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The Rowe Brothers are famous hockey hotshots, but as the youngest of the trio, Tennant has always had to play against his brothers’ reputations. To get out of their shadows, and against their advice, he accepts a trade to the Harrisburg Railers, where he runs into Jared Madsen. Mads is an old family friend and his brother’s one-time teammate. Mads is Tennant’s new coach. A The Rowe Brothers are famous hockey hotshots, but as the youngest of the trio, Tennant has always had to play against his brothers’ reputations. To get out of their shadows, and against their advice, he accepts a trade to the Harrisburg Railers, where he runs into Jared Madsen. Mads is an old family friend and his brother’s one-time teammate. Mads is Tennant’s new coach. And Mads is the sexiest thing he’s ever laid eyes on. Jared Madsen’s hockey career was cut short by a fault in his heart, but coaching keeps him close to the game. When Ten is traded to the team, his carefully organized world is thrown into chaos. Nine years his junior and his best friend’s brother, he knows Ten is strictly off-limits, but as soon as he sees Ten’s moves, on and off the ice, he knows that his heart could get him into trouble again. Can Tennant show Jared that age is just a number, and that love is all that matters?


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The Rowe Brothers are famous hockey hotshots, but as the youngest of the trio, Tennant has always had to play against his brothers’ reputations. To get out of their shadows, and against their advice, he accepts a trade to the Harrisburg Railers, where he runs into Jared Madsen. Mads is an old family friend and his brother’s one-time teammate. Mads is Tennant’s new coach. A The Rowe Brothers are famous hockey hotshots, but as the youngest of the trio, Tennant has always had to play against his brothers’ reputations. To get out of their shadows, and against their advice, he accepts a trade to the Harrisburg Railers, where he runs into Jared Madsen. Mads is an old family friend and his brother’s one-time teammate. Mads is Tennant’s new coach. And Mads is the sexiest thing he’s ever laid eyes on. Jared Madsen’s hockey career was cut short by a fault in his heart, but coaching keeps him close to the game. When Ten is traded to the team, his carefully organized world is thrown into chaos. Nine years his junior and his best friend’s brother, he knows Ten is strictly off-limits, but as soon as he sees Ten’s moves, on and off the ice, he knows that his heart could get him into trouble again. Can Tennant show Jared that age is just a number, and that love is all that matters?

30 review for Changing Lines

  1. 4 out of 5

    BWT (Belen)

    2.5 Stars I'm not going to lie, with the majority of Ten and Jared's relationship being off page, and with quite a bit of the little on page development being not-so-interesting sex, and then the ending it all left me a bit...disappointed. I am surprised that, even with the dual POV, I don't really feel like I got to know the characters very well, and at 200+ pages I don't really understand why. The hockey sequences were cool, but it would have been nice to get to know the players a bit better. Lik 2.5 Stars I'm not going to lie, with the majority of Ten and Jared's relationship being off page, and with quite a bit of the little on page development being not-so-interesting sex, and then the ending it all left me a bit...disappointed. I am surprised that, even with the dual POV, I don't really feel like I got to know the characters very well, and at 200+ pages I don't really understand why. The hockey sequences were cool, but it would have been nice to get to know the players a bit better. Like, Stan, the enormous goalie...we never find out why he talks completely in tv and commercial catchphrases, but it seemed like he understood what was being said to him...did he? Was that the only English he knew? Where did he learn it? What was his deal? I wanted to know more about everything and it just wasn't there. There were really only four scenes in the entire book that "stood out" for me - when Ten came out to his parents, then to his brothers, when Mads stands up to his son's Grandfather and has a heart to heart with his son, Ryker, and when Ten and Mads are "outed" as a couple to the team. I loved how when Ten told his parents about being gay, their reaction had me tearing up. That scene got me in the feels. Then, after he came out to his brothers, Brady and Jamie, I really thought the story had reached a turning point. Alas, no. I'll probably check out the second book in the series, but it will be more out of curiosity to see if this writing pair gel more than being drawn in by the next set of main characters, particularly as I didn't feel like there was any development of those characters here either. Advanced Review Galley copy of Changing Lines (Harrisburg Railers Ice Hockey #1) provided by Love Lane Books in exchange of an honest review. This review has been cross-posted at Gay Book Reviews.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Simone

