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The Love You Make: An Insider's Story of the Beatles

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Here is the national bestseller that Newsday called “the most authoritative and candid look yet at the personal lives…of the oft-scrutinized group.” In The Love You Make, Peter Brown, a close friend of and business manager for the band—and the best man at John and Yoko’s wedding—presents a complete look at the dramatic offstage odyssey of the four lads from Liverpool who e Here is the national bestseller that Newsday called “the most authoritative and candid look yet at the personal lives…of the oft-scrutinized group.” In The Love You Make, Peter Brown, a close friend of and business manager for the band—and the best man at John and Yoko’s wedding—presents a complete look at the dramatic offstage odyssey of the four lads from Liverpool who established the greatest music phenomenon of the twentieth century. Written with the full cooperation of each of the group’s members and their intimates, this book tells the inside story of the music and the madness, the feuds and the drugs, the marriages and the affairs—from the greatest heights to the self-destructive depths of the Fab Four.  In-depth and definitive, The Love You Make is an astonishing account of four men who transformed the way a whole generation of young people thought and lived. It reigns as the most comprehensive, revealing biography available of John, Paul, George, and Ringo.   Includes 32 pages of rare and revealing photos A Literary Guild® Alternate Selection  


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Here is the national bestseller that Newsday called “the most authoritative and candid look yet at the personal lives…of the oft-scrutinized group.” In The Love You Make, Peter Brown, a close friend of and business manager for the band—and the best man at John and Yoko’s wedding—presents a complete look at the dramatic offstage odyssey of the four lads from Liverpool who e Here is the national bestseller that Newsday called “the most authoritative and candid look yet at the personal lives…of the oft-scrutinized group.” In The Love You Make, Peter Brown, a close friend of and business manager for the band—and the best man at John and Yoko’s wedding—presents a complete look at the dramatic offstage odyssey of the four lads from Liverpool who established the greatest music phenomenon of the twentieth century. Written with the full cooperation of each of the group’s members and their intimates, this book tells the inside story of the music and the madness, the feuds and the drugs, the marriages and the affairs—from the greatest heights to the self-destructive depths of the Fab Four.  In-depth and definitive, The Love You Make is an astonishing account of four men who transformed the way a whole generation of young people thought and lived. It reigns as the most comprehensive, revealing biography available of John, Paul, George, and Ringo.   Includes 32 pages of rare and revealing photos A Literary Guild® Alternate Selection  

30 review for The Love You Make: An Insider's Story of the Beatles

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Basto

    I loved this book! Actually, I read it aloud to my husband each evening and we enjoyed it very much. This is a book on everything you didn't know about the Beatles and everything perhaps you are really not sure you want to know about the Beatles. Peter Brown was an insider into the Beatles' beginnings, a manager at Apple and follows them through the dissolution of the group. The book begins with their early lives in Liverpool, their Hamburg gigs and their entry into the London pop world. Brown re I loved this book! Actually, I read it aloud to my husband each evening and we enjoyed it very much. This is a book on everything you didn't know about the Beatles and everything perhaps you are really not sure you want to know about the Beatles. Peter Brown was an insider into the Beatles' beginnings, a manager at Apple and follows them through the dissolution of the group. The book begins with their early lives in Liverpool, their Hamburg gigs and their entry into the London pop world. Brown really emphasizes each of the Beatles' unique personalities. John, the angry and often rude "working class hero", George the young, underage brat, Ringo the most normal of the four northern blokes and of course Paul. Paul clearly was the most different of the fab four. He always aspired to be more cultured, more in tune with society and what was expected of him. Image was everything to Paul and he couldn't abide to have his image tarnished. After several pot busts with Linda, he still managed to maintain a fairly clean cut image. There are so many juicy tidbits to this story. The section on how Yoko moved in on the married John and became obsessed with making him her own, the sexist manner in which George flatly refused Patty Boyd his wife to have a career and was just happy to have her cooking at home. Of course, along came Eric Clapton to steal Patty away from George. Then there was Ringo's wife Maureen who ended up sleeping with George! It is clear that although the Beatles moved on to become one of the most famous bands ever, they could not get that "northern man" mentality out of them. After all, they still were products of the fifties. There was no taking the Liverpool out of these guys! It's sad toward the end when Paul tried to reconcile with John right before his death, that John flatly refused anything to do with Paul. He was so enmeshed with Yoko that if anyone rejected her, he'd have nothing to do with them as well. Many people blame Yoko for the Beatles breakup. However, according to Brown, Paul and the Eastmans had a great deal to contribute to the growing animosity between the four. Paul really tried to take control, treated the group as if he were in charge and demanded his own way. So many things went right at times for the Beatles but so many things went terribly wrong! Mismanagement and greedy folks taking advantage of the Beatles as well as the ever present "taxman" of England wiped them clean time and again. They were so young when they started off and it was amazing to follow their personal growth, who they were involved with and the book dispels so many of the Beatles' myths out there. This was truly an eye opener, a truly FAB read!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Georgette

