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As One Is: To Free the Mind from All Conditioning

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In this series of 8 talks, given in Ojai, California in 1955, Krishnamurti confronts the confusion, habits, and assumptions of the human mind, and claims these lie at the root of all violence and suffering in the world. While these reflections were offered over 50 years ago, their meaning is as fresh and as relevant heard today. Krishnamurti discusses a world in which boom In this series of 8 talks, given in Ojai, California in 1955, Krishnamurti confronts the confusion, habits, and assumptions of the human mind, and claims these lie at the root of all violence and suffering in the world. While these reflections were offered over 50 years ago, their meaning is as fresh and as relevant heard today. Krishnamurti discusses a world in which booming productivity and scientific advancement promise a happy future, but don't provide it. He points to the ongoing escalation of war, competition, envy and territoriality despite gains in education, religious ecumenism and the technologies of self-improvement. Ultimately and throughout, he asks his listeners to consider that all apparent progress of the self is not progress toward freedom, but a treadmill of illusion. Knowing one's mind, he asserts, through diligent self-observation, is the only way to freedom.


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In this series of 8 talks, given in Ojai, California in 1955, Krishnamurti confronts the confusion, habits, and assumptions of the human mind, and claims these lie at the root of all violence and suffering in the world. While these reflections were offered over 50 years ago, their meaning is as fresh and as relevant heard today. Krishnamurti discusses a world in which boom In this series of 8 talks, given in Ojai, California in 1955, Krishnamurti confronts the confusion, habits, and assumptions of the human mind, and claims these lie at the root of all violence and suffering in the world. While these reflections were offered over 50 years ago, their meaning is as fresh and as relevant heard today. Krishnamurti discusses a world in which booming productivity and scientific advancement promise a happy future, but don't provide it. He points to the ongoing escalation of war, competition, envy and territoriality despite gains in education, religious ecumenism and the technologies of self-improvement. Ultimately and throughout, he asks his listeners to consider that all apparent progress of the self is not progress toward freedom, but a treadmill of illusion. Knowing one's mind, he asserts, through diligent self-observation, is the only way to freedom.

30 review for As One Is: To Free the Mind from All Conditioning

  1. 5 out of 5

    Samir Rawas Sarayji

    Krishnamurti’s insight and explanations have always helped me understand myself better in ways no psychologist, analyst, scientist, philosopher or writer ever will. To understand what he explains is to go deep within yourself and observe. No judgement, no opinions, no foreknowledge, no rituals, no dogma, no concept, no condemnation, no competition, no ego, no demands, no greed, no ambition, no control, no domination... Try it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jen Madsen

    "And do you know how difficult it is to understand oneself? It is difficult because we are dilettantes; we are not really that interested. But if you are really aware, if you give your attention to understanding yourself, then you will find an indestructable treasure." --Jiddu Krishnamurti That quote, perhaps, best sums up the entire book. This is a collection of talks Krishnamurti gave in Ojai, California in 1955. Once again I'm drawn to philosophy that at heart is as far from esoteric as it can "And do you know how difficult it is to understand oneself? It is difficult because we are dilettantes; we are not really that interested. But if you are really aware, if you give your attention to understanding yourself, then you will find an indestructable treasure." --Jiddu Krishnamurti That quote, perhaps, best sums up the entire book. This is a collection of talks Krishnamurti gave in Ojai, California in 1955. Once again I'm drawn to philosophy that at heart is as far from esoteric as it can be and yet feels very esoteric on the surface. There is no path to truth, no guru to get you there, no there to get to, in fact. So why bother trying to see oneself as one is? Is it possible to free yourself from all conditioning? I don't know, but I think I know why Krishnamurti thinks it's important to try: "So, if there is no possibility for the mind to extricate itself from this prison of the collective, then the mind can only go back and reform the prison. But to me, there is such a possibility because to struggle everlastingly in the prison would be too stupid." So the question is, do I remain a dilettante or set out on a pathless path with no guru, no guidance other than my own ability to observe the mind and peer into the abyss?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karthik Vegi

    The moment you stop seeking, you'll know the truth. The moment you stop seeking, you'll know the truth.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James Jesso

    this book fully changed my life when I read it as a young man.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tarini Chandrashekhar