    ***3.5 Stars*** for both, audiobook and story

  3. 5 out of 5

    DarienMoya

    First I’m gonna start off by saying I care nothing for Hockey in RL, and this book didn’t change that. My first time reading R.J Scott with writing partner V.L Locey. The Story: 3.5 Pants Off Tennant Rowe is a superstar in the making and when he decides on an up and coming team a few eyebrows were raised. Of course he could have gone with superstar teams most likely to win the Stanley Cup but Ten decides on the Railers with big disapproval from his family, but Ten is a big boy and he’s making hi First I’m gonna start off by saying I care nothing for Hockey in RL, and this book didn’t change that. My first time reading R.J Scott with writing partner V.L Locey. The Story: 3.5 Pants Off Tennant Rowe is a superstar in the making and when he decides on an up and coming team a few eyebrows were raised. Of course he could have gone with superstar teams most likely to win the Stanley Cup but Ten decides on the Railers with big disapproval from his family, but Ten is a big boy and he’s making his own decisions. While the Raiders aren’t cloaked in history it’s the team he wants to join and the upside is that the team has Jared Madsen. An old family friend and someone Ten is looking to get up close and personal with. Yeh, they have history and Mads is a bit older but age ain’t nothing but a number after-all. Downside, you can’t be gay in hockey. So when Ten finds himself telling his coaches that he’s gay he’s expecting the worst but what it gets him is a secret relationship with Mads and things are almost perfect. All that’s left is coming out to his family and maybe one day even publicly. Ten’s got hockey, love, and Mads, what more could he even want?! First, things moved pretty fast from the get go. Ten is the new to the team and next things he’s sharing he’s gay, and professing his attraction to Mads. Their relationship moves pretty fast, and most of their loving happens off page so I sort of felt like I was filling things in. The hockey was too much of the story, and the romance felt like a backdrop but again I have no particular feelings for hockey. Ten spent most of his time dwelling on his brothers, and everyone else on the fact that he plays for a unknown team. Throw in some conflict involving Mads and that pretty much made the entirety of the story. I was a bit more interested in a few side characters actually, so the rest of the series is peaking my interest. Overall, an alright read. I can’t call it sexy or amazing but I can say I found it sweet. I enjoyed Ten a lot more than I did Mads. There’s still so much of the story that I feel needs to be explored, and I wasn’t a fan of how it ended. Changing Lines wasn’t horrible but I fear that it’s quite easily forgettable for me. The Narration: 4 Pants Off Sean Crisden did an amazing job bringing the characters to life. I’m in love with his take on Tennant, listening to his voice was far more enjoyable than the story and because of his narration I enjoyed it more. I’m positive if I’d read Changing Lines instead of listening I wouldn’t have liked it at all. Sean was dramatic where he needed to be and sweet in others, definitely enjoyed that. Also brought a new voice to each character which strongly made them individuals. Sean Criden does an amazing job with whatever story you give him.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    (Originally posted 4 July 2017): 2.5 stars -- Since the blog I review for is participating in the blog tour for this book, I am withholding my non-glowy review until after the book's release, but suffice it to say that I think this book is only okay at best. --- (Edits posted on 21 July 2017): Now that it has been more than a week since release, here's the quick-and-dirty: Changing Lines is my first exposure to either author, RJ Scott and V.L. Locey, and while I didn't have issues with the writing st (Originally posted 4 July 2017): 2.5 stars -- Since the blog I review for is participating in the blog tour for this book, I am withholding my non-glowy review until after the book's release, but suffice it to say that I think this book is only okay at best. --- (Edits posted on 21 July 2017): Now that it has been more than a week since release, here's the quick-and-dirty: Changing Lines is my first exposure to either author, RJ Scott and V.L. Locey, and while I didn't have issues with the writing style they used, the focus of the story overemphasized an overused component in the gay-professional-athlete trope to such an extent that it made me lose interest in the romance. The Good: - I really loved the fact that the voices of the thirty-something coach (Jared "Mads" Madsen) and the barely-in-his-twenties player (Tennant "Ten" Rowe) were not only very distinct from one another but also used language differences appropriate to ages. This made the characters feel realistic and made it obvious which character's point of view was being used at any point in the novel. Whether or not this means one author wrote one character and the other wrote the other doesn't matter, because the distinction was among the best I have read. - This is related to the previous point a little, but it was refreshing (and honestly fun to see) that even though Ten, like most anyone that age, was all about sex sex sex, Mads made him wait for it, taking things slow to make it be more than sex. The Bad: - I had a difficult time connecting to the characters emotionally and, perhaps somewhat as a result of that, failed to get any sort of big feels from the relationship itself. - Instead of clearly being focused on the relationship first and on Ten's process of stepping out from his older brothers' shadows and other individual things after that, my expectations were let down by the fact that the book's focus was apparently on the process of Ten coming out. Obviously, I have no problems with this concept; it's downright expected to be a plot device in books that involve gay professional sports players in this day and age. But this device is overused, mainly because there are only so many possible outcomes, so after you've read more than a handful, they start to get repetitive and predictable unless the authors weave it into their story in such a way to make it different. Unfortunately, that didn't happen here. The Ugly: - While there is a good slow-build romance taking place in the story, something I appreciate typically, once the characters make it clear that they're interested in seeing where a relationship could go in spite of the forbidden nature of the coach/player dynamic, the story seems to skim over that development process, giving only a few highlights between the other, more common scene prevalent in the book, which I'll get to in the next point. This certainly hurt my ability to connect to them as a couple, and since that's one of romance's main goals, it hurt my overall enjoyment of the book. - The book contains no fewer than SIX complete scenes of Ten coming out to various people in the book. (I actually think the number is eight, but I'm giving a couple of them the benefit of the doubt.) I'm all for coming-out scenes when they're vital to the plot, doing more than just causing some short-lived tension, advancing the conflict for one or both of the members of the relationship. For the most part, these scenes failed miserably to advance the plot of the book much at all. And since the coming-out scenes outnumbered the scenes that advanced the romance between Ten and Mads, I couldn't help but scratch my head about the focus of the novel. One or two fully developed coming-out scenes, followed by the set-up and allusion to more times when the character comes out, is plenty to show how that story arc develops. Even three can work if there's good reason for it. But six to eight? Overkill. That's the only word for it. And more than anything else, that focus was what disappointed me about the book. As far as whether I'll read more books by these authors, individually or collaboratively, probably. But this book was not the right place for me to be introduced to them. The authors and/or publisher generously provided me a complimentary copy of Changing Lines in exchange for this fair and honest review. Follow Me: Reviews by Tammy & Kim | Facebook | Twitter