    Still the best Beatles book I've ever read(and I have read many!) Still the best Beatles book I've ever read(and I have read many!)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    2.5 stars -- On the book jacket of the edition I am reading, Paul looks ready to punch the photographer, George looks disgusted, Ringo seems despondent and John looks as if he’s plotting something evil. This will give you a clue of what’s inside THE LOVE YOU MAKE, one of the most controversial Beatles biographies. While some have painted it as a shag-a-minute scandal sheet, it isn’t really. That said, the writer peppers the pages with exasperating phrases such as “revealed here for the first tim 2.5 stars -- On the book jacket of the edition I am reading, Paul looks ready to punch the photographer, George looks disgusted, Ringo seems despondent and John looks as if he’s plotting something evil. This will give you a clue of what’s inside THE LOVE YOU MAKE, one of the most controversial Beatles biographies. While some have painted it as a shag-a-minute scandal sheet, it isn’t really. That said, the writer peppers the pages with exasperating phrases such as “revealed here for the first time” and tries to recreate conversations and scenes he admittedly wasn’t within miles of. I don’t think Peter Brown wrote the book either, but rather suspect it was written almost entirely by his collaborator. When a mistake jumped out at me within the first couple of pages, I knew right off the bat that other reviewers’ warnings of the large number of factual errors would hold true. -The author describes John sitting in his sunroom at Kenwood, under a cabinet with a decal reading “MILK IS GOOD.” Photos of John’s sunroom are a dime a dozen, and the decal clearly reads “SAFE AS MILK.” (This was on page 2!) -When George auditions for the group, we are told he played a song named “Ranchee” for them in a bar, and the other band members are unimpressed. Erm, actually, the song is called RAUNCHY, he played it on the top seats of a double-decker bus, and the guys are very impressed—this is recounted many times in interviews with the Beatles themselves! -When John, George, and their wives are unwittingly dosed with LSD by the dentist, the author attributes the quote “you can sit by me only if you don’t talk,” to Pattie Harrison, when in actuality it was John who said that…once again, this is recounted in later interviews with John. -When Brian Epstein dies while the Beatles are studying with the Maharishi, the author maintains that they responded with stupid and flippant quotes to the press. Did he see a different film than I have? What I see is a group of human beings who are profoundly shocked, staring and stuttering at the throng of reporters, as any of us would be upon hearing such awful news. -The author messes up both the title and lyrics of Paul’s song “Too Many People.” -The Yoko, Inc. story of John’s househusband phase is accepted without question. After the Lost Weekend, we are told, he never again touched drugs in favor of carting around a toddler and baking bread. According to John himself and just about everyone besides Yoko, this wasn’t the case. -In a Dewey-defeats-Truman moment, the writer mocks Neil Aspinall’s work collecting Beatles archival footage as a “pathetic project.” This turned out to be the Beatles Anthology! These are just everyday things I caught. I’m not an expert. I can’t tell you what Ringo had for breakfast on Jan. 3, 1967 like some folks seemingly can. There are no doubt many more mistakes that the Beatleologists have caught. At the same time, some of the things that were probably scandalous at the book’s release have now been confirmed by others and passed into the canon of accepted fact, like that Yoko stalked John for months, trying to get his attention and art patronage before he began paying attention to her. With such a mishmash of solid info and flights of fancy, the real shame in this book is that it’s so hard to separate the two. There’s a roaring fantastic Lennon quote from when the Beatles visit Greece—“What good is the Parthenon without LSD?” yet because of this book’s untrustworthy nature readers have no idea if it’s true or not. I also laughed out loud at Aunt Mimi snapping at George’s mother Louise, “You thing! We’d all have had lovely peaceful lives but for you encouraging them!” Yet once again, I have no idea if it’s real. The author can offer up a funny turn of phrase, too, such as “There was also more baggism [sic], in which [John and Yoko] appeared inside large canvas bags and made noises at public events.” Is THE LOVE YOU MAKE mean to the Beatles? At times it indeed is, but it’s not the character smear offered up by some people like Goldman. I’d argue that it’s meaner to Brian Epstein, especially written as it was in a far more homophobic time. Should Beatles fans read this book? Sure, but don’t make it the first or only Beatles book you read—get a good grip on the facts first. And be sure to take it all with a shovelful of salt, as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    I just remember hating this one - Peter Brown seemed to remember all the bad times and the miserable anecdotes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    East Bay J