    One reads about Eastern and Western philosophers, often wondering if any of this actually practical. Mr. Krishnamurthy keeps it real, in the truest sense of the word. His talks, ideas, books, are to be commended, not just because they are as simple as they come, they merely talk about observing one's mind. At the outset, this seems easy, but as the chapters progressed, I was genuinely taken aback by how the timelessness of mind can be destroyed just by a simple judgment of your thought, as oppos One reads about Eastern and Western philosophers, often wondering if any of this actually practical. Mr. Krishnamurthy keeps it real, in the truest sense of the word. His talks, ideas, books, are to be commended, not just because they are as simple as they come, they merely talk about observing one's mind. At the outset, this seems easy, but as the chapters progressed, I was genuinely taken aback by how the timelessness of mind can be destroyed just by a simple judgment of your thought, as opposed to mere observation. Problems like wars, violence can be understood better if we understand the nature of one's own mind. How would you look at your mind, if you stripped it of all of its conditioning, dogmas, beliefs, society? The book is not about the answers, it's about asking the right questions.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sunil Goel

    First of all this book is not for beginners.it tells you to question your mind,to self enquiry,to understand the process of functioning of mind. It cant be understandable for beginners in meditation only for people who are at advance stage of meditation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ty

    This book is a great insight to the mind and was geared to free yourself from all conditioning. One of my favorite questions in the book was "Is it possible to teach your children without conditioning them?" This book covers things such as The accumulation of knowledge vs the Individual and keeping the mind still or motionless. Krishnamurti also explains the difference between attention, concentration and distraction. This book was produced from an 8 day discussions in Oak Groove California in 1955 This book is a great insight to the mind and was geared to free yourself from all conditioning. One of my favorite questions in the book was "Is it possible to teach your children without conditioning them?" This book covers things such as The accumulation of knowledge vs the Individual and keeping the mind still or motionless. Krishnamurti also explains the difference between attention, concentration and distraction. This book was produced from an 8 day discussions in Oak Groove California in 1955. Krishnamurti's words were recorded and published in this book. This man is quite fascinating and he touches on the problems of society, religion, politics, violence, dominance, sorrow, conscious, subconscious, ego and the cultivation of virtue vs. virtue. This man is obviously one of the great philosophers of our time, even though he does not consider himself a philosopher at all. Krishnamurti seems to be a proponent of self discovery and always tells people to find out the truth for themselves. Because if you take someones word as truth, then you've been conditioned. :) Truth is a pathless land.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Veronique

    This book is composed of eight talks given in California in 1955. The author constantly goes back to the conditioning of the mind, which is important I agree, but still, there is a LOT of repetition in this book. After a while, I found Krishnamurti's tone not only very repetitive, but also annoying (I don't think I can stand another rhetorical question at this point) and borderline arrogant. He asks a lot questions but seems to be circling around without ever finding the path to an answer. One s This book is composed of eight talks given in California in 1955. The author constantly goes back to the conditioning of the mind, which is important I agree, but still, there is a LOT of repetition in this book. After a while, I found Krishnamurti's tone not only very repetitive, but also annoying (I don't think I can stand another rhetorical question at this point) and borderline arrogant. He asks a lot questions but seems to be circling around without ever finding the path to an answer. One should not try to find peace and truth reading books or listening to a teacher or a spiritual adviser according to Krishnamurti (what exactly was he doing in front of an audience??). Well isn't there a contradiction when he spent a big part of his life creating foundations around to world to preserve his talks and writings? Or did I totally miss something?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Connery

    Some useful and interesting insights. Thoughtful commentary about society’s problems and human psychological tendencies that may be at the root of that. However, at times somewhat aloof or patronizing in tone. Krishnamurti often prefaces a topic with some uncertainty about the audience’s ability to fully grasp his point, then proceeds to repeat his thesis which becomes redundant in a written format.

  10. 4 out of 5

    St aL iN

    This book is compilation of Eight Talks,given by Jiddu krishnamurti in Ojai, California,in 1955. What Mr. J.K communicated in Razor Sharp words and as Experience (few times with unoccupied, aware/Unconditioned mind - most of the times with occupied memory/conditioned mind) I could only made an attempt to fathom his talks. Mr.J.K's method of teaching is not having a Method at all,he don't use a method or examples, parabols, stories, Jokes, quotes, scriptures,Imaginations or logics .... We will simp This book is compilation of Eight Talks,given by Jiddu krishnamurti in Ojai, California,in 1955. What Mr. J.K communicated in Razor Sharp words and as Experience (few times with unoccupied, aware/Unconditioned mind - most of the times with occupied memory/conditioned mind) I could only made an attempt to fathom his talks. Mr.J.K's method of teaching is not having a Method at all,he don't use a method or examples, parabols, stories, Jokes, quotes, scriptures,Imaginations or logics .... We will simply dissect the mind by paying 'ATTENTION'(attention is entirely different from concentration or absorption in something - where their is urge, struggle, conflict) to his words observing the Judging mind ,the Evaluating mind ,the Condemning mind, the Justifying mind and from the superficial self-knowledge of the surface mind or the cumulative memory of the mind to deeply more profound to the self-knowledge of the mind to the state of 'Not knowing' in discovering the new knowledge/Truth/Reality where ever it leads to.. As Mr. J.K says 'It is the mind that is totally unoccupied, completely empty it is only such a mind that can receive something new,in which their is no occupation.' It is not as simplified as I put it above.The book deals on many things profoundly deep which can only be experienced with Mr. J.K's talk.It is suggestable not to read the at once because it takes more than just READING.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Senthil Ganesh