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annery

    *4.00 for the AB* // *4.5 for the story* Baseball is long gone, football season is almost over, and now is the time for hockey. This book will set you right up. The audio is by Sean Crisden, who I know has legions of fans, and I can see why. I liked the narration very much. The voices for the MCs are clear and distinctly defined, the women are non-campy or cartoonish (which I always fear), in general everything was very pleasant if a bit rushed, and those were my stumbling blocks. The story is tol *4.00 for the AB* // *4.5 for the story* Baseball is long gone, football season is almost over, and now is the time for hockey. This book will set you right up. The audio is by Sean Crisden, who I know has legions of fans, and I can see why. I liked the narration very much. The voices for the MCs are clear and distinctly defined, the women are non-campy or cartoonish (which I always fear), in general everything was very pleasant if a bit rushed, and those were my stumbling blocks. The story is told in a dual P.O.V. style, in alternating chapters. I don’t know if it was inspired by the character of Ten, who’s young, or the writing, but the narration, particularly in the Ten chapters, has a breezy, chit chatty, almost rushed quality, to the point where, at least in the beginning, the emotions seem to be brushed over or elided. I don’t know. However once Ten & Mads become an item things, narration-wise, settle to a better pace IMO. As I said I liked most of the choices Sean Crisden made except for that initial speed, which to me, seemed to dilute or diminish the real upheaval, conflict, or turmoil the characters are going through. My final point on the audio is that to my ears SCs voice is maybe a bit old for Ten, who’s 22, but then again these are hockey players, “fifteen going on thirty” physique-wise, so take that with a grain of salt. The Book: Tennant Rowe is the youngest of three hockey playing Rowe brothers. At 22 he’s looking for a way to get out from under the long shadow of his siblings and the opportunity comes when he gets traded to the Harrisburg Railers, an NHL expansion team, with a still untested roster. What he also gets in Harrisburg is Jared Madsen. Jared “Mads” Madsen is 32, a former defensive player who due to health issues has transitioned into coaching. He still misses playing but has made the best of his options. He’s also the father of Ryker, a 17 year-old hockey prodigy, product of some youthful experimentation. And yep, he’s bi. I like Jared mucho. Clearly, from the beginning, the authors meant to write a multivolume series and this first book quite nicely sets up a world of friends, family, coworkers, teammates etc. which I won’t mind revisiting. They’ve also cleverly positioned the story within the margins of quite a few tropes: sports, friend of a sibling, coming out, being bi, family dynamics, size difference (a little bit), and age gap. It’s absolutely not May/December because there’s only 10 (ten) years between our MCs and culturally that isn’t much nowadays, regardless of what Mads thinks. Overall this is a low-angst and, much to Ten’s chagrin, slow-burn romance. The last time they’d seen each other Ten was 12 and clearly there was nothing, however upon meeting once again there’s a spark of lust which in time morphs into something more. Save for Mads’ quasi ex father-in-law there are no villains or behind the scenes connivers and I think that fits. Whether they’re more cognizant of acceptable mores or have just grown up in a different world, younger people are less likely to be tripped up by someone’s sexuality. As for owners & management of sports teams they know where the political winds blow. This doesn’t mean that the real downside of coming-out in professional sports is glossed over or candy coated. There are just no hysterics. Just the facts ma’am. Many of the things I liked about this story are will perhaps put others off. The road from lust to love develops at a believable pace. “I love yous” aren’t bandied about at the drop of a hat or after the first week of lustful eyeing. Those who want a play-by-play of every encounter by the MCs might be disappointed. I wasn’t. There’s quite a bit of sport and it’s very well done. The authors know their hockey, locker room culture, game dynamics, players and their psyche. I liked that the relationship developed over a few months, the pre-season to just over Thanksgiving, and there are other things going on in the MCs lives, besides the romance, that are equally addressed. Mads’ relationship with his son, his son’s grandfather, his conflicting emotions about no longer being able to play, his lust, and eventual love for the younger brother of one of his friends are given pretty much equal time because like in RL things overlap. Ten doesn’t suddenly cease wanting to be first line because he’s also lusting and falling in love with Mads; having the hots for a certain defensive coach doesn’t diminish Ten’s competitive drive or desire to be the best, to win. Ten can love hockey, Mads, having Skype piano-playing sessions with his mom, and evolve his Pokémon beasties at the same time. Real life. Worry not those who love the smexy times. We have them. True that at first Mads, for valid reasons, limits their interaction to kissing, heavy petting, and some handjobs or frottage, which are plenty hot. Mads is in control but equally gobsmacked by the wonder of Ten, and I was happy that other than getting his son’s opinion, he wasn’t overly hung up on the age difference. Once they’ve reached the end of their respective tethers things get beyond lust to outright romantic, in a non-cloying way: "Mads kissed me. I blossomed under his mouth and hands. All this time I’d thought I was so experienced and such a top notch lover, but Mads showed me that making love to someone was vastly different from simply fucking someone.” *Heart eyes* I can see going on with this series, because though technically it ends in a HEA, there’s lots more to be covered as to where the relationship goes and how things evolve, careerwise, especially for Ten. I know the other books have different MCs but I’m optimistic that in the mix we get more of Mads & Ten. I like them. They complement each other in the best ways.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eugenia

    Just OK. I almost DNF’d this but then decided to suck it up and finish it for a challenge. It did get better, but not by much. I felt little chemistry between the characters and I became bored. I’m a die hard hockey romance fan, but the writing here didn’t do it for me. Will I continue? Maybe, if the books are free.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    ‘Changing Lines’ is the first book in a new series by R.J. Scott and V.L. Locey. While I’m a long time fan of R.J. Scott this is my first time reading anything by Ms. Scott’s co-author V.L. Locey and from the looks of things I’m about to become a fan of this author as well…I’m definitely a fan of this series already. It’s hockey and I am after all Canadian and a Bruins fan, I’ll explain this shortly. Tennant ‘Ten’ Rowe is one of the 3 brothers who are making a name for themselves on the ice. The ‘Changing Lines’ is the first book in a new series by R.J. Scott and V.L. Locey. While I’m a long time fan of R.J. Scott this is my first time reading anything by Ms. Scott’s co-author V.L. Locey and from the looks of things I’m about to become a fan of this author as well…I’m definitely a fan of this series already. It’s hockey and I am after all Canadian and a Bruins fan, I’ll explain this shortly. Tennant ‘Ten’ Rowe is one of the 3 brothers who are making a name for themselves on the ice. There’s Ryan his oldest brother captain of the amazing Boston Bruins. Unfortunately, while he loves his little brother Ten, Ryan tends to be a bit obnoxious at times but hey, that’s what big brothers are for…I should know I have four of them. Then there’s Jamie (James to their mom) he’s the peace keeper the negotiator of the family and Ten well he’s the baby and needless to say he’s tired of living in everyone’s shadow. He’s got talent of his own and then some but between his two older brothers and playing in the shadow of Tate Collins his teammate and the shining star of Texas hockey Ten’s thinking that getting traded to the Railers might not be such a bad thing and maybe it’ll be his chance to shine. Jared ‘Mads’ Madsen is the defensive coach for the Railers. Having his NHL career cut short wasn’t his plan but at least coaching allows him to continue with the game he loves and spend time with his son, Ryker. Jared’s not a stranger to the Rowe brothers but what he suddenly realizes is that Ten’s may be 9 years his junior but he’s not a little kid anymore and keeping his hands off may not be something Mads really wants to do. I’m not sure where to start here so let’s start with the obvious I enjoyed the hell outta’ this story…I loved it. For me it was well balanced between the romance and the hockey. I liked the amount of hockey that was there in terms of the detail…like I said “I am Canadian”. I loved Mads and how he refused to rush things between him and Ten. He wanted to take it slow for him and Ten to really get to know one other. I loved that it wasn’t just a case of ‘Hi, how you been? and then falling into bed. That took time and drove Ten crazy as he discovered that Mads may have wanted him but he wasn’t going to lose control or think with his little head…nope Mads was a man with the maturity to know that ‘good things come to he, who waits’ or has strawberries… I will never view strawberries quite the same again. These two men are sweet, funny, sexy and just really good together both in and out of the bedroom. Their communication is strong and then there’s all the other fun stuff. Things like Mads son Ryker. He was a typical 17 year old wanting to rush his life but a the still time silently crying out for help and guidance from his parents. His grandfather not so much…the guy was an idiot…but you’ll have to read the story for the scoop on him. I would also seriously like to spend a holiday at the Rowe house this family is awesome…don’t get me wrong, they’re not perfect. They fight, they argue and then they talk and make up or go to the treehouse…again you’ll need to read the story to find out about this but the treehouse is awesome. ‘Changing Lines’ is by no means a comedy but it is a good start to what I think is going to be an enjoyable hockey themed series. There were hot men both on and off the ice, humorous moments…also on and off the ice, there’s Pokemon and Pokemon tattoos, there’s Sven, one of the best Russian goalies EVER!…I love Sven and a coming out that is epic from start to finish. If book 2 is anything like this one…well all I can say is…‘Hockey Night in Canada’ just got a whole lot more interesting. ********************* A copy of ‘Changing Lines’ was graciously provided by the authors in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cadiva