    I read this 1983 Beatle bio many years ago and decided to give it another read. I don't remember what I thought at the time but, this time around, I thought, "Oh, the misery." According to Peter Brown, being a Beatle was a nightmare. This is likely due in no small part to the fact that Brown and Gaines managed to include every negative aspect of every member in this cast of characters. Brian hates his homosexuality, Paul is greedy, George is a lothario, Ringo is a third rate Beatle, John is an as I read this 1983 Beatle bio many years ago and decided to give it another read. I don't remember what I thought at the time but, this time around, I thought, "Oh, the misery." According to Peter Brown, being a Beatle was a nightmare. This is likely due in no small part to the fact that Brown and Gaines managed to include every negative aspect of every member in this cast of characters. Brian hates his homosexuality, Paul is greedy, George is a lothario, Ringo is a third rate Beatle, John is an asshole, Yoko has serious emotional problems, etc. On and on, page after page of tabloid gossip and sadness. My understanding is that a lot of these people granted interviews and disclosed tons of personal information only to find themselves essentially trashed. Brown was more or less cut off from The Beatles and their inner circle following the book's publication. After the picture painted by the authors, it's hard to imagine any other reaction. On the other hand, it is of value to note that The Beatles and friends were not mythical beings. They were very human with myriad human flaws. John really was an asshole, making fun of the handicapped, beating his wives, being the perfect absentee father to Julian. Eventually, after lots of mysticism and primal scream therapy, he found some kind of peace and began to make amends in his life. Had Chapman not cut Lennon's life short, a great tale of redemption may have played out. As it is, Brown denigrates each of Lennon's efforts as each being "The Next Big Thing," making light of the spiritual journey Lennon was trying to undertake. He treats all The Beatles this way and all their friends and business associates. In the end, you just don't get a complete picture. This is a very quick and easy read for being just shy of 400 pages long. Anyone interested in the dirty little secrets will enjoy this book. Those seeking insight into who The Beatles were, however, will get only a drab, poorly executed caricature.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Ozawa

    Fame does some crazy things to people. Sometimes famous people started out as straight-up rotten (looking at you, Lennon) and sometimes people have the rotten foisted on them, and sometimes they stay sane, but the Beatles seem to have all the bad stuff as a common denominator. The author was a Beatles insider and so has some things to say that other Beatle books don’t. At times, the tone is a little breathless and exploitative but it’s otherwise a good time.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julie_ian_curtis

    Apart from a day in the life this is one of the greatest Beatles books ever written and fuck you if you don't agree Apart from a day in the life this is one of the greatest Beatles books ever written and fuck you if you don't agree

  8. 4 out of 5

    James M.

    As I was reading through the five star reviews about this book, I came across one which read "...this is one of the greatest Beatles books ever written nd (sic) fuck you if you don't agree." Well, I guess that was intended for me because I don't agree. The actual title of the book should have been "And Here, For The First Time" because of the frequency with which that phrase is used. Although it does contain some interesting anecdotes, it's difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff because As I was reading through the five star reviews about this book, I came across one which read "...this is one of the greatest Beatles books ever written nd (sic) fuck you if you don't agree." Well, I guess that was intended for me because I don't agree. The actual title of the book should have been "And Here, For The First Time" because of the frequency with which that phrase is used. Although it does contain some interesting anecdotes, it's difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff because of the many errors invoked in this book. For example: 1) "Starr Time" was not the point at which Ringo played a drum solo with Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. Ringo always eschewed drum solos. He practically had to be forced to play one on "The End" on "Abbey Road." "Starr Time" was actually the point at which Ringo sang a song. B) Brown recounts the worn out tale from John's childhood when his Father was sailing for New Zealand and allegedly forced John to choose between his Mother, Julia, and him. This story was probably perpetuated by John himself but was debunked in Lewisohn's "Tune In." 3) John's primal screaming "Moooooother," at the end of his song "Mother" from the first Plastic Ono Band album. In reality, he sings "Mama don't go" and, with every verse, screams on the word "go." Errors such as these drive the Beatlemaniac in me crazy and cause me to be skeptical of the rest of the stories told by Mr. Brown. However, I still gave it three stars because it's a book about the Beatles and, as they sing in "She Loves You," you know that can't be bad.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark Mywords