    "An artist who is concerned with his name, with his greatness, with comparison, with fulfilling his ambition, has ceased to be an artist; he is merely a technician like everybody else. Which means, really, that to love something there must be a total cessation of all ambition, of all desire for the recognition of society, which is rotten anyhow." In this nice little series of lectures, JK posits that - deep down , all of us are afraid of being empty/lonely and to avoid being empty , we keep ourse "An artist who is concerned with his name, with his greatness, with comparison, with fulfilling his ambition, has ceased to be an artist; he is merely a technician like everybody else. Which means, really, that to love something there must be a total cessation of all ambition, of all desire for the recognition of society, which is rotten anyhow." In this nice little series of lectures, JK posits that - deep down , all of us are afraid of being empty/lonely and to avoid being empty , we keep ourselves engaged and tie ourselves to competitive pursuits that seek social approval. Ultimately, we seek an illusion of our future, better selves.. ignoring the more peaceful current-self. This impacts the state of mental peace.To avoid this trap, JK suggests the following. " If you are examining, understanding the ways of your own mind without seeking a reward, an end, without the motivation of gain, then there is self-knowledge, and you will see an astonishing thing come out of it."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nithila Talgaswatte

    First attempt at a "philosophical" book, it was quite captivating, in that I continued to read it with great interest but at the same time quite difficult to comprehend and grasp some of the concepts, reading the first 6 "talks" will leave you with far more questions than answers but the 7th and 8th definitely provide more direction, I'll certainly attempt to read a few more books by Krishnamurti to try and make more sense of this one ! First attempt at a "philosophical" book, it was quite captivating, in that I continued to read it with great interest but at the same time quite difficult to comprehend and grasp some of the concepts, reading the first 6 "talks" will leave you with far more questions than answers but the 7th and 8th definitely provide more direction, I'll certainly attempt to read a few more books by Krishnamurti to try and make more sense of this one !

  13. 5 out of 5

    Onur Bulun

    After I read this book I realized that I am always seeking for a method or an authority to be free from my mind. Also I am always seeking for a reward for my efforts. I was not be able to watch my mind because I could not see these seekings and many other activities of the mind. Now, I can watch and discover my mind's activities. After I read this book I realized that I am always seeking for a method or an authority to be free from my mind. Also I am always seeking for a reward for my efforts. I was not be able to watch my mind because I could not see these seekings and many other activities of the mind. Now, I can watch and discover my mind's activities.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laurie A. Brown

    Oh my goodness. I love reading spiritual literature. This is one of the best as the teachings direct me to my own inner self. This is a very thought provoking read. I highly recommend Krishnamurti's books. Oh my goodness. I love reading spiritual literature. This is one of the best as the teachings direct me to my own inner self. This is a very thought provoking read. I highly recommend Krishnamurti's books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Abu Sesay

    A massive amount to chew on with some parts missing flavor and others being the best taste you’ll ever have in life. Grateful for this text. Truly challenges your mind in terms of thoughts and really seeking oneself.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bejoy Kuruvilla

    The culmination as is I thought this seems to be a culmination of all the readings of K or for that matter any book on the self. I truly enjoyed this book and I feel any first time reader of K should read his other books before embarking on this particular journey.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hatke

    Wish I would have read this when I was younger, but that doesn’t take away from the lecture’s material now.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Finlay

    Very simple, but of course not easy. Can you see what conditioning means? I recommend you read this a bit at a time, because it does feel repetitive (as it's a series of talks, transcribed). Very simple, but of course not easy. Can you see what conditioning means? I recommend you read this a bit at a time, because it does feel repetitive (as it's a series of talks, transcribed).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Viraj Sabane

    Are any of our thoughts original?. Krishnamurti answers this question masterfully.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chirag Jain

    Every word that Jiddu Krishnamurti says conveys the one same truth.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Saurabh Jain

