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Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be

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With wry wit and hard-earned wisdom, popular online personality and founder of TheChicSite.com founder Rachel Hollis helps readers break free from the lies keeping them from the joy-filled and exuberant life they are meant to have. Founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Chic Media, Rachel Hollis has created an online fan base of h With wry wit and hard-earned wisdom, popular online personality and founder of TheChicSite.com founder Rachel Hollis helps readers break free from the lies keeping them from the joy-filled and exuberant life they are meant to have. Founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Chic Media, Rachel Hollis has created an online fan base of hundreds of thousands of fans by sharing tips for living a better life while fearlessly revealing the messiness of her own. Now comes her highly anticipated first book featuring her signature combination of honesty, humor, and direct, no-nonsense advice. Each chapter of Girl, Wash Your Face begins with a specific lie Hollis once believed that left her feeling overwhelmed, unworthy, or ready to give up. As a working mother, a former foster parent, and a woman who has dealt with insecurities about her body and relationships, she speaks with the insight and kindness of a BFF, helping women unpack the limiting mind-sets that destroy their self-confidence and keep them from moving forward. From her temporary obsession with marrying Matt Damon to a daydream involving hypnotic iguanas to her son's request that she buy a necklace to "be like the other moms," Hollis holds nothing back. With unflinching faith and tenacity, Hollis spurs other women to live with passion and hustle and to awaken their slumbering goals.


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With wry wit and hard-earned wisdom, popular online personality and founder of TheChicSite.com founder Rachel Hollis helps readers break free from the lies keeping them from the joy-filled and exuberant life they are meant to have. Founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Chic Media, Rachel Hollis has created an online fan base of h With wry wit and hard-earned wisdom, popular online personality and founder of TheChicSite.com founder Rachel Hollis helps readers break free from the lies keeping them from the joy-filled and exuberant life they are meant to have. Founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Chic Media, Rachel Hollis has created an online fan base of hundreds of thousands of fans by sharing tips for living a better life while fearlessly revealing the messiness of her own. Now comes her highly anticipated first book featuring her signature combination of honesty, humor, and direct, no-nonsense advice. Each chapter of Girl, Wash Your Face begins with a specific lie Hollis once believed that left her feeling overwhelmed, unworthy, or ready to give up. As a working mother, a former foster parent, and a woman who has dealt with insecurities about her body and relationships, she speaks with the insight and kindness of a BFF, helping women unpack the limiting mind-sets that destroy their self-confidence and keep them from moving forward. From her temporary obsession with marrying Matt Damon to a daydream involving hypnotic iguanas to her son's request that she buy a necklace to "be like the other moms," Hollis holds nothing back. With unflinching faith and tenacity, Hollis spurs other women to live with passion and hustle and to awaken their slumbering goals.

30 review for Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sadie Esplin

    Some parts of this book spoke to me (yes, I can be better at showing up for myself), and others made me want to throw the book across the room and scream. I struggled with every word she said about diet and body image—what was meant to be uplifting and inspiring was preached as scientific fact from someone with no medical/dietetic credentials. She had nothing to back up her claims, but she preached it like doctrine. I also really struggled with the story of how she met her husband. She says that Some parts of this book spoke to me (yes, I can be better at showing up for myself), and others made me want to throw the book across the room and scream. I struggled with every word she said about diet and body image—what was meant to be uplifting and inspiring was preached as scientific fact from someone with no medical/dietetic credentials. She had nothing to back up her claims, but she preached it like doctrine. I also really struggled with the story of how she met her husband. She says that people may have issue with her sharing it and that it isn’t meant for it to be used to condone an unhealthy relationship. But....she married the man from her super unhealthy relationship. Guys, don’t marry the guy who “brings you to bars and ignores you while he hits on other women.” Don’t marry the guy who “only calls you at night when he’s been drinking but ignores you during the day.” Don’t marry the guy who you “give your virginity to because you don’t know how else to keep him interested.” I mean, really. She gave so much time to how terrible their first year was and then gives a quick “but now everything is great!” And it just doesn’t work for me. I think the point of the husband story was that when she told him she needed to be respected and she didn't want him calling anymore, he realized she was worth respecting. She had to respect herself to get respect, yada yada. Buuuutttt telling someone you don't want them to contact you anymore and then having them show up on your doorstep the next morning is literally the opposite of respect. I love it when I set boundaries and people totally ignore them—romance! Edit: I have to come back and discuss more things that are not okay. The diet pills? She essentially tells everyone that she and her roommate survived off of diet pills to the point that they were hallucinating, so they stopped taking them and gained back 40 lbs. She doesn’t discourage this, if anything the quick “oh and then we gained weight and became less attractive” seems like a subtle “I can’t recommend this BUT if you want to lose weight here’s how to do it.” Sooo not okay. Additionally, when people come to her her diet advice (why is she giving diet advice? Is she a dietician? Does she have any medical knowledge?) she tells them to start by drinking more water, and when they’ve mastered that start cutting out foods. Here’s an idea: listen to your body!! Thin =/= worthy/good/important. Another edit: I was on a plane with my young exhausted kids today and was thinking how an outsider would totally judge my parenting skills, but I gotta do what I gotta do and my in-flight parenting techniques are totally different from day-to-day. Then I remembered how Rachel went off on the totally exhausted mom for giving her kid candy on a plane. Maybe there was more to it that I’m not remembering? But honestly, anyone who has flown with their kids knows the struggle is real.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    Ughhhh. I wanted to like this! Things that irked me: -The painfully tone-deaf, privileged, white, conservative, upper-class worldview (one of her personal “goals” that she uses to structure a chapter is literally buying a $1000 Louis Vuitton purse) -Frequent mentions of how she’s REALLY good at X/the most organized/the hardest working/the most tenacious/ the biggest nerd you’ve EVER MET (dude, give it a rest) -Near constant reminders of how fabulously successful she is (although I’d never heard of Ughhhh. I wanted to like this! Things that irked me: -The painfully tone-deaf, privileged, white, conservative, upper-class worldview (one of her personal “goals” that she uses to structure a chapter is literally buying a $1000 Louis Vuitton purse) -Frequent mentions of how she’s REALLY good at X/the most organized/the hardest working/the most tenacious/ the biggest nerd you’ve EVER MET (dude, give it a rest) -Near constant reminders of how fabulously successful she is (although I’d never heard of her before picking up this book) -Weirdly sporadic “god/your creator has a plan” (more concentrated in the latter half of the book) sprinkled throughout the bland self-help cliches It’s like a big long humble brag in narrative form. I rolled my eyes at least once per chapter. BUT — if you’re white, wealthy, and Christian, and you like generic self-help offered from the aforementioned perspective, it might work for you. There are some nuggets of wisdom in certain parts; it’s just all stuff I’ve heard and read a thousand times over, and it could’ve been written with a tad more humility and self-awareness. 1.5 stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This book is for privileged white women with no real problems but the ones they make up for themselves. I was told this book was “inspiring”. But let’s be real, it’s easy for a rich lady to tell me (or anyone) that I’m “in control of my own life”. Any woman with a husband who makes enough money that you find yourself on the red carpet can say that. I found this book to be very unrelatable and full of humble brags. It was like social media in book form. Also, if I hear one more white woman call o This book is for privileged white women with no real problems but the ones they make up for themselves. I was told this book was “inspiring”. But let’s be real, it’s easy for a rich lady to tell me (or anyone) that I’m “in control of my own life”. Any woman with a husband who makes enough money that you find yourself on the red carpet can say that. I found this book to be very unrelatable and full of humble brags. It was like social media in book form. Also, if I hear one more white woman call other white women her “tribe” I’m going to throw up. This book ended up in the trash after reading 50 pages and countless eye rolls.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Hollis