    The sign of a good book for me is when the ending comes upon you without you realising you've got through the whole narrative without wondering how long it is. This book did just that for me. I'm a fan of RJ Scott anyway, this was the first I've read of VL Locey (although I have her Point Shot series on my Kindle waiting to be read) and together they put down a very good ice hockey romance. I loved the fact there actually was ice hockey in this book! Games happened on the ice, training happened, i The sign of a good book for me is when the ending comes upon you without you realising you've got through the whole narrative without wondering how long it is. This book did just that for me. I'm a fan of RJ Scott anyway, this was the first I've read of VL Locey (although I have her Point Shot series on my Kindle waiting to be read) and together they put down a very good ice hockey romance. I loved the fact there actually was ice hockey in this book! Games happened on the ice, training happened, it wasn't all off the ice with the relationship being the only story. I liked the complexities of the two main characters' families. The age gap element was well done, never felt like a big deal and - while everything goes swimmingly with very little angst and is perhaps a touch unrealistic - you know what, I didn't care. I don't want to read about the horrors of a sportsman or woman coming out because that shit already happens in Real Life and it makes me incandescently angry. That Mads and Ten could just be themselves with only a few hiccups made me happy. As this is book one in an interconnected series, it may be that some of that side of the story still has to come and I'm happy with that too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christelle

    **3.5 stars** An enjoyable read and there was a lot that sparked my interest : a hockey player (yes, I’m quite a fan and there is some hockey here, to my delight) and a Hockey coach, age-gap, family bounds. I really enjoyed Tennant, such a nice guy, not afraid to go for what he wants and Jared and how he takes care after the one in his life. But sometimes, my English gets in the way and there were some parts I didn’t get. It’s all on me. No angst, slow burn, nice and sexy MCs. A pleasant read !! I t **3.5 stars** An enjoyable read and there was a lot that sparked my interest : a hockey player (yes, I’m quite a fan and there is some hockey here, to my delight) and a Hockey coach, age-gap, family bounds. I really enjoyed Tennant, such a nice guy, not afraid to go for what he wants and Jared and how he takes care after the one in his life. But sometimes, my English gets in the way and there were some parts I didn’t get. It’s all on me. No angst, slow burn, nice and sexy MCs. A pleasant read !! I think I’m going to follow this series. **THANK YOU, “Go with the Flow” for this gift. Merry Christmas to you <3**

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    This couple to me just didn’t mesh very well at all. Ten was too immature and cocky and very free with his old man jokes but when Mads called him kid he got bent out of shape about it. It also seemed so unrealistic how well everyone at work took their relationship plus the families as well. I didn’t hate the read but I also didn’t love it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ⚣Michaelle⚣

    Audio Review 19Jan2020: 3.5 Stars Whiles Sean's narration was outstanding, I was less impressed the second time around on this story. BUT I am gonna get to the next one, at least, probably this week? Original Review 24Oct2017: 4 Stars Fun and sexy hockey romance (which I expect from VLL) with just a little bit of angst and drama. About the only thing I disliked was how it felt like - from Mads' perspective/POV - this was some May/December romance and it was NOT. While the life experience and maturi Audio Review 19Jan2020: 3.5 Stars Whiles Sean's narration was outstanding, I was less impressed the second time around on this story. BUT I am gonna get to the next one, at least, probably this week? Original Review 24Oct2017: 4 Stars Fun and sexy hockey romance (which I expect from VLL) with just a little bit of angst and drama. About the only thing I disliked was how it felt like - from Mads' perspective/POV - this was some May/December romance and it was NOT. While the life experience and maturity levels were distinctive (Ten was a bit obsessed with Pokemon...and so was Ryker, Mads' kid), with Mads becoming a father so very young, there really wasn't this huge age gap like it sounds and feels coming from some players. I think the potential scandal of a player/coach relationship provided more emotional fodder and potential for problems further down the line than did the "age gap". That and Mads being friends with Ten's oldest brother, so sort of like family already. Also, what's with all the O6 snobbery? I mean, more than half of the Stanley cup winners since 1967 have NOT been O6 teams - and I think the Oilers, Islanders & Penguins have eacg won more NHL championships than a couple of those O6 teams have. Again, since the 1967 expansion, but don't go knocking the expansion, man. (Says the girl in Vegas desperate for our new team to do well! The Golden Knights are 6-1, tied with the Kings for first in our conference...so fingers crossed!) Still a good start to a new series; definitely gonna pick up the next one!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    This is a really weird case of a 2+ star book that I almost DNF'd a couple of times but also found compelling enough at other times that I could easily see myself trying more of the series (as long as I'm not paying for it) -- even though I found this installment seriously flawed?? I'm not really sure how to explain it! I guess the main issue is that none of the compelling scenes actually involved the romance, which I'm pretty sure is supposed to be the main plotline? I'm curious if maybe the aut This is a really weird case of a 2+ star book that I almost DNF'd a couple of times but also found compelling enough at other times that I could easily see myself trying more of the series (as long as I'm not paying for it) -- even though I found this installment seriously flawed?? I'm not really sure how to explain it! I guess the main issue is that none of the compelling scenes actually involved the romance, which I'm pretty sure is supposed to be the main plotline? I'm curious if maybe the authors wouldn't agree with that since it almost seems to be treated like a tertiary plot throughout most of the book...but that would suggest that something else stands out as the main plotline, and that is not the case at all. It's almost like a day-in-the-life type approach without having any cohesive point. Also, just out of curiosity, was (is??) Pokemon actually a thing for this age group?? I had no idea. And I may be concerned :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kaje Harper

    This is a fun start to a new series, by two authors whose hockey players are among my favorite MCs. Tennant (Ten) is a young player with a ton of talent, sent from a second spot on a top team to fight for first line on an expansion team. His hockey-player brothers add a touch of humor and emotion in their sibling-attempts to both make sure little bro's career is on track and to keep their older sib influence on his life. Madsen (Mads) coaches the defensemen on the team where Ten winds up. Mads tu This is a fun start to a new series, by two authors whose hockey players are among my favorite MCs. Tennant (Ten) is a young player with a ton of talent, sent from a second spot on a top team to fight for first line on an expansion team. His hockey-player brothers add a touch of humor and emotion in their sibling-attempts to both make sure little bro's career is on track and to keep their older sib influence on his life. Madsen (Mads) coaches the defensemen on the team where Ten winds up. Mads turned to coaching after an injury revealed an underlying health issue, and he was forced to retire from a promising career. He's pretty much reconciled with a new role as a coach, and he's even out now in a limited way as bisexual. But he is far from prepared for his attraction to one of his players, especially when he discovers Ten is gay (and perforce closeted.) Although Ten is a forward, and thus not really Mads' responsibility as a coach, there is an element of impropriety in getting together. Add that to the risk of Ten being outed while actively playing, and the stakes are high. But sometimes when a relationship is right, it's too hard to fight. They want each other for more than one fast round of hot sex, but it's going to be a rocky road. I loved the characters here, and the build of the relationship. The hockey content hit the just-right spot for me. There are some great secondary characters. The ending is a bit frustrating, (despite a solid HFN) with where it stops. This is not unusual with gay-in-sports books, but I really hope that the next in the series continues to follow these guys as MCs, and doesn't drift off to a new couple on the team. What comes next will be the emotional and plot-related density of their story for Mads and especially for Ten, and failing to show it, or showing it only from the outside, will feel to me like a loss of what I'm looking for most. We shall see.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tpagirl Loves Romance