    Complete and utter CRAP. Just look at the pic of the author on the back (original) cover......and this will be no surprise. Fantastical garbage, written as if the author was somehow a little (retarded and very dishonest) bird, sitting nearby EVERYONE, at EVERY moment mentioned in this book. And somehow able to hear and memorize everything. It also speaks lies about Paul. If you are a true Beatle fan......stay far away from this bound joke of daft drivel, it will anger you (if you have any good s Complete and utter CRAP. Just look at the pic of the author on the back (original) cover......and this will be no surprise. Fantastical garbage, written as if the author was somehow a little (retarded and very dishonest) bird, sitting nearby EVERYONE, at EVERY moment mentioned in this book. And somehow able to hear and memorize everything. It also speaks lies about Paul. If you are a true Beatle fan......stay far away from this bound joke of daft drivel, it will anger you (if you have any good sense at all).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Did not finish. Thought there would be more insight into the music and songwriting and less about the personal lives of the band.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

    The Beatles are my favorite band and I went through a period of obsession with them during my high school years, which had tapered off for a while although I'll always love them. This was the perfect book to return to at age 25 when I hadn't read or thought much about them in several years. What I loved immediately about this book was it's honesty and portrayal of The Beatles as real, flawed people. All too often I had seen them caricatured as the cutesy, loveable mop tops, so it was refreshing The Beatles are my favorite band and I went through a period of obsession with them during my high school years, which had tapered off for a while although I'll always love them. This was the perfect book to return to at age 25 when I hadn't read or thought much about them in several years. What I loved immediately about this book was it's honesty and portrayal of The Beatles as real, flawed people. All too often I had seen them caricatured as the cutesy, loveable mop tops, so it was refreshing to read this book which confirmed many of the rumors that I previously had only heard vague hints of. I think for some people this would destroy the "fantasy" of them but I am in favor of that, although I may be biased because there's probably nothing new I could learn that would make me love The Beatles any less. The best part of this book, in my opinion, is the anecdotes. Some are hilarious, some are shocking, all of them are interesting to read. I couldn't put the book down--it was like reading a fast paced fiction novel with favorite characters who I already knew and loved. "Truth is stranger than fiction" would apply to many of the events early in The Beatles career, especially during their touring days. Another high point of this book for me was it's focus on Brian Epstein and Cynthia Lennon, so often put on the sidelines in other publications about The Beatles but both incredibly fascinating people who I learned so much about. Of course I had always respected Brian Epstein in an abstract way, but after this book I feel a stronger emotional connection to thinking about what he was like as his own person. About halfway through the book I could not deny my growing frustration with it's neglect of George, Ringo, and even Paul, which would only grow stronger the more I read. In fact, the author's stark honesty doesn't always cast them in the best light either and I think he could have done more to remedy that or make the book appear less biased. John is definitely treated as the most interesting Beatle in this book, and his faults are often tempered with portrayals of his redeeming qualities, but the author does not extend that courtesy to the other three. And I definitely don't mind reading that much about John, but I thought this book was out of balance--I feel motivated to read the biography of George I have sitting at home now. My only other complaint about this book is that the lengthy descriptions of legal proceedings and "money issues" can get dry and boring after a while (although initially it's pretty shocking what kind of messes they got into). Other than that, I would recommend this book to any Beatles fan. To revisit one of my old favorite stories as an adult and to learn so much new information made it an incredibly interesting and exciting read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Russo

    Well written book. Very informative behind the scenes details in the Beatles covering nearly 20 years to johns murder in 1980. As a true blue Beatles fan though, it was sad to read much if the behind the scene details of their breakup, financial issues, Yoko, drugs, Maharishi, lawsuits, Epstein and many other issues. Beatles fan know the musically journey but this tells the hidden journey.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Craig Rowland