    Because, if I don't think it's worth five stars, what hope is there?? Because, if I don't think it's worth five stars, what hope is there??

  5. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Cumberland

    Girl, shut your face. This book is a winner in one sense - it takes top marks for the worst book in this genre that I have ever read. This book is epically bad. I understand false five-star reviews, but I chose this book partially because a FB friend of mine heartily urged everyone to read it and partially because I was honestly a bit drunk-browsing on Amazon and I impulsively downloaded it to Kindle. I knew this book was bad before I got to Chapter 3, but felt compelled to hate-read (thank you, Girl, shut your face. This book is a winner in one sense - it takes top marks for the worst book in this genre that I have ever read. This book is epically bad. I understand false five-star reviews, but I chose this book partially because a FB friend of mine heartily urged everyone to read it and partially because I was honestly a bit drunk-browsing on Amazon and I impulsively downloaded it to Kindle. I knew this book was bad before I got to Chapter 3, but felt compelled to hate-read (thank you, GRer Marin for that excellent descriptor) the rest in order to critically annotate it throughout and on hopes it would redeem itself somehow. What follows is full of spoilers, but believe me, you want to read them to spare yourself from the waste of time that is this book. Let me enumerate just some of the many ways I hated this book: 1. The humble-brags and the outright brags. You can barely turn a page without being reminded how incredibly successful her businesses have been. Pg. 21, “But being at work? Oh man, I have that in the bag! I excel at being at work! I am the Babe Ruth of knocking it out of the park in the lifestyle media sector!” 2. Her perception of hardship. Towards the back of the book, there were two glimpses where she almost revealed some suffering of substance in her life: her brother’s suicide and the adoptions that fell through and the simultaneous investigation by CPS. These two chapters almost made me think she had more depth than a soupbowl. But it was buried in so much priviledged moaning (she realized once that she had worked for three whole years without taking a two-week getaway to Europe). 3. Contradictory advice. Set goals! Never break a promise to yourself! Get up early! Run a marathon! -But also - Be lazy sometimes! Give yourself a break! Let go of perfection! 4. Vanity. It’s everywhere. 5. Her divulgences are so childish. Shaving her toes. A little stress incontinence after having three babies. And one time, when she was in high school, she made a mean comment about hairy toes behind a girl’s back! Shocker! 6. The “love” story. Interestingly, I also met my husband when I was a naive 19yo and he was eight years older. But her husband was just a dick. And, whatever she claims to the contrary, I don’t think leopards change their spots all that much. I’m just saying. 7. The Chapter that says it is a lie that “no is the final answer.” #metoo has been made possible by generations of men who believe that no is not the final answer. I think this is dreadfully bad advice. Maturity is found in learning that sometimes, no IS the final answer. People who have gone through deaths and disease and poverty and loss often do find that there are big, fat, ugly Nos that cannot be fixed. They can only be eventually, maybe, accepted. 8. There was also some grammar and editing that drove me nuts like the constantly incorrect word breaks and capitalizing the word “dumpster.” 9. Chapter 7 - instructions on marital sex. NOOOOO! Just noooooo! Plus, just wait until andropause and menopause become part of your vernacular, Rachel. 10. Priviledge. She pops off options many people will never have. Her constant recommendations of therapy got on my damn last nerve. 11. Unlucky Chapter 13 is where she really burned down the house with the story of coveting that Louis Vuitton purse. She spends countless hours fantasizing about that purse and made a specific goal as to what parameters would allow her to buy the purse. I was seriously holding out hope that she was going to finally have the thousand dollars for the purse, but would realize that this symbol does not define her and she would drive down the street to a mission and donate the money for good. But alas. She is just as shallow as it sounded like she was going to be. She “walked out of that store the proudest I’d ever been in my whole life.” P.138 Proudest moment of her life: buying a ridiculously overpriced purse. 12. Chapter 14. After she got her very first mean ol’ one-star review she decided that her therapist was right and, “someone else’s opinion of me is none of my business.” Ummm...it is if you create media which you intend for people to pay you for! She could learn so much about where she’s hitting sour notes if she would read one tenth of the low reviews on GRs or Amazon. But she doesn’t want the buzzkill, girlfriend! Believe it or not, this is not an exhaustive list of the defects in this book, but I’m tired and I think the case has been pretty well-made now. One thing that is sort of positive about having read this book is that I have made a decision about all books I choose for the future: I will read or buy not a single book produced by bloggers or people who claim to be “lifestyle media experts” unless I read or hear from numerous, disparate friends whom I personally know that it is a great book. Even then, I’m not sure. I have a list of to-reads more than sixty books long, so I have decided today that I will not waste one more minute on this type of trite, immature drivel. I’m too tired to proof this longest-ever review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Rogers