    Changing Lines was the first book in the Harrisburg Railers series by JS Scott. It was not my first book by Scott, but it was my first same sex book by Scott. Tennant “Ten” Rowe was the youngest brother in a family with three NHL players. Ten was just traded to the expansion team of the Harrisburg Railers. He was excited for a fresh start and knew he would shine. Jared “Mads” Madsen’s NHL playing career had been cut short due to injury and now he was the D-coach for the Railers. He was known to b Changing Lines was the first book in the Harrisburg Railers series by JS Scott. It was not my first book by Scott, but it was my first same sex book by Scott. Tennant “Ten” Rowe was the youngest brother in a family with three NHL players. Ten was just traded to the expansion team of the Harrisburg Railers. He was excited for a fresh start and knew he would shine. Jared “Mads” Madsen’s NHL playing career had been cut short due to injury and now he was the D-coach for the Railers. He was known to be bi-sexual, have a fifteen year old son and had ties to an ex NHL star who was overbearing, disrespectful and all out hateful. It was written with a dual POV. I liked the storyline and the level of detail Scott included about the challenges of coming out as well as the in depth nuances provided about the game of hockey. I also enjoyed the banter between the Rowe brothers and the close knit family. I struggled a little with fully connecting to the main characters. I liked Ten, but he was a little immature to me - but he was barely twenty two, so yea it was probably realistic. And with the age difference between Ten and Mads, I felt Mads acted a lot older than thirty. He was harder to connect with at times. My favorite part of the storyline was the hockey focus. Although the plot centered around Ten and Mads’ relationship development, they were immersed in the hockey season and Scott provided realistic schedules and details. This kept the book intriguing and fast paced. All in all, it was a decent start to the series. I’m curious to see where Scott takes us next.

  15. 5 out of 5

    JustJen "Miss Conduct"

    This was a fun start to a new series, and what’s not to love about hot hockey players finding love? Tennant (or Ten, as he is called) is a talented player, but has always lived in the shadows of others, be it his older (pro hockey playing) brothers, or the star player on his current team. His family doesn’t hesitate to chime in about his life, playing, choices, etc., and when he is traded to new franchise team, instead of a successful NHL team, they have plenty to say. But Ten is just happy to be This was a fun start to a new series, and what’s not to love about hot hockey players finding love? Tennant (or Ten, as he is called) is a talented player, but has always lived in the shadows of others, be it his older (pro hockey playing) brothers, or the star player on his current team. His family doesn’t hesitate to chime in about his life, playing, choices, etc., and when he is traded to new franchise team, instead of a successful NHL team, they have plenty to say. But Ten is just happy to be getting out on his own and making his own way. As that gets underway, he finds that one of his new coaches is an old family friend and ex-player, Jared Madsen (Mads). Mads is a little bit older than Ten, closer to Ten’s brothers’ ages. He had to quit playing pro hockey due to an on-ice injury that led to heart problems. He is now happy coaching the new up and coming Railers. When these guys see each other again, there is an instant connection. Tens has had a crush on Mads since he was young, and now that he is around him again, knowing he is bisexual, it doesn’t take him long to go after what he wants. He is confident like that. He pretty much takes whatever is thrown at him and runs with it. There is some reluctance on Mads’ part due to the age gap and family connection, but he cannot resist for long. The two carry on a secret relationship that is tested when Ten is outed on the team and then it steamrolled from there. His oldest brother finds out and Ten takes the rest of the matters in his own hand by coming out to the rest of his family, the team heads and players, etc. Poor Mads has to deal with some things on his side as well, with regards to his son, his grandfather and that whole situation. I really liked Mads and loved his confident, wanting to make his own mistakes and fix them attitude. I got a bit teary at his coming out to his parents, and loved him and Mads together. They made a great couple, and each were just with the other needed. I really enjoyed this series opener and am looking forward to seeing it continue in the next installment. P.S. It was fun reading about this made up team from the area where I live! I wanted to go right out and cheer them on. 🙂 Review written for Love Bytes Reviews.

  16. 5 out of 5

    BR11

    3.5 stars. It was sweet and I enjoyed Ten and Mads' story. My only complaint is the oversimplification of every challenge these two have to face. This book is 100% drama free, everybody accepts Ten's coming out, everyone is ok with him being with his coach... everything is rainbows and puppies and unicorns and glitter. 3.5 stars. It was sweet and I enjoyed Ten and Mads' story. My only complaint is the oversimplification of every challenge these two have to face. This book is 100% drama free, everybody accepts Ten's coming out, everyone is ok with him being with his coach... everything is rainbows and puppies and unicorns and glitter.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alisa

    2.5 stars I can't believe I believe I'm going to say these words but "There was way too much hockey in this book". There is an enormous amount of game and practice time in this book and lot's and lot's of plays and strategies. It's obvious the authors love the game and I really appreciate that but when it comes at the cost of character development this it's a no go for me. This book had a lot of potential. There were a few scenes that were super good. Very emotional and very well done. One of whic 2.5 stars I can't believe I believe I'm going to say these words but "There was way too much hockey in this book". There is an enormous amount of game and practice time in this book and lot's and lot's of plays and strategies. It's obvious the authors love the game and I really appreciate that but when it comes at the cost of character development this it's a no go for me. This book had a lot of potential. There were a few scenes that were super good. Very emotional and very well done. One of which was Ten coming out to his parents and one with Mads having a heart to heart talk with his teenage son. Both (& a few others) showed that the authors were capable of giving readers an emotional, well written book. They just didn't. They made other choices. One of those choices was to include too much hockey. The other, which was the worst for me, was to have most of Ten and Mads relationship development takes place off page. The only on page stuff was sex scenes and hockey and family. We never see them behind closed doors and as a result have to be told they're in love and committed to each other. I never felt anything between them. It was all telling and no showing. The story is told in alternating pov's but you never get to know either mc well. I wasn't sure what they saw in each other. I wasn't really feeling their "love" at all. Another thing that bothered me a lot was the fact that Mads was Ten's coach and it was never really presented as an issue. They talked about Ten coming out as gay and how it would effect him being a professional sports player but no one seemed to bat an eye that he was boinking his coach. So unprofessional. It was a big deal and should have been presented as such imo. My last issue was that it ends on a cliffhanger of sorts. The guys are together and happy but a giant part of the plot is left hanging. If I had been into this story and this couple I would have been really mad about this. As it was I really didn't care which is even worse. **Oh....and would it be possible for any hockey romance writer to actually do a book without horrible stereotypes about Russian players?? Seriously not cool.**

