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The Story of Paintings: A History of Art for Children

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From prehistoric cave art to graffiti, this beautiful compendium introduces children to the world of paintings. Get ready to feast your eyes on an exhibition of fantastic art! Kids can time-travel through the centuries and learn all about 39 paintings, from a galloping horse drawn in the Lascaux Caves during the Stone Age, to Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus and Velázquez’s From prehistoric cave art to graffiti, this beautiful compendium introduces children to the world of paintings. Get ready to feast your eyes on an exhibition of fantastic art! Kids can time-travel through the centuries and learn all about 39 paintings, from a galloping horse drawn in the Lascaux Caves during the Stone Age, to Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus and Velázquez’s Las Meninas, to masterpieces by Dalí, Picasso, Kahlo, and Basquiat. Each spread showcases a different painting, along with a profile of the artist, kid-friendly cartoons, and fun prompts that encourage children to ask questions (like, “What do you think Mona Lisa is smiling about?”) and spot details in each work.


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From prehistoric cave art to graffiti, this beautiful compendium introduces children to the world of paintings. Get ready to feast your eyes on an exhibition of fantastic art! Kids can time-travel through the centuries and learn all about 39 paintings, from a galloping horse drawn in the Lascaux Caves during the Stone Age, to Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus and Velázquez’s From prehistoric cave art to graffiti, this beautiful compendium introduces children to the world of paintings. Get ready to feast your eyes on an exhibition of fantastic art! Kids can time-travel through the centuries and learn all about 39 paintings, from a galloping horse drawn in the Lascaux Caves during the Stone Age, to Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus and Velázquez’s Las Meninas, to masterpieces by Dalí, Picasso, Kahlo, and Basquiat. Each spread showcases a different painting, along with a profile of the artist, kid-friendly cartoons, and fun prompts that encourage children to ask questions (like, “What do you think Mona Lisa is smiling about?”) and spot details in each work.

30 review for The Story of Paintings: A History of Art for Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    This is a nice selection of paintings through time starting with cave paintings and finishing with Jean Michel Basquiat. There was quite a jump from cave paintings to Giotto (1266-1337) it would have been good to see one or two examples inbetween but other than that, this book shows a good range of styles over the other eras. I didn't like the accompanying illustrations much, too whimsical and cartoonish for my taste but overall a good children's introduction to painting. This is a nice selection of paintings through time starting with cave paintings and finishing with Jean Michel Basquiat. There was quite a jump from cave paintings to Giotto (1266-1337) it would have been good to see one or two examples inbetween but other than that, this book shows a good range of styles over the other eras. I didn't like the accompanying illustrations much, too whimsical and cartoonish for my taste but overall a good children's introduction to painting.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fitzgerald

    This has the faint odor of Diversity - where a predetermined checklist influences the selections and where a quota must be met. I also sense the politics of the "Patriarchy" in several of the notes on women artists. One can always quibble about selection, of course. Thirty-nine artists is not much at all. However, note that Renoir, Raphael, and Rubens are all out. So are Gainsborough and Gaugin and El Greco. Degas and Durer are absent. You will not find Stuart, Seurat, or Cezanne. No Manet, no M This has the faint odor of Diversity - where a predetermined checklist influences the selections and where a quota must be met. I also sense the politics of the "Patriarchy" in several of the notes on women artists. One can always quibble about selection, of course. Thirty-nine artists is not much at all. However, note that Renoir, Raphael, and Rubens are all out. So are Gainsborough and Gaugin and El Greco. Degas and Durer are absent. You will not find Stuart, Seurat, or Cezanne. No Manet, no Mondrian, no Hogarth, no Audubon, no Bosch, no Cassat, no Titian. While the majority of the 39 artists that were included are the usual suspects whose importance cannot be disputed, there are a few whom I would say have not had an influence on the history of art that meets or surpasses that of those who were omitted. Interestingly, the book specifically notes, "We decided not to show living artists but those who have now passed into art history themselves." So while all the artists are dead, there are some who have not had much time to be assessed by history. Basquiat (1960-88) is the final example - I would argue that his early death allowed him to be included, while many others of his generation who still live and could well be more important in art history were excluded by the arbitrary criteria. I would probably have preferred a set cutoff date, leaving off the last 50 years or whatever. I also found that religion, which has played an incredibly huge role in art, was downplayed. The only examples included are Giotto and Michelangelo. The large reproductions of the actual artwork are wonderful. The other illustrations (cartoons with speech bubbles) are mostly dumb. The text is extremely brief and while there are some good facts in there, it feels very insubstantial. I feel that many additional resources would be required to convey any real significance to a historical overview. And very likely, those works would end up rendering this book superfluous.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Library_geek