    Girl, stop preaching at me At the end of each chapter, Hollis tells us what worked for her...what helped her master something in her life. Wow. We’re the same age and I certainly feel like a constant work in progress. And she’s this wise, worldly woman who seems to think very highly of herself and her progress in life. I’d be sooooo annoyed if she were sitting around at a party and kept talked about “what worked for her,” like some wise old grandma reflecting on her youth. I would have connected Girl, stop preaching at me At the end of each chapter, Hollis tells us what worked for her...what helped her master something in her life. Wow. We’re the same age and I certainly feel like a constant work in progress. And she’s this wise, worldly woman who seems to think very highly of herself and her progress in life. I’d be sooooo annoyed if she were sitting around at a party and kept talked about “what worked for her,” like some wise old grandma reflecting on her youth. I would have connected more if she finished each chapter with a more active statement, such as, “What’s working for me now.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bedelia

    Nope. Belittling people by saying you can pick yourself up by the boot straps and CHOOSE happiness is irresponsible and uneducated. It just isn’t that simple. Her approach to body image and dieting is downright scary. She seems very self centered and looking for her 15 minutes as opposed to ‘helping’ anyone let alone women. Throwing in a scripture here and there does not a Christian based book make. This should not be considered self help. I would not recommend this book to anyone. It’s uncomfor Nope. Belittling people by saying you can pick yourself up by the boot straps and CHOOSE happiness is irresponsible and uneducated. It just isn’t that simple. Her approach to body image and dieting is downright scary. She seems very self centered and looking for her 15 minutes as opposed to ‘helping’ anyone let alone women. Throwing in a scripture here and there does not a Christian based book make. This should not be considered self help. I would not recommend this book to anyone. It’s uncomfortable, frustrating and ignorant.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alishia