    I bought The Love You Make: An Insider's Story of the Beatles by Peter Brown and Steven Gaines in 1983 when I was seventeen and at the height of my Beatlemania craze. I bought anything associated with the Beatles, regardless of merit. If it had the Beatles' name on it, I got it. With so much Beatles stuff on the market in the early eighties, I am amazed that I still managed to put myself through university without incurring any debts. The Love You Make caused a scandal when it came out, not just I bought The Love You Make: An Insider's Story of the Beatles by Peter Brown and Steven Gaines in 1983 when I was seventeen and at the height of my Beatlemania craze. I bought anything associated with the Beatles, regardless of merit. If it had the Beatles' name on it, I got it. With so much Beatles stuff on the market in the early eighties, I am amazed that I still managed to put myself through university without incurring any debts. The Love You Make caused a scandal when it came out, not just by its salacious contents but because of who wrote it. Peter Brown, name-dropped in "The Ballad of John and Yoko", was a personal assistant to the Beatles and a member of their inner circle. If anyone had the inside scoop on the Beatles' lives it was Peter Brown. He claimed to have had the authorization from all four of the Beatles to tell their story (having started to write the book in 1979, one year before Lennon's murder), so it made for essential reading. As readers of my blog or my on-line book reviews already know, I often acquire books and then may take years to read them--sometimes decades. In this particular case, it has taken me thirty-five years to finally read this book. Why didn't I read such a scandalous book when it first came out? I was still in high school and had plenty of time for pleasure reading. I certainly read my share of Beatles books back then. I recall that I took some heat from my circle of Beatles friends for having bought this book. And I didn't buy just one copy--I bought three: the original American hardcover edition; the original UK hardcover edition; and the Canadian paperback. I read the paperback. Did I decide not to read it because my friends would disapprove? Did I not want to know the dirt behind the Beatles' image? I cannot answer now why I didn't read the book back then. There is no doubt in my mind that any insider's story of the Beatles would turn the tables on their lovable moptop image. No one should believe that the Beatles were as innocent as their reputation portrayed in press releases. Brown must have witnessed drug and sexual escapades that no one--not even friends of the Beatles and least of all the press--would ever have known about. I don't have a problem with the Beatles experimenting with drugs or sleeping around with a harem of women. I listen to their music, not police their sense of character. Yet Brown and Gaines did lay it on pretty thick, where the Beatles--especially John--are portrayed as stumbling around daily in the latter half of the sixties stoned on weed, LSD and heroin. Brown tries too hard to be scandalous. The constant drug binges would have killed anyone else. The story reads as if Brown needed to create a scandal in order to make it seem interesting. Since I come from reading The Beatles' authorized biography by Hunter Davies only a month ago, the stories are still fresh in my mind and indeed some of them appeared to be lifted word-for-word. Beatles manager Brian Epstein was given a most pathetic portrayal, where he carried an unrequited love for John until his untimely death in 1967. Brown insinuates that the two had a gay affair while vacationing in Spain, but even in 1983 this wasn't news. In spite of Brown being who he was and all the genuine access to the Beatles that he had, The Love You Make was still overrun with errors, many of which were chronological. Other errors misspelled names. It is normally my style to list every mistake an author makes but I just couldn't be bothered this time. Why should I spend my time documenting the factual errors when what I am reading amounts to trash. I just let the mistakes pass. Two examples of how he or Gaines could have prevented errors would have been simply to listen to the albums they were writing about. The authors confused the contents of John and Yoko's first collaborative effort, Unfinished Music No. 1. Two Virgins with their second, Unfinished Music No. 2: Life with the Lions. They also got the lyrics to John's song "Mother" incorrect. Another mistake that made me roll my eyes was this statement: "Although it had certain merits, Let It Be was purely a Phil Spector Wall of Sound Production, with his inimitable backdrop of vast choruses and lavish orchestrations. Paul was mortified by the kitschy female voices--the first female voices ever on a Beatles record--any by what Spector had done to one of his prettiest songs, 'The Long and Winding Road,' which Klein had earmarked as the album's first single." I expect then that neither Brown nor Gaines even listened to the White Album, the popular name for the double album known simply as The Beatles, for there are a number of songs on it which feature women's voices, including "The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill", "Birthday" and "Revolution 9". When Allen Klein entered the scene this was the only time that I felt the book became boring. (Trashy book as it is, I could not put it down.) I found all the talk about taxes, royalties and renegotiated contracts to be confusing as well. The authors sometimes flipflopped between UK pounds and American dollars in the same paragraph. Brown revealed many stories for the first time, and told us so. Was the UK press such a close-knit circle of conspirators that no one wanted to scoop the others by revealing any of this dirt? I found the authors' convenient and overused excuse that the press miraculously kept some events quiet to be beyond my scope of belief. Who has the press at their beck and call to write or withhold writing articles? Why would the press stifle a story about paternity lawsuits or junkie Beatles scoring acid? Were the Beatles so untouchable that the press--every single columnist who ever covered the group--decided at certain times to leave them alone? In spite of when Brown claims to have started writing this book (in 1979), I firmly believe that after John Lennon's assassination he and Gaines (the more experienced rock journalist coauthor) focussed on scandal to sell more books. The Beatles were everywhere in the early eighties, and what better way to direct attention your way among the dozens of tell-all books being published or reprinted at that time but to wholly tarnish the Beatles' image. Now that I have read this book, I have to go back in time thirty-five years and ask myself, why did I buy three copies? Do I even want to keep these three on my bookshelves anymore now that I have read it?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jason A.