    Its difficult To understand the concept of conditioning..once u understand it u hv a totally different perspective about life..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    This reaffirmed my belief in the importance of working on our own shit as a way to make social change. I loved the synchronicity of recently attending a panel on healing organizers, healers who work within social justice movements. But it goes beyond that. Violence does begin within each of us. How can we stop wars when we can't even get along with ourselves and our loved ones? The violence is within each of us. (And I love his very broad definition of violence, which includes "this whole proble This reaffirmed my belief in the importance of working on our own shit as a way to make social change. I loved the synchronicity of recently attending a panel on healing organizers, healers who work within social justice movements. But it goes beyond that. Violence does begin within each of us. How can we stop wars when we can't even get along with ourselves and our loved ones? The violence is within each of us. (And I love his very broad definition of violence, which includes "this whole problem of acquisition, of competition, the desire on the part of the individual as well as the collective to seek power.") I loved how he talked about how merely learning new behaviors, practicing nonviolence isn't enough. We can learn better behavior, but this is not the same as truly eliminating violence at the root, which he identifies as trying to avoid what I call the gaping maw of loneliness that each of us feels if we ever stop long enough to let ourselves feel it. While I'd gotten good at watching my thoughts and being aware of my feelings, I had not moved beyond not trying to change them. This book helped me focus on simply being attentive and not trying to control the outcome. Just watch the feelings of anger, agitation, judgment come up. Just watch. As the feeling persists, don't name it, just feel it. He also condemns efforts at self-improvement, which I've heard before, but not quite in this way. He basically says that anything directed at improvement is happening in the mind, in time, and cannot get outside of the past and social conditioning and experience. So basically if we want to "improve" we have to do so right NOW, we can't put it off. It's a moment-to-moment thing and isn't cumulative. I appreciated the fact that it was from 1955, which isn't a time period that I associate spirituality with, so it's nice to know there were folks interested in it at that time. I also liked how I checked this out of the library and then found that it was referenced in another book I was finishing up. I am excited to explore the principles in this book. (Note: the first chapter or two I found harder to connect with than the later chapters, so don't be put off by those.) I will almost certainly come back to this book and use it in my writing in the future.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sankar

    Reading J.Krishnamurti is a state of mind. It is like a gently flowing river and should be read in its entirety. In this collection of eight talks given over a period of a month in California in 1955, he generally talks about all the conditioning we subject our mind to - Religion, culture, habits, job, love, envy, desire .... He is to be read. As he says himself he has nothing to teach. All he does is ask people to observe their mind and understand its depths. Again he has to be read. Personally Reading J.Krishnamurti is a state of mind. It is like a gently flowing river and should be read in its entirety. In this collection of eight talks given over a period of a month in California in 1955, he generally talks about all the conditioning we subject our mind to - Religion, culture, habits, job, love, envy, desire .... He is to be read. As he says himself he has nothing to teach. All he does is ask people to observe their mind and understand its depths. Again he has to be read. Personally it was very refreshing to read him after 5/6 years.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John J

    A Diagnosis in Search of a Cure The book presents a series of talks given by Krishnamurti in the 1950s. The general theme, repeated over and over throughout these talks, is that every human being has been conditioned from birth to conform to a set of ideas and beliefs, which ultimately distort reality. For a more clinical description of conditioning, read "a mind of its own" by Cordelia Fine, subtitled "How Your Brain Distorts and Deceives." There is nothing wrong with Krishnamurti's diagnosis, bu A Diagnosis in Search of a Cure The book presents a series of talks given by Krishnamurti in the 1950s. The general theme, repeated over and over throughout these talks, is that every human being has been conditioned from birth to conform to a set of ideas and beliefs, which ultimately distort reality. For a more clinical description of conditioning, read "a mind of its own" by Cordelia Fine, subtitled "How Your Brain Distorts and Deceives." There is nothing wrong with Krishnamurti's diagnosis, but I was quite frustrated by his failure to offer a cure and his apparent annoyance directed toward those who entertain the notion that a cure even exists. It's kind of like being told by an oncologist that you have cancer, then being told to "just get over it" on your own. Even if that oncologist were tops in his field in terms of diagnosing the disease, those "words of wisdom" regarding the cure are entirely useless. In my view, overcoming the conditioning Krishnamurti describes is equivalent to overcoming the "brain chatter" we're constantly being subjected to. The technique of transcendental meditation (TM), which was introduced by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, offers a cure without the lengthy diagnosis. Maharishi didn't say exactly what is wrong with us; he simply prescribed TM as a practical technique for making us better. Krishnamurti's talks in Ojai are interesting and somewhat informative, but I was left with an empty feeling after reading them. Although K seems to feel genuine compassion regarding suffering, he seems somewhat detaced from it all. This gives some go the impression that K is arrogant, but I don't believe he was. I think he was frustrated by the inability of mere mortals to find their own cure.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mariah