    Girl, just don’t read this book. Bless your tiny little bunny heart if you can make it through this entire book… Like seriously, girl, how many times can you contradict yourself? I had never heard of this women in my life, apparently, according to her, she has is an extremely successful entrepreneur. Immediately my perception of the author was that she read a few really good books about women how have ACTUALLY struggled and then put her Reese Witherspoon in legally blond spin on it, adding a few Girl, just don’t read this book. Bless your tiny little bunny heart if you can make it through this entire book… Like seriously, girl, how many times can you contradict yourself? I had never heard of this women in my life, apparently, according to her, she has is an extremely successful entrepreneur. Immediately my perception of the author was that she read a few really good books about women how have ACTUALLY struggled and then put her Reese Witherspoon in legally blond spin on it, adding a few “Good Christian Girl” references to increase her wholesome persona (and obvi to make points with her Christian publisher). The use of self-deprecating humor in effort to create the notion that she’s gone through some shit was annoying, patronizing and way over the top. I won’t even go into the annoying references to exercise and diet, wine drinking, and constant references to her “years” of hard work (this chick is like 34, come on, girl, you've got at least another decade of life until you can say you have done anything for “years”) This book could have been a short story if she’d left out all the filler fluff and strange tangents. I could go on, but I won’t. If you are a privileged women who has some insecurities, this book is for you. If you are a regular women who was interested in finding a deeper and more authentic sense of joy in your life, this book is not for you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    Ok, maybe I’m the wrong audience for this. Or maybe I shouldn’t have chosen the audiobook narrated by the author. But I just couldn’t finish this Mostly, I found the author’s supposed revelations to be really obvious and unenlightening. “It’s important to have self-worth by dumping the guy who uses you as a booty call (but oh yeah I ended up marrying the guy).” “Hey girls, we should support each other instead of judging each other.” And on top of all that, her anecdotes were way too long and self Ok, maybe I’m the wrong audience for this. Or maybe I shouldn’t have chosen the audiobook narrated by the author. But I just couldn’t finish this Mostly, I found the author’s supposed revelations to be really obvious and unenlightening. “It’s important to have self-worth by dumping the guy who uses you as a booty call (but oh yeah I ended up marrying the guy).” “Hey girls, we should support each other instead of judging each other.” And on top of all that, her anecdotes were way too long and self-aggrandizing. “So I used to make fun of this girl for shaving her toes, when actually I also shaved my own toes!” And unbelievably, right after her chapter on how women shouldn’t judge each other, she makes fun of people like Kim Kardashian for how they got their success...without acknowledging that she comes from an enormous place of privilege herself. Thanks but no thanks. To top it off, the audiobook narration by the author had way too much preacher/coddling guru/“let go and let god” vibes. I’m not sure what’s worse: Her romanticizing of an abusive relationship, her dangerous diet advice, or how condescending and appallingly tone-deaf she is.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    (Get ready for some flames, folks.) Are you an upper-class, skinny, Christian, white, mother? Well I've found the self-help book for you!! If you're looking for a light dose of fat shaming (disguised as "the kick in the pants you may need, girl, to take control of your life!! Love ya!!"), it's in here. If you want someone who has lived through a close family suicide but remains highly shame-ridden about mental health issues and how to discuss them, please visit this book. (Because the challenge of (Get ready for some flames, folks.) Are you an upper-class, skinny, Christian, white, mother? Well I've found the self-help book for you!! If you're looking for a light dose of fat shaming (disguised as "the kick in the pants you may need, girl, to take control of your life!! Love ya!!"), it's in here. If you want someone who has lived through a close family suicide but remains highly shame-ridden about mental health issues and how to discuss them, please visit this book. (Because the challenge of being an adoptive parent is given at least triple the airtime here than the suicide, which I find... very very weird.) There's even a whole chapter on not judging gays, and how you should even hang out with them!! And people of color, hang out with them too!! Like, y'all, I'm disgusted. But this book happened, and Hollis means well enough... but this book is tone-deaf at a high level. I'm sure this speaks to a certain audience, but it sure as hell isn't me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    5 stars!!! Rachel Hollis's newest book Girl Wash Your Face is just the book I needed to read to start my new year. It's one of those books that made me think about my life, the things I do, and it was a highly entertaining read! A few months ago, one of my facebook friends posted about this thing called 'The Last 90 Days'. I read up on it, and I was inspired to make changes to my life and not wait until the first of the year, but do it now. I started getting up earlier, drinking more water, goin 5 stars!!! Rachel Hollis's newest book Girl Wash Your Face is just the book I needed to read to start my new year. It's one of those books that made me think about my life, the things I do, and it was a highly entertaining read! A few months ago, one of my facebook friends posted about this thing called 'The Last 90 Days'. I read up on it, and I was inspired to make changes to my life and not wait until the first of the year, but do it now. I started getting up earlier, drinking more water, going to the gym more, and most importantly, I started making a gratitude list daily. It really changed my perspective on a lot of things. Since then, I started following Rachel Hollis. I love her personality and she has great tips and advice. When I got the opportunity to read this book early, I jumped on it. Each chapter is about a lie we're told, and why that lie isn't actually true. It's a motivating read that made me want to go out and conquer the world- or at least my own life! I found Rachel's stories inspiring. This book inspired me to be better, but also not to be so hard on myself when I fail. Laced with humor, relateable stories, and things that will actually resonate and help most of us, I recommend this book to all women. It's a must read! *arc provided by publisher*

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    This book isn't written for me, but that's not why I didn't like it. The main reasons: 1. You cannot tell that story about how awful your husband treated you when you first started dating and then, later in the book, continuously mention how you were "best friends from the beginning." You were not. He was an asshole, and her revisionist history later in the book makes me question everything she said. 2. Hollis thinks the difference between her and the people who didn't make their dreams come true i This book isn't written for me, but that's not why I didn't like it. The main reasons: 1. You cannot tell that story about how awful your husband treated you when you first started dating and then, later in the book, continuously mention how you were "best friends from the beginning." You were not. He was an asshole, and her revisionist history later in the book makes me question everything she said. 2. Hollis thinks the difference between her and the people who didn't make their dreams come true is that she never gave up. Survivorship bias: plenty of people work their asses off and don't give up and things don't work out for them. She didn't mention luck or even the grace of god. Nope, she just works harder than anyone else. 3. She makes a point to say that dreams shouldn't have deadlines, and then in the very next chapter says her goal is to own a vacation home in Hawaii before she's 40. 4. She, generally, comes off as self-absorbed and with an inflated sense of the value her advice is worth. I will say, Hollis did a great job of narrating the audiobook. Her pacing and comedic timing is good. But listening to the book did make her calling her readers "my sweet friend" more jarring.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    You, and only you, are ultimately responsible for who you become and how happy you are. So, this book works...and it doesn't. It works because Hollis has an engaging story at its core. She has achieved quite a lot over the last few years and because of that, it seems that what she says comes from experience. Her wildly popular career as a motivational speaker and blogging shows the audience that you, too, can grab your own bootstraps and make a success of yourself. It works because it You, and only you, are ultimately responsible for who you become and how happy you are. So, this book works...and it doesn't. It works because Hollis has an engaging story at its core. She has achieved quite a lot over the last few years and because of that, it seems that what she says comes from experience. Her wildly popular career as a motivational speaker and blogging shows the audience that you, too, can grab your own bootstraps and make a success of yourself. It works because it is catchy. Hollis knows how to take a concept and frame it in such a way that it seems brilliant. And the purported goal of her career focuses on helping others achieve what she has gotten all the while balancing family and self-care. So, on the surface - this seems like a great book. However, ultimately it doesn't work for me because a lot of the time the advice contradicts itself, the stories she shares aren't relatable and often I see her advice subtly digging at people who can't do what she can. She frames things as if everyone has the ability and resources to do what she has done, and if you haven't yet then YOU are the only reason that that hasn't happened. But, obviously, it isn't true. It is a sobering reality that not all people are granted equal opportunities, rights and lots in life. But reading her book, it feels like she sweeps that all under the rug. She gives this rosy-tinted glasses view at achieving grand success but often neglects to give her own privilege, relative wealth and opportunities the proper weight. Also, this book doesn't work for me because so much of the advice she gives feels very...familiar. Essentially, after reading this book...there's not a lot new. The advice being given isn't groundbreaking. And when I looked it up, lo and behold, there's been numerous scandals regarding her ripping off self-help quotes and advice from other bloggers less successful than her and when I read the book, I feel like I can see those concept from other books leaking through. I swear, if I go to the self-help section of any book store/library in the country and pick out half a dozen books at random, I can cobble together most if not all of her book. The main difference between Hollis and the rest of those gurus is that she does a fantastic job of polishing their words and giving it a boost when putting it into her book. I would definitely recommend checking out the reviews from Sadie and Danielle if you want more details about the problematic moments in this book. Ultimately, at the end of the day...I was entertained by the book...just don't take her word as gospel. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Read for book club. Not something I would EVER choose for myself. The fact that people like this, quirky bloggers who are experts in precisely nothing, get to write entire books about how to live is probably the strongest argument I can think of in support of shutting down the internet, full stop. Also, as an adult woman named Rachel, I am personally offended by how many times she refers to herself in the third person as "Rach". Ew. Read for book club. Not something I would EVER choose for myself. The fact that people like this, quirky bloggers who are experts in precisely nothing, get to write entire books about how to live is probably the strongest argument I can think of in support of shutting down the internet, full stop. Also, as an adult woman named Rachel, I am personally offended by how many times she refers to herself in the third person as "Rach". Ew.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Abbie Miller