    I read this over 20 years ago and it still sticks with me. For a largely first-person account, it's tremendously well-researched, provides intimate behind-the-scenes access to their lives (and finances) and it introduces new characters to Beatles lore (Magic Alex, Mal Evans, etc.). However, I'm not sure if I'd recommend it, mostly because Brown seems to have an axe to grind with Paul McCartney, most notably when he subtly suggests that Paul was responsible for Stu Sutcliffe's death (at least tha I read this over 20 years ago and it still sticks with me. For a largely first-person account, it's tremendously well-researched, provides intimate behind-the-scenes access to their lives (and finances) and it introduces new characters to Beatles lore (Magic Alex, Mal Evans, etc.). However, I'm not sure if I'd recommend it, mostly because Brown seems to have an axe to grind with Paul McCartney, most notably when he subtly suggests that Paul was responsible for Stu Sutcliffe's death (at least that's how I read it two decades ago). Also, he seems to place more than a fair amount of blame for the breakup on Paul, and he seems to have fun dishing about his sexual exploits. That said, if you're looking for a unique perspective into the lives of the Beatles (particularly the business aspect), this is it. If you're interested in gossip, this is it. If you're looking for a fair treatment of the band, allow me to suggest Bob Spitz's The Beatles: The Biography.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

    At the time this was originally published back in 1983 I seem to remember that this insider's perspective on the Beatles was regarded as revelatory. Reading it now though, much of the material seems to have become common currency, and I found the account as a whole mean-spirited and somewhat grubby. Most damagingly Peter Brown pretty much ignores the music - if you take out what actually made the Beatles great then i guess what you end up with is rather more earth-bound, but inherently less inte At the time this was originally published back in 1983 I seem to remember that this insider's perspective on the Beatles was regarded as revelatory. Reading it now though, much of the material seems to have become common currency, and I found the account as a whole mean-spirited and somewhat grubby. Most damagingly Peter Brown pretty much ignores the music - if you take out what actually made the Beatles great then i guess what you end up with is rather more earth-bound, but inherently less interesting, and sort of missing the point. The book is best on Brian Epstein, and has at least motivated me to read A Cellarful of Noise, Brian's own story. For a business perspective on the Beatles I much preferred Peter Doggett's excellent You Never Give Me Your Money, which was both more balanced and written in a far more engaging style. 3 stars - it is not all bad. I'm sure any Beatles fan will find something of worth in here, but it is rather lacking in insight.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Martin Grunseit

    The author (yes, the Peter Brown mentioned in "The Ballad of John and Yoko") was very close to the Beatles throughout their decade of magic, and remained in contact for decades afterwards, too. This doesn't mean that he played favourites or was soft on them at all, and this account truly feels like the nitty gritty, like you are actually there during many crucial hours of the Beatles history, including some of the more sordid ones. The book continues up to and including John's death, and makes a The author (yes, the Peter Brown mentioned in "The Ballad of John and Yoko") was very close to the Beatles throughout their decade of magic, and remained in contact for decades afterwards, too. This doesn't mean that he played favourites or was soft on them at all, and this account truly feels like the nitty gritty, like you are actually there during many crucial hours of the Beatles history, including some of the more sordid ones. The book continues up to and including John's death, and makes a good counterpoint to Geoff Emerick's view from inside the studio chronicled in "Here, There, and Everywhere". Essential reading for the literary Beatles fan, and those interested in the social history of the 60's.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lovely Rita

    An interesting book, though much of what's in it isn't so revolutionary any more. It was still the first book to spill the beans on a lot of the less complimentary stories about the Beatles. It's a little amusing just by it's dated-ness (it came out in '81), since according to the book Pattie Boyd and Eric Clapton are still just as in love as ever. Oh, and the ending is sad. :-( Worth a read for a Beatles fan. There is some info that's not in other sources, but a lot of it is. An interesting book, though much of what's in it isn't so revolutionary any more. It was still the first book to spill the beans on a lot of the less complimentary stories about the Beatles. It's a little amusing just by it's dated-ness (it came out in '81), since according to the book Pattie Boyd and Eric Clapton are still just as in love as ever. Oh, and the ending is sad. :-( Worth a read for a Beatles fan. There is some info that's not in other sources, but a lot of it is.

  18. 4 out of 5

    keith koenigsberg

    A good history of the Beatles, but bloody depressing. The lovable moptops were nasty to everyone, including each other, got a dozen girls pregnant, took a lot of drugs, sued everyone and each other, and were generally not "nice". Especially John. Shattered a lot of my preconceptions about the whole "all you need is love" ethos. There's a lot more here about their business and legal interests than you might want to read, and a lot less about their music. A good history of the Beatles, but bloody depressing. The lovable moptops were nasty to everyone, including each other, got a dozen girls pregnant, took a lot of drugs, sued everyone and each other, and were generally not "nice". Especially John. Shattered a lot of my preconceptions about the whole "all you need is love" ethos. There's a lot more here about their business and legal interests than you might want to read, and a lot less about their music.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dave Glorioso

