven helps those who help themselves," Montgomery's unyielding will and diligent practice of writing everyday were the sine qua non of her meet reward as a successful writer. This light volumed, charming autobiography is a must read for not only fans of her books but also those who love writing and cherish in secret the thought of becoming writers. Or those who are struggling to rise above the planes of biological, psychological, or sociological inhibition through what means they deem aspirational and meaningful to achieve will find a kindred spirit in this book. Montgomery encourages her readers to climb up the alpine path so steep, so hard that will eventually lead to the height sublime as she once did. I

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey Clark

    This kind of thing is always hard to review; how do you critique the way someone remembers their life? It's very personal. Thankfully ol' Luce will never read this. Anyway, I was really looking forward to this book after a trip to Cavendish over the summer, visiting Green Gables and making the walk over to where L. M. Montgomery's house originally stood. The guides there are awesome and extremely knowledgeable, being relations to the author (great great great nephew or something?) and told her st This kind of thing is always hard to review; how do you critique the way someone remembers their life? It's very personal. Thankfully ol' Luce will never read this. Anyway, I was really looking forward to this book after a trip to Cavendish over the summer, visiting Green Gables and making the walk over to where L. M. Montgomery's house originally stood. The guides there are awesome and extremely knowledgeable, being relations to the author (great great great nephew or something?) and told her story really wonderfully. I picked this up with hopes of filling in some more details, but it was kind of lacklustre. My main issue was how long this book is - which may seem strange, seeing as it's a tiny little thing. But it really felt like Montgomery was stretching for content, particularly in the last two parts, which she borrows a lot from her own travel journals. This part really didn't entertain me or give much insight into how these travels affected her writing career. It was like she was contracted out for the 10 parts of this book (they were originally published in a series in a newspaper, I think the intro said), and realized she was running out of stuff. The earlier chapters didn't do much else for me. Her childhood memories were probably nice if you were more into Anne of Green Gables and Montgomery's other works; I feel like they definitely would have given a little insight into some of the real life inspirations for her fictional world. But as a person who hasn't really read any of her work in a good fifteen years or more, I found these recollections a little dull. The more interesting parts, for me, were the sections Montgomery talked about her initial attempts at getting published and her perseverance when success did not come immediately. Her drive is palpable and makes you want to go out and chase your own aspirations. The editing on this little piece was pretty horrid; there was some strange punctuation which I found very jarring. The writing itself wasn't awful, nor was it terribly great. So all in all, I'd say fans should give this one a look, but otherwise, give it a pass.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Rash

    This was a very interesting little book! It didn't make me feel as close to Lucy as I hoped it might, but I did learn a lot about her. In reading the snippets of her childhood and chunks of her journals, I am more certain of the likeness between her character Emily Starr and herself. There seemed to be less about her career than one would expect, and the entries of her honeymoon got a little long and seemed out of place. Still, a good book; Lucy writes just as beautifully about herself as she di This was a very interesting little book! It didn't make me feel as close to Lucy as I hoped it might, but I did learn a lot about her. In reading the snippets of her childhood and chunks of her journals, I am more certain of the likeness between her character Emily Starr and herself. There seemed to be less about her career than one would expect, and the entries of her honeymoon got a little long and seemed out of place. Still, a good book; Lucy writes just as beautifully about herself as she did her characters, and captures the feelings and colors of all her years spent climbing The Alpine Path.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Rae

    I loved it! But perhaps it was too early in life to wrote an autobiography....she ended so abruptly with her trip to Europe and announcement she was moving to Toronto with her husband. But her charming writing style continued to...well...charm me, Haha! Loved hearing a bit about her childhood, and her plight to become a novelist. And I haven't actually read The Story Girl yet, but upon learning it's her favourite of her own books, I'm eager to pick it up! Good to read if you're an Anne/L.M. Mont I loved it! But perhaps it was too early in life to wrote an autobiography....she ended so abruptly with her trip to Europe and announcement she was moving to Toronto with her husband. But her charming writing style continued to...well...charm me, Haha! Loved hearing a bit about her childhood, and her plight to become a novelist. And I haven't actually read The Story Girl yet, but upon learning it's her favourite of her own books, I'm eager to pick it up! Good to read if you're an Anne/L.M. Montgomery fan!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Vogel

    What a delightful, flowery story of hard work and determination as only L.M. Montgomery could write. It was fun to hear about her childhood, where the ideas for some of her characters came from, and all about her honeymoon in Scotland. It was helpful to read near the internet so I could look up the beautiful places that she referenced. If you like L.M. Montgomery, you will love this quick read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

    I've been a fan of L. M. Montgomery since I first read Anne of Green Gables as a child. I can't believe that it took me so long to pick up this little memoir. It is a very quick read but full of the lovely prose you expect from Ms. Montgomery. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in this author's life in her own words. Reading her journals will definitely be next on my list. I've been a fan of L. M. Montgomery since I first read Anne of Green Gables as a child. I can't believe that it took me so long to pick up this little memoir. It is a very quick read but full of the lovely prose you expect from Ms. Montgomery. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in this author's life in her own words. Reading her journals will definitely be next on my list.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Salma

    Short, beautiful, inspiring- just like one of her better short stories. Only- it began to drag a little after she started talking about her married life- hope that wasn't a metaphor for something. :-( Short, beautiful, inspiring- just like one of her better short stories. Only- it began to drag a little after she started talking about her married life- hope that wasn't a metaphor for something. :-(

  27. 4 out of 5

    Weathervane

    Nice insight into Montgomery's mind and career, though the section describing her visit to the British Isles was a little out of place. Nice insight into Montgomery's mind and career, though the section describing her visit to the British Isles was a little out of place.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Robyn Rosencutter

    Very interesting to read a memoir in her own words, however it seemed oddly scattered. I have to wonder if it was heavily edited to remove the negative aspects of her life, as her journals were.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    As whimsical and fanciful as Anne herself

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I loved this book so much! It was like a letter from a very cherished friend from beyond the grave. I was lucky to read this book whilst on a camping trip in a rainforest by a waterhole that had a waterfall running into it, and it was the perfect setting for reading a book about/by someone who swooned so much over the beauties of the natural world. If you're an Anne of Green Gables/Emily of New Moon fan this is a must read. Lots of stories about her upbringing, which draw a lot of parallels with I loved this book so much! It was like a letter from a very cherished friend from beyond the grave. I was lucky to read this book whilst on a camping trip in a rainforest by a waterhole that had a waterfall running into it, and it was the perfect setting for reading a book about/by someone who swooned so much over the beauties of the natural world. If you're an Anne of Green Gables/Emily of New Moon fan this is a must read. Lots of stories about her upbringing, which draw a lot of parallels with Annes/Emilys. Her mum died when she was 21 months old, and she was raised by her grandparents, and loved letting her imagination run away from her, and naming trees, lanes, lakes etc just like her characters do. Also the tale of her progression as a writer, and the writing of Anne of Green Gables, and diary entries from her honeymoon. Short, but charming.

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