    We’re being honest here, right? After all, that was the premise of the book. To be clear, I’m not in the target demographic for this title. (I’m over 40! Oh, the horror!) This was just another self-help book written by a self-proclaimed celebrity (ish) who wants to be recognized for changing all our lives. We should admit we’re imperfect, confess to wearing Spanx and give in to the demands of life and just show up at our kid’s school in (gasp!) our work clothes! The last third of the book she sp We’re being honest here, right? After all, that was the premise of the book. To be clear, I’m not in the target demographic for this title. (I’m over 40! Oh, the horror!) This was just another self-help book written by a self-proclaimed celebrity (ish) who wants to be recognized for changing all our lives. We should admit we’re imperfect, confess to wearing Spanx and give in to the demands of life and just show up at our kid’s school in (gasp!) our work clothes! The last third of the book she spent lecturing us from high on her mountain of self-importance about everything from antibiotics to eating healthy food to drinking alcohol (tsk tsk) to getting up off our asses to go achieve all our dreams. After listening this one, I need a glass of wine for sure! (I’m the devil.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Helen 2.0

    One of my distant relatives on my mom's side was known in the family for his severe chronic depression. He died about 20 years ago, but the one thing I remember about him was my grandmother's opinion of his life. Whenever it came up in conversation, she would lament, in German: "I don't know why he insisted on being so sad all the time. He could have had such a happy life!" The advice in Girl, Wash Your Face! is based on exactly that kind of ignorant attitude. The book is full of upbeat tips and One of my distant relatives on my mom's side was known in the family for his severe chronic depression. He died about 20 years ago, but the one thing I remember about him was my grandmother's opinion of his life. Whenever it came up in conversation, she would lament, in German: "I don't know why he insisted on being so sad all the time. He could have had such a happy life!" The advice in Girl, Wash Your Face! is based on exactly that kind of ignorant attitude. The book is full of upbeat tips and emotional anecdotes that are supposed to inspire you to do better in your life. Think good thoughts! Be healthy! Work towards your goals! Rachel Hollis wrote this book addressing an audience of people whose only problem was presumably their own inability to get shit done. Here's an example from the book. Each chapter is named for a different lie us women allegedly tell ourselves, and one chapter is titled "I Can't Tell the Truth." Here is the first tip Rachel lists to help you learn to tell the truth: Take the plunge. Finding the courage to be honest about who you are or what you're going through is like throwing yourself into the deep end of the pool and fighting to swim once you hit the cold water. It won't necessarily be pleasant, but once you're in, it's done. The longer you live in a state of honesty, the easier it becomes to simply exist there all the time. The gist of this tip is, "here's how to do it: just do it." Rachel gives many more of these "Feeling unhappy? Just stop!" types of platitudes throughout the chapters, and they build up frustratingly. Sure, some of the problems in my life, as in most people's lives, are of my own making. I could be more proactive towards maintaining relationships and planning my future, and the author does address these topics pretty well. But the overwhelming majority of women (at whom this book is targeted) are dealing with issues that can't be solved with a little pep talk and some willpower. Institutional sexism and racism. Mental illness. Poverty, broken welfare systems, family troubles, sickness, global warming. "Washing your face", as Rachel puts it, will not do jack shit to make the most pressing problems in women's lives disappear. Which means that readers of the book must rein in their expectations about the sort of impact Rachel's advice can have on their lives, or end up disappointed. To be fair, the author does acknowledge the limitations of her book, to some extent. She never claims to be able to cure your mental illness. But the tone of every chapter still implies that taking her advice is all you'll need to succeed, girl - which is just not true. However, there was one passage in Girl, Wash Your Face that was memorable to me. The author speaks about the types of questions she receives from readers and fans: Do you know the number one thing I hear most get emails about most, get asked advice on most? Friends. How to make friends. How to keep friends. How to cultivate real, valuable friendships. That's what women are craving. Insights on relationships is one of the few things this book can help you with. And this point the author makes about female friendship really struck me. With all the romance and RH I read, the male-driven fantasy, the dumb high-school movies with "queen bitch" characters, none of them feature female friendship as a central plot point. I'm going to look for those friendships more in the fiction I consume and in my daily life next year - call it a resolution.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashlie Elizabeth