  18. 5 out of 5

    SoCalBookReviews

    5 Stars, Book & Narration I did not want this book to end. I think that this book was put together well, and if this is what we have to look forward to in the rest of the series, I won’t hesitate to get my hands on the next several books. I think the collaboration between RJ Scott and VL Locey is a definite mark in the win column, this book turned out great and I was sucked in from the first few lines. Oh, and then add in the fantastic narration by Sean Crisden and this book was basically perfect. 5 Stars, Book & Narration I did not want this book to end. I think that this book was put together well, and if this is what we have to look forward to in the rest of the series, I won’t hesitate to get my hands on the next several books. I think the collaboration between RJ Scott and VL Locey is a definite mark in the win column, this book turned out great and I was sucked in from the first few lines. Oh, and then add in the fantastic narration by Sean Crisden and this book was basically perfect. Sean gave us a great performance (again), making sure the main characters and even the minor hockey players and family members were all given the correct voices and accents depending on where they were from. Sean even gives us some good Boston and Ukrainian/Russian accents too, it was awesome. This was another really solid narration from him. Sean is still one of my favorite narrators no matter how many books I’ve heard because he is always so consistent with what he gives us. I was happy to see that not only do we get a great book and personal story for these two men, Tennant “Ten” and Jared “Mads”, but *gasp* we actually got see and learn about some hockey in this book as well. Sometimes with sports books we don’t actually get to see the sports being played or written in on-page and that was so not the case here. We got to see these characters put their hearts and souls into their sport as well as each other. Tennant is an upcoming hockey star on the new Harrisburg Railers team, and Mads is the defensive line coach. It was great to hear that Ten and Mads grew up together, that they had that background even though they fell out of touch. They get a second chance at getting to know each other again now they are both adults. The two of them together is seriously steamy H.O.T. and there are a few scenes that were pretty sexy, but I would have loved to see more of them getting personal together. There just wasn’t enough time in this book for them to get really in-depth, strengthen their dynamic and create enough chemistry and tension. This book was really low angst and had virtually no drama. Ten and his brothers have an interesting dynamic though, all three of them being pro hockey players and getting competitive when their teams collide in a match. Ten is still the baby of the family and his brothers are consistently treating him as such throughout the book, always questioning his decisions. Mads is the perfect older “hot” dad to a teenage boy Ryker. One thing I had issue with was how Mads always made himself out to be “old” but he was really only mid-thirties and Ten really wasn’t that much younger like 10-13yrs difference in age. I thought that the deal with Mads’s ex father in law, Ryker's grandpa, was an interesting situation all around. I didn’t get how they just let him act the way he did, almost like they were all afraid to stand up to him and put their foot down. He was the main drama piece in this book and I hated him each time he surfaced. Omg, and the hockey players all playing Pokémon Go and creating their own Pokémon team was hilarious, I thought that was a really fun addition to this book, and made them see all that much more real to me. This book was really great. I would also like to add that Mads's son Ryker is younger like 17 or so in this one. But I would love to see him a few years down the line as the main character of his own book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bitchie

    This was cute, but so similar to other books about hockey players,that I'm not sure it'll stick with me for very long. This was cute, but so similar to other books about hockey players,that I'm not sure it'll stick with me for very long.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tess

    4.25 stars Sweet and low-angst!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    2.5/3 stars I have mixed feelings about this one. I love M/M hockey romance even though I am not a fan of sports in real life. I liked the set up for this story and thought the story line was a good one. A young gay hockey player trying to come out of the shadows and make his own way who ends up with his coach who is also an old family friend. I liked the main characters and the side characters fine and I got annoyed with the antagonists appropriately. The writing styles of these two new authors 2.5/3 stars I have mixed feelings about this one. I love M/M hockey romance even though I am not a fan of sports in real life. I liked the set up for this story and thought the story line was a good one. A young gay hockey player trying to come out of the shadows and make his own way who ends up with his coach who is also an old family friend. I liked the main characters and the side characters fine and I got annoyed with the antagonists appropriately. The writing styles of these two new authors to me flowed well. But for some reason that I cannot put my finger on, I just did not emotionally connect to them as a couple. This surprised me especially since it was told in dual points of view and they had enough challenges between them that I should have been invested in them. I liked Mads and Ten. Mads hockey career was cut short by a medical condition so he is now a coach and is also a single Dad. He is bisexual, smart, serious, responsible, and patient. Ten is nine years younger and more impulsive and impatient. But he also knows what he wants and is not afraid to go after it. I appreciated their struggles due to their differing ages, family ties, and professional relationship. But I felt the story broke down during the relationship building portion of it. A lot of it was off page especially in the beginning. And there were quick transitions that seemed to come out of nowhere from not-going-to-do-this to taking-it-slow to exploring sexually to love. They seemed to progress quickly through stages, but I never felt anything. There was not much self doubt, relationship angst, drama, or fall-out over decisions. It just seemed too easy and like I was missing something. I wanted to know more about them and how they were feeling. There were some emotional scenes interspersed as Ten began to share more about his life. His scenes with his parents and Mads with his son Ryker were stand outs. But much of the time I felt like I was being told what happened versus actually feeling it along with the characters and being emotionally involved. I just did not feel their passion, love, devotion, and real need between them as a couple. I was told it was there and that they were in love. But it all felt really one-dimensional to me. But I will admit that it could just be me as I have been in a book hangover from a really emotionally charged book so it made this one pale more in comparison. It worked its way towards an expected outcome, but did not quite finish it off fully. So I assume there will be more about it moving forward in book two of the series that was set up a bit in the end. There were things I like about it and things that I felt needed to be fleshed out more. So I am still left with mixed feelings. I did not hate it. I did not love it. Just somewhere in between like and okay. I was gifted a copy in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I love RJ Scott books, I love V.L Locey books so what a treat to read a book written by them both :) and...it's about hockey...I LOVE books about hockey!! (lots of love going on here) This is the first book in the Harrisburg Railers series and honestly, I can't wait for more. Ten and Mads are lush, they had me swooning and I really enjoyed watching them fall in love <3 There's some fantastic supporting characters and some I'm desperate for RJ and VL to write a story for (Ryker & Stan). There's j I love RJ Scott books, I love V.L Locey books so what a treat to read a book written by them both :) and...it's about hockey...I LOVE books about hockey!! (lots of love going on here) This is the first book in the Harrisburg Railers series and honestly, I can't wait for more. Ten and Mads are lush, they had me swooning and I really enjoyed watching them fall in love <3 There's some fantastic supporting characters and some I'm desperate for RJ and VL to write a story for (Ryker & Stan). There's just enough hockey in there for the hockey enthusiasts but not too much to confuse those who know nothing *raises hand* (I might love reading about the players but know little to nothing about the actual game). All in all a fabulous read and the great start to a new series :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Helena Stone