    Ironic that it is called "The Love You Make". Not much love being made by the four lads. Unless gratuitous sex, drugs and financial folly count for love. Yet, I loved the book. These aren't the cute Beatles you fell in love with. This book shows the demons that destroyed them. Highly recommended. Ironic that it is called "The Love You Make". Not much love being made by the four lads. Unless gratuitous sex, drugs and financial folly count for love. Yet, I loved the book. These aren't the cute Beatles you fell in love with. This book shows the demons that destroyed them. Highly recommended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    bluejeanamy

    I read this in 7th grade and still remember bizarre and inappropriate details I probably didn't need to know in the first place. I read this in 7th grade and still remember bizarre and inappropriate details I probably didn't need to know in the first place.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vaibhav Chauhan

    Miss you, Beatles :'( ! Miss you, Beatles :'( !

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joe Emery

    I’ve read hundreds of Beatles books and they can be a bit samey – but this is superb. What makes it more special is that the author was there with the band so see it all...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Terry Miller

    Loved all the insight into the history of the band.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sowden

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a fine book, but it didn’t tell me much that I didn’t already know. I’m sure it was a bombshell tell-all when it was first released, and though this book may have been the first one to let them out of the bag, I was already familiar with most of the cats. The most interesting parts of the book were about Brian Epstein, the Beatles’ manager, and about their business deals. I knew that Epstein was gay and had designs on John Lennon, and I knew he’d died of a drug over dose, but I never kne This is a fine book, but it didn’t tell me much that I didn’t already know. I’m sure it was a bombshell tell-all when it was first released, and though this book may have been the first one to let them out of the bag, I was already familiar with most of the cats. The most interesting parts of the book were about Brian Epstein, the Beatles’ manager, and about their business deals. I knew that Epstein was gay and had designs on John Lennon, and I knew he’d died of a drug over dose, but I never knew that his life was such a sad mess. For all his success, you wouldn’t be wrong to characterize it as “failing up.” His mistakes with business deals are shocking, and there is more than one example in this book of people who made huge sums of money off of the band in exchange for doing relatively little. Additionally, the book sheds more light on the realities of touring than other books have. The Beatles Anthology is revelatory but I think even it downplays some of the horrors of touring. (For example, in the Anthology you learn that George was sick before going on Ed Sullivan; in this book you learn that he was very sick and pumped full of amphetamines so that he could perform.) Perhaps the Anthology downplays the dark side of touring (not by a lot, but it holds some stuff back) because they left out the fact that their roadies would bring girls to them — and sometimes only after the girls slept with roadies first. This book reveals those myth-busting details. The best parts of the book are the stories that come from the author himself. He was with them on tour, and as an assistant to Epstein he was aware of their business dealings. But the rest — about how they all met each other, how they rose to fame and how their marriages fell apart — this book covers it ably but no better or worse than any other Beatles book. As an avid fan and one who has read many texts on the subject, I asked myself frequently why I was reading this book when so little of it was new to me. And yet, read it I did. I guess that’s how it is with the Beatles. The shadowy truth behind their myth is endlessly fascinating, enough so that you’ll read about Cynthia Lennon discovering Yoko’s slippers over and over again.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Around the time I read this book it was considered the definitive book on the Beatles and all their inner turmoils. I remember feeling that was the case, but I also remember feeling that Peter Brown was a little too much in Lennon's camp. Naturally, that would be the case being John was the one he was closest to. I remember Brown being particularly harsh on George Harrison, but at the same time, he didn't seem to pull any punches when it came to the poor behavior on the part of all of the Beatle Around the time I read this book it was considered the definitive book on the Beatles and all their inner turmoils. I remember feeling that was the case, but I also remember feeling that Peter Brown was a little too much in Lennon's camp. Naturally, that would be the case being John was the one he was closest to. I remember Brown being particularly harsh on George Harrison, but at the same time, he didn't seem to pull any punches when it came to the poor behavior on the part of all of the Beatles. Brian Epstein was quite the tragic figure in this particular telling of the story, as was John's first wife, Cynthia. At times the detailed history surrounding the labyrinthine complexities of the band's finances and legal woes grew a bit tiresome, but being as he was the band's lawyer, it is to be expected that Brown would focus much of his energy on these issues. All in all, this is book is an excellent resource on the Beatles, but there may be better versions of the story out there these days.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    This is an extremely in-depth look at The Beatles - pretty much everything you could want to know, from their births to the group's inception, and right up to John Lennon's death at the end of 1980. Written in 1983 by Peter Brown and Steven Gaines, we get the back-story on their parentage, their education and how they came together to form the group that revolutionized the music industry in the early '60's. Peter Brown was the Executive Director of The Beatles management company. He was John Le This is an extremely in-depth look at The Beatles - pretty much everything you could want to know, from their births to the group's inception, and right up to John Lennon's death at the end of 1980. Written in 1983 by Peter Brown and Steven Gaines, we get the back-story on their parentage, their education and how they came together to form the group that revolutionized the music industry in the early '60's. Peter Brown was the Executive Director of The Beatles management company. He was John Lennon's best man when John married Yoko Ono, and later served as Director of Apple Corps. He had a close personal relationship with Paul, George and Ringo, too. My only problem with the book was the lack of information regarding the music that was produced. He doesn't go into detail about the songs or albums as much as I would have liked. I suppose, not being a musician himself, he didn't feel confident to talk about such things. He is extremely thorough when talking about the business side of things, as that was his forte. Overall, this is a good read, and I recommend it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Staughton