    There were parts of this book that were highly motivating and not too coddling, which is always appreciated. One thing that was tough was a constant thread of diet culture and weight loss talk throughout the whole book. The chapter about weight itself was...not great. There is a line where the author says (paraphrased) "science shows you need to eat less and move more, the end!" Where a lot of the other chapters examined the nuance of different issues and talked about developing an internal mono There were parts of this book that were highly motivating and not too coddling, which is always appreciated. One thing that was tough was a constant thread of diet culture and weight loss talk throughout the whole book. The chapter about weight itself was...not great. There is a line where the author says (paraphrased) "science shows you need to eat less and move more, the end!" Where a lot of the other chapters examined the nuance of different issues and talked about developing an internal monologue to become more driven, the weight loss chapter felt super icky. It was basically "you shouldn't be fat, you won't be as long as you don't overeat to numb your feelings, and take better care of this body God gave you." A lot of other chapters were motivating, but the diet talk (peppered through every chapter) would keep me from recommending this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Holly Jo

    Could not finish this. Listened to audio book and had to stop halfway through. The author has no concept of her own privilege, and that many women reading this book don't have the same opportunities she has. I found it self-centered. Could not finish this. Listened to audio book and had to stop halfway through. The author has no concept of her own privilege, and that many women reading this book don't have the same opportunities she has. I found it self-centered.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tara Lynn

    I was anxious but cautious when starting this book, as I've heard a lot about it. My opinion is probably pretty unpopular, but I could hardly wait to be done with it. It's pretty misleading to put this book in the "religious/Christian" book genre. Some of the most notable/cringey parts to me were, "I am my own hero. This is all me. Any achievements you've accomplished, those are all you. I wish someone had told me this, but I had to navigate through life and learn it on my own: Only YOU have the I was anxious but cautious when starting this book, as I've heard a lot about it. My opinion is probably pretty unpopular, but I could hardly wait to be done with it. It's pretty misleading to put this book in the "religious/Christian" book genre. Some of the most notable/cringey parts to me were, "I am my own hero. This is all me. Any achievements you've accomplished, those are all you. I wish someone had told me this, but I had to navigate through life and learn it on my own: Only YOU have the power to change your own life - this is the truth. I ran an entire marathon with Philippians 4:13 written on my arm with Sharpie, and I fully believe my Creator is the strength by which I can achieve anything. **But God can't make you into something, without your help.** You have the power to change, you have to stop waiting around for someone else to do it for you." Each chapter begins with a lie, and the author's answers to overcoming those lies. Those answers very, very rarely included any truth beyond maybe a simple line about faith or God. Rather, I got so sick of hearing "I did, I worked, I earned." It's a pretty cliche, "pull yourself up by the bootstraps," self-help type book. Her honesty when talking about the struggles of fostering, dealing with alcohol, and some other topics, was admirable. That said, it hurt my heart to hear that the answers to all of those struggles were just doing better, deciding to be better, or something of the like. If you like being called, "girl, yo, ya'll," as a reader, followed by some "dang straight truth bombs," you may like this book. 🤮

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I didn’t finish the book. I stopped around chapter 12 when I asked myself why I was putting myself through this. I’ll leave it at that.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Britany

    Multiple people told me to read this book, so I figured I'd give it a shot. I've never heard of Rachel Hollis before or anything about her. I listened to this on audio, read by the author which was a treat. She goes through some lies that she used to believe about herself in hopes to help other women from falling into the same pitfalls. Most of this is pretty cliched, but sometimes it's a nice reminder to pick yourself up by the bootstraps and work hard for the life you want to live. To be honest Multiple people told me to read this book, so I figured I'd give it a shot. I've never heard of Rachel Hollis before or anything about her. I listened to this on audio, read by the author which was a treat. She goes through some lies that she used to believe about herself in hopes to help other women from falling into the same pitfalls. Most of this is pretty cliched, but sometimes it's a nice reminder to pick yourself up by the bootstraps and work hard for the life you want to live. To be honest, this is just another book telling you "You can do anything" which is always a positive message, but there is nothing unique or new to be gleaned from this book. I honestly rolled my eyes more often than nodding along with the author. Especially the story of how she met her husband. She had the courage to walk away from a terrible relationship blah blah blah... I was annoyed with her most of the time. It is hard to rate a book about someone else's life, so I will stay right down the middle. This book might be for you if you've recently had kids and have struggled with finding a balance between family, work, friends, and self. If that's not you, then keep doing you.