    Before I get into the review proper, I have to be honest and admit that I’m not into ice hockey and know little to nothing about it. While the book is by no means filled with endless amounts of hockey detail, even the bits that were there went straight over my head. They didn’t bore me as such, nor did they pull me out of the story, but I doubt that I would have missed them if they hadn’t been there. But, that’s on me. I guess you’ll have to look at other reviews if you want to know more about h Before I get into the review proper, I have to be honest and admit that I’m not into ice hockey and know little to nothing about it. While the book is by no means filled with endless amounts of hockey detail, even the bits that were there went straight over my head. They didn’t bore me as such, nor did they pull me out of the story, but I doubt that I would have missed them if they hadn’t been there. But, that’s on me. I guess you’ll have to look at other reviews if you want to know more about how well the authors dealt with that aspect of the story. I’ll limit myself to things I’m more familiar with, such as the romance. I wouldn’t go so far as to say Tennant and Jared fall victim to a case of insta-love, but there is a clear instance of insta-attraction for both of them as soon as they lay eyes on each other for the first time in years. Of course, nothing is ever as simple as that. Professional sportsmen aren’t supposed to be gay. And, if they are, they’re expected to keep the fact well hidden. Coming out just isn’t an option if you want to succeed in that particular world. Which means Tennant faces a dilemma. He can’t deny is attraction to Jared and he’s sick and tired of hiding who he really is not just from the world at large but also from his family. All of this means that once his secret starts to unravel he can’t quite see it as a bad thing. Sure, coming out is scary and the possible consequences could be devastating but Tennant is ready to face them head on. The situation for Jared is somewhat easier. He’s a trainer and no longer finds himself in the limelight a professional hockey player can’t escape. Besides the fact that he’s bi rather than gay seems to make his situation more acceptable in some weird way. His issues stem from different sources. While he is definitely attracted to Tennant, he’s all too aware that he’s older than him. Add to that the fact that he’s been a family friend of the Rowe family for a long time, and he has enough reasons to fight the pull towards Tennant he experiences. But, when the two men do give in to the attraction between them it is almost immediately clear they’re playing for keeps, which means that they have to deal with potentially bad reactions from Tennant’s family, the management of the Harrisburg Railers, not to mention the world at large. This was a sweet romance, especially since any of the minimal angst in the story wasn’t caused by conflicts between Tennant and Jared but rather by the tension their having to come out created. I refuse to give away how all of that plays out, but will mention that I was very, very happy with the direction of the story. The story made me smile quite often. The banter between our two protagonists was wonderful. I loved all the Pokemon references and was charmed by both the Russian goalie and Jared’s son. Overall this was a charming and comfy read. And despite the fact that it hasn’t triggered any interest in hockey in me, I’m still eager to read the next book in this series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    ReadingAllNite

    I’ve been reading RJ Scott’s books for years, but V.L. Locey is a new to me author and I was intrigued to see what they’d do with a hockey romance. There was a fair amount of hockey action and I can’t say I understood all of it but it didn’t make too much difference to the story. The first several chapters, with alternate POV’s, did not flow very well and felt somewhat disjointed. Tenant/Ten’s character was given lots of background including his family and their dynamics. Jared/Mads was fleshed I’ve been reading RJ Scott’s books for years, but V.L. Locey is a new to me author and I was intrigued to see what they’d do with a hockey romance. There was a fair amount of hockey action and I can’t say I understood all of it but it didn’t make too much difference to the story. The first several chapters, with alternate POV’s, did not flow very well and felt somewhat disjointed. Tenant/Ten’s character was given lots of background including his family and their dynamics. Jared/Mads was fleshed out more as the book continued. However, I never gelled with the characters until later in the book. The initial interactions between Ten and Mads was too much telling and not enough showing. The start of their relationship was abrupt, seeming to go from a kiss to okay, let’s have a relationship, with little in-between. The month long frottage rule was just...weird. It did improve in the last third with added depth to more secondary characters, like Tennant’s older brother, Mad’s son Ryker, and the grandfather. It also developed the relationship more, and there was an attempt to spice up sex scenes. But Stan, the Russian goalie, remained a caricature, occasionally used as some kind of comedic relief. The entirety of the story just never meshed well for me. Both Mads and Tennant’s characters were not always consistent within the narrative either. It was a pleasant read but just never reached more than an “okay” level for me. *An ARC was provided to me me via Jessie G Books Review Blog for the purpose of an honest review*

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    This book turned out to be way sweeter than I thought it would be. I love this trope, brother's best friend/best friend's brother and this one was very sweet. First let's talk about how great Mads is, like he is a wonderful coach, father, and boyfriend and really grounds Ten!! Also, just real quick, these names are bomb!! Then you have Ten, who may be a bit impulsive, but loves very big. I loved the piano aspect as well, and his family was just great. There was no real angst between these two, j This book turned out to be way sweeter than I thought it would be. I love this trope, brother's best friend/best friend's brother and this one was very sweet. First let's talk about how great Mads is, like he is a wonderful coach, father, and boyfriend and really grounds Ten!! Also, just real quick, these names are bomb!! Then you have Ten, who may be a bit impulsive, but loves very big. I loved the piano aspect as well, and his family was just great. There was no real angst between these two, just the coming out story that you love to see/read. I felt it was great and realistic. I also adored Ryker, I hope that he eventually gets his own book. I do with the ending was a bit longer, as it kinda just ended, but I know the series continues and I am sure they will be huge part of it. ARC provided and this is my honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robin Powers