    This book by by Mick Manning and Brita Granstrom has a beautiful selection of art, information about the artists , and their paintings. These range from Cave paintings, self portraits and contemporary art with both familiar and non familiar paintings and artists. The interactive nature of the book encourages the children to find things in each painting and is something you can easily do with your 3-5 year old. Even though it is recommended for older children I think it would make a great resource This book by by Mick Manning and Brita Granstrom has a beautiful selection of art, information about the artists , and their paintings. These range from Cave paintings, self portraits and contemporary art with both familiar and non familiar paintings and artists. The interactive nature of the book encourages the children to find things in each painting and is something you can easily do with your 3-5 year old. Even though it is recommended for older children I think it would make a great resource in a kindergarten class and beyond. At each different grade, the book can be used and inspiration gained from it in different ways, for example: younger children may find the different items throughout the pages but a child heading into high school might examine the images more closely to learn more about technique and paint choices. The large pages enable the reader to really enjoy taking their time looking at each image. You are able to look at each piece of art in depth and appreciate all the work that has gone into it. The book gives the reader more insight into paintings and the ability to think and talk about each one with others. Overall, this book would remain interesting to your child for many years. Insight will be gained into how paints and dyes have changed over the course of time and how artistic experimentation is keeping art fresh and exciting. People of all ages will be inspired by these artists, their stories, and their paintings. Full review can be found at www.littlebigreads.com

  4. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Cox

    It is hard to sum-up of the entirety of this particular book. The best way to explain it is just very simple and will be done using the google explanation: "Get ready to feast your eyes on an exhibition of fantastic art! Kids can time-travel through the centuries and learn all about 39 paintings, from a galloping horse drawn in the Lascaux Caves during the Stone Age, to Botticelli's The Birth of Venus and Velázquez's Las Meninas, to masterpieces by Dalí, Picasso, Kahlo, and Basquiat. Each spread It is hard to sum-up of the entirety of this particular book. The best way to explain it is just very simple and will be done using the google explanation: "Get ready to feast your eyes on an exhibition of fantastic art! Kids can time-travel through the centuries and learn all about 39 paintings, from a galloping horse drawn in the Lascaux Caves during the Stone Age, to Botticelli's The Birth of Venus and Velázquez's Las Meninas, to masterpieces by Dalí, Picasso, Kahlo, and Basquiat. Each spread showcases a different painting, along with a profile of the artist, kid-friendly cartoons, and fun prompts that encourage children to ask questions (like, "What do you think Mona Lisa is smiling about?") and spot details in each work." Basically, it is a book that introduces young readers to artist in different time periods and shows them some of that artists work. Art is very important for a child education. It allows them to experience different types of cultures. It also gives them the chance to explore their own creativity and see how others express theirs. This can also help them figure out ways to express their own. Art can be used in many ways in the classroom other than for simply teaching the visual arts and their "rules". Art can be used in many different grade levels but I will only use two as an example of a lesson. Let's take Vincent Willem van Gogh and his painting "Starry Night" for example; after all the painting is on the cover of the book. I could easily use this painting with Kindergarten or 1st grade to help me with a science lesson. I could compare and contrast it to other works in the book that depict night vs. day. This can help me teach a lesson that focuses on teaching the differences between night and day (and how they transition). What are some things we see during the day that we may not see at night? what are some things we may see at night but not during the day? How does the sky look when it is transitioning from day to night, what about from night to day? Another option is to use van Gogh's Sunflower paintings. You can use this to help teach a lesson about the different parts of a flower, how plants grow, and so on. Don't be afraid to read about the artist as well, can can only further a child knowledge. Also, when teaching about "Starry Night" you can play the song "Starry Starry Night" from the movie Loving Vincent in the background as students work. It is a very calming song and can help students relax and stay focused as they work. it also relates to the painting and person they were just talking about!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

    This is by no means a comprehensive look at art history, but it worked well for us as a follow-up to Famous Paintings: An Introduction to Art. Some of the artists included seem a little minor for kids to know, especially when a lot of major figures are omitted, but since this isn't the only art book we're reading, it didn't need to include everything. I wouldn't use it on its own, though, because it does have significant gaps. This is by no means a comprehensive look at art history, but it worked well for us as a follow-up to Famous Paintings: An Introduction to Art. Some of the artists included seem a little minor for kids to know, especially when a lot of major figures are omitted, but since this isn't the only art book we're reading, it didn't need to include everything. I wouldn't use it on its own, though, because it does have significant gaps.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Burkhart

    Terrific book for just about any age! Many short entries are just right for a quick view of art, the various styles,artists, and an example of their work. Each entry includes a “think about” question. Included is a very nice, student friendly glossary at the back. I think that every elementary classroom should have a copy since in addition to being a joy to read, serves as an excellent quick reference book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    A very nice, brief survey of 39 of primarily Western art history’s most significant paintings and artists—some well know and beloved and others not often included like Shen Zhou, Anders Zorn, Tamara de Lempicka and Jean-Michel Basquiat. A great gift and a great addition to an inquisitive child’s library. Beautiful format.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    A good starting point for introduction to famous paintings.

  9. 5 out of 5

    CantKids

    Borrowed this from the library as a long shot - amazed to find my 4yo twins engaging and getting excited about their favourite paintings

  10. 4 out of 5

    gennie jolley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne O'connor

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amber Scaife

  15. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lara

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Xia

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Robinson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carly Park

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robbie Lipe

  22. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lyndi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  25. 5 out of 5

    Virginie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Áine Maire

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

  28. 4 out of 5

    AEP

  29. 4 out of 5

    MaryAnn Biamonte

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn White

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