  22. 4 out of 5

    FMABookReviews

    ❝If we can identify the core of our struggles, while simultaneously understanding that we are truly in control of making changes, then we can utterly change our trajectory.❞ I've laughed, cried and contemplated. There are self-help books, and then there's 'Girl, Wash Your Face'! Through lies she's told herself, Rachel Hollis takes her readers on a journey through her triumphs and losses, heartbreaking moments and celebrations. ❝Recognizing the lies we've come to accept about ourselves is the ❝If we can identify the core of our struggles, while simultaneously understanding that we are truly in control of making changes, then we can utterly change our trajectory.❞ I've laughed, cried and contemplated. There are self-help books, and then there's 'Girl, Wash Your Face'! Through lies she's told herself, Rachel Hollis takes her readers on a journey through her triumphs and losses, heartbreaking moments and celebrations. ❝Recognizing the lies we've come to accept about ourselves is the key to growing into a better version of ourselves.❞ Rachel Hollis is a gifted communicator. Speaking to you like one girlfriend to another, Hollis encourages you to be your best self, to take charge of your life and to find your happy! Her straight shooting message that --- ❝if you're unhappy, that's on you.❞ gives women permission to take control of their lives. Why do we feel we need permission, even if that permission is from someone we don't know? Because of LIES. Lies we've been told and lives we've told ourselves. "Something else will make me happy." "I'll start tomorrow." "I'm not good enough." "I should be further along by now." "I am who others think I am." "My best isn't good enough." Those are some of MY lies (and some I share with Mrs. Hollis). Rachel's truth is poignant, it is devastating, and it is healing. Her honesty is admirable. And she reminds us that we are the captains of our own ship. What we do and where we go is our choice. It's up to us. ❝...once you understand that  you are the one in control, you'll get up and try again. And you'll keep going until being in control feels more natural than being out of control.❞ She doesn't sugar coat it, she doesn't tell you it's going to be easy nor does she tell you that change will happen overnight. What she does tell you is that YOU ARE WORTH IT. You are worth the fight, the struggle, the battles, and the pain. YOU ARE WORTH the hard work, the tears, the rejection, and the exhaustion. Because, ❝Life isn't meant to be merely survived-it's meant to be lived❞ ❝You are meant to be the hero of your own story.❞ **I was provided a review copy by the publisher. This did not influence my opinion of the book nor my review.**

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shaghayegh

    I need a hero,Actually I don't need a hero I need a hero,Actually I don't need a hero

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carlene Inspired

    *I no longer support or follow Rachel Hollis and her teachings* Two reads completed, several passages highlighted, and a whole new perspective on life and the pursuit of happiness. :) Rachel Hollis has given us a new book! It's not fiction, it's not a cookbook, it's Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are so You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be. Part self help, part honest, heartbreaking non-fiction, Girl, Wash Your Face was the book I didn't know I needed. Broken into c *I no longer support or follow Rachel Hollis and her teachings* Two reads completed, several passages highlighted, and a whole new perspective on life and the pursuit of happiness. :) Rachel Hollis has given us a new book! It's not fiction, it's not a cookbook, it's Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are so You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be. Part self help, part honest, heartbreaking non-fiction, Girl, Wash Your Face was the book I didn't know I needed. Broken into chapters by lie, yes as in the lies we believe in about ourselves, Rachel Hollis tackles the struggles women face daily and the steps we can take to make a positive, lasting difference. Rachel's personal stories are sometimes tough to read, but always relatable and her willingness to share her truths was incredibly impactful for me. The things she struggled and/or struggles with are the same things I struggle with. Her solutions? Easy to follow, though the dedication and the creation of the habit relies on your strength, will, and determination. It inspired me, Rachel's voice and words run through my head now throughout the day, and it taught me the ability to forgive myself each time I fail and believe the lies I shouldn't. ❝Recognizing the lies we've come to accept about ourselves is the key to growing into a better version of ourselves.❞ Though I cried, a lot, Girl, Wash Your Face is a humorous, powerful read that is easy to follow and inspiring. The solutions Rachel gives us are every day solutions, things that anyone can implement into their daily life whether through physical action or personal thought. She gives us the honest, harsh reality, but also gives us the chance to forgive ourselves, to understand others, and to create a healthy path towards healing and positivity. I loved the overarching message of self worth, power, and strength. I finished the last page with a renewed vigor for life and a new method of self-love. I highly recommend that everyone picks up a copy of Girl, Wash Your Face, whether you think you believe any lies or not. It's a book that women need and a book I'll be returning to repeatedly. In fact, I'm off to read it again before I'm off to RISE, Rachel's women's conference!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    In full disclosure, this was a hate read. I despise self-help books and anything motivational/trendy/inspirational. After all the articles I’ve read picking this book apart, I knew I would hate it. And yet, I read it anyway because apparently I’m in the mood to be annoyed today. *rolls up sleeves* I don’t even know how to review this. As a “Christian” book, which it’s marketed as, it’s dangerous. We were not born to live our best lives now and pursue whatever makes us happy. We were put on earth t In full disclosure, this was a hate read. I despise self-help books and anything motivational/trendy/inspirational. After all the articles I’ve read picking this book apart, I knew I would hate it. And yet, I read it anyway because apparently I’m in the mood to be annoyed today. *rolls up sleeves* I don’t even know how to review this. As a “Christian” book, which it’s marketed as, it’s dangerous. We were not born to live our best lives now and pursue whatever makes us happy. We were put on earth to glorify God. The tenet of our faith is NOT “Love thy neighbor.” Yes, YES we need to love every person as Jesus loved us, but the tenet of our faith is that God sent His son to die for us so that we are saved from our sins. REPENT AND BELIEVE. Flee from sin. Don’t love and accept it. This book absolutely falls under what the Bible warns about in 2 Timothy 4:3. God is only mentioned when it suits Rachel’s narrative, which is about three times. There’s a lot more I could say, but putting the faith part aside, I still hated it. I cannot even deal with people who run around spewing “Love my tribe!!!! Hustle!!!!! Positive vibes!!!!” I can’t roll my eyes hard enough. She said “I run a lifestyle media company” more times than she referenced the Bible. She CONSTANTLY brags about working with A-list celebrities. I am zero percent impressed and one hundred percent annoyed. She talks about going to the Oscars and the “internet going wild” over her glammed up pictures, but she tries SO HARD, you guys, to make us believe that she’s not glam!! Sometimes she pees a little when she jumps on the trampoline because she’s had babies! Giggle!!! I could not get over the amount of shameless bragging and conceit. Just stop. I am convinced she wrote this book to pretend that she’s a mess, but really to brag about how she has figured out what we’re all doing wrong and to remind us of how special she is. Thanks, but I’m good. I don’t hustle. I have no desire to create a vision board with my #goals because not all women want to live that way. The day I refer to my friends as my “tribe” is the day I will beg someone to duct tape my mouth shut. I’m not a workaholic. If I believe God is in control, then I don’t need to worry about “taking control of my life.” Girl, Read Your Bible.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    This book is truly AMAZING! I mean I loved every minute of it. I have told all my family and friends to read this book and now I am telling you, READ IT you won't regret it! This book is truly AMAZING! I mean I loved every minute of it. I have told all my family and friends to read this book and now I am telling you, READ IT you won't regret it!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy | Foxy Blogs