    I love hockey romances so I was pretty excited for a new M/M one. Tennant is a closeted hockey player that is attracted to the defense coach, Mads, his brother's friend. While I got the reasons to keep this hush hush, the taking it at a snail's pace drove me almost as crazy as Ten! I found the relationship between Mads and Ryker to be sweet and heartbreaking at times. Ev...omg! Ev stands for evil. Mads and Ten could almost send me on a sugar overload with how cute their interactions were as they I love hockey romances so I was pretty excited for a new M/M one. Tennant is a closeted hockey player that is attracted to the defense coach, Mads, his brother's friend. While I got the reasons to keep this hush hush, the taking it at a snail's pace drove me almost as crazy as Ten! I found the relationship between Mads and Ryker to be sweet and heartbreaking at times. Ev...omg! Ev stands for evil. Mads and Ten could almost send me on a sugar overload with how cute their interactions were as they grew closer. I enjoyed this new series and can't wait to read more. Full review coming on The Smut-Brarians.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is a solid sport romance that featured Ten, the up and coming raising star of NHL contemplating with being the first out player. Although this is not my first time reading about gay NHL player, I can still feel the fear from Ten's perspective. Ten is the youngest in the family and with two boisterous and overbearing NHL player older brothers, Ten want to forge his own path away from his brother shadow. Railers is a new team and it might just present an opportunity for Ten to shine. Jared was This is a solid sport romance that featured Ten, the up and coming raising star of NHL contemplating with being the first out player. Although this is not my first time reading about gay NHL player, I can still feel the fear from Ten's perspective. Ten is the youngest in the family and with two boisterous and overbearing NHL player older brothers, Ten want to forge his own path away from his brother shadow. Railers is a new team and it might just present an opportunity for Ten to shine. Jared was an ex-NHL player and a friend of Ten's brother, who was forced into retirement due to his health condition. Now he is the assistant coach for the Railers and was surprised to see Ten all grown up. Their relationship development was pretty standard. They are old time friends reunited again with Jared trying not to act on his feelings due to his work and Ten being his friend's younger brother. It took a little more time for them to finally come together and it feels natural. The story deals a lot with Ten's wanting to come out, but all in all, everything seems alright, not too much drama happened. Jared was supportive and never once pressure Ten into making any decision. I like the camaraderie between the players and looking forward to read about the rest of them.

  28. 4 out of 5

    LIGHTSONG13

    This was just okay for me. Mind you "okay" is not a negative rating, not for me anyway. Still, this was too okay for me to actually LIKE it :-/! This definitely wasn't as good as book #4, which I read first. I hope book #2 and #3 are much (MUCH) better than this one was [I own the whole series]!! This was just okay for me. Mind you "okay" is not a negative rating, not for me anyway. Still, this was too okay for me to actually LIKE it :-/! This definitely wasn't as good as book #4, which I read first. I hope book #2 and #3 are much (MUCH) better than this one was [I own the whole series]!!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    It's hockey, V.L. Locey & RJ Scott narrated by Sean Crisden...so really, need I say more? I doubt it but if you want more than there is my original review and just add 'Sean Crisden did an amazing job with the narration and I loved it'. So on to audio book #2. It's hockey, V.L. Locey & RJ Scott narrated by Sean Crisden...so really, need I say more? I doubt it but if you want more than there is my original review and just add 'Sean Crisden did an amazing job with the narration and I loved it'. So on to audio book #2.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    4.5 stars rounded up - I am a little sad right now, and that's because I finished this book today (and yes, I realise I also started it today and spent my entire afternoon binge-reading it, so yeah...), and now it's finished and I really want more of this series, but I have to wait for book two! I enjoyed Ten and Mads' story a lot, but then I knew I would because one of the authors is RJ Scott, and she's a favourite of mine. VL Locey is a new author to me, but one I will certainly be looked out f 4.5 stars rounded up - I am a little sad right now, and that's because I finished this book today (and yes, I realise I also started it today and spent my entire afternoon binge-reading it, so yeah...), and now it's finished and I really want more of this series, but I have to wait for book two! I enjoyed Ten and Mads' story a lot, but then I knew I would because one of the authors is RJ Scott, and she's a favourite of mine. VL Locey is a new author to me, but one I will certainly be looked out for in future. The story was entertaining and just plain lovely, I adored Ten way more than I thought possible, and I particularly liked the way we got to see the relationship from both perspectives. I'm going to be honest here - I know absolutely zilch about hockey. Nada. Not a single bloody thing. That in no way hindered my enjoyment of the story. Yes, there were a lot of hockey terms used. Yes, there were lots of hockey related scenes. But it was incredibly easy to understand and written in a way that was accessible to anyone, like me, who doesn't know anything about the sport. I actually really enjoyed the hockey scenes, too. I'm sure those who do know about hockey would probably get even more enjoyment out of them, but honestly you don't need to have that knowledge to read this one. The actual romance was lovely. I liked that Mads wanted to take things slow, which made it all the more romantic and moving when they finally moved their relationship forward and took that next step. Especially in the context of the story, it was so right and wonderful... and yes, also bloody HOT ;) Something I really enjoyed reading about was Ten's family. I loved his parents, and Jamie was awesome. Brady was a bit of an arsehat, but hey ho you can't win them all. He did try, at least, but he was still a pain in the butt most of the time. I do wish that we had learned more about Mads, about his childhood and his family - his parents? Any siblings? I'm not sure they were ever mentioned, although having said that maybe I missed it? - but then we did meet Ryker, his son, who was an interesting character and I really felt sorry for him and how he was being pulled in all kinds of directions and the shitty controlling way he was treated by his Grandfather. I would have liked to see more of the Harrisburg Railers team, but then I realise that this will likely come over time, and as the series develops. There were some really interesting characters, and although I know already who will be the focus of the next book in the series, there are a few other characters I'd like to learn more about and hope to see in later books. My only minor gripe was that a lot of the relationship happened off the page. A lot of time was skimmed over and certain things seemed rushed. I would have LOVED to have seen it all on the page. I guess you can't write every tiny little detail or run the risk of making it the longest story in the history of ever, but I would still have liked to see certain aspects of their developing romance, particularly in the early stages, in more detail. Maybe I'm just greedy though, as I loved the romance and I love seeing relationships as they develop and wanted to see so much! The ending was HEA, but sort of a cliffhanger on other things, if that makes any sense? (I'm trying not to be too spoilery here!) Usually even the smallest hint of cliffhanger bugs the heck out of me but I'm not too bothered by that here because I know we'll likely be seeing plenty more of Ten and Mads during the course of this series, and we get their HEA in terms of the relationship, which is what I always need to see! All in all, this was a nice romance with interesting and likeable main characters, and a sweet and easy read for an afternoon or evening in :) I would recommend for anyone and not just hockey fans (which I am not), as just a sweet and enjoyable romance. ***I was provided with an ARC of Changing Lines from Signal Boost Promotions in exchange for an honest review.

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