    Although I don't question what Peter Brown wrote about the Beatles as pure fact(as some other reviewers do), it surprised me about how much drugs and alcohol were involved in their lives. The fact that their music couldn't be heard at their concerts due to all the fans screaming was a shock to me and I'm now glad I didn't beg to see them in person. I do still enjoy a lot of the Beatles's music. It is a shame about how their lives were orchestrated and all the money they lost due to poor manageme Although I don't question what Peter Brown wrote about the Beatles as pure fact(as some other reviewers do), it surprised me about how much drugs and alcohol were involved in their lives. The fact that their music couldn't be heard at their concerts due to all the fans screaming was a shock to me and I'm now glad I didn't beg to see them in person. I do still enjoy a lot of the Beatles's music. It is a shame about how their lives were orchestrated and all the money they lost due to poor management. It seems that all 4 of them had a "need" to "find themselves" and it took them all several life experiences to realize what they wanted in life. I'm glad I read this book to realize what the music industry is really like and how the performers are treated. It was confusing and also thrilling for these 4 young men who became music icons.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ricky Santos

    The book was interesting up until a certain point, after which it just seemed rushed. It began reading like a business law text book full of cases, and all these facts of company mergers and buyouts involving so many different people going as far as giving stock numbers and cash amounts. The point could have gone through minus the minute details. As far as the music went it seemed as though the author talked about where each number one single was created (there were ALOT), when and who was invol The book was interesting up until a certain point, after which it just seemed rushed. It began reading like a business law text book full of cases, and all these facts of company mergers and buyouts involving so many different people going as far as giving stock numbers and cash amounts. The point could have gone through minus the minute details. As far as the music went it seemed as though the author talked about where each number one single was created (there were ALOT), when and who was involved, it almost came off as promotional. I came very close to giving up on this book I'd put it down for days and full weeks but I continued, after all the business talk it got interesting again. Tragic story, I do not regret reading also I'm a Beatle fan now (I didn't grow up around this music).

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    This is the best Beatles book I have read since Pete Shotton's THE BEATLES, LENNON, AND ME. Peter Brown knew and worked with The Beatles and Brian Epstein, so this is really an insider's view, much better than Hunter Davies's book THE BEATLES: AN AUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY or Philip Norman's SHOUT: THE BEATLES IN THEIR GENERATION. It does show the Beatles, warts and all, and vividly illustrates that, despite fame and fortune, or maybe because of it, being The Beatles could be quite terrible at times, This is the best Beatles book I have read since Pete Shotton's THE BEATLES, LENNON, AND ME. Peter Brown knew and worked with The Beatles and Brian Epstein, so this is really an insider's view, much better than Hunter Davies's book THE BEATLES: AN AUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY or Philip Norman's SHOUT: THE BEATLES IN THEIR GENERATION. It does show the Beatles, warts and all, and vividly illustrates that, despite fame and fortune, or maybe because of it, being The Beatles could be quite terrible at times, and so it was often painful to read, but always fascinating.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Dunmire

    This was more business-oriented rather than music-oriented, which was disappointing. The author is opinionated and judgmental in language rather than objective in writing. It felt more about Brian Epstein than the Beatles themselves. It certainly gets into the dark and dirty aspects of the Beatles and felt more negative than positive. The ending was sudden with no conclusion other than Yoko living with John’s death. Despite the assurance that interviews were had with all Beatles and many that wo This was more business-oriented rather than music-oriented, which was disappointing. The author is opinionated and judgmental in language rather than objective in writing. It felt more about Brian Epstein than the Beatles themselves. It certainly gets into the dark and dirty aspects of the Beatles and felt more negative than positive. The ending was sudden with no conclusion other than Yoko living with John’s death. Despite the assurance that interviews were had with all Beatles and many that worked with them, it really felt like a secondhand account. Overall, disappointing and unsettling.

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