    I really wanted to enjoy this book, but I decided to listen to what Krishnamurti said about accepting what is in my mind without looking to change it. I accept that I did not love this book. I enjoyed the beginning of the book more than I enjoyed later chapters. It may be because his message became repetitive as time went on. I’ve found that there is some insight to be found in “As One Is,” but I disliked Krishnamurti’s tone. At many point it appeared to be arrogant and patronizing. It may just I really wanted to enjoy this book, but I decided to listen to what Krishnamurti said about accepting what is in my mind without looking to change it. I accept that I did not love this book. I enjoyed the beginning of the book more than I enjoyed later chapters. It may be because his message became repetitive as time went on. I’ve found that there is some insight to be found in “As One Is,” but I disliked Krishnamurti’s tone. At many point it appeared to be arrogant and patronizing. It may just be that his talks did not translate well on paper, but here are a few examples: “...but as long as you do not know the process of your own thinking, what you think about God may be stupid and petty, and generally it is” (p.97). “So your thinking about God is an utter waste of time; it is a speculation that has no value” (p. 98). I understand what he is saying, but I feel as though it could be expressed more eloquently and compassionately. Who is he to say that an individual’s speculations have no value? I feel as though value is subjective. I only made it to page 101 so I am sure there is much to be found in the lectures that I missed. I intend to receive my dose of philosophy and ontology from teachers other than Krishnamurti in the future.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bhakta Kishor

    Are we really free from conditioning from literally hundreds of years of formation by culture? He poses the question and elegantly shares his perspective on it. Are we the ones making the decisions or have our decisions been made already through our environment / local culture / ideas (i behave like a green person and make green person actions, because i was born in a green area--- and so on) Are our thoughts truly free or is it limited/controlled by culture, beliefs, and systems. Fundamentally c Are we really free from conditioning from literally hundreds of years of formation by culture? He poses the question and elegantly shares his perspective on it. Are we the ones making the decisions or have our decisions been made already through our environment / local culture / ideas (i behave like a green person and make green person actions, because i was born in a green area--- and so on) Are our thoughts truly free or is it limited/controlled by culture, beliefs, and systems. Fundamentally changed my views on life and becoming a contrarian---- but not in a snobby way. It's necessary to always take a step back and view things (much similar to a fish in a fish bowl not knowing that it is in water, because it has been in water all its life). North Korea comes to mind immediately. Even in 1st world countries our thoughts are shaped in certain ways by systems without knowing it by cultural systems, organizations, and people. Is it bad? Well, possibly. Are we truly independent decision makers? I'd say no. The book is worth checking out. It's a work of art. In the end, I can't fulfill what he asks of being 100% true freedom of thought. The world would be paradise if that were the case, but I do not live in a world that's built for that.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paola

    “Being free of society... implies being nothing in relation to that society which is striving to be something. [...] As long as one wants to be part of this society, one must breed insanity.” You won’t find more wisdom anywhere else. It all comes back to “know thyself”, but that’s exactly the last thing we want to do. It is easier to be told what to do, who we are; it is easier to feel safe inside our cage, sing and be fed and die in peace. It is easier to dream the approved dreams and to believ “Being free of society... implies being nothing in relation to that society which is striving to be something. [...] As long as one wants to be part of this society, one must breed insanity.” You won’t find more wisdom anywhere else. It all comes back to “know thyself”, but that’s exactly the last thing we want to do. It is easier to be told what to do, who we are; it is easier to feel safe inside our cage, sing and be fed and die in peace. It is easier to dream the approved dreams and to believe the respectable beliefs. If not, we are alone, and it’s cold out here, it’s dangerous, it’s dark. But. Quoting Bukowski now: “I want to live free; featherless, cold, malnourished, but free.”

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    This is my first introduction to the teachings of Krishnamurti and I am blown away. He pulls no punches in skewering all cultural artifacts including all religions. His teachings are basically the same as those of the Buddha but he completely rejects all institutions. His piercing insights, if taken to heart, leave you nowhere to run except into your own mind/heart to examine it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vinayak Dasari

    If you are in search of Truth/God/Immeasurable/Eternal or not even named it what you are searching for, then this is guide to you to find your answers. I have read this book still every time I open it it feels new to me. Can not read this book in one go, read a passage try to digest and go ahead again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Krishnamurti gives some interesting insights to answer the question of finding true peace and harmony. However, I think that sometimes he is deviating from what the natural state of the human being wants to do, which is be a goal oriented individual.

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