    It's hard not to get motivated when you get bit by Rachel Hollis' enthusiasm. She lays it all out there and shares stuff that is deeply personal for her. Her vulnerability allows the reader to tear down their own walls knowing they aren't alone in their journey. Thank you for sharing your story with us, Ms. Hollis. I've been a fan of yours for awhile and I enjoy getting a glimpse into your personal life via InstaGram stories and lives. GIRL, WASH YOUR FACE is a standalone non-fiction book. If yo It's hard not to get motivated when you get bit by Rachel Hollis' enthusiasm. She lays it all out there and shares stuff that is deeply personal for her. Her vulnerability allows the reader to tear down their own walls knowing they aren't alone in their journey. Thank you for sharing your story with us, Ms. Hollis. I've been a fan of yours for awhile and I enjoy getting a glimpse into your personal life via InstaGram stories and lives. GIRL, WASH YOUR FACE is a standalone non-fiction book. If you're looking for a book that will motivate you to be a better YOU then this book is what you are looking for. Follow Foxy Blogs at: Blog ♥ Twitter ♥ Instagram ♥ Facebook

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chelsey Connor

    This is a book all girls need to read. It was so good. I loved Rachel’s honesty throughout it. So much in there to put into practice and learn from. Thank you Rachel for writing it

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    **I received an ARC of this book from the publisher; opinions are my own** "Girl, Wash Your Face," honestly, isn't anything new. All the same, I found that it resonated with me in a way that not many self-help books ever have. Part of it, no doubt, is where I am in my own life. I suspect that had I read it even five years ago, GWYF likely would not have hit me in the same way. A bigger part of it, though, is that Rachel Hollis just seems so damn likeable. I'm not normally the sort to fan-girl ove **I received an ARC of this book from the publisher; opinions are my own** "Girl, Wash Your Face," honestly, isn't anything new. All the same, I found that it resonated with me in a way that not many self-help books ever have. Part of it, no doubt, is where I am in my own life. I suspect that had I read it even five years ago, GWYF likely would not have hit me in the same way. A bigger part of it, though, is that Rachel Hollis just seems so damn likeable. I'm not normally the sort to fan-girl over the internet famous, but something about Rachel makes it easy to imagine meeting up with her for coffee. Her advice, while nothing new, is presented less like a traditional self-help book and more like an older sister sitting you down and saying, "Look. Let me tell you all the ways I screwed up so you can save yourself the trouble." Each chapter of the book is a different lie that the author at one time believed: something else will make me happy, I'm not good enough, I'll start tomorrow, etc... Through her own stories, she shares how she came to learn the truth and offers action steps on how you can break away from the lies, too. While Hollis now lives a pretty charmed life (she's married to someone with Hollywood connections and has an awfully cushy existence), she remains relatable and, dare I say, down-to-earth. She's not always had an easy life and has clearly worked her butt off to get where is; her wisdom is hard-earned. This book is definitely aimed at a certain demographic: late 20s/early 30s, new-ish mothers. This isn't to say that others won't benefit, but there's enough mothering/parenting/marital advice that I think someone in their early 20s will find themselves flipping past a lot. Similarly, I think someone in their 40s will have probably figured out a lot of this stuff on their own already. But for those of us in that sweet spot? There's so much good advice to be found in here. I found myself highlighting and starring many passages; this is definitely a book I will be coming back to.

  30. 4 out of 5

    ✰ Liz ✰

    I had the pleasure of hearing Rachel Hollis speak at Book Bonanza this past summer. Her passion and joy are absolutely contagious! I immediately downloaded the audible of this book and downloaded any and all podcasts available for download. I find her testimony to be one of inspiration and truth. The ideas and experiences explored in this book are truly remarkable and her delivery is full of honesty and witty humor. I highly recommend this book to ANYONE and EVERYONE! This book is full of advice I had the pleasure of hearing Rachel Hollis speak at Book Bonanza this past summer. Her passion and joy are absolutely contagious! I immediately downloaded the audible of this book and downloaded any and all podcasts available for download. I find her testimony to be one of inspiration and truth. The ideas and experiences explored in this book are truly remarkable and her delivery is full of honesty and witty humor. I highly recommend this book to ANYONE and EVERYONE! This book is full of advice and encouragement. I am so glad that I read it. I look forward to more from this dynamic author. For more reviews/reveals/giveaways visit:

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